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Dig Deeper Than CFP® To Find a Financial Planner

CFP® is a Designation  – Not a Guarantee!

By Rick Kahler CFP®

I have long recommended that consumers look for a Certified Financial Planning (CFP) certificant when shopping for a financial planner.

But don’t stop there. A CFP is no guarantee that someone is a competent, ethical, fiduciary professional. It only ensures that you are choosing from a pool of 85,000 financial services providers who are educated in the technical aspects of financial planning. It doesn’t mean the person is engaged in financial planning, is a fiduciary, or has a spotless ethical history.

In a troubling Wall Street Journal article on August 9, 2019, columnist Jason Zwieg writes that the “CFP Board’s online search directory neglected to inform the public that thousands of planners listed” have known “customer complaints, criminal histories, financial problems or regulatory proceedings.”

“Among these CFPs were 499 who have faced criminal charges, 324 who left a previous firm amid allegations of misconduct, 323 who had been disciplined or investigated by regulators and 68 who filed bankruptcy within the past 10 years,” Zweig notes. Yet none were ever disciplined by the CFP Board.

Let’s not lose perspective—these “bad apples” amount to less than 2% of CFP certificants. Every profession has those few who use its licensing and credentialing as a cover to manipulate, deceive, and abuse consumers. No amount of regulation or oversight will ever eliminate all the crooks.

In addition, you cannot simply assume because a professional has a certain license, designation, or formal degree that they are competent. In the graduate class I teach at Golden Gate University, not all students earn As and Bs. Many earn Cs. A few earn Ds and Fs. While I am not sure the D and F group ever graduate, I am sure I would not want them doing my financial planning without convincing evidence that their poor performance in my class was a one-off due to extenuating circumstances.

As the consumer, you cannot know if a prospective financial planner was that student. Nor can you know if they have a tainted criminal background, unless you dig deeper.

That digging includes looking for any past criminal or disciplinary charges brought by licensing agencies. It also includes determining whether the advisor is legally bound to a fiduciary standard—required to put your interests ahead of theirs—but has any conflicts of interest, especially by making a significant amount of their income from commissions on the sale of financial products.

Here are a few tips for digging deeper:

  1. Go to brokercheck.finra.org to see if FINRA has brought disciplinary actions against the advisor.
  2. Go to the SEC’s website to look for disciplinary actions.
  3. Have the prospective advisor sign a written disclosure that you are a client and they have a fiduciary duty to put your interests above their own, rather than a customer where they have no such obligation and will usually put the interests of their company first. Many advisors, especially those not legally bound to be fiduciaries, don’t understand the difference, so insist on getting this assurance in writing.
  4. Have the prospective advisor sign a statement disclosing what percentage of their company’s gross revenues comes from fees charged to clients.  These might be paid as hourly fees, annual retainers, or separate charges for advice. The lower the percentage of income from fees, the greater the chance of a significant conflict of interest. I recommend finding firms receiving over 90% of gross revenue from fees; I prefer 100% because such firms advertise themselves as “fee-only” or will offset any commissions against a flat fee.

Assessment

To find a trustworthy financial planner, I still recommend the CFP designation. Just remember that it’s a starting point, not a guarantee.

Conclusion

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***

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Why we cannot assume CFP® equals “Fiduciary”

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Rick Kahler MS CFP

By Rick Kahler MS CFP®

One of the most important ways to find competent and trustworthy investment advisers is to be sure they owe you a fiduciary duty.

This means the advisers’ legal and ethical responsibility is to act in your best interests, not their own or their employer’s.

An ongoing legal case featured in an October 31 article by Ann Marsh in the online Financial Planning magazine highlights both the importance and the difficulty of finding a fiduciary adviser. (Disclosure: I am one of several advisers quoted in the article.)

The whistleblower case against J. P. Morgan involves an adviser and former J. P. Morgan employee, Johnny Burris, who says he was fired after refusing to give in to pressure to sell some of his employer’s high-priced products that he did not believe to be in his clients’ best interest.

Importance?

Here is why this case is important to anyone looking for financial advice: many advisers at investment firms like J. P. Morgan hold the Certified Financial Planner (CFP) designation. According to the website of the CFP Board of Standards, the organization that awards the certification, CFP’s are required “to put your interests ahead of their own at all times and to provide their financial planning services as a ‘fiduciary’—acting in the best interest of their financial planning clients.”

This sounds straightforward enough. Since 2008, the CFP Board has positioned the CFP designation as an indicator that an adviser will put clients’ interest first.

Unfortunately, that isn’t quite accurate.

Here is the tricky part: Advisers who sell financial products are allowed to “wear two hats” in their interaction with consumers. Any time they are giving financial advice and acting as financial planners (as defined by the CFP Board), they are expected to act in the best interest of the client/customer.

Yet if they don’t give any financial advice other than what is ancillary to the sale (a very confusing concept) of financial products to the same client/customer, that fiduciary requirement does not apply. The consumer is apparently expected to have the exceptional discernment and knowledge to know which hat is being worn at any given time.

As a consumer, you can assume that advisers holding the CFP® designation have completed many hours of education and passed tests to assess their professional competence.

However, because of the CFP Board’s hairsplitting, you cannot assume “CFP” equals “fiduciary.”

You still have to ask two essential questions:

The first is “In this engagement with me, who are you primarily responsible to, me or your company?” An adviser employed by a brokerage house or investment bank is very likely to be held most responsible to their company and expected to sell that firm’s financial products. This sets up a conflict of interest, in that the products with the highest fees will make the most money for the firm and the adviser, while those with lower fees may well be in the best interest of the clients.

A CFP® adviser who works for an independent financial planning firm may be less likely to be pressured to sell a given line of products. They also may do enough financial planning to be required to be a fiduciary.

However, you still need to ask the second question: “How do you get paid?” Any adviser who receives income from selling financial products cannot fully represent clients as a fiduciary without first overcoming an inherent conflict of interest.

***

stock market

***

Assessment

An adviser who doesn’t sell any products, who gives investment advice, and whose income comes solely from client fees is answerable and responsible to those clients as a fiduciary. You can trust that such a fee-only adviser will genuinely put your interests first. 

Conclusion

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Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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***

Is the CFP-BOD, and the CFP® mark, in Jeopardy? [VOTE]

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Early CFP® Board Leader Says Future of Certification in Jeopardy

[By Staff Reporters]

The CFP® Board’s strategy of punishing some certificate holders over compensation disclosure issues in what critics charge is an arbitrary manner threatens the future of the CFP® designation, according to one of the early leaders of the board who also chaired its disciplinary commission.

Please vote

And so, we ask this question.

Assessment 

Link: http://www.financial-planning.com/news/early-cfp-board-leader-says-future-of-certification-in-jeopardy-2686698-1.html?ET=financialplanning:e14975:86235a:&st=email&utm_source=editorial&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=FP_Weekend__092713

Read More:

Read even more:

2016 Update:

 

Conclusion

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Are “Financial Advisors” True Professionals or Employed Sales Representatives for Retail Products?

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White House Sides With Sales Reps On Overtime

Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP™

[ME-P Editor-in-Chief]

www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

As the US Supreme Court is preparing to review the contentious debate about overtime pay for sales reps, the US Solicitor General has filed an amicus curaie, or friend of the court brief, and sided with pharma reps. The move is not surprising, given that the US Department of Labor has, several times, taken a similar step in federal courts around the country where cases were heard.

Far Reaching Implications?

The review is expected to have far-reaching implications for the pharmaceutical industry, and I believe the financial services industry, as well. Why?

Both sectors have been fighting a growing number of cases nationwide over the past several years, but has had mixed results as the issue has continually divided the courts. At the same time, drug makers, Wall Street and broker-dealers have been laying off thousands of sales reps – “financial advisors”, “wealth managers” and stock brokers – as they try to cut costs and alter their business models to prepare for some level of fiduciary accountability.

The Issue

At issue is whether drug reps, and FAs by extension, are exempt from overtime provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act. The FLSA overtime compensation requirement does not apply to employees who work as outside salespeople, but the law does require employers to pay overtime for hours worked beyond 40 hours a week, unless a FLSA exemption applies.

Link: http://www.pharmalot.com/2012/02/white-house-sides-with-sales-reps-on-overtime/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Pharmalot+%28Pharmalot%29

My Issue

And so, does this mean that most “financial advisors” are really stock-brokers and product pushers after all? At least in medicine, we doctors know what a pharmaceutical rep is – and we understand his/ her roll is to push pharma products, DME and drug sales.

Shouldn’t a salesman – be a salesman – and an “advisor” – be an RIA or RIA rep? I don’t often agree with the White House, but I do on this one.

FAs can’t be independent client advocates – and employees – at the same time

Now, isn’t it time for the public to know that the vast majority of FAs are just salesmen [still SBs], too? Just selling retail financial products to doctors and others; not drugs. After all, FAs can’t be independent client advocates – and employees – at the same time.  And, it appears with this potential filing and ruling; that they truly wish to be the later. Now FAs, admit it!

Assessment

Why do you think FAs are licensed as “registered representatives”? Rarely; a fiduciary among them!

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

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How to Become A Financial Advisor [Learned Profession or Professional Sales Force?]

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A Recent E-mail that I Received

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA, CMP™

www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

[Editor-in-Chief]

As a former certified financial planner for almost 15 years, I was surprised to recently receive the following unedited e-mail correspondence.

Dear Marcinko,

If you are clever, have a way with people, or are a born salesperson, then becoming financial advisor could be your ticket to paradise.

Maybe not exactly paradise, but you could definitely have a ticket to a rewarding career. If you’re thinking about starting out as a new financial advisor – you may already be half the way there.

Why?

Because it’s an occupation where your life challenges will give you the understanding and empathy needed to work with your clients. Have you ever been in the position where you had to figure out a budget for your children’s education? Or manage an over extended credit card? These life situations will aid an individual on the path to become a financial consultant.

Requirements to Be a Financial Advisor

Even though a formal education is not a necessity to become financial adviser, it helps if you’ve taken certain courses.

What degree do you need to become a financial advisor? A bachelor’s degree in Finance, Economics, Accounting, Commerce, Business or Marketing would be a good start. A degree won’t assure you of a startling career but it may help get your foot in the door.

Rumor has it that a degree in psychology is also an asset as financial advising is as much about counseling as it is about advising. There are a plethora of people with all sorts of emotional entanglements around their financial lives.

Licenses

So, what licenses do you need to be a financial advisor? Some companies will assist a newbie in the financial advisory business and place them into a special program that will help them to obtain the required regulatory licenses such as a Series 66, this license permits them to vend annuities and mutual funds. It’s also possible to manage your own training. You can take part-time courses in order to qualify for the CFP (Certified Financial Planner) exam.

There are roughly over 286 universities and colleges that will assist you in preparing for the CFP exam. How long does it take to become a financial advisor? In order to qualify for the exam you will also need three years full-time working experience with a financial planning establishment.

Statistics state that over 40% regularly fail this all important exam. Its worth the time and effort as with this certification you are deemed as a certified financial planner and demand a higher salary.

Assessment

Hot tip: Stay away from insurance companies for financial employment. They’ll insist that you sign everyone including the dog and your grandmother. Then get rid of you if you don’t procure sufficient business. Banks are better they will bring in the clients for you.

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Are financial advisors true professionals; or a truely professional sales force?

Please review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure. Are financial advisors true professionals, or a professional sales force?

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The One-Woman Physician Investors Should Not Trust

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Why We Should “Run” from the SEC’s Mary Schapiro

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP™

[Publisher-in-Chief]

OK, I’ve opined about fiduciary accountability for stock brokers, FAs and FPs – as well as Mary Schapiro [Chairman of the SEC] before – on this ME-P. And usually, in not so glowing terms!

But now, Mary really chaps my ethical and linguistic sensibilities.

Why I’m So P…… Off!

According to Bloomberg, and Advisor One [a financial services industry trade magazine], the chairwoman is considering something called the “business model neutral” rule that retains proprietary financial products, and brokerage sales commissions.

This concept of ‘business neutral’ is the one sought by many in the brokerage and insurance industry in order to redefine the term ‘fiduciary’ as an enhanced form of ‘suitability’ with opt-out provisions.

But, it is not sought by me, and should not be accepted by physicians.

Definitions

Suitability Rule – According to the Free Dictionary:

A stated or implied requirement by a regulatory body that a broker or investment adviser must reasonably believe that a certain investment decision will benefit a client before making a recommendation to him/her. That is, the broker or investment adviser must act in good faith, and may not knowingly recommend bad investments. Different regulators and self-regulating organizations incorporate suitable rules in different places in their bylaws. Two commonly referenced suitability rules are Rule 2310 for the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority and Rule 405 for the NYSE. See also: Due diligence, Prudent-person rule, Twisting.

Fiduciary Rule – According to the Free Dictionary:

A uniform standard for financial advisors that requires them to put retail customer interests ahead of their own financial interests.

This is clearly a higher duty [level of care] than suitability. Insurance agents, stock brokers, BDs and most “financial advisors” hate it.

Link: http://www.advisorone.com/2011/12/09/reaction-to-schapiro-comments-on-fiduciary-rule-ar?ref=hp

“Suitability on Steroids”

Some pundits suggest we think of this new “business model neutral” rule as “suitability on steroids.”

However, as most of us in medicine know, steroids are not a panacea and are typically used as a quick fix for short term gain, only.

Otherwise, the excessive use of anabolic steroids is bad for our physical health. Just like Mary Schapiro is bad for our fiscal health. But, a Certified Medical Planner™ is a fiduciary at all times http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

More: Enter the CMPs

Assessment       

And so, your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. I was an insurance agent and certified financial planner for almost 15 years [Series 7, 63 and 65] before I resigned all – in disgust over the fiduciary flap.

Doctors are fiduciaries. I am a fiduciary, a doctor, and a financial advisor. Shouldn’t all physician-investors demand same from their own financial advisors [NASD-FINRA, RIAs, RIA-Reps]?

But hey – I’m just a medical provider.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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***

Mike Kitces asks: What Can Financial Planners Learn from Suze Orman and Dave Ramsey?

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Follow Paretto’s Law – or Learn Something Unique and Compete?

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; FACFAS, MBA, CMP™

[Publisher-in-Chief]

Michael Kitces is an industry pundit, and well known certified financial planner [CFP], who writes for a financial advisory and financial planner audience at thewebsite Nerd’s Eye View:

http://www.kitces.com

He is a bright guy, who holds the following professional degrees and designations:

  • MSFS – Master of Science in Financial Services
  • MTAX – Master’s in Taxation
  • CFP – Certified Financial Planner
  • CLU – Chartered Life Underwriter
  • ChFC – Chartered Financial Consultant
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  • REBC – Registered Employee Benefits Consultant
  • CASL – Chartered Advisor of Senior Living
  • CWPP – Chartered Wealth Preservation Planner

Yet, in a recent essay, he laments that all the CFPs® in the country added together don’t have as much reach, or impact, as three mass marketing gurus: Suze Orman, David Bach, and Dave Ramsey. And, he is correct.

Markets Vary

These gurus, and the CFPs®, serve different markets for sure. The gurus’ products are free or inexpensive. Their messages are simple and actionable. Once you go beyond the simple messages, however, you will find the gurus no longer satisfying. So, it’s no coincidence that the three gurus focus on controlling spending and getting out of debt. Why?

Eighty percent of us do need to get out of debt and control our spending, period!

Link: Do Financial Planners Have Something To Learn From Suze Orman and Dave Ramsey?

Pareto’s Law

Here is where the mass market is located, said economist V. Pareto PhD more than a century ago. The Pareto principle (also known as the 80-20 rule, the law of the vital few, or the principle of scarsity) states that, for many events, roughly 80% of the effects come from 20% of the causes. It is a common thumb-rule in business; e.g., “80% of your sales come from 20% of your clients”.

Look, most clients can’t control their income but they can be taught to control spending and debt habits [needs versus wants]. Most patients need a family doctor; not a brain surgeon.  And, most of us do not have Einstein’s intelligence, Gate’s wealth, or Hercules’s strength.

But, our lives can vastly be improved by 80%, with just 20% more effort and cost. This is what the gurus know – most of us are average – not so the CFPs® who believe we all need a comprehensive financial plan and have the ability to pay for it and the time to execute and monitor it.

Assessment

And so, CFPs® can’t charge an 80% premium – to 80% of the population – when clients don’t need or want a comprehensive financial plan. Or, when clients can be better off by 80%, and such success can be had for 20% of the cost and effort offered by the CFPs®.

Basic supply-demand economics 101! Ford autos are fine – we all don’t need or want a Mercedes.

More confusing is the fact that even the CFPs® themselves are suspect since prior to 2008 a college degree was not required for the certification mark. And, having same allows the practitioner no additional diagnostic or interventional tools.

IOW: Whatever a CFP® can do – a non-CFP® can do.  And, it is increasingly considered by the well-informed …. to be a marketing mark …. to hold a marketing mark. This is akin to being famous; for being famous.  That’s why I resigned my CFP® mark years ago.

Full Disclosure: I am the Founder of the: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org online program. CMP™ certificants – like doctors – hold fiduciary accountability at all times and with unique healthcare industry specificity.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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Calling All Financial Advisors, Brokers, EAs, CFPs, CPAs, CFAs and RIAs to Contribute

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By Ann Miller RN MHA

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On American Health Care and Financial Services Competitiveness

A MEMORIAL DAY OPINION – EDITORIAL

[Innovation – Not Nationalization – Can Again Lead]

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; FACFAS, MBA, CPHQ, CMP™

[Publisher-in-Chief]

By Hope Rachel Hetico; RN, MHA, CPHQ, CMP™

[Managing Editor]

Ann Miller; RN, MHA

[Executive-Director]

American Flag

On this 2010 Memorial Day weekend, please allow us to directly reflect for a moment on the decline of the healthcare, banking and financial services industry in America. And; then somewhat indirectly comment on the hopeful emergence of the web 2.0 phenomena of which we all are a part. The competitive applicability to these sectors should be appreciated by the insightful ME-P reader.

Collapse of Command and Control Monopolies and Oligarchies   

Old monopolies everywhere are crumbling because of tougher new competitors and the transparency wrought by electronic connectedness. For example, our old newspaper has to compete with the internet, your electric utility company battles low-cost local start-ups, telephone companies must begin installing fiber optic lines to fend off cable companies; and RIAs and fiduciary focused financial advisors [FAs] will supplant BDs and stock brokers in the financial services sector.

www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

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The airline industry collapsed a few years ago, the banking industry has just collapsed, and the auto industry is recovering as we pen this post. [We have a particular affinity for the auto sector however, as the son of a UAW member and step-daughter of Michiganders]. Regardless, the rush to more intense competition cannot be stopped. As a doctor, FA or other business competitor; you either keep pace or get crushed by quasi-oligarchic organizations like the American Medical Association [AMA], American Podiatric Medical Association [FPMA], American Dental Association [ADA], American Osteopathic Medical Association AOMA], Financial Planning Association [FPA], Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards [CFP BoS], College for Financial Planning [CFP] or the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors [NAPFA], etc. What have they, and Wall Street, done for you … lately? Scandal, taint, doubt, lost-credibility, a business-as-usual ennui, lethargy and ruin! Enter www.Sermo.com

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2009/04/19/calling-for-cfp%c2%ae-fiduciary-status-real-education-and-higher-duty/#comment-4136

Health Insurance Companies

In the last-generation of health insurance companies and related fraternal medical organizations, patients exercised great control over physician selection, had quicker access to specialists and encountered fewer restrictions on care. The reverse was true with financial services. But, because of advancing technology, aging demographics, intense R&D, global manufacturing, and escalating domestic HR costs – competitive market forces against traditional and structured staff model managed care companies – many industry analysts [like us] predicted growth would decline [Yes, greed was also involved as healthcare was presumed a recession-proof sector; and didn’t we all own behemoth big-pharma and HMO stocks in our 401-K, and 403-B plans]? But now, many former stock-brokers and FAs are going rogue; er – independent!

“Although inefficiencies in any business often open up in the short term, and can be greatly exploited by creative and visionary entrepreneurs – as in most business structures – market forces will prevail in the long run”.

Leo F. Mullin, MBA

[Former CEO – Delta Airlines]Shadows

Next-Gen with “Fly”

Fortunately, a new generation of enlightened physician and FA entrepreneurs is coming “out-of-the-shadows” as new-wave web 2.0 corporations and RIAs are becoming more flexible, competitive and market responsive. Simultaneously, monolithic and collectivist political ideas keep trying to regulate the medical and financial services workplace with rules, regulations and contracts to control entire populations. Yet, in the new healthcare economy, this new generation of doctors and FAs with “fly,” is headed toward more competition; not less – with more collaboration with patients and clients – regaining self autonomy.

Physician and FA Advocates

Meanwhile, as medical professionals, FAs and patient advocates, we must all choose between staying flexible to ride out tough times – or – adopting a hard, brittle line that will crack under the pressure of competition. We know where we stand at the ME-P, do you?

Flexibility and Virtual Reality

In recent years, many large corporations and top-down business models were not market responsive and change was not inherent in their DNA. These traditional organizations represented a rigid or “used-to-be” mentality, not a flexible or “wanna-be” mindset; according to business columnist Alan Webber. Some financial advisory corporations, and today’s emerging health 2.0 initiatives, may possess the market nimbleness that cannot be recreated in a controlled or collectivist [nationalistic] environment. And so, going forward, it is not difficult to imagine the following new rules for the new financial and virtual medical ecosystem.

[A] Rule No. 1

Forget about “SEC suitability and FINRA rules”, large office suites, surgery centers, fancy equipment, larger hospitals and the bricks and mortar that comprised traditional medical practices or financial product delivery systems. One doctor or niche focused FA with a great idea, good bedside manners or competitive advantage, can outfox a slew of public servants, the AMA, SEC, ADA or FINRA “faux copy-cat examiners”, while still serving the public – and patients – and making money. It’s now a unit-of-one economy where “Me Inc.”, is the standard. Physicians and FAs must maneuver for advantages that boost their standing and credibility among patients, peers, payers, customers and clients. Examples include patient satisfaction surveys; outcomes research analysis, evidence-based-medicine, physician economics credentialing and true integrated fiduciary-focused financial planning.

However, we should also realize the power of networking, vertical integration and the establishment of virtual RIAs or medical practices, which come together to treat a patient, or help a client, and then disband when a successful outcome is achieved. Job security is earned with more successful outcomes; not necessarily a degree, automatic AUMs, certifications or onsite presence. In fact, some competition experts, like Shirley Svorny PhD, a professor of economics and chair of the Department of Economics at California State University, wonder if a medical degree is a barrier – rather than enabler – of affordable healthcare.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2009/01/08/medical-licensing-obstacle-to-affordable-quality-care

Others even presume the establishment of virtual medical schools and hospitals, where students and doctors learn and practice their art on cyber-entities that look and feel like real patients, but are generated electronically through the wonders of virtual reality units. The same can be said for the financial services industry, although much farther down-line given its current slow rate of real education and quasi-professional acceptance.

[B] Rule No. 2

Challenge conventional wisdom, think outside the traditional box, recapture your dreams and ambitions, disregard conventional gurus and work harder than you have ever worked before. Remember the old saying, “if everyone is thinking alike, then nobody is thinking”. Do collective-nistas and nationalized healthcare advocates react rationally; or irrationally? [THINK: Wall Street, medical unions]

[C] Rule No 3

Differentiate yourself among your healthcare and financial advisory peers. Do or learn something new and unknown by your competitors. Market your accomplishments and let the world know. Be a non-conformist. Conformity is an operational standard and a straitjacket on creativity. Doctors and FAs should create and innovate, not blindly follow organization or political “union” leaders [shop stewards, BDs, etc] into oblivion.

[D] Rule No 4

Realize that the present situation is not necessarily the future. Attempt to see the future and discern your place in it. Master the art of the quick change with fast but informed decision making. Do what you love, disregard what you don’t, and let the fates have their way with you. Then, decide for yourself if you are of this ilk – and adhere to any of the above rules? Or, just become an employed [government, BD] doctor or FA shill. Just remember that the political party, or monopoly that can give you a job, can also take it away [THINK: LB, ML, Wachovia, national healthcare, etc].

CP 1

Memorial Day Considerations

Finally, on this Memorial Day weekend, consider that life and career is a journey, and that in this country we have the choice to ponder or pursue any, and all of the above options, and more. We have the ability to think, cogitate and ruminate, as we have done here today. So – please – thank those who have helped turn this idealistic philosophy, into pragmatic daily reality.

For us personally, we thank Bonze Star Medal Winner Captain Cecelia T. Perez, RN. Now – ponder and consider – who do you thank? If no one has impacted you up-close on this Memorial Day weekend and national holiday, please visit our military channel to reflect, comment and opine.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/category/military-medicine

Conclusion

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Financial Advisory Reform Going Down in Flames

A [False] Hobson’s Choice*

By Staff Reporters

In political Washington DC, according to Ian Salisbury, almost anything will fly if you can make an argument it will benefit the middle class. It worked in the fight against requiring advisors to act in clients’ best interests … Say what?

Is this the case of a classic Hobson’s choice?

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The Strategy

Yep, its true! At least, this strategy worked for the National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors [NAIFA], which fought a recent proposal that would have made all financial advisors act in clients’ best interests … you know – the “F” word.

Assessment

It seems that there are few protections for the public from unscrupulous FAs, stockbrokers, and insurance agents. And, few wish to become fiduciaries.

http://www.fa-mag.com/online-extras/5406-a-phony-argument.html

*A Hobson’s choice is a free, usually economic, choice in which only one option is offered.

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Please visit: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

As former certified financial planner, insurance agent, stockbroker, surgeon and this ME-P publisher Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA, CMP™ has always opined to physician colleagues: it is “buyer-beware” out there!

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Modern Retirement Planning and “Banding” for Physicians

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The “AgeBander” Approach Presents a More Accurate Portrayal

[By Somnath Basu, PhD, MBA]

A convergence of mega-trends will forever change the face of retirement planning and raise its importance in the pantheon of physician retirement planning and most all employee benefits. Chief among them: longer life expectancy, advances in medicine, healthier lifestyles and mounting concern about years of abysmally low savings rates.

What it all Means in Practical Terms

What this means in practical terms for future retired physicians and most all retirees is the need for employers, service providers and financial advisers [FAs] to plot a more accurate and thoughtful course to planning for retirement that acknowledges the necessity of pursuing an “age-banded” approach. The idea behind this new approach is that individuals undergo various changes in lifestyles during retirement that last for finite or “age-banded”, periods.

Example:

For example, doctors like most people spend more time and money on leisurely activities early on in retirement, while health care needs dominate the latter years. Further, the costs associated with these lifestyles also change at differential inflation rates than from the basic inflation rate. While the basic inflation rate is about 3%, the U.S. Census Bureau noted that annual recreation costs increased at 7.14% though most of the 1990s. Health care costs also increased by much higher rates than the basic rate. Since the traditional model bundles all costs (including leisure, health care, basic living, etc) and extrapolates at the basic rate, it tends to underestimate retirement expenses. The traditional model’s “static” approach to retirement can have dangerous implications since it may lead to under-funded retirement plans, especially those earmarked for the critical years.

A Flawed Model?

In a research paper published by the Association for Financial Counseling and Planning Education, I detailed the reasons why an age-banded approach is superior to the traditional view of retirement planning. This new model provides for a more accurate portrayal of retirement expenses and an algorithm to calculate the income-replacement ratio, as well as smaller resource requirements and greater flexibility in managing risk. It also allows easier incorporation of long-term care insurance (LTCI) and significantly reduces funding needs. Indeed, the funding needs of a husband and wife who are both age 60 and presumably five years away from retirement are reduced by more than 16% and contributions for a 35-year-old single woman are reduced by 42% compared with previous approaches.

Traditional Retirement Planning Weaknesses

There are five inherent weaknesses to the traditional approach to retirement planning. They include the assumption that all living expenses will increase at the overall rate of inflation as measured by the Consumer Price Index (CPI), bundling all expenses together and not allowing them to change based on the life-cycle, estimating those expenses as a fixed percentage (replacement ratio) of pre-retirement costs, investing in low-return assets and failing to consider contingencies such as LTCI benefits, which can have a significant impact on the amount of funding required for retirement.

Financial Advisory Estimates

When financial planners estimate how much income a client needs in retirement, the calculation hinges on their income just prior to retirement. The pre-retirement income is adjusted downward by 10% to 35%. This adjustment reflects the income necessary to maintain one’s standard of living and incorporates reductions in taxes and other work-related expenses that cease upon retirement. Unfortunately, there’s no objective way to estimate the replacement ratio. Aggressive financial planners typically use large ratios and conservative planners use smaller ones.

30-year Retirement Window

Under the age-banded model, an individual typically lives about 30 years in retirement (e.g., age 65 to 95) and experiences a lifestyle change every 10 years at 65, 75 and 85. Of course, both the retirement period and the width of the age bands are arbitrary but can be subjectively changed to fit each retiree as closely as possible. In addition, a number of steps are taken to produce a clearer picture of retirement costs by categorizing them based on taxes, living expenses, health care and leisure, as well as calculating anticipated expenses using the appropriate rate of inflation for each category, which is adjusted to reflect post-retirement lifestyle changes.

Those expenses are extrapolated through 30 years of retirement and the present value of post-retirement expenses are calculated at an amount deemed sufficient to finance the three following decade (each age band). Instead of discounting these values to the year of retirement (the traditional model), the age banding considers them to be three retirement portfolios that require funding.

Since the portfolio required to fund the expenses during the years 86 to 95 is 20 years behind the first band (66 to 75), investors can seek marginally higher rates of return to reflect the longer terms. Contributions toward these amounts can now be calculated.

Example:

For example, the couple mentioned earlier is able to seek higher rates of return for longer-term investment portfolios which more than mitigate the effects of escalating health care costs. In the case  of the 35-year-old single woman, since the funds required for these three portfolios are 30, 40 and 50 years away she should be willing to take on more risk since she has ample time to manage the portfolio risk.

The expenses for the age-banded method become considerably higher at the latter stages of retirement as compared to the traditional model. This is desirable since the over-funding is associated with an age at which one cannot afford to be out of funds. The higher estimate of the age band comes from higher inflation rates for health care and the incorporation of lifestyle changes that imply accelerated costs such as increased leisure spending upon retirement and higher health care costs in the latter years.

Thus, these higher costs are not only more realistic but they incorporate the dynamics of a retired life, unlike the traditional model. Incredible as it might seem, the ability to assume a marginally higher risk leads to an actual decrease in the funding requirements versus the traditional plan.

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Assessment

One caveat that doctors need to know, and that financial planners will need to keep in mind, is that their clients may be reticent to buy equities when markets are underperforming. Clear explanations are required regarding why it may still be beneficial for the long run and that the risk will be managed on an ongoing basis. But, the results will be well worth the effort for the multiple stakeholders involved in assuring that tomorrow’s retirees are able to live more comfortable after their working years. It’s a small price to pay for the peace of mind associated with knowing retirement expenses will be portrayed more accurately and plan participants will be afforded greater flexibility in managing their risk.

Table [Comparison of growth in retirement expenses]

Link: Age-Banded Retirement Planning FINAL[1]

Editor’s Note: Somnath Basu PhD is program director of the California Institute of Finance in the School of Business at California Lutheran University where he’s also a professor of finance. He can be reached at (805) 493 3980 or basu@callutheran.edu. See the agebander at work at www.agebander.com

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Financial advisors please chime in on the debate? Is Basu correct; why or why not? Review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

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About the Covestor Mutual Fund Portfolio Sharing Service

Certified Medical Planner

What it is – How it works

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™

[Publisher-in-Chief]

Covestor, with offices in New York and London, is a web platform started by entrepreneurs Perry Blancher, Richard Tachta and Simon Veingard http://www.covestor.com. Their belief was that salaried mutual fund managers have no monopoly on investment talent and shouldn’t have a lock on the rewards that come with investment success. As financial services, and online netizens, they also believed in democratizing the investment management industry and helping proven self-investors compete with the large institutions. This is known as the power of “crowd-sourcing.” All core philosophies seem to be shared by this ME-P.

What it is

According to their website, Covestor is both a portfolio sharing service for proven self-investors and for those wishing to track them; where data is private, secure and anonymous. With Covestor, one can coat-tail successful investors and follow their real trade activity. Or, have their moves auto-traded for you by Covestor Investment Management. Members can also keep track of their investments andBuild a free track record comparable to professional mutual funds. Members earn fees for their hard work, and Manage a model that their clients can mirror thru shared management fees.

Profit Sharing Investors

Covestor investors sharing portfolios include professionals, full time amateurs and industry specialists. They are a serious bunch with an average reported portfolio size of over $200,000 (excluding cash). Positions are typically held in over 5,000 different equities; are based in 50 countries and span the full range of ages, backgrounds and styles.

Issues

As a doctor-investor, health economist and former certified financial planner, there are at least three issues needed to be raised about this firm.

The first is SEC/NASD/FINRA rules and applicable SRO and state regulations for brokers, RIAs, FAs and related others? The status of suitability versus fiduciary accountability for ERISA regulated plans is also questioned. The third [and least important] is the potential negative impact on traditional financial services “professionals.”

In other words, is this another example of how technology will flatten the “intermediary curve” and reduce the profit of middle sales-men and sales-women? Oh! What about medical specificity for our target audience?

www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Assessment

I am sure there are other issues as well. Your thoughts and comments on this ME-Pare appreciated; especially from financial services “professionals”, lawyers and FAs, etc, Give em’ a click and tell us what you think http://www.covestor.com?

Conclusion

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Video on Hedge Fund Manager Michael Burry MD

In The Subprime of His Life – My Story

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA, CMP™

[Editor-in-Chief]

I am a long time fan of financial industry journalist Michael Lewis [Liars’ Poker, Moneyball and others] who just released a new book. The Big Short is a chronicle of four players in the subprime mortgage market who had the foresight [and testosterone] to short the diciest mortgage deals: Steve Eisner of FrontPoint, Greg Lippmann at Deutsche Bank, the three partners at Cornwall Capital, and most indelibly, Wall Street outsider Michael Burry MD of Scion Capital.

They all walked away from the disaster with pockets full of money and reputations as geniuses.

About Mike

Now, I do not know the first three folks, but I do know a little something about my colleague Michael Burry MD; he is indeed a very smart guy. Mike is a nice guy too, who also has a natural writing style that I envy [just request and read his quarterly reports for a stylized sample]. He gave me encouragement and insight early in my career transformation – from doctor to “other”.

And, he confirmed my disdain for the traditional financial services [retail sales] industry, Wall Street and their registered representatives and ‘training’ system, and sad broker-dealer ethos [suitability versus fiduciary accountability] despite being a hedge fund manager himself.

I mentioned him in my book: “Insurance and Risk Management Strategies” [For Physicians and their Advisors].

http://www.amazon.com/Insurance-Management-Strategies-Physicians-Advisors/dp/0763733423/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1269254153&sr=1-2

He ultimately helped me eschew financial services organizations, “certifications”, “designations” and ”colleges”, and their related SEO rules, SEC regulations and policy wonks; and above all to go with my gut … and go it alone!

And so, I rejected my certified financial planner [marketing] designation status as useless for me, and launched the www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org on-line educational program for physician focused financial advisors and management consultants interested in the healthcare space … who wish to be fiduciaries.

And I thank Mike for the collegial good will. By the way, Mike is not a CPA, nor does he posses an MBA or related advanced degree or designation. He is not a middle-man FA. He is a physician. Unlike far too many other industry “financial advisors” he is not a lemming.

IOW: We are not salesman. We are out-of-the-box thinkers, innovators and contrarians by nature. www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com

From a Book Review

According to book reviewer Michael Osinski, writing in the March 22-29 issue of Businessweek.com, Lewis is at his best working with characters and Burry is rendered most vividly.

A loner from a young age, in part because he has a glass eye that made it difficult to look people in the face, Burry excelled at topics that required intense and isolated concentration. Originally, investing was just a hobby while he pursued a career in medicine. As a resident neurosurgeon at Stanford Hospital in the late 1990s, Burry often stayed up half the night typing his ideas onto a message board. Unbeknownst to him, professional money managers began to read and profit from his freely dispensed insight, and a hedge fund eventually offered him $1 million for a quarter of his investment firm, which consisted of a few thousand dollars from his parents and siblings. Another fund later sent him $10 million”.

“Burry’s obsession with finding undervalued companies eventually led him to realize that his own home in San Jose, Calif., was grossly overpriced, along with houses all over the country. He wrote to a friend: “A large portion of the current [housing] demand at current prices would disappear if only people became convinced that prices weren’t rising. The collateral damage is likely to be orders of magnitude worse than anyone now considers.” This was in 2003.

“Through exhaustive research, Burry understood that subprime mortgages would be the fuse and that the bonds based on these mortgages would start to blow up within as little as two years, when the original “teaser” rates expired. But Burry did something that separated him from all the other housing bears—he found an efficient way to short the market by persuading Goldman Sachs (GS) to sell him a CDS against subprime deals he saw as doomed. A unique feature of these swaps was that he did not have to own the asset to insure it, and over time, the trade in these contracts overwhelmed the actual market in the underlying bonds”.

“By June 2005, Goldman was writing Burry CDS contracts in $100 million lots, “insane” amounts, according to Burry. In November, Lippmann contacted Burry and tried to buy back billions of dollars of swaps that his bank had sold. Lippmann had noticed a growing wave of subprime defaults showing up in monthly remittance reports and wanted to protect Deutsche Bank from potentially massive losses. All it would take to cause major pain, Lippmann and his analysts deduced, was a halt in price appreciation for homes. An actual fall in prices would bring a catastrophe. By that time, Burry was sure he held winning tickets; he politely declined Lippmann’s offer”

And the rest, as they say, is history.

Link: http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/10_12/b4171094664065.htm

My Story … Being a Bit like Mike

I first contacted Mike, by phone and email, more than a decade ago. His hedge fund, Scion Capital, had no employees at the time and he outsourced most of the front and back office activities to concentrate on position selection and management. Early investors were relatives and a few physicians and professors from his medical residency days. Asset gathering was a slosh, indeed. And, in a phone conversation, I remember him confirming my impressions that doctors were not particularly astute investors. For him, they generally had sparse funds to invest as SEC “accredited investors” and were better suited for emerging tax advantaged mutual funds. ETFs were not significantly on the radar screen, back then, and index funds were considered unglamorous. No, his target hedge-fund audience was Silicon Valley.

And, much like his value-hero Warren Buffett [also a Ben Graham and David Dodd devotee], his start while from the doctor space, did not derive its success because of them.

Moreover, like me, he lionized the terms “value investing”, “margin of safety” and “intrinsic value”.

Co-incidentally, as a champion of the visually impaired, I was referred to him by author, attorney and blogger Jay Adkisson www.jayadkisson.com Jay is an avid private pilot having earned his private pilot’s license after losing an eye to cancer.

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Mike again re-entered my cognitive space while doing research for the first edition of our successful print book: “Financial Planning Handbook for Physicians and Advisors” and while searching for physicians who left medicine for alternate careers!

In fact, he wrote the chapter on hedge funds in our print journal and thru the third book edition before becoming too successful for such mundane stuff. We are now in our fourth edition, with a fifth in progress once the Obama administration stuff [healthcare and financial services industry “reform” and new tax laws] has been resolved

http://www.amazon.com/Financial-Planning-Handbook-Physicians-Advisors/dp/0763745790/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1269211056&sr=1-1

Assessment

News: Dr. Burry appeared on 60 Minutes Sunday March 14th, 2010. His activities with Scion Capital are portrayed in Michael Lewis’s newest book, The Big Short.  An excerpt is available in the April 2010 issue of Vanity Fair magazine, and at VanityFair.com 

Video of Dr. Burry: http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=6298040n&tag=contentBody;housing

Video of Dr. Burry: http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=6298038n&tag=contentBody;housing

PS: Michael Osinski retired from Wall Street and now runs Widow’s Hole Oyster Co. in Greenport, NY http://www.widowsholeoysters.com

And, our www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com related books can be reviewed here: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=david+marcinko

Assessment

Visit Scion Capital LLC and tell us what you think http://www.scioncapital.com.

And to Mike himself, I say “Mazel Tov” and congratulations? I am sure you will be a good and faithful steward. The greatest legacy one can have is in how they treated the “little people.” You are a champ. Call me – let’s do lunch. And, I am still writing: www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com for the conjoined space we both LOVE.

Conclusion

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  Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™  Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

[Dr. Cappiello PhD MBA] *** [Foreword Dr. Krieger MD MBA]

***

New Regulations Needed For Financial Planners?

So Says New Coalition

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™

[Publisher-in-Chief]

The Financial Planning Coalition [FPC] is pushing for a law that would require anyone calling themselves a financial planner to meet certain ethical and educational standards and to register with the Securities and Exchange Commission [SEC].

About the FPC

According to its’ website, the Financial Planning Coalition is a collaboration of Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards (CFP Board), the Financial Planning Association® (FPA), and the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (NAPFA) to advise legislators and regulators on how to best protect consumers by ensuring financial planning services are delivered with fiduciary accountability and transparency. Americans have grown leery of those who work in financial services.

Currently, financial planning (the process of advising individuals and families across a range of personal finance topics in addition to investment advice) is unregulated as a profession, resulting in major gaps in current laws. So, is it really a “profession” many ask – void of any significant barrier to entry?

The Financial Planning Coalition intends to work with Congress to produce legislation that puts the interests of clients first and enables consumers to identify a trusted financial adviser.

To learn more about the Financial Planning Coalition’s purpose and mission, click here to read, or download the Statement of Understanding [PDF].

SEC Wrong Oversight Agency?

According to this report in Financial Advisor magazine, an advertiser-driven trade journal:

the standards would be set by a public oversight board that would be funded by small registration fees paid by the financial planners, said Robert Glovsky, chair of the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards during a conference call today. The CFP Board, as well as the Financial Planning Association and the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors makes up the coalition.

Exemptions

However, brokers and insurance agents would not be forced to register as financial planners, but those who held themselves out as financial planners would have to meet the required minimum competency and ethics standards or stop using the financial planner title.

Assessment

And so, as we have noted, written, preached and warned for more than a decade – anyone can call themselves a financial planner, or financial advisor; so beware medical colleagues.

More: http://www.fa-mag.com/fa-news/5314-new-regs-needed-for-financial-planners-coalition-says.html

NOTE: The fiduciary definitional standard conundrum was not even addressed in the article or by the committee, as far as I know. Moreover, note that SEC oversight was in place before, during and now after the Bernie Madoff scandal – so enough said about competency! www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. What do you think FAs, and CFPs®? Should all become an RIA or ERISA styled fiduciary? Or, will this be another CFP® lite fiasco?

Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Disclaimer: I am a former certified financial planner and CEO of the online www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com program for fiduciary advisors working in the healthcare space.

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Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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Tax Planning Strategies for Physicians in 2010-11

Ten Ways to Lower your Taxes

By Sean G. Todd, Esq., M. Tax, CFP®, CPA

1. Buy a home

You can take advantage of a buyer’s real estate market and buy a home at prices not seen for years. We are seeing prices discounted from 10-30%. First time buyers – doctors and other individuals – who haven’t owned a residence in the last three years – can claim up to the $8,000 tax credit. Current homeowners who’ve lived in their residence for five of the eight years before buying can get up to $6,500. Remember a tax credit is a dollar-for-dollar reduction in your tax liability. Taxpayers love tax credits. You must have a contract in place by April 30, 2010, and the deal closed by June 30th to qualify for this outstanding credit.

2. Avoid the Making Work Pay trap 

This is an accounting trick … timing. This tax break was designed to put more money in consumer hands quicker (by under-withholding), but if you work two jobs it may have a tax bite. If you work more than one medical job, check with a tax advisor, or the payroll department at your office to make sure your W-4 is filled out properly at each job.

3. Make a Roth Conversion

The $100,000 income limit has been eliminated in 2010. Now, anyone can now convert a traditional IRA to a Roth retirement account. But, review the numbers.  Everyone’s situation is unique and making the conversion may not be a smart financial decision. But, note that you will have to pay taxes on the previously untaxed amounts in your traditional IRA that you convert. The good news is you can choose to pay half the conversion costs on your 2011 taxes and the other half in 2012.  Beware, making the conversion might push you into the next tax bracket and could cause some deductions to be lost—so you have to run the numbers.

4. Gain tax benefits from improving your home’s energy efficiency

You might be eligible for more tax credits based on your improvements to the principal residence. Making such improvements might just make your home a bit more-cozy. Homeowners can claim up to 30 percent of the first $5,000 spent on qualifying residential energy upgrades, or up to $1,500 in tax credits. A solar home heating system can get you even bigger tax credits.  We are uncertain if these credits will be extended so if you need to make home repairs, consider energy-efficient upgrades now.

5. Buy a hybrid car now…but not just any hybrid

The hybrid credit is set to expire in 2010. The credit remains good only with manufacturers that have not sold 60,000 eligible cars. So shop carefully to make sure the hybrid you are looking at qualifies.  Be sure to get the salesman’s representation that this vehicle qualifies and the manufacturer has sold less than the above amount to qualify.

6. See an Estate Tax Professional

Right now–everyone is trying to figure this area out. Since Congress has really messed this area up by the lack of clarity and with our deficit spending, you can expect that money hungry legislators will want to reclaim more of your money they don’t deserve. Ask a licensed Tax Attorney or CPA to help you arrange your affairs to make sure you and your heirs do not give the IRS more than necessary.

7. You must take your Required Minimum Distributions for your retirement accounts

Many doctors utilize tax-deferred savings plans such as traditional IRAs or workplace 401(k)s or 403(b)s to save for retirement. Now, the IRS is again telling us you have to start taking money out of these accounts via required minimum distributions, or RMDs, once you turn 70 1/2.  You were given a reprieve in 2009 from taking RMDs.

8. Plan for rising income tax rates

By law, the Bush tax cuts expire at the end of 2010. Tax rates go up for higher income earners and the 10 percent rate is eliminated for lower earners. One can only speculate what Congress will do in the light of trillion dollar deficits, but keep an eye out and plan accordingly. Be proactive and not reactive. Do not be afraid to call your Senators and Congressperson and let them know how you feel about tax hikes.

9. Act now to take capital gains at lower rates

George W. Bush’s tax cuts included reductions in capital gains tax rates based on taxpayer adjusted gross income. Right now the highest rate is 15 percent for individuals in the 25 percent to 35 percent tax brackets.  Taxpayers in the 10 percent and 15 percent tax brackets pay no capital gains tax at all. Current law says this is scheduled to change in 2011.The top rate will return to 20 percent; the zero rate will revert to 10 percent. And with this administration and the party controlling Congress, this could get worse. Here is the wildcard: there is no guarantee they won’t make retroactive changes, either.

10. Watch out for health care changes

In light of the Massachusetts special election going to a Republican, health care changes could jump off the fast track; but nevertheless there could be ramifications for you tax wise if something does finally pass. Keep your eye on this and stay out from under the surgeon’s knife on this one!

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Assessment

There is nothing like a good tax advisor, and it pays to be as informed as possible.

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. What was missed? Fee free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too! Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

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Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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Dr. Somnath Basu on Investing

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He Writes for the Medical Executive-Post

By Ann Miller; RN, MHA

[Executive-Director]

Dr. Somnath Basu is no stranger to the ME-P, or the financial planning community. He is a Professor of Finance at California Lutheran University and the Director of its California Institute of Finance.

Academic Background

Dr Basu earned his BA in Economics, University of Delhi, MBA (Finance), Marquette University and a PhD (Finance), University of Arizona. He is well published and is an award winning teacher. He has significant consulting experience with US Fortune 100 companies, advising institutional money managers and in developing proprietary finance and planning software. He serves on various Boards and committees including the CFP (chaired the Model Curriculum Revision Committee) Board of Standards and the Financial Planning Association.

Basu’s New Book

His new book, co-authored with Professors’ Block and Hirt, Investment Planning for Financial Professionals is available now, published by McGraw Hill, in May 2006.

Link: http://www.amazon.com/Investment-Planning-Geoffrey-Hirt/dp/0071437215/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1265918999&sr=1-1

Additional essays by Dr. Basu can be viewed at: http://blog.fpaforfinancialplanning.org/author/somnathbasufpa/

He also writers a column for the Journal of Financial Services Professionals. He can be reached at:

Contact Dr. Somnath Basu
Director – California Institute of Finance
Cell: 805 405 4448
Work: 805 493 3980
http://www.clunet.edu/cif

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners(TM)

When to Change Portfolio Managers

Some Considerations for Medical Professionalsfp-book

By Clifton N. McIntire, Jr.; CIMA, CFP®

By Lisa Ellen McIntire; CIMA, CFP®

Sometimes even the best made physician financial plans just don’t work out. And, despite extensive time and energy spent on due diligence before hiring an investment or portfolio manager, it becomes evident that you must change managers.

Some Thoughts for Doctors

Here are a few thoughts when considering a portfolio manager change:

  • You should have initially hired the manager with a long-term relationship in mind. Realizing that styles go in and out of favor, we were not simply buying last quarter’s best numbers; in 2009.
  • Market statistics often mask “real” performance of money managers, both good and bad. The S&P 500’s 2007 performance can be attributed to a few very large companies.
  • Generally, a full market cycle would be required to assess money manager performance. Having said that, what could happen that would warrant changing managers? Here is a brief list:
  1. Style Drift: You have a growth manager and when growth stocks turn down, you begin to see the purchase of “value” stocks.
  2. Not Sticking to Previously Established Disciplines: If the process is to sell if the price declines 20 percent down from the original buy range and now they are holding because, “This time, it is different.”
  3. Personnel Changes: New analysts are hired with a different philosophy. Recent transactions seem 180 degrees off course.
  4. Principals Leave: Like professional sports figures, good money managers are in demand and sometimes change firms. The replacement may be a 29-year-old MBA with little experience.
  5. The Firm is Sold: This may be good new if it broadens ownership and helps retain good people.  Look for long-term incentive driven “staying” bonus plans.
  6. Loss of Major Accounts: Reduced revenues may force cut backs in personnel and services. Attention may shift from portfolio management to marketing.

Assessment

Finally, sometimes it is just not working. Misjudgments in asset allocation and poor stock selection over a reasonable period of time can be reason enough to change managers.

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When Investing or Stock Trading Is No Longer Fun

Understanding Obsessive-Compulsive Behavior

By: Dr. David Edward Marcinko; FACFAS, MBA, CMP™

By: Dr. Eugene Schmuckler; MBA, CTS

By: Dr. Kenneth H. Shubin-Stein, CFA

By: Richard B. Wagner; JD, CFP®fp-book1

An obsession is a persistent, recurring preoccupation with an idea or thought. A compulsion is an impulse that is experienced as irresistible. Obsessive-compulsive individuals feel compelled to think thoughts that they say they do not want to think or to carry out actions that they say are against their will. These individuals usually realize that their behavior is irrational, but it is beyond their control. In general, these individuals are preoccupied with orderliness, perfectionism, and mental and interpersonal control, at the expense of flexibility, openness, and efficiency.

Specifically, behaviors such as the following may be seen:

  • Preoccupation with details.
  • Perfectionism that interferes with task completion.
  • Excessive devotion to work and office productivity.
  • Scrupulous and inflexible about morality (not accounted for by cultural or religious identification).
  • Inability to discard worn-out or worthless objects without sentimental value.
  • Reluctance to delegate tasks or to work with others.
  • Adopts a miserly spending style toward both self and others.
  • Demonstrates a rigid, inflexible and stubborn nature.

Most people resort to some minor obsessive-compulsive patterns under severe pressure or when trying to achieve goals that they consider critically important. In fact, many individuals refer to this as superstitious behavior. The study habits required for medical students entail a good deal of compulsive behavior.

Related Addictions

As the above examples suggest, there are a variety of addictions possible. Recent news accounts have pointed out that even high-level governmental officials can experience sex addiction. The advent of the Internet has led to what is referred to as Internet addiction where an individual is transfixed to the computer working for hours on end without a specific project in mind. The simple act of “surfing” offers the person afflicted with the addiction some degree of satisfaction.

The Gambler

Still another form of addictive behavior is that of the compulsive gambler. This is the behavior of an individual who is unable to resist the impulse to gamble. Many reasons have been posited for this type of behavior including the death instinct; a need to lose; a wish to repeat a big win; identification with adults the “gambler” knew as an adolescent; and a desire for action and excitement. There are other explanations offered for this form of compulsive behavior. The act of betting allows the individual to express an immature bravery, courage, manliness, and persistence against unfavorable odds. By actually using money and challenging reality, he puts himself into “action” and intense emotion. By means of gambling, the addicted individual is able to pretend that he is favored by “lady luck,” specially chosen, successful, able to beat the system and escape from feelings of discontent.

Just Plain Greed

Greed is another reason. In fact, a 1987 poll conducted by the Chicago Tribune revealed that people who earned less than $30,000 a year, said that $50,000 would fulfill their dreams, whereas those with yearly incomes of over $100,000 said they would need $250,000 to be satisfied. More recent studies confirm that goals keep getting pushed upward as soon as a lower level is reached. Now, consider Bernie Madoff, and the recent sub-prime mortgage debt fiasco in this light?

Compulsive Doctors

Edward Looney, executive director of the Trenton, New Jersey based Council on Compulsive Gambling (CCG) reports that the number of individuals calling with trading-associated problems is doubling annually. In the mid 1980s, when the council was formed, the number of people calling the council’s hotline (1 – 800 Gambler) with stock-market gambling problems was approximately 1.5 percent of all calls received. In 1998 that number grew to 3 percent and it is projected to rise to 7-8 percent by 2005. Dr. Robert Custer, an expert on compulsive gambling reported, that stock market gamblers represent over 20 percent of the gamblers that he has diagnosed. It is evident that on-line trading presents a tremendous risk to the speculator. The CCG describes some of the consequences:

  • Dr. Fred B. is a 43-year-old Caucasian male physician with a salary above $100,000 and in debt for more than $100,000. He is married with two children. He was a day trader.
  • Michael Q. is a 28-year-old Caucasian male registered nurse. He is married and the father of one (7 month old) child. He earns $65,000 and lost $40,000 savings in day trading and is in debt for $25,000. He has suicidal ideation.

Assessment

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Question: So how much money is enough?

Answer: Just a little bit more.

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

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Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

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Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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Sponsors Welcomed

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Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2007/11/11/advertise

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First Annual iMBA, Inc Educational Cruise

Meet, Greet, Lunch and Learn from the Experts

By Ann Miller; RN, MHA

[Executive-Director]

CruiseSome time ago, a CPA, CFP® and fellow Certified Medical Planner™ suggested that we hold annual meetings, or education seminars, for all our colleagues. As a nascent organization at the time, this was considered a “pipe dream.” But, it may now become a reality depending on your response. All interested stakeholders are invited. 

 

The Cruise

Currently, we are soliciting interest in a – Princess – Caribbean cruise [Southern] for 2010. This would afford us the opportunity to meet  you on both a formal or informal basis. Educational and other activities would then be scheduled,  as-needed or requested. Departure from Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. All info subject to change without notice, at this time.

www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.comcmp-logo

For example, activities could be arranged for CMP™ program credits in health economics and medical management; or simply on an ad-hoc [audit] informational basis. We will also attempt to individualize and accommodate personal situations and professional needs. 

Seeking Interest and Input

And so, your thoughts, ideas and comments on this Medical Executive-Post cruise idea and opportunity are appreciated. Please email me your ideas; or contact us for more information with details. Serious inquiries only:

MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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Seeking Sponsors

Ship Solstice

We are also seeking sponsors for this cruise, and other iMBA corporate engagements.

https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2007/12/11/support-the-executive-post

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com  or Bio: www.stpub.com/pubs/authors/MARCINKO.htm

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Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

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Our Recent Experience with CFP® Mark Utility

Join Our Mailing List

Certification Falling from Grace – Deserved or Not?

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™

[Publisher-in-Chief] dem21 

The Premise

In the summer [2008], we sent a random email blast to the first 200 Certified Financial Planners® on our list-serve. These were folks who had previously contacted us, and/or purchased our textbooks, handbooks, tools and/or dictionaries that assist accountants, financial advisors, attorneys, medical management consultants and all those working to assist physicians and medical professionals on business and economics matters.

The “Straw-Poll” Query

Our email blast asked the simple question:

“Did you ever voluntarily resign your license to use the CFP® mark?”

First Round Results

We received four positive responses [2%]. We then followed up to learn that 2 of the 4 were CPAs, one was a CFA and another was an MBA. Now, what do these results signify – probably nothing – or maybe an emerging trend?

Repeat

So, last summer [2009], after the continuing Wall Street collapse, and the Somnath Basu PhD article on “CFP Trust” in Financial Advisor magazine and this blog, we sent out a follow-up email to the exact same 200 Certified Financial Planners® as before; but carved-out and replaced the 4 CFPs who had resigned the mark, with 4 others.

Link: I Jealously “Shake my Fist” at Somnath Basu PhD

This time we asked the question:

“Have you recently considered allowing your CFP mark to lapse; or resigning it?”

Second Round Results

This time we received exactly eight positive replies [4%] or double the number from the first round. One CFP® said:

“I am rethinking my entire business and marketing philosophy. This includes separation from any taint left over from recent industry scandals – and yes – even including my CFP® mark”

 CMP logo

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Assessment

This little experiment was not statistically significant by any means. And, again it probably is indicative of nothing. Yet, these types of questions must be boldly asked today; even if they were not even timidly asked yesterday.

Nevertheless, cited plausible reasons for the increased negative CFP® mark response may be:

 

  • CFP BoS lacks modernity and membership alliance. 
  • SEC mismanagement.
  • NASD/FINRA impotence.
  • Wall Street greed.
  • Lack of true fiduciary accountability.
  • Client anger and public distrust.
  • Advisor frustration at lost income.
  • College for Financial Planning and American College credibility.  
  • ME-P operations in the medical niche advisory space.
  • CFP® mark and related industry certification taint.
  • Alternative degrees and available designations.
  • Rise of RIAs and the fiduciary CMPmark for healthcare specificity.
  • Resigning [doing] and considering [thinking] are not equivalent;
  • etc, etc. 

It is interesting to note that no CFP® resigned their mark who did not hold either another graduate degree [MBA, MSFS, MA, MS, PhD], or more rigorous industry [CFA and CPA] certification.

Assessment 

So, is CFP mark allegiance just a union-like mentality of “united we stand – divided we fall”, by those with little to no gravitation pull of their own – or something else; ie., industry group think? You decide; and do tell us what you think.

Note: I am the founder of the CMP online education and certification program for financial advisors and consultants interested in the health economics, finance and medical practice management space, and a former [resigned] certified financial planner www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org 

Update 2013:

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Product Details  Product Details

Product DetailsProduct Details

Why Most Financial Advisors Won’t be Fiduciaries

Industry Groups Differ On Fiduciary Standard

By Staff ReportersBenjamin Bills

The House Financial Services Committee recently heard two takes on the fiduciary standard – investment advisors who want it applied to broker dealers – and broker-dealers who want to apply a universal standard of care to all advisors, including investment advisors.

Assessment

And so, we encourage all ME-P subscribers to read industry trade magazines [aka ”trade rags”] to learn how some financial advisors fleece physicians and other investors by not being fiduciaries; with sincere apologies to all honest and hard working fiduciary advisors.Become a CMP IOW: Follow the money.

Link: http://www.financialadvisormagazine.com/fa-news/4532-industry-groups-differ-on-fiduciary-standard-.html

www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Channel Surfing

Have you visited our other topic channels? Established to facilitate idea exchange and link our community together, the value of these topics is dependent upon your input. Please take a minute to visit. And, to prevent that annoying spam, we ask that you register. 

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Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

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Sponsors Welcomed

And, credible sponsors and like-minded advertisers are always welcomed.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2007/11/11/advertise

Product Details  Product Details

 

Off-Road Touring with Dr. Marcinko [Final Part 2009]

Hello Everyone and Thank You!

By Ann Miller; RN, MHAOff Road Touring '09

To all of you who made it to one of our venues for an Off Road Tour segment with our Publisher Dr. David E. Marcinko, or to those who just read his posts, we wanted to thank you for your support and for supporting each other!

Our mission – is to bridge the gap between financial planning and medical practice management, and to serve as a networking resource for medical, managerial and financial advisory colleagues who possess the ethics and intellect to serve in a fiduciary capacity.

The Next Step

Ready for the next step? Just visit www.HealthcareFinancials.com and subscribe to the Journal of Financial Management Strategies, to create a roadmap to success for your healthcare organization.

Thanks with a Shout-Out

Finally; we give a hearty shout-out to www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com who made the book “signing and opining” tour possible. We are so proud of our partnership with an institute whose team learning approach creates such rich success for students, both in the virtual and real-world classroom and in their personal and professional lives www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Online Certified Medical Planner Program

Interested in becoming a Certified Medical Planner ™ or to learn about how your broker-dealer, advisory firm or company can build an educational partnership with us? Call me at 770.448.0769 (9am – 5pm EST).

Channel Surfing

Have you visited our other topic channels? Established to facilitate idea exchange and link our community together, the value of these topics is dependent upon your input. Please take a minute to visit. And, to prevent that annoying spam, we ask that you register. 

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Assessment

Thanks so much for your interest in our Summer 2009 tour, and the ME-P. We hope it, and all our books, texts, dictionaries, products and educational formats serve you well!

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com 

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Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest ME-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Sponsors Welcomed

And, credible sponsors and like-minded advertisers are always welcomed.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2007/11/11/advertise

Understanding Expenses and Investment Portfolio Performance

A Direct Relationship

By Clifton N. McIntire, Jr.; CIMA, CFP®

By Lisa Ellen McIntire; CIMA, CFP®fp-book

Expenses can play an important role in portfolio performance. You don’t hear much about expense ratios in an up market, like early 2007. If your account was up +28 percent, whether the expense was 3 percent or 1 percent doesn’t seem to make much difference. But, let the market decline, like it did later on in October 2007 and we change our perspective. A 10 percent portfolio decline plus charges of 3 percent equals a 13 percent decline. Now we need a 15 percent increase net of fees just to get even.

The Four Cost Horsemen

Basically you have four cost areas:

  1. Custody—someone must hold the stocks and bonds, collect dividends and interest, prepare tax information for the government, issue monthly statements, and send checks.
  2. Commissions—orders must be executed, transfer securities into and out of your account, trades settled.
  3. Investment Decisions—the money manager must be paid.
  4. Monitoring Performance and Advice—usually an investment management analyst is engaged to provide this service; as well as write the investment policy statement and prepare the asset allocation study.

Portfolio Size

Naturally, size makes a difference. For a doctor’s stock account with a $200,000 total value, all of the above can be accomplished for annual fees between 2.00 and 3.00 percent. An account with $1,500,000 in total assets part bonds and part stocks would pay annual fees between 1.25 and 1.75 percent depending on the ratio of stocks and bonds. These are annual fees and are all-inclusive. Commissions, portfolio management fees, and statements check charges are all included. One quarter of the annual fee is charged every three months. Family related accounts are generally grouped for a quantity fee discount.

Assessment

Some financial consultants prefer to use mutual funds with smaller accounts. A charge of 1 percent per year for their service with a stated minimal fee is common practice. This does not include fees deducted from the account by the mutual fund (anywhere from .50 to 2.50 percent) or commissions paid by the fund managers for trade executions. 

Morningstar Report: Morningstar Expense Ratio Results

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. How much do you pay for this service? Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com 

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Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Introducing Somnath Basu; PhD MBA

Our Newest ME-P Thought-Leader in Finance and Economics

By Ann Miller; RN, MHA

[Executive Director]Dr. Basu

Dr. Somnath Basu is a Professor of Finance at California Lutheran University and the Director of its California Institute of Finance. Dr. Basu is also a Professor of the Helsinki School of Economics Executive MBA Program. He earned his BA in Economics, University of Delhi, MBA (Finance), Marquette University and a PhD (Finance), University of Arizona.

Publications and Experience

Dr. Basu is extensively published in the field of investments and financial planning and is an award winning teacher. He has significant consulting experience with US Fortune 100 companies, advising institutional money managers and in developing proprietary personal investment software. Dr. Basu is actively involved with financial planning organizations including the National Endowment for Financial Education (NEFE), the CFP Board of Standards, International CFP Board and the Financial Planning Association. He coauthored the book (with Block and Hirt), “Investment Planning for Financial Professionals” McGraw Hill, May 2006 which is widely used by financial planning programs nationwide. 

AssessmentCLU

To regular our ME-P readers, Dr. Basu’s opinions are well known and not without controversy. But, whether you agree with him or not, his commitment to the industry and his economics and financial planning students is solid. And, always adhering to the Socratic dialog tradition of candor intelligence and goodwill.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2009/04/09/i-jealously-shake-my-fist-at-somnath-basu/

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2009/04/16/dr-somnath-basu-replies-to-the-cfp%c2%ae-mis-trust-controversy/ 

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Pleas give Somnath a warm ME-P welcome and electronic “shout-out”. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

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Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

ME-P Thought-Leader [MD] in the News

Brian J. Knabe MD of Savant Capital Management

By Max Alexander

Dow Jones Newswires; 212-416-2245 Brian J. Knabe MD

Lots of doctors get burnt out dealing with the business end of medicine. But Brian Knabe, a family practice physician in Rockford, Ill., had such a passion for crunching numbers that he became a financial planner.

Knabe, 42 years old, still sees patient’s two half-days a week. He also teaches residents for another half-day at the University of Illinois – College of Medicine.

Most of the week, he’s a certified financial planner with Savant Capital Management.

“I hear all the jokes,” says Knabe, “the most popular being some version of, ‘Hey I guess my portfolio’s doing so badly, they had to bring in the doctor.'”

When the laughter dies down – it doesn’t take long – people often ask what motivated him to transition from medicine into finance.

His short answer is what you’d expect from a wealth adviser: “I wanted to diversify my career.”

The long answer includes a lifelong passion for math that runs in the family. Knabe’s father and brother are both engineers, and the doctor himself majored in bioengineering at Marquette University. “In college, I loved calculus, statistics and differential equations,” he says.

Growing up in Rockford, his best friend was Brent Brodeski, a partner at Savant, and Knabe had been a client of the firm since 1995. “For years, I joked with Brian, ‘If you ever get bored with medicine, you can join us,'” says Brodeski. “Three years ago he called and said, ‘I’ll take you up on that.’ I was floored.”

Knabe wasn’t bored with medicine. “I love taking care of patients, and the intellectual stimulation of the field,” he says. “So I told the partners at Savant that I would only do this if they allowed me to continue practicing medicine part-time.” Meanwhile, he went back to Marquette and got his CFP credentials.

About half of Knabe’s financial clients are doctors, who appreciate his insider’s knowledge of their work and financial issues. Both fields involve privacy and trust, he notes, and both involve planning for the future. They also involve an element of uncertainty.

Sometimes his advice is specifically health-related.

“One client I was working with was a couple where the husband had a terminal illness,” recalls Knabe. “I worked closely with the family in planning living will issues and durable power of attorney for health care. I’ve helped other clients wade through health insurance and disability issues.”

Yes, financial clients do sometimes ask him for medical advice, but he stops them before they can unbutton their shirt.

“If they have a problem and need a diagnosis, I’ll tell them where to go to get a second opinion,” he says.

Link: http://online.wsj.com/article_email/BT-CO-20090914-711325-kIyVDAtMEM5TzEtNDIxMDQwWj.html 

Managing Editor’s Note:Become a CMP

Dr. Knabe is also enrolled in the www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com program in health economics and medical practice management for financial advisors and healthcare consultants.

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com 

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Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Do Financial Advisors Add Value to Retail Portfolios?

Some Consultants Emphatically Say … No!

By Staff Reportersfp-book1

Nope! So says Andre’ Cappon, Guy Manual, Stephan Mignot and Seth Varnhagen of the CBM Group, Inc; a consulting firm in Manhattan, New York. In fact, while writing in Registered Rep – a trade magazine for FAs in September 2009 – they estimate that long-term real (adjusted for inflation), actual (after taxes, fees and market timing) returns for the average retail investor, to be around 0 percent. That’s right; not the 8-12 percent usually attributed to long term investing trends.

Or; do you simply have the wrong type of Financial Advisor [FA]?

Visit: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com Do you need a fiduciary advisor? Who really knows for sure?

About the CBM Group

Founded in 1992, the CBM Group is a general management consulting firm specialized in the financial services industry. Their goal is to help leading financial institutions, and their financial advisors, create and sustain the competitive advantages necessary to thrive in the global marketplace.

Link: www.theCBMGroup.com

Assessment

Despite the math, and numerics like Ibbotson charts showing impressive long-term gains, on average retail investors — like doctors, medical professionals and ME-P readers — have made very little actual return on their savings; according to CMB.

Link: http://registeredrep.com/advisorland/marketing_selling/0901-small-investment-return/index.html

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Does your FA add value to his/her fees of 1-3%; or are they a drag on your portfolio’s performance. Ever consider “doing it yourself”  like some medical institutions www.HealthcareFinancials.com 

Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com 

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Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Product Details  Product Details

Evaluating a Sample Physician Financial Plan III

Stress Testing Results a Decade Later

[By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; CPHQ, MBA, CMP™]

[By Hope Rachel Hetico; RN, MHA, CPHQ, CMP™]dave-and-hope4

We are often asked by physicians and colleagues; medical, nursing and graduate students, and/or prospective clients to see an actual “comprehensive” financial plan. This is a reasonable request. And, although most doctors who are regular readers of this Medical Executive-Post have a general idea of what’s included, many have never seen a professionally crafted financial plan. This not only includes the outcomes, but the actual input data and economic assumptions, as well.

The ME-P Difference

And so, in a departure from our pithy and typically brief journalistic style, we thought it novel to present such a plan for hindsight review. But; we present same in a very unusual manner befitting our iconoclastic and skeptical next-generation Health 2.0 philosophy. And, we challenge all financial advisors to do same and compare results with us.

How so?

By using a real life plan constructed a decade ago and letting ME-P reader’s review, evaluate and critique same.

  • Part I is for a married drug-rep, then medical school student [51 pages] with no children.
  • Part II is for the same mid-career practicing physician [28 pages] with 2 children.
  • Part III is for the same experienced practitioner at his professional zenith [56 pages].

Part III: Sample Financial Plan III

Fiduciary Advisors

fp-book2

As former financial advisors and licensed insurance agents – and a reformed certified financial planner – it is our duty to act as economic fiduciaries for clients. In other words; to put client interests above our own. This culture was incumbent in our participatory online www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org educational program in health economics and medical practice management; since inception in 2000.

Assessment

And so, as Edward I. Koch famously asked as Mayor of New York City from 1978-1989: “how am I doing”; we sought to ask and answer same. What did we do right or wrong; and how were our assumptions correct or erroneous?  As Certified Professionals in Healthcare Quality this is the question we continually seek to answer in medicine. And, as health economists, this is the financial advisory equivalent of Evidence Based Medicine [EBM] or Evidence Based Dentistry [EBD] etc. It is a query that all curious FAs should ask.

Note: Be sure to review sample plan I and II, right here:

Link: Sample Financial Plan I

Link: Sample Financial Plan II

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. As a financial advisor, accountant, financial planner, etc., we challenge you to lay bare your results as we have done. And, be sure to “rant and rave” – and – “teach and preach” about this post in the style of Socrates, with Candor, Intelligence and Goodwill, to all. Doctors – chime in – too. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

DICTIONARIES: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko
PHYSICIANS: www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com
PRACTICES: www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com
HOSPITALS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781466558731
CLINICS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439879900
BLOG: www.MedicalExecutivePost.com
FINANCE: Financial Planning for Physicians and Advisors
INSURANCE: Risk Management and Insurance Strategies for Physicians and Advisors

 

ASSUMPTIONS

Sample Mega Plan for a New Physician

Joe Good, a 30-year-old pharmaceutical sales representative, and his pregnant wife Susie Good, a 30-year-old accountant, sought the services of a certified financial planner because of a $150,000 inheritance from Joe’s grandfather. The insecurity about what to do with the funds was complicated by their insecurity over future employment prospects, along with Joe’s frustrated boyhood dream of becoming a physician, along with only a fuzzy concept of their financial future.

After several information-gathering meetings with the CFP, concrete goals and objectives were clarified, and a plan was instituted that would assist in financing Joe’s medical education without sacrificing his entire inheritance and current lifestyle. They desired at least one more child, so insurance and other supportive needs would increase and were considered, as well. Their prioritized concerns included the following:

1. What is the proper investment management and asset allocation of the $150,000?

2. Is there enough to pay for medical school and support their lifestyle?

3. Can they indemnify insurance concerns through this transitional phase of life,  including the survivorship concerns of premature death or disability?

4. Can they afford for Susie to be the primary bread winner through Joe’s medical school,   internship, and residency years?

5. Can they afford another child?

Current income was not high, and current assets were below the unified estate tax-credit. Therefore, income and estate-planning concerns were not significant at that time.

After thoroughly discussing the gathered financial data, and determining their risk profile, the CMP™ made the following suggestions:

1. Reallocate the inheritance based on their risk tolerance, from conservative to long-term growth.

2. Maximize group health, life, and disability insurance benefits.

3. Supplement small quantities of whole life insurance with larger amounts of term insurance.

4. Create simple wills, for now.

Sample Mega Plan for a Mid-Life Physician

A second plan was drawn up 10 years later, when Joe Good was 40 years old and a practicing internist. Susan, age 40, had been working as a consultant for the same company for the past decade. She was allowed to telecommunicate between home and office. Daughter Cee is nine years old, and her brother Douglas is seven years old.

The preceding suggestions had been implemented. The family maintained their modest lifestyle, and their investment portfolio grew to $392,220, despite the withdrawal of $10,000 per year for medical school tuition. The financial planning aspects of the family’s life went unaddressed. Educational funding needs for Cee and Douglas prompted another frank dialogue with their CMP. Their prioritized concerns at this point were as follows:

1. Reallocation of the investment portfolio

2. Educational funding for both children

3. Tax reduction strategies

4. Medical partnership buy-in concerns

5. Maximization of their investment portfolio

6. Review of risk management needs and long-term care insurance

7. Retirement considerations

The following suggestions were made:

1. Grow the $392,220 nest egg indefinitely.

2. Project future educational needs with current investment vehicles.

3. Maximize qualified retirement plans with tax efficient investments.

4. Update wills to include bypass marital trust creation, and complete proper testamentary planning, including guardians for Cee and Douglas.

5. Retain a professional medical practice valuation firm for the practice buy-in.

Sample Mega Plan for a Mature Physician

At age 55, Dr. Joseph B. Good was a board-certified and practicing internist and partner of his group. Susan, age 55, was the office manager for Dr. Good’s practice, allowing her to provide professional accounting services to her husband’s office and thereby maximizing benefits to the couple from the practice. Daughter Cee was 24 years old, and her brother Douglas was 22 years old. The preceding suggestions had been implemented.  They upgraded their home and modest lifestyle within the confines of their current earnings. They did not invade their grandfather’s original inheritance, which grew to $1,834,045. Reallocation was needed. The other financial planning aspects of their lives had gone unaddressed. Retirement and estate planning issues prompted another revisit with their original CMP’s junior partner.

Their prioritized concerns at this point were as follows:

1. Long-term care issues

2. Retirement implementation

3. Estate planning

4. Business continuity concerns

The following suggestions were made:

1. Analyze the cost and benefits of long-term case insurance, funded with current income until retirement.

2. Reallocate portfolio assets and  plan for estate tax reduction, with offspring and charitable planning consideration..

3. Retain a professional practice management firm for practice sale, with proceeds to maintain current lifestyle until age 70.

If you want the opportunity to reach a personalized weekly audience of health care industry insiders, innovators and watchers, the Medical Executive-Post and its educational forums may be right for you?

Advertise with us:

https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2007/11/11/advertise/

Ann Miller; RN, MHA

[Executive Director]

Medical Executive-Post

Product DetailsProduct DetailsProduct Details

Product Details  Product Details

Product Details

VOTE: Poll on Rule 206(4) of the IAA of 1940?

 Please Vote

 

Get our Widget: Get this widget!

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest ME-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Sponsors Welcomed

And, credible sponsors and like-minded advertisers are always welcomed.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2007/11/11/advertise

Guest ME-P Bloggers Welcome

Join Us!

By Ann Miller; RN, MHA

[Executive Director]Lighthouse

Perhaps you have a great idea for a short article to promote the integration of personal financial planning and medical practice management, including expert posts, humorous stories or interesting news; but don’t want to maintain a blog? We have more than 50 topic channels to consider.

 

Contact me at MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com and be a guest blogger! 

Conclusion

Be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com 

Get our Widget: Get this widget!

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest ME-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Sponsors Welcomed

And, credible sponsors and like-minded advertisers are always welcomed.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2007/11/11/advertise

What is a Zero-Based Budget?

A Most Cruel – but Needed – Endeavor

[By Staff Reporters]fp-book2

A zero-based budget means you start with the absolute essential expenses and then add-back expenses from there until you run out of money. This is an extremely effective, yet rigorous, exercise for most doctors and medical professionals; and can be used personally or at the office.

Triage and Prioritize

Your first personal financial item should be retirement plan contributions, then your mortgage and other debt payments, and then other required fixed expenses. From the office perspective, the first budget item should be salary expenses for both you and your staff. Operating assets and other big ticket items come next, followed by the more significant items on your net income statement. Some doctors even review their P&L statements quarterly, line by line, in an effort to reduce expenses. Then, you add discretionary personal or business expenses that you have some control over.

More Month than Money

Now, do you run out of money before you reach the end of the month, quarter, or year? Then you better cut back on entertainment at home or that fancy new, but unproven piece of office or medical equipment. This sounds Draconian until you remind yourself that your choice is either (1) entertainment now but no money later or; (2) living a simpler lifestyle now as you invest so you’re able to enjoy yourself at retirement.

Assessment

When you were a young doctor, budgeting may have seemed a task needed far into the future; but at midlife, you are staring retirement right in the face.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

DICTIONARIES: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko
PHYSICIANS: www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com
PRACTICES: www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com
HOSPITALS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781466558731
CLINICS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439879900
BLOG: www.MedicalExecutivePost.com
FINANCE: Financial Planning for Physicians and Advisors
INSURANCE: Risk Management and Insurance Strategies for Physicians and Advisors

 

Product DetailsProduct DetailsProduct Details

Evaluating a Sample Physician Financial Plan II

Stress Testing Results a Decade Later

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; CPHQ, MBA, CMP™

By Hope Rachel Hetico; RN, MHA, CPHQ, CMP™dave-and-hope4

We are often asked by physicians and colleagues; medical, nursing and graduate students, and/or prospective clients to see an actual “comprehensive” financial plan. This is a reasonable request. And, although most doctors who are regular readers of this Medical Executive-Post have a general idea of what’s included, many have never seen a professionally crafted financial plan. This not only includes the outcomes, but the actual input data and economic assumptions, as well.

The ME-P Difference

And so, in a departure from our pithy and typically brief journalistic style, we thought it novel to present such a plan for hindsight review. But; we present same in a very unusual manner befitting our iconoclastic and skeptical next-generation Health 2.0 philosophy. And, we challenge all financial advisors to do same and compare results with us.

How so?

By using a real life plan constructed a decade ago and letting ME-P reader’s review, evaluate and critique same.

  • Part I is for a drug-rep, then married medical school student [51 pages] with no children.
  • Part II is for the same mid-career practicing physician [28 pages] with 2 children.
  • Part III is for the same experienced practitioner at his professional zenith [56 pages].   

Part II: Sample Financial Plan II

Fiduciary Advisorsfp-book2

As former financial advisors and licensed insurance agents – and a reformed certified financial planner – it is our duty to act as economic fiduciaries for clients. In other words; to put client interests above our own. This culture was incumbent in our participatory online www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com educational program in health economics and medical practice management; since inception in 2000.

Assessment

And so, as Edward I. Koch famously asked as Mayor of New York City from 1978-1989: “how am I doing”; we sought to ask and answer same. What did we do right or wrong; and how were our assumptions correct or erroneous?  As Certified Professionals in Healthcare Quality this is the question we continually seek to answer in medicine. And, as health economists, this is the financial advisory equivalent of Evidence Based Medicine [EBM] or Evidence Based Dentistry [EBD] etc. It is a query that all curious FAs should ask.

Note: Sample plan III to follow; so keep visiting the ME-P. Be sure to review sample plan I, right here:

Link: Sample Financial Plan I

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. As a financial advisor, accountant, financial planner, etc., we challenge you to lay bare your results as we have done. And, be sure to “rant and rave” – and – “teach and preach” about this post in the style of Socrates, with Candor, Intelligence and Goodwill, to all. Doctors – chime in – too.

Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com 

Get our Widget: Get this widget!

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest ME-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Sponsors Welcomed

And, credible sponsors and like-minded advertisers are always welcomed.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2007/11/11/advertise

 

ASSUMPTIONS

Sample Mega Plan for a New Physician 

Joe Good, a 30-year-old pharmaceutical sales representative, and his pregnant wife Susie Good, a 30-year-old accountant, sought the services of a certified financial planner because of a $150,000 inheritance from Joe’s grandfather. The insecurity about what to do with the funds was complicated by their insecurity over future employment prospects, along with Joe’s frustrated boyhood dream of becoming a physician, along with only a fuzzy concept of their financial future. 

After several information-gathering meetings with the CFP, concrete goals and objectives were clarified, and a plan was instituted that would assist in financing Joe’s medical education without sacrificing his entire inheritance and current lifestyle. They desired at least one more child, so insurance and other supportive needs would increase and were considered, as well. Their prioritized concerns included the following:

1. What is the proper investment management and asset allocation of the $150,000?

2. Is there enough to pay for medical school and support their lifestyle?

3. Can they indemnify insurance concerns through this transitional phase of life,  including the survivorship concerns of premature death or disability?

4. Can they afford for Susie to be the primary bread winner through Joe’s medical school,   internship, and residency years?

5. Can they afford another child?

Current income was not high, and current assets were below the unified estate tax-credit. Therefore, income and estate-planning concerns were not significant at that time.

After thoroughly discussing the gathered financial data, and determining their risk profile, the CMP™ made the following suggestions: 

1. Reallocate the inheritance based on their risk tolerance, from conservative to long-term growth.

2. Maximize group health, life, and disability insurance benefits.

3. Supplement small quantities of whole life insurance with larger amounts of term insurance.

4. Create simple wills, for now. 

Sample Mega Plan for a Mid-Life Physician 

A second plan was drawn up 10 years later, when Joe Good was 40 years old and a practicing internist. Susan, age 40, had been working as a consultant for the same company for the past decade. She was allowed to telecommunicate between home and office. Daughter Cee is nine years old, and her brother Douglas is seven years old. 

The preceding suggestions had been implemented. The family maintained their modest lifestyle, and their investment portfolio grew to $392,220, despite the withdrawal of $10,000 per year for medical school tuition. The financial planning aspects of the family’s life went unaddressed. Educational funding needs for Cee and Douglas prompted another frank dialogue with their CMP. Their prioritized concerns at this point were as follows:

1. Reallocation of the investment portfolio

2. Educational funding for both children

3. Tax reduction strategies

4. Medical partnership buy-in concerns

5. Maximization of their investment portfolio

6. Review of risk management needs and long-term care insurance

7. Retirement considerations

The following suggestions were made:

1. Grow the $392,220 nest egg indefinitely.

2. Project future educational needs with current investment vehicles.

3. Maximize qualified retirement plans with tax efficient investments.

4. Update wills to include bypass marital trust creation, and complete proper testamentary planning, including guardians for Cee and Douglas.

5. Retain a professional medical practice valuation firm for the practice buy-in.

Sample Mega Plan for a Mature Physician 

At age 55, Dr. Joseph B. Good was a board-certified and practicing internist and partner of his group. Susan, age 55, was the office manager for Dr. Good’s practice, allowing her to provide professional accounting services to her husband’s office and thereby maximizing benefits to the couple from the practice. Daughter Cee was 24 years old, and her brother Douglas was 22 years old. The preceding suggestions had been implemented.  They upgraded their home and modest lifestyle within the confines of their current earnings. They did not invade their grandfather’s original inheritance, which grew to $1,834,045. Reallocation was needed. The other financial planning aspects of their lives had gone unaddressed. Retirement and estate planning issues prompted another revisit with their original CMP’s junior partner.

Their prioritized concerns at this point were as follows:

1. Long-term care issues

2. Retirement implementation

3. Estate planning

4. Business continuity concerns

The following suggestions were made:

1. Analyze the cost and benefits of long-term case insurance, funded with current income until retirement.

2. Reallocate portfolio assets and  plan for estate tax reduction, with offspring and charitable planning consideration..

3. Retain a professional practice management firm for practice sale, with proceeds to maintain current lifestyle until age 70.

If you want the opportunity to reach a personalized weekly audience of health care industry insiders, innovators and watchers, the Medical Executive-Post and its educational forums may be right for you?

Advertise with us:

https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2007/11/11/advertise/

Ann Miller; RN, MHA

[Executive Director]

Medical Executive-Post

Meet Brian J. Knabe MD CFP™ CMP™

A New ME-P Thought-Leader

By Ann Miller; RN, MHA

[Executive Director]Brian J. Knabe MD

Brian J Knabe MD is a financial advisor with Savant Capital Management www.SavantCapital.com. He uses his experience from the medical field in his work with clients, portfolio managers, physicians and other financial advisors to develop comprehensive planning, investment, and tax strategies for professionals.

Medical and Financial Background

Brian is a magna cum laude graduate of Marquette University with an honors degree in biomedical engineering. He earned his medical degree from the University Illinois College of Medicine. Brian also attended the University of Illinois for his family practice residency, where he served as chief resident. Brian is currently pursuing his Certified Financial Planner (CFP®) designation, and he recently passed the exam.

Certified Medical Planner™

Dr. Knabe is also matriculating in the online www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org [CMP™] charter-designation program for financial advisors and medical management consultants, from the Institute of Medical Business Advisors, Inc.

Personal Background

As if the above were not enough to keep him busy, Brian is also a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Family Medicine with the University of Illinois. He is a member of several professional organizations, including the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Medical Association [AMA], and the Catholic Medical Association. Brian has also served as the vice president of membership for the Blackhawk Area Council of the Boy Scouts of America.

Our Congratulations

And so, we trust all ME-P readers will give a congratulatory “shout-out” to Brian J. Knabe MD, our newest “thought-leader.” Read his position paper here:

Evidence Based Investing [A Scientific Framework for the Art of Investing]

Link: Evidence Based Investing[1][1]

We trust we will hear much more from him in the future.

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Tell us what you think about the credentials of Dr. Knabe. Is this extreme education a new-wave of fiduciary focus for all financial advisors and planners in the healthcare space? Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest ME-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Sponsors Welcomed

And, credible sponsors and like-minded advertisers are always welcomed.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2007/11/11/advertise

Product Details  Product Details

Product DetailsProduct Details

Evaluating a Sample Physician Financial Plan I

Stress Testing Our Results a Decade Later

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; CPHQ, MBA, CMP™

By Hope Rachel Hetico; RN, MHA, CPHQ, CMP™dave-and-hope4

We are often asked by physicians and colleagues; medical, nursing and graduate students, and/or prospective clients to see an actual “comprehensive” financial plan. This is a reasonable request. And, although most doctors who are regular readers of this Medical Executive-Post have a general idea of what’s included, many have never seen a professionally crafted financial plan. This not only includes the outcomes, but the actual input data and economic assumptions, as well.

The ME-P Difference

And so, in a departure from our pithy and typically brief journalistic style, we thought it novel to present such a plan for hindsight review. But; we present same in a very unusual manner befitting our iconoclastic and skeptical next-generation Health 2.0 philosophy. And, we challenge all financial advisors to do same and compare results with us.

How so?

By using a real life plan constructed a decade ago and letting ME-P reader’s review, evaluate and critique same. 

  • Part I is for a married drug-rep, then medical school student [51 pages] with no children.
  • Part II is for the same, now mid-career practicing physician [28 pages] with 2 children.
  • Part III is for the same experienced practitioner at his professional zenith [56 pages].   

Link: Sample Financial Plan I

Fiduciary Advisors?fp-book2

As reformed financial advisors and former licensed insurance agents; and a former certified financial planner – it is now  our professional duty to act as health economists and fiduciaries for our clients and colleagues. In other words; to put client interests above our own. This culture was incumbent in our participatory online www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com educational program in health economics and medical practice management; since inception in 2000.

 

Assessment

And so, as Edward I. Koch famously asked as Mayor of New York City from 1978-1989: “how am I doing”; we sought to ask and answer same. What did we do right or wrong; and how were our assumptions correct or erroneous?  As Certified Professionals in Healthcare Quality this is the question we continually seek to answer in medicine. And, as health economists, this is the financial advisory equivalent of Evidence Based Medicine [EBM] or Evidence Based Dentistry [EBD] etc. It is a query that all curious FAs should ask.

Note: Sample plans II and III to follow; so keep visiting the ME-P

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. As a financial advisor, accountant, financial planner, etc., we challenge you to lay bare your results as we have done. And, be sure to “rant and rave” – and – “teach and preach” about this post in the style of Socrates, with Candor, Intelligence and Goodwill, to all.  

Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com 

Get our Widget: Get this widget!

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest ME-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Sponsors Welcomed

And, credible sponsors and like-minded advertisers are always welcomed.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2007/11/11/advertise

 

ASSUMPTIONS

Sample Mega Plan for a New Physician 

Joe Good, a 30-year-old pharmaceutical sales representative, and his pregnant wife Susie Good, a 30-year-old accountant, sought the services of a certified financial planner because of a $150,000 inheritance from Joe’s grandfather. The insecurity about what to do with the funds was complicated by their insecurity over future employment prospects, along with Joe’s frustrated boyhood dream of becoming a physician, along with only a fuzzy concept of their financial future. 

After several information-gathering meetings with the CFP, concrete goals and objectives were clarified, and a plan was instituted that would assist in financing Joe’s medical education without sacrificing his entire inheritance and current lifestyle. They desired at least one more child, so insurance and other supportive needs would increase and were considered, as well. Their prioritized concerns included the following:

1. What is the proper investment management and asset allocation of the $150,000?

2. Is there enough to pay for medical school and support their lifestyle?

3. Can they indemnify insurance concerns through this transitional phase of life,  including the survivorship concerns of premature death or disability?

4. Can they afford for Susie to be the primary bread winner through Joe’s medical school,   internship, and residency years?

5. Can they afford another child?

Current income was not high, and current assets were below the unified estate tax-credit. Therefore, income and estate-planning concerns were not significant at that time.

After thoroughly discussing the gathered financial data, and determining their risk profile, the CMP™ made the following suggestions: 

1. Reallocate the inheritance based on their risk tolerance, from conservative to long-term growth.

2. Maximize group health, life, and disability insurance benefits.

3. Supplement small quantities of whole life insurance with larger amounts of term insurance.

4. Create simple wills, for now. 

Sample Mega Plan for a Mid-Life Physician 

A second plan was drawn up 10 years later, when Joe Good was 40 years old and a practicing internist. Susan, age 40, had been working as a consultant for the same company for the past decade. She was allowed to telecommunicate between home and office. Daughter Cee is nine years old, and her brother Douglas is seven years old. 

The preceding suggestions had been implemented. The family maintained their modest lifestyle, and their investment portfolio grew to $392,220, despite the withdrawal of $10,000 per year for medical school tuition. The financial planning aspects of the family’s life went unaddressed. Educational funding needs for Cee and Douglas prompted another frank dialogue with their CMP. Their prioritized concerns at this point were as follows:

1. Reallocation of the investment portfolio

2. Educational funding for both children

3. Tax reduction strategies

4. Medical partnership buy-in concerns

5. Maximization of their investment portfolio

6. Review of risk management needs and long-term care insurance

7. Retirement considerations

The following suggestions were made:

1. Grow the $392,220 nest egg indefinitely.

2. Project future educational needs with current investment vehicles.

3. Maximize qualified retirement plans with tax efficient investments.

4. Update wills to include bypass marital trust creation, and complete proper testamentary planning, including guardians for Cee and Douglas.

5. Retain a professional medical practice valuation firm for the practice buy-in.

Sample Mega Plan for a Mature Physician 

At age 55, Dr. Joseph B. Good was a board-certified and practicing internist and partner of his group. Susan, age 55, was the office manager for Dr. Good’s practice, allowing her to provide professional accounting services to her husband’s office and thereby maximizing benefits to the couple from the practice. Daughter Cee was 24 years old, and her brother Douglas was 22 years old. The preceding suggestions had been implemented.  They upgraded their home and modest lifestyle within the confines of their current earnings. They did not invade their grandfather’s original inheritance, which grew to $1,834,045. Reallocation was needed. The other financial planning aspects of their lives had gone unaddressed. Retirement and estate planning issues prompted another revisit with their original CMP’s junior partner.

Their prioritized concerns at this point were as follows:

1. Long-term care issues

2. Retirement implementation

3. Estate planning

4. Business continuity concerns

The following suggestions were made:

1. Analyze the cost and benefits of long-term case insurance, funded with current income until retirement.

2. Reallocate portfolio assets and  plan for estate tax reduction, with offspring and charitable planning consideration..

3. Retain a professional practice management firm for practice sale, with proceeds to maintain current lifestyle until age 70.

If you want the opportunity to reach a personalized weekly audience of health care industry insiders, innovators and watchers, the Medical Executive-Post and its educational forums may be right for you?

Advertise with us:

https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2007/11/11/advertise/

Ann Miller; RN, MHA

[Executive Director]

Medical Executive-Post

How to Become a ME-P Thought-Leader

Answering a Growing Chorus of Inquiries

By Professor Hope Rachel Hetico; RN, MHA, CMP™

[Managing Editor]hetico

The Medical Executive-Post is the complimentary companion blog to the premium peer-reviewed quarterly subscription journal: Healthcare Organizations [Financial Management Strategies]. While the perspective of our blog is private medical practitioners, the focus of our e-journal on CD-ROM is large medical groups, healthcare organizations, hospitals, healthcare-systems, ASCs, emerging healthcare institutions and medical business entities  TABLE OF CONTENTS

HOFMS

The ME-P is for Doctors

 

Currently, the ME-P is being developed as a common venue for medical professionals to share their insights on how to best manage a private medical practice. A well-established practice will have a solid financial and executive-management foundation, and will have protocols, procedures and contingency plans in place before they are ever needed in an emergency. And so, we seek new-wave and next-generation input from physicians, osteopaths, podiatrists, dentist, nurses, PAs, CRNAs and optometrists who have experience starting and running medical practices in the Health 2.0 modern era. The goal is better patient care as doctors avoid costly or tragic management mistakes.

biz-book

The ME-P is for Financial Advisors and Management Consultants

Physician advisors like attorneys, accountants, practice managers, medical billing experts, insurance agents, commercial realtors, healthcare IT experts and others are invited to display their expertise, too. You may not become rich here, but you may become famous, or at least develop an excellent client base from the doctors and practitioners reading your articles, posts and comments! Financial advisors, CMAs, CFAs, MBAs, PhDs, CFP® and Certified Medical Planners [CMP™] are also invited to strut “cognitive-stuff”, as free-labor publishing entrepreneurs! Then, we aim to unite both sectors for success.  

fp-book3

Steps to Becoming a Thought-Leader

1. Send us an email with your bio and contact info.

2. Tell us why you want to write for the ME-P.

3. Send in an original writing sample.

We may follow-up and discuss your credentials and the topics you’re interested in writing about.

Assessment  

Speaking engagements, travel to exotic locales, and print or e-book chapter contributions may all be in your future because of your career launching contributions to the ME-P. Everyone has something to share and teach, and we look forward to learning from everyone joining us here. And, please feel free to contact us for deeper involvement in all www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com, www.HealthDictionarySeries.com or www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com activities. Take your career to the next level with the ME-P.

HDS

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Tell us what you think. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com 

Get our Widget: Get this widget!

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest ME-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Sponsors Welcomed

And, credible sponsors and like-minded advertisers are always welcomed.

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Selecting Financial Advisors the Risky Way

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Physician Due Diligence is Important

[By Daniel B. Moisand; CFP®, and the ME-P Staff]Tall Shadows

While the merits of hiring the right financial advisor [FA] may be clear, hiring the wrong one can be devastating. Medical professionals still tend to have higher incomes and are an attractive target for most financial institutions and scam artists. This fear is a poor excuse for not getting the assistance necessary. Advice about who to engage for financial assistance comes from a hodge-podge of disjointed sources. This leads to good intentions and bad results. Take caution when using the following as sources of advice.

Relying on Family and Friends

By far more people seek financial advice from trusted family members and friends than any other source.  This is only natural. It is essential to trust that you are getting advice from a source that means well. It is also important that you get along well with your advisors. Hesitating to communicate with your advisor, even a great advisor, can cause problems even more problematic that getting bad advice from someone you like. While these sources have a good handle on the essential elements of trust and rapport, it is the competence of the advice that is most often the issue. The life and money experiences of those who are close to you certainly have value, but they are not necessarily relevant to your unique goals and circumstances. THINK: Bernie Madoff.

Media

A few years ago, the dominant media force in consumer oriented financial matters was the print media.  Magazines and newsletters proliferated with the bull market. More recently however, television has supplanted print even in the bear market. For example, a study now estimates that 80 percent of what the average American knows about current events comes from TV. Why wait three weeks for the next issue when you can get a commentary instantly on the television? There is nothing wrong with watching shows that cover the markets or subscribing to a consumer finance magazine. It is certainly a good idea to be informed. However, be wary of the quality and applicability of information put out by the media.

The Internet

It is easy to run across an ad for prescriptions drugs on television. Images prance across the screen followed by a litany of potential side effects and the obligatory, “Ask your doctor about”. With the expansion of the information superhighway, more and more companies are going direct to the consumer in some manner or another.

Financially speaking this information can be of great benefit but should also generate more concern. It is very easy to project a particular image via the web. The webmaster controls the interaction from what you see to what you hear. One of the results of this is that the Internet has already garnered a reputation as a breeding ground for new scams. More prevalent, however, is the presentation of information meant to be useful that is simply wrong, misinterpreted, or misapplied. The most terrifying source of misinformation on the net is the chat rooms. Here the entire interaction is clouded by anonymity. Some people enter chat rooms because there is a comfort in anonymity when asking a question. There is also a danger in an anonymous answer. When it comes to something as important as your finances or your health, the prudent course should be to take all the advice with a grain of salt. A great deal of consideration to the quality of the source is in order. It is also essential that one understand the level of accountability a source may possess.   fp-book2

Assessment

Much has been written on financial advisor selection, here on the ME-P and elsewhere; but little on how not to select an advisor. We trust this information will be of assistance to the medical professional in some small increment. Send in your FA stories; both good and bad.

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Discount Brokerages versus On-Line Brokerages

Physicians Must Appreciate the Differences

By Daniel B. Moisand; CFP® and the ME-P StaffME-P Blogger

Here are a few questions for all physician-investors to consider in 2009:

1. True or False? 

The key to investment success is to pay as little for a trade as possible.

2. True or False? 

The higher the number of trades in an investment account, the better the investment results.

3. True or False? 

The majority of revenue of a discount or on-line brokerage comes from trades. 

A: The answers should be crystal clear! False, False and True. It is almost entirely that simple.

Cost Control

Much like a medical practice, keeping costs down is an important objective of personal finance but, it is certainly not the key to success.  There are many studies that show that active trading garners inferior results compared to a longer term buy and hold type of strategy. One of the most publicized recently was conducted by a UC-Davis team led by Dr. Terrance Odean. The study examined the actual tracing activity of thousands of self-directed accounts at a major discount brokerage over a six-year period. The results were clear. Regardless of trading level, most of the accounts underperformed the market and showed that the higher the number of trades, the worse the result.

Of Bulls and Bears

While the U.S. markets were on a dramatic upswing a decade ago, the general interest level in them increased as well.  More households owned financial assets than ever before. Demographics drive much of this surge. The older edge of the baby boom generation is finding that as the children leave home, they have more income than ever before and saving for retirement becomes a higher priority. The proliferation of defined contribution [401-k, 403-b] retirement plans has also forced more people to take responsibility for their long-term security. When, the US stock market was on a tear; one would have be wise to remember an old Wall Street saying – “Don’t confuse brains with a bull market.” Unfortunately today, far too many self-directed investors did not heed the warnings. The media is full of stories about investors whose portfolios were decimated by the recent bear market. While this loss of wealth is somewhat tragic, in almost all cases the losses were made possible by poor planning and/or poor execution that a mediocre advisor would have avoided.

The Business of Advice

One also cannot conclude that everyone is acting as his or her own investment advisor. The advice business continues to thrive. Sales of load mutual funds have continued to grow, as has commission revenue at full-service firms. No-load funds have continued to grow as well and gain market share from the load funds. However, it would be inaccurate to tie that growth to do-it-yourselfers. Much of the growth of no-load funds can be attributed to the advice of various types of advisors who are recommending the funds. In addition, several traditionally no-load fund families have begun to offer funds through brokers for a load.

The Discounters

For physicians and all clients, the primary attraction to a discounter is cost. Everyone loves a bargain. Once it is determined that it is a good idea to buy say 100 shares of IBM, the trade needs to get executed. When the trade settles one owns 100 shares of IBM, regardless of what was paid for the trade. There is no harm in saving a few bucks. However, the decision to buy the IBM shares and when to sell those shares will have a far greater impact on the investment results than the cost of the trade as long as the level of trading is kept at a prudent level. The fact is that most good advisors use discount firms for custodial and transaction services. The leading providers to advisors are Schwab, Fidelity, and Waterhouse.fp-book1

Ego Driven

In addition to cost savings, discounters appeal to one’s ego for business. Everyone wants to feel like a smart investor; especially doctors. Often, marketing materials will cite the IBM example and portray the cost difference as an example of how the investor is either stupid or being ripped off. There is also a strong appeal to one’s sense of control. An investor is made to feel like they are the masters of their own destiny.  All of this is a worthy goal. One should feel confident, in control, and smart about financial issues. Hiring a professional should not result in losing any of these feelings, rather solidify them. Getting one’s affairs in order is smart. The advisor works for the client so a client should maintain control by only delegating tasks to the extent one is comfortable. Knowing that the particular circumstances are being addressed effectively should yield enhanced confidence.

Sales Pressure Release

The final reason people turn to discount and on-line brokerages is to avoid sales pressure. Unlike the stereotypical stockbroker, no one calls to push a particular stock. Instead, sales pressure is created within the mind of the investor. By maintaining a steady flow of information about stocks and the markets to the account holders, brokerages keep these issues in the forefront of the investor’s minds. This increases the probability that the investor will act on the information and execute a trade. Add some impressive graphics and interfaces and the brokerage can keep an investor glued to the screen. The Internet has made this flow easier and cheaper for the brokerages, lowering costs and increasing the focus on trade volume to achieve profitability.

Assessment

The pressurized information flow however, does little to protect investors during a bear market. Ironically, this focus on trading is one of the very conflicts investors are trying to avoid by fleeing a traditional full service broker.

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. What are your feelings on discount and internet brokers? Tell us what you think. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

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College for Financial Planning Credibility

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Confusing Nomenclature? 

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™

[Publisher-in-Chief]

dem2Recently, John H. Robinson – a Honolulu based independent and dual-registered financial advisor who holds a degree in economics from Williams College and who has written and published numerous professional papers – essentially challenged the credibility of the College for Financial Planning.

“Dr. [Somnath] Basu [PhD] is quite correct in pointing out that the College for Financial Planning is not academically accredited and there are no admissions standards other than a nominal three year industry experience standard (three years as a clerk in a brokerage firm will qualify). Mr. [Kevin] Keller [CEO-CFP BoS] defends the curriculum by stating that, “Topics include economic concepts such as supply and demand, fiscal and monetary policy, time-value of money concepts…” The mere fact that that no prior college level academic experience in finance is required is testament to the fact that the coursework is largely 101 level materials.

To illustrate this point by example, economics represents one small chapter of the Investments section of the CFP curriculum. In contrast, econometrics and statistics alone was a semester long 300 level course in my undergraduate economics studies. This is not to suggest that the CFP program does not provide adequate training and preparation for a career in financial planning, but to assert that the CFP designation trumps a graduate or even undergraduate degree in finance or economics is difficult to defend. This was my counterpoint to Mr. [Dan] Moisand’s bellicose labeling of non-CFP certificants as “faux planners”.

Source: http://www.fa-mag.com/online-extras/4037-revisiting-cfp-credentialing.html

Moreover, he stated that:

In fairness, some of Dr. Basu’s ideals on the educational standards for financial planning certification seem a bit extreme as well. For instance, I can’t imagine subjecting doctors, attorneys, or even business school professors to periodic recertification exams.”

Source: http://www.fa-mag.com/online-extras/4037-revisiting-cfp-credentialing.html

The Big Question

And so, the big question for financial advisors and Certified Financial Planners®: Is the College for Financial Planning, a college at all? Is it accredited and more importantly, who accredits it? If not; why not? And, was the name “college” purposely selected to obfuscate?

Moreover, and of more importance to our physician readers, FAs and ME-P subscribers: Do doctors, attorneys or business school professors need to periodically recertify themselves by examinations?

IOW: Is Mr. Robinson correct or not – in fact or meaning – on one or both accounts? How about Dan Moisand? Am I, or Mr. Robinson, a “faux” planner?

Assessment

A paper co-authored by Mr. Robinson, entitled, “Reality Check: The implications of sustainable withdrawal analysis on real world portfolios” was awarded the CFP Board of Standards’ 2008 Outstanding Paper Award. He does not hold the CFP® designation.

Disclosure

Among many other “hats”, I am a former licensed insurance agent, certified financial planner, board certified surgeon, visiting B-school professor, and current academic provost for the CMP™ online program in health economics and medical practice management for fiduciary consultants. Our goal is to “raise the bar” for all colleagues in this space.

Update 2013:

Recent:

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Living Wills and Healthcare Proxies

Important  Issues for Financial Planners

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CPHQ, CMP™

By Hope Rachel Hetico; RN, MHA, CPQH, CMP™

dave-and-hope13Some current financial planning issues, for advisors are as follows: 

·         The constitutional right to refuse medical treatment is continually being challenged. The cases generally have been decided in favor of the patient. The law in this area is changing fast and bears watching.

·         Is the client competent to sign eldercare documents? It is best not to wait until the client becomes ill before making plans.

·         The intentions of the client must be ascertained and clearly stated in the documents, especially in the living will. The patient’s wishes must be clear and convincing, if they are to be followed. For example, if nutrition and/or hydration are to be removed from the patient’s healthcare, then this instruction must be clearly stated. Other special medical procedures may be required unless expressly excluded by the living will.

·         The determination of terminal and non-terminal conditions can be difficult. The directives of a living will usually apply to terminal conditions.

·         The professional responsibility to advise patients and clients of their alternatives is unclear. The legal liability of healthcare providers, and financial advisors, has been tested in courts with mixed results. For example, what is the liability of a provider that does not follow the directions of a living will?

·         With increasingly more complicated and sophisticated forms of medical treatment, the complete nature and scope of medical treatment and its effects are becoming more difficult to understand. Although medical professionals may be relied upon, in many cases the complete extent and nature of the treatment is not clear to everyone.

·         The effect of these relatively new healthcare powers on estate and property laws is yet to be determined. Do the property rights under a life insurance policy change, for example, if death is hastened by not doing all that is medically possible to sustain life?  This is especially germane if a policy has recently been issued and is within either the period of contestability or within the context of a suicide clause.

Assessment

What did we miss? With respect to these issues; the financial planner is well advised to stay abreast of the law in the state in which he or she practices and to consider these issues when making client recommendations. Otherwise, he or she should refer the client to a lawyer who does. Should financial advisors even become involved in this issue? If not – why not; and if so – to what extent?

insurance-book7

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About Certified Medical Planner™

 

 

 

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Top 10 Reasons to Become a

Certified Medical Planner™

 

1. Expertise: Provide health economics, business and financial advice to physicians.

2. Credibility: Gain health industry recognition and fiduciary clout.

3. Opportunity: Focus on the lucrative and expanding physician advisory niche.

4. Recognition: Join a select group of advisory experts.

5. Distinction: Become quality; rather than product driven.

6. Achievement: 500 hours of financial, health economics and management education.

7. Evidence: Validate deep healthcare industry knowledge.

8. Resource: CMP™ text and hand books, dictionaries, and institutional print journal.

9. Distinction: Set yourself apart with our chartered logo and trade-mark identity.

10. Commitment: Become the “go-to” financial advisor for all medical professionals.

 

www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

 

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Re-Examining Medical “Do Not Resuscitate” Orders

Information for Financial Planners and Advisors

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CPHQ, CMP™

By Hope Rachel Hetico; RN, MHA, CPQH, CMP™

[Publisher-in-Chief and Managing Editor]

dave-and-hope11

According to the Rev. Chuck Meyer, former Vice President of Operations and Chaplain at St. David’s Medical Center in Austin, Texas, a new designation for Allowing a Natural Death (“A.N.D.”) would eliminate confusion and suffering when patients are resuscitated against their wishes.

Defining Do Not Resuscitate [DNR] Orders

As medical professionals, we know that a Do Not Resuscitate [DNR] order does not mean that medical care has stopped. It simply means that the goal of treatment has been changed. But, to FAs, patients and family members who are emotionally involved in the situation, this truth may not be apparent www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Terminal versus Healthy Patients

While a completed DNR tells physicians not to start Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation [CPR] if the patient suddenly goes into cardiac arrest, the order does not differentiate between a terminally elderly ill patient; and a potentially healthy younger person who may die due to current circumstances. A non-terminal patient may be in a DNR category and continue to receive aggressive or supportive treatment aimed at a cure; or at supporting him through this medical crisis. If symptoms start to respond, then the DNR category might even be changed to a full code.

insurance-book5

Assessment

Should financial advisors become involved in this issue? If not, why not; and if so; to what extent? MD-CFP® subscribers please chime-in with your unique experiences.

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated?

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