PODCAST: How Doctors are Really Paid in 2022?

Learn the Incentives in Physician Compensation

BY ERIC BRICKER MD

RAND and Harvard University Researchers Recently Published a Study in the Journal of the American Medical Association Examining How Doctors are Paid by Hospital System-Owned Practices. The Study Found that only 9% of Primary Care Physician Compensation was Based on Value (Quality and Cost-Effectiveness) and only 5.3% of Specialist Compensation was Based on Value.

The Study Concluded: “The results of this cross-sectional study suggest that PCPs and specialists despite receiving value-based reimbursement incentives from payers, the compensation of health system PCPs and specialists was dominated by volume-based incentives designed to maximize health systems revenue.”

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MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2020/09/19/what-doctors-must-do-to-file-an-aetna-claim-to-get-paid/?preview_id=237387&preview_nonce=44f9028974&preview=true

RELATED: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2008/09/12/how-doctors-get-paid/

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BUSINESS MEDICINE: https://www.amazon.com/Business-Medical-Practice-Transformational-Doctors/dp/0826105750/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1448163039&sr=8-9&keywords=david+marcinko

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HOSPITALS: https://www.amazon.com/Financial-Management-Strategies-Healthcare-Organizations/dp/1466558733/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1380743521&sr=8-3&keywords=david+marcinko

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FEDERAL RESERVE: Keeps Buying Mortgages

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The Federal Reserve Keeps Buying Mortgages

Alex J. Pollock

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The Federal Reserve now owns $2.6 trillion in mortgages. That means about 24 percent of all outstanding residential mortgages in this whole big country reside in the central bank.

READ: https://mises.org/wire/federal-reserve-keeps-buying-mortgages

COMMENTS APPRECIATED

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FINANCE; https://www.amazon.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-Advisors/dp/1482240289/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418580820&sr=8-1&keywords=david+marcinko

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What is Your Academic Teaching Philosophy?

 Here is My Teaching Philosophy

[By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA]

Although any learner-centered teaching philosophy, or Boyer Model of scholarship, is constantly in flux, the mission of a public or private educator is: [1] to promote positive learning; [2] to motivate students, staff and graduates; [3] to provide a strong foundation for lifelong learning; and in modernity [4] to enhance career and life-work opportunities; to [5] improve bottom-line financial metrics, and [6] to collaborate on a national and global basis.

However, because we are specifically operating in the rapidly changing healthcare, business management, investing, finance, economics and education milieu, even deeper experiential insight is needed.

Developing NEW Teaching AND Education Skills FOR Business and Healthcare 2.0

Medicine and healthcare business today is different than a generation ago, and all educators and healthcare professionals need new skills to be successful.

Traditionally, the physician – like the classroom professor – was viewed as the “captain of the ship”. Today, their role may be more akin to a ship’s navigator, utilizing clinical, teaching skills and knowledge to chart the patient’s, or student’s, course through a confusing morass of requirements, choices, rules and regulations to achieve the best attainable clinical or didactic outcomes.

This new teaching paradigm includes many classic business school principles, now modified to fit the PP-ACA, the era of health reform, and modern technical connectivity. Thus, a Professor, Chair or Dean must be a subtle guide on the side; not bombastic sage on the stage.

These, newer teaching philosophies must include:

  • Negotiation – working to optimize appropriate curricula, services and materials;
  • Team play – working in concert with others to coordinate education delivery within a clinically appropriate and cost-effective framework;
  • Working within the limits of competence – avoiding the pitfalls of the generalist teacher versus the subject matter expert that may restrict access to professors, texts and facilities by clearly acknowledging when a higher degree of didactic service is needed on behalf of the student;
  • Respecting different cultures and values – inherent in the support of the academic Principle of Autonomy is the acceptance of values that may differ from one’s own. As the US becomes more culturally heterogeneous, educators and medical providers are called upon to work within, and respect, the socio-cultural and/or spiritual framework of patients, students and their families; 
  • Seeking clarity on what constitutes marginal education – within a system of finite resources; providers and professors are called upon to openly communicate with students and patients regarding access to marginal education and/or treatments.
  • Supporting evidence-based practice – educators, like healthcare providers, should utilize outcomes data to reduce variation in treatments and curriculum to achieve higher academic efficiencies and improved care delivery;
  • Fostering transparency and openness in communications – teachers and healthcare professionals should be willing, and prepared, to discuss all aspects of care and academic andragogy; especially when disclosing problems or issues that arise;
  • Exercising decision-making flexibility – treatment algorithms, templates and teaching pathways are useful tools when used within their scope; but providers and professors must have the authority to adjust the plan if circumstances warrant;
  • Becoming skilled in the art of listening and interpretingIn her ground-breaking book, Narrative Ethics: Honoring the Stories of Illness, Rita Charon, MD PhD, a professor at Columbia University, writes of the extraordinary value of using the patient’s personal story in the treatment plan. She notes that, “medicine practiced with narrative competence will more ably recognize patients and diseases; convey knowledge and regard, join humbly with colleagues, and accompany patients and their families through ordeals of illness.” In many ways, attention to narrative returns medicine full circle to the compassionate and caring foundations of the patient-physician relationship. The educational analog to this book is, The Ethics of Teaching [A Casebook], co-edited by my teacher and colleague Deborah Ware Balogh PhD of the University of Indianapolis.

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The Ohio State University
 Photo by Kevin Fitzsimons

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Assessment

Finally, these thoughts represent only a handful of examples to illustrate the myriad of new skills that tomorrow’s healthcare professionals, and modern educators, must master in order to meet their timeless professional obligations of compassionate patient care and contemporary teaching effectiveness.

Dr. Marcinko Teaching Philosophy

CHAIR: Chair 3.0 Philosophy Dr. Marcinko

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements.

Book Marcinko: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

Subscribe: MEDICAL EXECUTIVE POST for curated news, essays, opinions and analysis from the public health, economics, finance, marketing, IT, business and policy management ecosystem.

DOCTORS:

“Insurance & Risk Management Strategies for Doctors” https://tinyurl.com/ydx9kd93

“Fiduciary Financial Planning for Physicians” https://tinyurl.com/y7f5pnox

“Business of Medical Practice 2.0” https://tinyurl.com/yb3x6wr8

HOSPITALS:

“Financial Management Strategies for Hospitals” https://tinyurl.com/yagu567d

“Operational Strategies for Clinics and Hospitals” https://tinyurl.com/y9avbrq5

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PODCAST: Dental Insurance Doesn’t Exist?

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Don’t be Fooled?

By D. Kellus Pruitt DDS

1-darrellpruittDowney, California dentist John McCallister DDS has produced a splendid video which blows apart myths which keep dental “insurance” companies in business.

The more appropriately called, “discount dentistry brokers” – who casually hide dentists’ concerns – simply cannot survive transparency.

The Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PPo4XsYhHPk&feature=youtu.be

Quality?

Let’s face it. Purchasing rushed dental work which Delta Dental discounts more than 30% – or even faster dentistry that is discounted up to 65% by Brighter.com – will always be a foolish investment in one’s health simply because managed care dentistry has NO QUALITY CONTROL.

What’s more, neither Steve Olson, CEO of Delta, nor Brighter.com CEO Jake Winebaum can ever be held accountable for the shoddy work they sell.

Share the Cartoon

The Hippocratic thing to do, Doc, is to share Dr. McCallister’s cartoon with everyone.

As for me, I especially look forward to publicly taunting Delta Dental Insurance Company through @DeltaDentalins on Twitter, as well as CEO Jake Winebaum via @Brighter.com.

Jake blocked me from following @Brighter.com years ago after I asked him about Brighter.com’s quality control measures (There are none. Isn’t that right, Jake?)

Assessment

I pick on Delta Dental and Brighter.com not just because they are unresponsive to dentists’ concerns, but Steve Olsen and Jake Winebaum run the two most harmful examples of sleazy discount dentistry businesses.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

DICTIONARIES: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko
PHYSICIANS: www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com
PRACTICES: www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com
HOSPITALS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781466558731
CLINICS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439879900
BLOG: www.MedicalExecutivePost.com
FINANCE: Financial Planning for Physicians and Advisors
INSURANCE: Risk Management and Insurance Strategies for Physicians and Advisors

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CUSTOMIZABLE e-PODIATRY CONSENT FORMS

electronically CUSTOMIZABLE FOR EVERY SURGEON

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http://www.ePodiatryConsentForms.com

CUSTOMIZABLE CMS & AGENCY FOR HEALTHCARE RESEARCH AND QUALITY STYLED PROTOCOLS, CHECKLISTS AND TEMPLATES

.… Specifically for Podiatrists ….   

e-Podiatry Consent Forms™ is an innovative new suite of software programs from the Institute of Medical Business Advisors [iMBA, Inc]. Our products solve your informed consent problems and enhance the education, discussion and documentation of the informed consent process for all podiatrists performing foot, ankle and leg reconstructive surgical procedures.

THE PROBLEM

All podiatrists are being pressured by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services [CMS], the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations [JCAHO], liability carriers and private insurance payers to make their consent process more patient-friendly, informed and easily understood. And, the pressure to standardize and comply is great.

Most recently, based on the need to make healthcare even safer, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) undertook a major study to identify patient safety issues and develop recommendations for “best practices”.

The AHRQ Evidence Report

The AHRQ report identified the challenge of addressing shortcomings such as missed, incomplete or not fully comprehended informed consent, as a significant patient safety issue and opportunity for improvement.

The authors of the AHRQ report hypothesized that better informed patients:

“are less likely to experience errors by acting as another layer of protection.”

And, the AHRQ study ranked a “more interactive informed consent process” among the top 11 practices supporting more widespread implementation; especially for surgical consent forms.

THE SOLUTION

Why Us: https://epodiatryconsentforms.com/why-us/

One answer to the modern risk-management problem of “informed consent interactivity” may be e-Podiatry Consent Forms™  We license two core interactive surgical products, and a reference library, with related concepts and products in development:

  • Forefoot, Mid-Foot and Simple Rear-Foot Version
  • Complex Rear-Foot, Ankle and Lower Leg Version
  • Comprehensive content library for extreme customization.

Each e-Podiatry Consent Forms™ CD-ROM [secure email delivery is now available] is increasingly trusted as the simple solution to standardized communications across the entire office-enterprise; from managing-risk, informing-patients and complying with modern regulatory requirements through enhanced patient-centric informed consent encounters.

Thus, by improving the consistency, details, documentation and effectiveness of the informed consent process, e-Podiatry Consent Forms™ equips all podiatric surgeons with the tools needed to augment quality standards, reduce litigation potential and improve patient outcomes and safety.

http://www.ePodiatryConsentForms.com

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ORDER NOW: http://www.ePodiatryConsentForms.com

Phone: 770-448-0769

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PODCAST: Role of the “Entrepreneur” in Society

ACCORDING TO AUSTRIAN ECONOMISTS

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BY PER BYLUND

Colleague Peter R. Quinones and Per Bylund return to the show to talk about the role of the entrepreneur not only in society, but according to the Austrian School of Economics. Medical perspectives are implied.

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The Medical Entrepreneur Symposium Adds "LifeScience Innovation Roadmap"

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PODCAST: https://freemanbeyondthewall.libsyn.com/episode-312

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YOUR THOUGHTS AND COMMENTS ARE APPRECIATED.

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BUSINESS MEDICINE: https://www.amazon.com/Business-Medical-Practice-Transformational-Doctors/dp/0826105750/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1448163039&sr=8-9&keywords=david+marcinko

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On Wall Street’s Suitability, Prudence and Fiduciary Accountability

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Financial Advisor’s are Not Doctors!

dr-david-marcinko1

Dr. David E. Marcinko FACFAS MBA CMP™ MBBS

THRIVE-BECOME A CMP™ Physician Focused Fiduciary

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Financial advisors don’t ascribe to the Hippocratic Oath.  People don’t go to work on “Wall Street” for the same reasons other people become firemen and teachers.  There are no essays where they attempt to come up with a new way to say, “I just want to help people.”

Financial Advisor’s are Not Doctors

Some financial advisors and insurance agents like to compare themselves to CPAs, attorneys and physicians who spend years in training and pass difficult tests to get advanced degrees and certifications. We call these steps: barriers-to-entry. Most agents, financial product representatives and advisors, if they took a test at all, take one that requires little training and even less experience. There are few BTEs in the financial services industry.

For example, most insurance agent licensing tests are thirty minutes in length. The Series #7 exam for stock brokers is about 2 hours; and the formerly exalted CFP® test is about only about six [and now recently abbreviated]. All are multiple-choice [guess] and computerized. An aptitude for psychometric savvy is often as important as real knowledge; and the most rigorous of these examinations can best be compared to a college freshman biology or chemistry test in difficulty.

Yet, financial product salesman, advisors and stock-brokers still use lines such as; “You wouldn’t let just anyone operate on you, would you?” or “I’m like your family physician for your finances.  I might send you to a specialist for a few things, but I’m the one coordinating it all.”  These lines are designed to make us feel good about trusting them with our hard-earned dollars and, more importantly, to think of personal finance and investing as something that “only a professional can do.”

Unfortunately, believing those lines can cost you hundreds of thousands of dollars and years of retirement. 

More: Video on Hedge Fund Manager Michael Burry MD

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Suitability Rule

A National Association of Securities Dealers [NASD] / Financial Industry Regulatory Authority [FINRA] guideline that require stock-brokers, financial product salesman and brokerages to have reasonable grounds for believing a recommendation fits the investment needs of a client. This is a low standard of care for commissioned transactions without relationships; and for those “financial advisors” not interested in engaging clients with advice on a continuous and ongoing basis. It is governed by rules in as much as a Series #7 licensee is a Registered Representative [RR] of a broker-dealer. S/he represents best-interests of the firm; not the client.

And, a year or so ago there we two pieces of legislation for independent broker-dealers-Rule 2111 on suitability guidelines and Rule 408(b)2 on ERISA. These required a change in processes and procedures, as well as mindset change.

Note: ERISA = The Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) codified in part a federal law that established minimum standards for pension plans in private industry and provides for extensive rules on the federal income tax effects of transactions associated with employee benefit plans. ERISA was enacted to protect the interests of employee benefit plan participants and their beneficiaries by:

  • Requiring the disclosure of financial and other information concerning the plan to beneficiaries;
  • Establishing standards of conduct for plan fiduciaries ;
  • Providing for appropriate remedies and access to the federal courts.

ERISA is sometimes used to refer to the full body of laws regulating employee benefit plans, which are found mainly in the Internal Revenue Code and ERISA itself. Responsibility for the interpretation and enforcement of ERISA is divided among the Department Labor, Treasury, IRS and the Pension Benefit Guarantee Corporation.

Yet, there is still room for commissioned based FAs. For example, some smaller physician clients might have limited funds [say under $100,000-$250,000], but still need some counsel, insight or advice.

Or, they may need some investing start up service from time to time; rather than ongoing advice on an annual basis. Thus, for new doctors, a commission based financial advisor may make some sense. 

Prudent Man Rule

This is a federal and state regulation requiring trustees, financial advisors and portfolio managers to make decisions in the manner of a prudent man – that is – with intelligence and discretion. The prudent man rule requires care in the selection of investments but does not limit investment alternatives. This standard of care is a bit higher than mere suitability for one who wants to broaden and deepen client relationships. 

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Prudent Investor Rule

The Uniform Prudent Investor Act (UPIA), adopted in 1992 by the American Law Institute’s Third Restatement of the Law of Trusts, reflects a modern portfolio theory [MPT] and total investment return approach to the exercise of fiduciary investment discretion. This approach allows fiduciary advisors to utilize modern portfolio theory to guide investment decisions and requires risk versus return analysis. Therefore, a fiduciary’s performance is measured on the performance of the entire portfolio, rather than individual investments 

Fiduciary Rule

The legal duty of a fiduciary is to act in the best interests of the client or beneficiary. A fiduciary is governed by regulations and is expected to judge wisely and objectively. This is true for Investment Advisors [IAs] and RIAs; but not necessarily stock-brokers, commission salesmen, agents or even most financial advisors. Doctors, lawyers, CPAs and the clergy are prototypical fiduciaries. 

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More formally, a financial advisor who is a fiduciary is legally bound and authorized to put the client’s interests above his or her own at all times. The Investment Advisors Act of 1940 and the laws of most states contain anti-fraud provisions that require financial advisors to act as fiduciaries in working with their clients. However, following the 2008 financial crisis, there has been substantial debate regarding the fiduciary standard and to which advisors it should apply. In July of 2010, The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act mandated increased consumer protection measures (including enhanced disclosures) and authorized the SEC to extend the fiduciary duty to include brokers rather than only advisors, as prescribed in the 1940 Act. However, as of 2014, the SEC has yet to extend a meaningful fiduciary duty to all brokers and advisors, regardless of their designation.

The Fiduciary Oath: fiduciaryoath_individual

Assessment 

Ultimately, physician focused and holistic “financial lifestyle planning” is about helping some very smart people change their behavior for the better. But, one can’t help doctors choose which opportunities to take advantage of along the way unless there is a sound base of technical knowledge to apply the best skills, tools, and techniques to achieve goals in the first place.

Most of the harms inflicted on consumers by “financial advisors” or “financial planners” occur not due to malice or greed but ignorance; as a result, better consumer protections require not only a fiduciary standard for advice, but a higher standard for competency.

The CFP® practitioner fiduciary should be the minimum standard for financial planning for retail consumers, but there is room for post CFP® studies, certifications and designations; especially those that support real medical niches and deep healthcare specialization like the Certified Medical Planner™ course of study [Michael E. Kitces; MSFS, MTax, CLU, CFP®, personal communication].

Being a financial planner entails Life-Long-Learning [LLL]. One should not be allowed to hold themselves out as an advisor, consultant, or planner unless they are held to a fiduciary standard, period. Corollary – there’s nothing wrong with a suitability standard, but those in sales should be required to hold themselves out as a salesperson, not an advisor.

The real distinction is between advisors and salespeople. And, fiduciary standards can accommodate both fee and commission compensation mechanisms. However; there must be clear standards and a process to which advisors can be held accountable to affirm that a recommendation met the fiduciary obligation despite the compensation involved.

Ultimately, being a fiduciary is about process, not compensation.

More: Deception in the Financial Service Industry

Full Disclosure:

As a medical practitioner, Dr. Marcinko is a fiduciary at all times. He earned Series #7 (general securities), Series #63 (uniform securities state law), and Series #65 (investment advisory) licenses from the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD-FINRA), and the Securities Exchange Commission [SEC] with a life, health, disability, variable annuity, and property-casualty license from the State of Georgia.

Dr.Marcinko was a licensee of the CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ Board of Standards (Denver) for a decade; now reformed, and holds the Certified Medical Planner™ designation (CMP™). He is CEO of iMBA Inc and the Founding President of: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

More: Enter the CMPs

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[PHYSICIAN FOCUSED FINANCIAL PLANNING AND RISK MANAGEMENT COMPANION TEXTBOOK SET]

  Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™  Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

[Dr. Cappiello PhD MBA] *** [Foreword Dr. Krieger MD MBA]

[Two Newest Books by Marcinko annd the iMBA, Inc Team]

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

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[PRIVATE MEDICAL PRACTICE BUSINESS MANAGEMENT TEXTBOOK – 3rd.  Edition]

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  [Foreword Dr. Hashem MD PhD] *** [Foreword Dr. Silva MD MBA]

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TWO SKILLS: Physician Programmers Need to Know

By Joel Comm

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Machine Learning

The global machine learning market was valued at $15.44 billion in 2021, and it is expected to grow to $209 billion by 2029. Machine Learning is a technology that has grown in popularity over the past years, especially driven by the success of companies like Google in the field of AI.

This success is also in big part due to the technology becoming more accessible to the masses. Take OpenAI’s AI image generator, DALL-E, as an example: Since DALL-E Mini went public, it has been given uses ranging from making memes to artwork worth the attention of The New Yorker.

Gone are the days in which machine learning was only accessible to researchers in top-notch institutions. Today, machine learning can be mastered all around the globe in official institutions, online education platforms, and even via comics.

Web3 / Blockchain Development

Whether you are invested in crypto and NFTs or not, the Metaverse is being built, and it promises to turn centralized, corporate-controlled Web2 on its head. The world of computer users–that’s pretty much all of us–has, for years, grown increasingly frustrated by having to operate under the oversight of a few monoliths.

The promise of Web3 is community–not corporation–first.

Innovators in the space like Proof of Learn are developing easily accessible educational platforms where Web2 pros and the tech-interested can learn to code in Web3, in a learn and earn model. The company’s first project is a lore-rich online academy called Metacrafters.io, drawing in gamers and developers, and attracting some serious backing from leading VCs and crypto investors. Fellow industry leaders, such as Solana, Flow, Avalanche, and Polygon Foundations, recently gave $4.5 million in grant funding to support Metacrafters’ mission of upskilling Web2 developers. This grant helps fund their learn and earn protocol, so you get to take courses in a game world and get paid for it.

Metacrafters.io might be one with this learn and earn model teaching coding skills, but it is in line to inspire more of its kind. Look around at the landscape of Web3 education and get cracking, because the Metaverse will be here sooner than expected, and developers will be the major players in it.

HIT: https://www.amazon.com/Dictionary-Health-Information-Technology-Security/dp/0826149952/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1254413315&sr=1-5

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RELATED: https://www.amazon.com/Dictionary-Health-Information-Technology-Security/dp/0826149952/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1254413315&sr=1-5

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PODCAST: Hospital CFOs Found Doctors Drive $1.56 Million / Doctor / Year by Ordering Tests and Performing Procedures!

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By Eric Bricker MD

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COMMENTS APPRECIATED

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AMA ECONOMICS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2022/08/01/ama-to-teach-medical-students-about-health-economics/

Health Economics: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2022/07/31/podcast-history-applied-to-health-economics/

DHEF: https://www.amazon.com/Dictionary-Health-Insurance-Managed-Care/dp/0826149944/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1275315485&sr=1-4

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A Fiduciary Comes with Responsibilities to the Client

By Stephen Kelley, CSA

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As a Registered Investment Adviser (RIA) with a Series #65 securities license, we hold a fiduciary duty to you. This means that we are legally bound to put your interests above those of anyone else, including ourselves.

Now you might reasonably think that anyone offering financial advice or services to clients is required to be a fiduciary. Sadly, if you thought that, you’d be wrong. Some estimates claim that only 15 percent of advisors have a fiduciary duty to their clients. The Paladin Registry puts the number even lower, estimating that just one in 12 (8.3 percent) advisors have a fiduciary responsibility.

For the most part, stockbrokers (also called “Registered Representatives,” “Account Executives,” “Financial Advisors,” or “Wealth Managers”) are not fiduciaries, even though they are allowed to portray themselves as full-service investment advisors. If your stockbroker/registered representative/account executive/financial advisor/wealth manager holds a series seven [#7] securities license, then it’s probable that they aren’t a fiduciary.

This was made amply clear in the movie, “The Wolf of Wall Street,” a biopic about Jordan Belfort, a stockbroker who made his fortune selling junk stocks and bonds to middle-class investors: in other words, by cheating them. Much of it was perfectly legal. The SEC went after Belfort’s company, Stratton Oakmont, for nearly a decade before it was able to shut it down. The point being that even in the face of egregious wrongdoing, theft, fraud and a virtual sea of drugs and blatant hedonism, the securities laws in this country are so loose that it took billions in theft and a decade of suspected and known fraud to step in and stop the abuse. And this movie was based on a true story.

That’s why a fiduciary duty is so important to a client. Being a fiduciary is a legal distinction. A Registered Investment Advisor (RIA) or Investment Advisor Representative (IAR) who holds a Series #65 securities license, subject to the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, is a fiduciary. The legal investment advising standards that govern a non-fiduciary stockbroker and a fiduciary Registered Investment Advisor are very different.

A Registered Investment Advisor is legally required to follow the “trust” standard — the highest known in law — which requires it to place the interests of its clients ahead of its own and fulfill critical fiduciary duties of trust and confidence. Under the fiduciary trust standard, a Registered Investment Advisor must provide its “best advice” to a client. A non-fiduciary stockbroker (like the coveted Series #7 of “The Wolf of Wall Street”) follows only the “suitability” standard, which doesn’t require a stockbroker to place the interests of his clients ahead of its own. Under the non-fiduciary suitability standard, a stockbroker need provide only “suitable advice” to his clients — even if the stockbroker knows that the advice is not the best advice for the client.

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The table below helps summarize which professionals are fiduciaries.

Type of ProfessionalAre They A Fiduciary?
PhysicianYes
LawyerYES/Maybe
CPANo
Trust OfficerYes
Stock BrokerNo
Insurance AgentNo
Registered RepresentativeNo
CFP PractitionerMaybe
Financial PlannerMaybe
Registered Investment AdviserYes
NAFPA-Registered Financial AdvisorYes

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MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2022/05/21/an-interview-with-bennett-aikin-aif/

RELATED: https://www.kitces.com/blog/the-4-different-types-of-financial-advisor-fiduciaries/

CFPs: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2016/11/18/why-we-cannot-assume-cfp-equals-fiduciary/

INVESTING: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

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The Next-Generation of “Anti-Millionaire” Doctors

“$1 Million Mistake: Becoming a Doctor”

See the source image

BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

CBS Moneywatch published an article entitled “$1 Million Mistake: Becoming a Doctor” Aside from the possibility that devoting one’s life to helping others might be considered a mistake, medical student Dan Coleman was struck by the “$1 million” figure.

Before medical school, he worked in the pharmaceutical industry and even turned down a hefty promotion to his education as soon as possible, rather than defer for a year or two. But, his financial calculations made it fairly obvious that, including benefits, bonuses, and potential promotions, his medical decision was not a $1 million mistake, but was more like a $1.3 million dollar disaster. Still; he opined:

Yet, even today, as we stare down the barrel of the Affordable Care Act, being a doctor is a very desirable job. We may not be famous, but we will be well-respected. We may not be rich, but we will certainly live comfortably. We may work a lot, but we will never be out of work. To future doctors, the young and impecunious, the anti-millionaires, tuition is a mere afterthought. All that matters is the MD.

Source: http://in-training.org/medical-students-the-anti-millionaires-4361

Millionaire Interview 81 - ESI Money

OVER HEARD IN THE MEDICAL STUDENT’S LOUNGE

“We are medical students.
We are young, proud, and righteous.
We have made the hard choice (medicine), but we have cleared the high hurdle (getting into school).


We know healthcare is a difficult, imperfect art, but we are devoted.
We arm ourselves with the weapons of knowledge and compassion, prepared to defend against the onslaught of trauma, disease, and time.
We are here to the bitter end, for our patients and ourselves.
And above all, we know the cost of our choice.

And if we’re lucky, it will stay under 6% interest through graduation”.

Daniel Coleman

[Georgetown University School of Medicine]

First-year Student

Your thoughts are appreciated,

THANK YOU

***

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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Future Trends Help Choose The Most Fitting Medical Specialty

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By Bertalan Meskó, MD PhD

I hope you will find the newsletter useful!
Best regards,
Berci Meskó, MD
The Medical Futurist

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READ HERE: https://medicalfuturist.com/future-trends-help-you-choose-the-most-fitting-medical-specialty/?mc_cid=becfbe85ae&mc_eid=40fee31c25

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JOIN & PARTNER with the Medical Executive-Post!

By Staff Reporters

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MEDIA / INTERVIEW REQUESTS

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BLOGGING / VLOGGING / CROSS AND RE-POSTS

Yes. We’re looking for writers & cross-posts.

Send them to us: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

WHAT WE’RE LOOKING FOR

Op-eds. Cross and Re-Posts, Links and Columns. Great ideas for improving physician focused financial planning, health insurance, economics and the financial ecosystem; etc. Pitches for healthcare-focused startups and business. Write-ups of original research. Reviews of new health care products, DME and AI. Data driven analysis of health care trends. Policy proposals; etc.

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UPDATE: Recession, Goldman Sachs, and Tesla

By Staff Reporters

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The director of the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office [CBO] added his voice Thursday to those economists who say it’s unclear if the economy has hit a downturn, despite posting two straight quarterly drops in growth. “The U.S. economy shows signs of slowing, but whether the economy is currently in a recession is difficult to say,” wrote CBO Director Phillip Swagel in a letter to Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.). “It is possible that, in retrospect, it will become apparent that the economy moved into recession sometime this year. However, that is not clear from data that were available at the beginning of August,” Swagel added.

Goldman Sachs said its credit card unit is under investigation by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, a federal agency tasked with protecting Americans from financial abuse. In a securities filing, Goldman said the CFPB is examining a number of the company’s credit card account management practices, including refunds, resolving billing errors, advertisements and reporting to credit bureaus. And, in a statement to CBS MoneyWatch, Goldman said the bank “is cooperating with the CFPB on this matter.”

Finally, shares of electric vehicle maker Tesla rallied in after-hours trading as the company won shareholder approval for a 3:1 stock split, the second such move in two years, as the world’s most valuable automaker looks to make its stock more affordable.

***

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FINANCIAL PLANNING: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

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MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PLANS: TV Ads are Deceiving?

By Dr. Keith L. Gurnick, DPM

[Los Angeles, CA via PM Online]

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Paid spokespersons consisting exclusively of older celebrities, including William Shatner, George Forman, Joe Namath, and Jimmie “J.J.” Walker read similar, if not exact, scripts in an attempt to induce the elderly to phone and check their “zip code” to see if they are eligible. I can’t figure out what the zip code has to do with anything, but maybe someone can help me to understand this fish hook?

As of November 2021, 42% of all Medicare eligible patients are enrolled in Medicare Advantage plans. Does the viewing public not wonder why there is never any mention at all during these commercials that changing to a Medicare Advantage plan means switching their traditional Medicare over to an HMO, and that most likely they will lose their network of doctors and possibly hospitals as well? 

Why don’t they just tell the truth?

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Health Insurance: https://www.amazon.com/Dictionary-Health-Insurance-Managed-Care/dp/0826149944/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1275315485&sr=1-4

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PODCAST: Why AMAZON CARE Will Fail?

BY Eric Bricker MD

Employee AGE AND Demographics

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Healthcare Costs (Per Person Per Year) by Age:
Less than 18: $3,628
19 – 44: $4,422
45-64: $8,370
65+: $18,424

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Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors : Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™ book cover

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UPDATE: President Biden, Domestic Markets, IRS Tax Filing Service, Polio and Paul Krugman’s “Sorry”

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By Staff Reporters

President Biden tested positive for the coronavirus, raising health concerns for the 79-year-old president and underscoring how the virus remains a persistent, if muted, threat in a country trying to put the pandemic in the past.

U.S. IndicesChangeClose
Dow Jones+162.0632036.90
NASDAQ+161.9612059.61
S&P500+39.053998.95
SCHWAB1000+129.5013230.70

Senator Elizabeth Warren along with 22 more Democratic lawmakers are pushing the IRS to create its own free tax filing service. The bill also aims to allow eligible taxpayers to choose a “return-free option,” providing a pre-populated filing. “The average American spends 13 hours and $240 every year to file their taxes — that’s too much time and too much money,” Warren said in a press release. But some tax professionals say it’s not a realistic plan for the overburdened agency.

A case of polio has been identified in an un-vaccinated adult in Rockland County, according to a news release from the New York State Department of Health. The agency confirmed that the infection was transmitted from someone who received the oral polio vaccine, which has not been administered in the United States since 2000. Officials believe the virus may have originated outside the United States, where the oral vaccine is still administered.

he New York Times opinion columnist Paul Krugman published a mea culpa in column form flat out admitting he was wrong for thinking inflation wouldn’t be that bad. In his piece, titled, “I Was Wrong About Inflation,” the economics professor noted that he was on “Team Relaxed” when it came to fears of inflation and acknowledged that was a “very bad call.” Krugman began by recounting the “intense debate among economists about the likely consequences of the American Rescue Plan, the $1.9 trillion package enacted by a new Democratic president and a (barely) Democratic Congress.” He mentioned how he originally didn’t see the massive government spending bill as that dangerous for the economy. “Some warned that the package would be dangerously inflationary; others were fairly relaxed. I was Team Relaxed. As it turned out, of course, that was a very bad call,” he confessed.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/082610254

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My Conversation with an Anonymous Cigna Representative

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Cigna, do you even have a clue that dentists don’t like you?

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By Darrell K. Pruitt DDS

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Hi Dr. Pruitt,

I’m truly sorry for any negative experience you’ve encountered with us. Is there a claim, benefit, or authorization concern I can help with? Please email me at LetUsHelpU@cigna.com. I’d like an opportunity to assist.

At a time when interest rates are surging, and just when I request an increase, CIGNA REDUCED MY REIMBURSEMENTS! Never again will I do business with you, and will discourage other dentists from falling into your trap …. And that is why dentists don’t like #TeamCigna. 

What is your name, anyway. You know mine. Perhaps Linkedin’s transparency makes it a poor choice for marketing Cigna.

As if things could get no worse between Cigna and dentists, you censored my response!

NOTE: Cigna representatives prefer to remain anonymous for reasons of accountability.

***

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***

BUSINESS MEDICINE: https://www.amazon.com/Business-Medical-Practice-Transformational-Doctors/dp/0826105750/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1448163039&sr=8-9&keywords=david+marcinko

Health Insurance: https://www.amazon.com/Dictionary-Health-Insurance-Managed-Care/dp/0826149944/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1275315485&sr=1-4

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Don’t let Population Health Demographic Trends Guide “Investment” Decisions

A Different Perspective on Population Health

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®
http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Definition

Population health has been defined as “the health outcomes of a group of individuals, including the distribution of such outcomes within the group”. It is an approach to health that aims to improve the health of an entire human population or cohort. http://www.HealthDictionarySeries.org

History

In fact, the nominal “father of population health” is colleague and Dean David B. Nash MD MBA of Jefferson Medical School in Philadelphia. And, although I attended Temple University down the street, David still wrote the Foreword to my textbook years later; Financial Management Strategies for Hospitals and Healthcare Organizations [Tools, Techniques, Checklists and Case Studies].

Factors

Now age, income, location, race, gender  and education are just a few characteristics that differentiate the world’s population. These are called ”disparities” and they have a major impact on people’s lives; especially their healthcare. And, I’ve written about them before.  Perform a ME-P “search” for more.

So, it’s only natural that we’re keeping an eye on two major demographic trends: aging baby boomers and maturing Millennials [1982-2002 approximately].

Why it’s important

The impact of large population shifts propagate throughout an economy benefitting certain sectors more than others and influencing a country’s growth prospects; tantalizing investing ideas?

Example:

For example, as baby boomers retire, we’ll likely see higher spending on health care, but less on education and raising children. Likewise, tech-savvy Millennials will likely prioritize consumption on experiences over cars and houses [leading economic indicator].

So, can we profit from these trends?

Assessment

Well maybe – maybe not! Overall economic prospects may not be completely affected by these trends. Spending habits on combined goods and services will shift, rather than rise or decline.

So, be careful. What matters most for your investment success is your demographics and investing according to your personal circumstances and goals [paradox-of-thrift].

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

Subscribe: MEDICAL EXECUTIVE POST for curated news, essays, opinions and analysis from the public health, economics, finance, marketing, IT, business and policy management ecosystem.

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MEDICAL ETHICS: Managing Risk is a Component of Real Health Caring

Demanding High Moral Standards of Self … and Economic HEALTHCARE Organizations

Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

CMP logo

It has been argued that physicians have abdicated the “moral high ground” in health care by their interest in seeking protection for their high incomes, their highly publicized self-referral arrangements, and their historical opposition toward reform efforts that jeopardized their clinical autonomy. 

Experts Speak

In his book Medicine at the Crossroads, colleague and Emory University professor Melvin Konnor, MD noted that “throughout its history, organized medicine has represented, first and foremost, the pecuniary interests of doctors.” He lays significant blame for the present problems in health care at the doorstep of both insurers and doctors, stating that “the system’s ills are pervasive and all its participants are responsible.” 

In order to reclaim their once esteemed moral position, physicians must actively reaffirm their commitment to the highest standards of the medical profession and call on other participants in the health care delivery system also to elevate their values and standards to the highest level.

Evolution

In the evolutionary shifts in models for care, physicians have been asked to embrace business values of efficiency and cost effectiveness, sometimes at the expense of their professional judgment and personal values.  While some of these changes have been inevitable as our society sought to rein in out-of-control costs, it is not unreasonable for physicians to call on payers, regulators and other parties to the health care delivery system to raise their ethical bar. 

Harvard University physician-ethicist Linda Emmanuel noted that “health professionals are now accountable to business values (such as efficiency and cost effectiveness), so business persons should be accountable to professional values including kindness and compassion.” 

Within the framework of ethical principles, John La Puma, M.D., wrote in Managed Care Ethics, that “business’s ethical obligations are integrity and honesty.  Medicine’s are those plus altruism, beneficence, non-maleficence, respect, and fairness.”

Incumbent in these activities is the expectation that the forces that control our health care delivery system, the payers, the regulators, and the providers will reach out to the larger community, working to eliminate the inequities that have left so many Americans with limited access to even basic health care. 

Charles Dougherty clarified this obligation in Back to Reform, when he noted that “behind the daunting social reality stands a simple moral value that motivates the entire enterprise”. 

ASSESSMENT

Health care is indeed grounded in caring. And, managing risk is a component of caring. It arises from a sympathetic response to the suffering of others.

YOUR THOUGHTS ARE APPRECIATED

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***

The Emerging Role of CHIEF MARKETING STRATEGY IMPACT OFFICER

Common in Industry – Still Not so Much in Academe’

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA

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A Chief Strategy Officer [CSO], or chief strategist, is the senior  executive responsible for assisting the Chief Executive Officer [CEO] with developing, communicating, executing, and sustaining corporate strategic initiatives. Some companies give the title Chief Business Officer [CBO] to its’ senior executives who are holding the top strategy role.

My opinion in academia

A few decades ago, the role of university Chief Strategy Officer [CSO] did not exist or marginally existed as a mid-level project manager in the communications department. It may have consisted of a formal background in teaching and education exhibited by the BA and/or B.Ed degrees or HR certification.

A first generation didactic CSO 1.0; if you will.

Then, as academic competition and granularity increased along with new technology information exchange, the need for deeper subject matter expertise arose. Next – generation business, under/graduate LAs, HUMANITIES, modern culture, psychology / sociology and STEM expertise arose to create and explore new – real or perceived – strategic advantages for university public relations in the form of the M.Ed, MA or MBA degrees in marketing, advertising, sales or competitive analysis.

THINK: Michal Porter PhD, known for his theories on economics, business strategy, and social causes. He is the Bishop William Lawrence University Professor at Harvard Business School, and a social impact consultant. He is credited for creating Porter’s five forces analysis, which is instrumental in business strategy development today.

Also, consider traditional S.W.O.T analysis, as well. SWOT analysis (alternatively SWOT matrix) is an initialism for strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats—and is a structured planning method that evaluates those four elements of a project or business venture. A SWOT analysis can be carried out for a product, place, industry, university or person.

So, let’s call this a second generation expert CSO 2.0

However, as the complex business of running any college or university is ever changing, the ideal profile of CSO is still morphing to face modern business and management challenges like: physical and cyber security; culture and organizational behavior; gender differences, racial disparities and workplace violence issues; enrollment and international expansion; corporatization and competition; online and e-learning initiatives; with accounting, financial and economic pressures, etc.

Consequently, BODs are now seeking and embracing a new kind of CSO with advanced PhD or DBA degrees; and college and university experience. In fact, the role of contemporary CSO is emerging and becoming closer to that of an experienced corporate Chief Executive Officer, than the mere educator, academician or manager of the past.

Definitions: https://www.amazon.com/Dictionary-Health-Economics-Finance-Marcinko/dp/0826102549/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1254413315&sr=1-6

Universities and colleges  today

Insightful academic search committees are now seeking a new type of modern CSO who can build university and college rankings, maintain relationships with stakeholders, and project a positive image as a “celebrity university”.

This means shepherding students and attracting qualified youth, and faculty, for matriculation as areas of particular importance. This new entrepreneurial CSO must focus on business management, economics and finance – operational, marketing, advertising and consultative sales strategies to attract a qualified, protean and diverse student / professional staff that sets it apart from the competition; as well as more meaningfully interacting within [research and development], and without the university [outreach].

Accordingly, this  modern CSO must be a combination and protean surrogate for the university  CEO / CFO / CMO / COO / CAO and leader – NOT just a teacher or manager – who will help run it like a matrix business unit that makes a profit to generate needed capital and ROI.

Multiple lines of business – tuition; certifications; worker-placement; grants and endowments; CEUs and non-degree program fees; as well as for-profit R&D, publications, patents, copyrights and trade-marks; and applied business incubators – must ALL be created and managed as a diversified portfolio. S/he must lead in the implementation, planning and operations of systemic community responsive programs, as well as policy interventions requiring advocacy, political action and public analysis.

I prefer the moniker – CSO 3.0

Assessment

This academic CSO 3.0 must be a change-agent, crisis manager, corporate strategist, Machiavellian devotee and/or seasoned C-suite executive with the required inter – disciplinary skills outlined for this important position.

Above all – the modern CSO 3.0 must be pro-active, flexible and market responsive. This is not the place for tenure tracking.

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MEDICAL PRACTICE AND HOSPITAL OPERATIONS, STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT, ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT COMPANION TEXTBOOK SET

Product DetailsProduct DetailsProduct Details

[Foreword Dr. Phillips MD JD MBA LLM] *** [Foreword Dr. Nash MD MBA FACP]  [Foreword Dr. Hashem MD PhD] *** [Foreword Dr. Silva MD MBA]

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements.

imageproxy5

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PODCAST: Why We Still Need to Celebrate Independence Day?

By Richard Helppie

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EDITOR’S NOTE: I first Met Rich Helppie when I was in business school. He was the CEO of Superior Consultant at the time. Today he is a respected philanthropist and publisher of The Common Bridge. This is a much-requested replaying of Rich’s 2021 podcast honoring of Independence Day.  He takes some time to reflect on why we still should celebrate our nation’s birthday even though our history has been imperfect. -David E. Marcinko

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PODCAST: https://thecommonbridge.substack.com/p/independence-day?utm_source=substack&utm_medium=email#play

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PODCASTS: 36 Blue Cross / Blue Shield Organizations Explained

By Eric Bricker MD

By Laurence Baker MD

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A Doctor – Economist’s Solution for Health Reform

My Laundry Wish List for all US Healthcare Stakeholders

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™

[Publisher-in-Chief]Fox News

As President Obama spoke, prodded and cajoled for Congress to pass HR 3200-3400 in 2008, I believe that for any healthcare reform effort to work successfully for the American people – for the long term – we need to consider the following in no particular prioritized order:

  • Insurance portability uncoupled from patient employment
  • Health insurance regional exchanges with inter-state purchase competition
  • Doctor, drug, DME and hospital pricing and payment transparency for HSAs, and all of us
  • Modifying or eliminating AMA owned CPT Codes®; a huge money maker for them
  • Abandoning ala’ carte medicine for values-based outcomes
  • Reduce JCAHO influence; encourage competition from Norwegian Det Norske Veritas [DNV]
  • Reduce big-pharma influence thru-out the entire medical education, career and care pipeline
  • End DTC advertising from big-pharma
  • Promote wholesale drug purchase competition, MC bidding and generic drugs
  • Encourage evidence-based medicine, not expert-based medicine
  • Less pay for medical specialists with a  re-evaluation of the hospitalist concept
  • Advance the dying art of physical diagnosis, teach and embrace Paretto’s 80/20 rule for clinic issues
  • Reduce lab test, diagnostic imaging and testing
  • Encourage private 24/7/365 medical offices and clinics; and on-site and retail clinics
  • Abandon P4P, medical homes and disease management ideas
  • Give more economic skin-in-game to patients relative to health benchmarks
  • Concretize the “never-event” prohibitions and include a list of patient health responsibilities
  • More pay for primary care docs and internists
  • Adopt digital records and cloud computing for patients
  • Phase in true eHRs incrementally; and abandon CCHIT for open source SaaS
  • Promote Health 2.0 social media.
  • Augmented scope of practice, numbers and pay for NPs and DNPs, etc
  • Reduce pay for CRNAs and increase it for staff RNs
  • Develop step down triage and treatment units to reduce the number of full service ERs
  • Increase medical, osteopathic, dental, optometric and podiatric medical school classes
  • Increased practice scope for dentists, podiatrists and optometrists
  • Make some sort of catastrophic HI mandatory, much like auto insurance for all
  • End pre-existing conditon health insurance contract clauses
  • More choice  and end of life control for the terminally ill patient
  • Increase marketplace competition with fewer political and financial “externalities”.
  • Teach basic healthcare topics in school and encourage physical exercise
  • Health and insurance education should be, but is not, the “answer” for Americans
  • Protect borders and discourage undocumented illegals
  • Adopt medical malpractice tort reform
  • Make all stakeholders fiduciaries
  • No public “option” unless you like food stamps, Section 8 housing, public transportation and schools
  • Budget deficit neutrality
  • Slow down!

Assessment

Recently, while in the Baltimore/Washing area, I was asked by several reporters to opine on the healthcare debate; which I did so freely having never been known as the shy type. And, regular readers will note that many of these items have been used as posts or comments on this ME-P. Unfortunately, my “laundry list” interview was pre-empted by two local but boisterous town-hall meetings with respective passionate politicians. It was redacted no doubt, but never broadcast. Thus, I missed the potential for my “five minutes” of fame. C’est la vive!

Conclusion

There you have it; direct and straight forward. And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

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Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

THANK YOU

IMHO @TeamCigna Should Treat their Dentists Better!

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By Darrell Pruitt DDS

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“How Is The Market Feeling About Cigna?” Spoiler – According to Benzinga insights, the market is not optimistic about Cigna’s future. Neither am I. But then, I’m only their clients’ dentist.

Link: https://www.benzinga.com/short-sellers/22/06/27888029/how-is-the-market-feeling-about-cigna

Tomorrow is my last day as a Cigna Preferred Provider .. Never Again!

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ENTREPRENEURIAL MANAGEMENT EFFICIENCY: “Slowly I Turned … Step by Step … Inch by Inch”

By Staff Writers

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Venture capitalists who are in a rut should stop talking about how hard it is to raise a $100 million fund. Instead, raise a $5 million fund.

Rather, they should stop trying to invest $5 million at a time (with an 18-month window before going public). A better strategy is to start doing smaller investments with longer time horizons.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/082610254

Just like chili, low and slow is the way to maximum flavor.

READ: https://tinyurl.com/2ewwvz2c

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The Next Big [Investment] Thing?

Or, NOT!

By Rick Kahler CFP®

How do you spot the investment opportunity that will become the next Apple, Facebook, or Microsoft? Certainly they are out there. Someone is going to discover them and be set for life, so why shouldn’t it be you?

Here’s why it shouldn’t

As with all Registered Investment Advisors, the amount of money I manage for clients is publicly disclosed information that anyone with an Internet connection can find.

Because of that, I am seen as the gatekeeper of a source of funding for every under funded business opportunity that is sure to become the next Apple. I get to see a lot of proposals. Many have promise at first glance. But the promise usually fades the more I dig into the proposal, ask questions, and do the math.

After hours and hours of investigation, every few years I see that one proposal that looks really good. One that calls to me to invest, that really has the promise of being a winner. When all the stars and the planets align, I know I now have a 90% chance of not making a dime on the venture.

That’s why I have learned to save my time and my money when I am approached with “the next big thing.” I just don’t have time to investigate every project and cull hundreds of opportunities down to the one that has a 10% chance of succeeding. I see it as looking for the proverbial needle in the haystack. Certainly, there’s a needle in there somewhere. But examining every piece of hay in order to find it has a significant monetary cost.

To succeed, I would need a lot of time, even more money, and exponentially more intuition and intellect. Not to mention a fair amount of luck. The probability that I will go bankrupt before I ever find the needle is staggering.

Most of the “next big things” are discovered by driven entrepreneurs who bank everything they have on an idea and find the financing to shoestring it together. It usually isn’t the armchair investor who cashes in.

My experience

Over my 40 years of real estate and investment experience, I have seen people lose millions investing in lumber mills, emu farms, highly leveraged real estate, futures contracts, day trading, restaurants, multi-level-marketing companies, rare earth minerals, Iraqi currency, and the newest ones—marijuana farms and crypto-currencies.

As a result, for my money and the money of my clients, I’ll play the odds for success by saying “no” to every opportunity that comes across my desk. I don’t take the time to investigate them. I don’t read the offering circulars. I don’t attend presentations. The answer is “no” to the great odds of losing my money and “yes” to the staggering odds of keeping money growing conservatively for me and for my clients.

What do I say “yes” to? I say yes to investing in mutual funds that own or loan money to 12,000 successful companies around the globe and thousands of real estate properties. I say yes to well-diversified portfolios. I say yes to proven investment strategies with 25-year track records. I say yes to having enough cash reserves to fund two to five years of retirement income.

Boring

I know, it’s not very sexy, is it? In fact, the way I invest my money and the money of those who have entrusted their investments to me is downright boring.

***

https://www.crcpress.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

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Assessment

So here is my hot tip when it comes to finding investment opportunities to secure your future: forget about the “next big thing.” Instead, stay with the “next boring thing.” The odds are overwhelming that this will make you a long-term winner.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements.

Book Marcinko: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

Subscribe: MEDICAL EXECUTIVE POST for curated news, essays, opinions and analysis from the public health, economics, finance, marketing, IT, business and policy management ecosystem.

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What is Techno SCAM-BAITING?

BY ANONYMOUS

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

CMP logo

Scam-Baiting Behind the Scenes

The most basic form of scambaiting sets out to waste a scammer’s time. At a minimum, scambaiters attempt to make scammers answer countless questions or perform pointless and random tasks. By keeping a scammer busy, scambaiters claim they’re preventing the scammer from defrauding a real victim.

Scambaiting may also be conducted with a specific purpose in mind. Sometimes scambaiters attempt to obtain an offender’s bank account information, for instance, which they then report to a financial institution. But there are other, less benevolent motives in the scambaiting community.

Thousands of scambaiters are organised on the 419eater forum, which describes itself as the “largest scambaiting community on earth”, with over 1.7 million forum threads. The forum was first established in 2003 to tackle the growing issue of 419 emails – a scam that promises people huge sums of cash in return for a small upfront fee.

419eater provides a particularly interesting case study because members are incentivised and rewarded for their scambaits through a unique system of icons, regarded as trophies, that they can obtain in their profile’s signature lines.

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Romance Scam : Find Out How We Uncovered This Chinese Scam

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MORE: https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2021/oct/03/who-scams-the-scammers-meet-the-amateur-scambaiters-taking-on-the-crooks?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Healthcare: https://www.scamwatch.gov.au/types-of-scams/buying-or-selling/health-medical-products

Medical Insurance: https://www.reddit.com/r/scambait/comments/jsgffx/just_got_a_scam_call_to_sign_me_up_for_bogus/

YOUR COMMENTS ARE APPRECIATED.

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THANK YOU

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SUPREME COURT: Rules Against HHS Drug Pricing [340-B] Program

By Health Capital Consultants, LLC

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U.S. Supreme Court Rules Against HHS in 340B Case

On June 15, 2022, the U.S. Supreme Court released its decision regarding the cuts made by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to the 340B Drug Pricing Program, finding that HHS acted outside its statutory authority in changing reimbursement rates for one group of hospitals without first surveying them on their costs.

The 340B Drug Pricing Program allows hospitals and clinics that treat low-income, medically underserved patients to purchase certain “specified covered outpatient drugs” at discounted prices. (Read more…)

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COMMENTS APPRECIATED

Thank You

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INTERVIEW: A Healthcare Financing Solution for Entrepreneurs?

Former: CEO and Founder
Superior Consultant Company, Inc.
[SUPC-NASD]

EDITOR’S NOTE: I first met Rich in B-school, when I was a student, back in the day. He was the Founder and CEO of Superior Consultant Holdings Corp. Rich graciously wrote the Foreword to one of my first textbooks on financial planning for physicians and healthcare professionals. Today, Rich is a successful entrepreneur in the technology, health and finance space.

-Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

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Staff & Contributors - CHAMPIONS OF WAYNE

By Richard Helppie

Today for your consideration – How to fix the healthcare financing methods in the United States?

I use the term “methods” because calling what we do now a “system” is inaccurate. I also focus on healthcare financing, because in terms of healthcare delivery, there is no better place in the world than the USA in terms of supply and innovation for medical diagnosis and treatment. Similarly, I use the term healthcare financing to differentiate from healthcare insurance – because insurance without supply is an empty promise.

This is a straightforward, 4-part plan. It is uniquely American and will at last extend coverage to every US citizen while not hampering the innovation and robust supply that we have today. As this is about a Common Bridge and not about ideology or dogma, there will no doubt be aspects of this proposal that every individual will have difficulty with. However, on balance, I believe it is the most fair and equitable way to resolve the impasse on healthcare funding . . . .

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Let me start in an area sure to raise the ire of a few. And that is, we have to start with eliminating the methods that are in place today. The first is the outdated notion that healthcare insurance is tied to one’s work, and the second is that there are overlapping and competing tax-supported bureaucracies to administer that area of healthcare finance.

Step 1 is to break the link between employment and health insurance. Fastest way to do that is simply tax the cost of benefits for the compensation that it is. This is how company cars, big life insurance policies and other fringe benefits were trimmed. Eliminating the tax-favored treatment of employer-provided healthcare is the single most important change that should be made.

Yes, you will hear arguments that this is an efficient market with satisfied customers. However, upon examination, it is highly risky, unfair, and frankly out of step with today’s job market.

Employer provided health insurance is an artifact from the 1940’s as an answer to wage freezes – an employer could not give a wage increase, but could offer benefits that weren’t taxed. It makes no sense today for a variety of reasons. Here are a few:

1. Its patently unfair. Two people living in the same apartment building, each making the same income and each have employer provided health insurance. Chris in unit 21 has a generous health plan that would be worth $25,000 each year. Pays zero tax on that compensation. Pat, in unit 42 has a skimpy plan with a narrow network, big deductibles and hefty co-pays. The play is worth $9,000 each year. Pat pays zero tax.

3. The insurance pools kick out the aged. Once one becomes too old to work, they are out of the employer plan and on to the retirement plan or over to the taxpayers (Medicare).

4. The structure is a bad fit. Health insurance and healthy living are longitudinal needs over a long period of time. In a time when people change careers and jobs frequently, or are in the gig economy, they are not any one place long enough for the insurance to work like insurance.

5. Creates perverse incentives. The incentives are weighted to have employers not have their work force meet the standards of employees so they don’t have to pay for the health insurance. Witness latest news in California with Uber and Lyft.

6. Incentives to deny claims abound. There is little incentive to serve the subscriber/patient since the likelihood the employer will shop the plan or the employee will change jobs means that stringing out a claim approval is a profitable exercise.

7. Employers have difficulty as purchasers. An employer large enough to supply health insurance has a diverse set of health insurance needs in their work force. They pay a lot of money and their work force is still not 100% happy.

Net of it, health insurance tied to work has outlived its usefulness. Time to end the tax-favored treatment of employer-based insurance. If an employer wants to provide health insurance, they can do it, but the value of that insurance is reflected in the taxable W-2 wages – now Pat and Chris will be treated equally.

Step 2 is to consolidate the multiple tax-supported bureaus that supply healthcare. Relieve the citizens from having to prove they are old enough, disabled enough, impoverished enough, young enough. Combine Medicare, Medicaid, CHIP, Tricare and even possibly the VA into a single bureaucracy. Every American Citizen gets this broad coverage at some level. Everyone pays something into the system – start at $20 a year, and then perhaps an income-adjusted escalator that would charge the most wealthy up to $75,000. Collect the money with a line on Form 1040.

I have not done the exact math. However, removing the process to prove eligibility and having one versus many bureaucracies has to generate savings. Are you a US Citizen? Yes, then here is your base insurance. Like every other nationalized system, one can expect longer waits, fewer referrals to a specialist, and less innovation. These centralized systems all squeeze supply of healthcare services to keep their spend down. The reports extolling their efficiencies come from the people whose livelihoods depend on the centralized system. However, at least everyone gets something. And, for life threatening health conditions, by and large the centralized systems do a decent job. With everyone covered, the fear of medical bankruptcy evaporates. The fear of being out of work and losing healthcare when one needs it most is gone.

So if you are a free market absolutist, then the reduction of vast bureaucracies should be attractive – no need for eligibility requirements (old enough, etc.) and a single administration which is both more efficient, more equitable (everyone gets the same thing). And there remains a private market (more on this in step 3) For those who detest private insurance companies a portion of that market just went away. There is less incentive to purchase a private plan. And for everyone’s sense of fairness, the national plan is funded on ability to pay. Bearing in mind that everyone has to pay something. Less bureaucracies. Everyone in it together. Funded on ability to pay.

Step 3 is to allow and even encourage a robust market for health insurance above and beyond the national plan – If people want to purchase more health insurance, then they have the ability to do so. Which increases supply, relieves burden on the tax-supported system, aligns the US with other countries, provides an alternative to medical tourism (and the associated health spend in our country) and offers a bit of competition to the otherwise monopolistic government plan.

Its not a new concept, in many respects it is like the widely popular Medigap plans that supplement what Medicare does not cover.

No one is forced to make that purchase. Other counties’ experience shows that those who choose to purchase private coverage over and above a national plan often cite faster access, more choice, innovation, or services outside the universal system, e.g., a woman who chooses to have mammography at an early age or with more frequency than the national plan might allow.  If the insurance provider can offer a good value to the price, then they will sell insurance. If they can deliver that value for more than their costs, then they create a profit. Owners of the company, who risk their capital in creating the business may earn a return.

For those of you who favor a free market, the choices are available. There will be necessary regulation to prevent discrimination on genetics, pre-existing conditions, and the like. Buy the type of plan that makes you feel secure – just as one purchases automobile and life insurance.For those who are supremely confident in the absolute performance of a centralized system to support 300+ million Americans in the way each would want, they should like this plan as well – because if the national plan is meeting all needs and no one wants perhaps faster services, then few will purchase the private insurance and the issuers will not have a business. Free choice. More health insurance for those who want it. Competition keeps both national and private plans seeking to better themselves.

Step 4 would be to Permit Access to Medicare Part D to every US Citizen, Immediately

One of the bright spots in the US Healthcare Financing Method is Medicare Part D, which provides prescription drug coverage to seniors. It is running at 95% subscriber satisfaction and about 40% below cost projections.

Subscribers choose from a wide variety of plans offered by private insurance companies. There are differences in formularies, co-pays, deductibles and premiums.

So there you have it, a four part plan that would maintain or increase the supply of healthcare services, universal insurance coverage, market competition, and lower costs. Its not perfect but I believe a vast improvement over what exists today. To recap:

1. Break the link between employment and healthcare insurance coverage, by taxing the benefits as the compensation they are.

2. Establish a single, universal plan that covers all US citizens paid for via personal income taxes on an ability-to-pay basis.  Eliminate all the other tax-funded plans in favor of this new one.

3. For those who want it, private, supplemental insurance to the national system, ala major industrialized nations.

4. Open Medicare Part D (prescription drugs) to every US citizen. Today.

YOUR THOUGHTS ARE APPRECIATED.

Thank You

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Professor VERSUS Entrepreneur

Teaching / Educating

Bill Hennessey, M.D.

Bill Hennessey, M.D.

As a teacher educating is your job. It’s what you enjoy. There’s a fairly lax time schedule and resources are already built in the equation. Little accountability because the ultimate burden and measure of success is placed on the student to pass a test. If they don’t do well, it’s the student not directly the teacher who pays the price.

Now, I work with first year students who don’t know what a red blood cell looks like (biconcave disc, you thought I forgot, didn’t you) all the way to a chief resident who can probably do some surgeries better than me. It’s my job to take that first year student and turn them into a chief resident.

As an entrepreneur with limited resources, time, and energy, you don’t have the luxury to continuously teach, develop, and convince. You need people who simply get it especially in strategic positions. You don’t have the luxury of time or resources. You also are directly accountable if they don’t understand because you have a burn rate that probably just got worse. So how much “oxygen” do you allocate when trying to build your team?

Different story for Apple, Boeing and others that can create academies and educational tracks to teach and develop internally.

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

Product Details

ENCORE: How to Interview an Investment Portfolio Manager?

Selection Criteria Critical for Physicians

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™

[Publisher-in-Chief and former certified financial plannerdem2]

Recently in the Atlanta area, two high-profile financial advisors and portfolio investment managers have been charged with client embezzlement, malfeasance, and more!

The first was Kirk Wright, a Harvard-educated fund manager who was convicted last week in a fraud scheme that bilked investors out of tens of millions of dollars.  He later hanged himself, according to the Fulton County Georgia medical examiner’s office.  A federal jury convicted Wright last week on all 47 counts of mail fraud, securities fraud and money laundering stemming from a scam run through his firm, International Management Associates. High-profile clients included sports-stars, celebrities and several well-known local physicians.

The second, Frederick J. Barton, received a Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) civil action letter on June 3rd, 2008. Barton, formerly a registered representative of a national, registered broker-dealer and two entities he controlled: TwinSpan Capital Management, LLC (TwinSpan), an investment adviser formerly registered with the Commission, and Barton Asset Management, LLC (Barton Asset Management). The Commission alleges that, between 1999 and 2007, Barton, acting individually or through TwinSpan or Barton Asset Management, engaged in three separate securities frauds-including one involving a patient suffering from Alzheimer’s disease-and through his misconduct obtained over $3 million in ill-gotten gains. The Commission further alleges that he then spent his ill-gotten gains, among other things, to send his children to an exclusive private school, fund his own investment portfolio, and service his credit card debts. 

Manager Selection

So, how can the medical professional reduce the potential for similar behavior from his/her portfolio manager?

The first way is to skip the middle-man and “do-it-yourself.” But, doctors are sometimes hard-pressed to following this directive because of time constraints, knowledge paucity, fear/greed and/or disinterest; among other reasons.

The second way, of course, is to outsource the task by hiring a financial advisor. But, how do you find a financial advisor (easy), and more importantly, how do you discern a good fit (personally and professionally)? Still, there is no guarantee of honesty or capability.

But, your odds can be improved with insider knowledge of the financial services industry; a common-theme of the ME-P. And so, the following checklist may be a good place to start the selection, or triage process.  

SAMPLE: Engagement Letter

Mr. Joseph H. Sample

Vice President

Medical Capital Management of Nevada, LLC

RE: Letter to Request Pre-Interview Information from Portfolio Manager

Dear [Mr. Name]:

Thank you for agreeing to meet with us on [date, time] in our office. We are in the process of interviewing several portfolio investment managers.

So that we may obtain consistent information in our evaluation, we would appreciate the coverage of specific areas during your presentation. We are particularly interested in information regarding your approach to investment management in the following areas:

Investment philosophy and approach

• Describe your management style and any changes you have made over the past decade.

• Describe your investment decision-making process.

• Do you make the decisions or do you rely on others, and if so, who?

• Describe your sources of research.

• What contact, if any, do you have with the management of companies in which you invest?

• Briefly describe the sell disciplines employed by you and your firm.

• Describe whether/how you use top-down or bottom-up approaches to investment selection.

• Are you value or growth orientated; hedged or not; domestic or international?

Track record

• Please supply performance data by 5, 10 and 15-year intervals.

• Please supply performance records compared to benchmarks you feel appropriate.

• If balanced management, please provide performance data by asset class.

• Provide MPT or APT statistics such as beta, alpha, standard deviations, etc.

• What are your cash holdings; fully invested or selectively invested at various times?

• Turnover history and number of securities, industries and sectors; are guidelines in place?

• Typical portfolio percentage of largest ten positions.

Firm/advisor background

Please provide us with information regarding your background, including general information about the organization. In particular, please cover:

• The stability of ownership, managers, analysts or others directly involved in management.

• Who makes the investment decisions and how the firm dictates policy to managers?

• A description of expenses, including management fees, commissions, and other expenses.

• A detailed description of the growth of money under management over the past ten years.

• Please discuss the flexibility in design and management of a client’s portfolio by managers.

• If your firm is multidisciplined, what are your areas of expertise?

• Who is the custodian of securities? Does the firm have insurance?

Manager background

Please provide the resume(s) of the manager(s) as well as information about the manager’s style and consistency. Additional items of interest include:

• The manager’s record with other firms, if employed less than ten years.

• How the manager does research, including use of analysts and outside research?

• Regarding the decision process, what steps does the manager actually take?

• Manager’s ownership status in the firm?

• History of asset growth under the specific manager.

• Examples of past successes and failures on investment decisions.

Statistics

Please provide the following statistical information:

• Price/earnings ratios compared to market

• Price/book ratios compared to market

• Average earnings growth data

• Average market cap of companies in portfolio

• Average dividend yield information

• Average maturity and/or duration of fixed-income portfolios (and how this is managed)

• Average credit rating of fixed-income portfolios

• Where short-term funds are invested

Communication

• How often do you provide portfolio and performance reports?

• How do you compare performance to the market? What benchmarks do you use?

• Who will meet with us (and how often)?

• Who is the primary and secondary contact?

• Does the firm provide investment newsletters or promotional literature, with sample?

• Is the portfolio manager(s) available to meet or discuss issues with the client or advisor?

Compliance

• Are you a fiduciary? Will you sign-off as same?

• Are you a stoke-broker or registered representative?

• What securities licenses do you hold?

• Are you independent?

• Who is your broker-dealer?

• Who is your custodian and clearinghouse?

• Are you a RIA or RIA representative?

• May we please see you ADV Parts I, II, III

• May we review a sample investment policy statement?

• May we see your CRD report?

• Must we sign an arbitration clause?

• What educational degrees have earned?

• What financial/securities designation do you hold?

• What peer-reviewed or non-peered reviewed material have you published, and where? 

• What medical specificity do you possess?

• Do you hold the AIF® and/or AIFA® designations, and adhere to its code-of-ethics?

• Are you a [CMP] Certified Medical Planner™?

• Are you a [CFP] Certified Financial Planner™ with health economics knowledge?

• How do/can you demonstrate you specific knowledge on the heath care space?

Thank you.

Dr. Michael B. Sample; MD/DO

Managing Partner – Medical Associates of Nevada, PC  

Assessment

Some financial advisors, insurance agents, portfolio and wealth managers speak of “prospecting”, “hunting” or “screening” clients. In fact, potential doctor-clients are often, not-so-charmingly called, “prospects”.

Don’t you think it’s about time that the “tables-are-turned” by informed medical professionals, as the “hunted-becomes-the-hunter”, by the informed physician? Triage well, and always remember; caveat emptor and vendor emptor!

What other criteria should be included in this engagement letter, or personal interview itself? What has been your experience with portfolio manager selection? How do you select same, and what has been your success rate? Why don’t you do-it-yourself? Please comment and opine.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Product DetailsProduct DetailsProduct Details

Product Details  Product Details

Musings on a Famous Portfolio Asset Allocation Study

Some Critics Claim Brinson, Hood, and Beebower Conclusions Wrong

[By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP™]

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

[Publisher-in-Chief]

Frequently, we hear the axiom that asset allocation is the most important investment decision, explaining 93.6% of portfolio returns. The presumption has been that once the risk tolerance and time horizon have been established, investing is simply a matter of implementing a fixed mix of stocks, bonds, and cash using mutual funds selected for this purpose. This axiom is based on a famous study by Brinson, Hood, and Beebower (BHB) published in the Financial Analysts Journal in July/August 1986. It is the stuff of most modern business school and graduate students in economics and finance.

Enter the Critics

One critic claims that BHB’s conclusions and the interpretation of their conclusions are wrong, stating that because of several methodological problems, BHB needed to make certain assumptions for their analysis to go forward. They assumed that the average asset-class weights for the 10-year period studied are the same as the actual normal policy weights; that investments in foreign stocks, real estate, private placements, and venture capital can be proxied by a mix of stocks, bonds, and cash; and that the benchmarks for stocks, bonds, and cash against which fund performance was measured are appropriate. The author believes that each of these assumptions can lead to a faulty measurement of success or failure at market timing and stock selection.

The Jahnke Study

William Jahnke claims that BHB erred in their focus on explaining the variation of quarterly portfolio returns rather than portfolio returns over the 10-year period studied. According to the study, asset allocation policy explains only a small fraction of the range of 10-year portfolio returns earned by the pension funds reported in the study. The author concluded that this discrepancy is caused by the effect of compounding returns. He adds that BHB were wrong to use variance of quarterly returns rather than the standard deviation. Use of standard deviation would reduce the often cited 93.6% to about 79%. Moreover, BHB did not consider the cost of investing, such as operating expenses, management fees, brokerage commissions, and other trading costs, which are more significant for individual investors than for the pension plans studied. Jahnke claims that excessive costs can reduce wealth accumulation by 50%.

Note: (“The Asset Allocation Hoax,” William W. Jahnke, Journal of Financial Planning, February 1997, Institute of Certified Financial Planners [303] 759-4900).

Assessment

Finally, the author takes issue with establishing long-term fixed asset class weights. Asset allocation should be a dynamic process. Higher equity return expectations should in turn produce larger equity allocations, other things being equal.

Certified Medical Planner

Conclusion

Are doctors different than the average investor noted in this essay?

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Product Details

  Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

Invite Dr. Marcinko

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Of Financial Certifications and Designations

Join Our Mailing List

The “Too Numerous to Count” Syndrome

[By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™]

Dr. MarcinkoThe following list of certifications enumerates only a partial exposure of the often nebulous field of “financial planning credentials” that presently exist in the market place. 

Good … and Not So

Some of these professional designations are awarded to individuals in the financial planning or financial “advisory” space after [some] diligent study and [often not so] arduous testing; others not so.

Disclaimer: I am a reformed Certified Financial Planner®, Series 7 [stock-broker], 63 and 65 license holder, and RIA representative who also held all applicable insurance and security licenses.

The individuals hold not only proper education [some only reguire a HS diploma or GED] as evidenced by the credential; the holders are often people of ethics [hopefully] and competence [usually]. But, not all credentials are the same. Some credentialing bodies have higher educational requirements that also require years of experience and a thorough background search. Others are awarded after only a few hours of study and, most all, remain non-fiduciary in nature.

Too Many To Count – Syndrome

In medicine, the abbreviation TNTC is well known. Sometime, I think this term is better applicable to the plethora of “credentials” in the financial services industry.

dhimc-book1

The Designation Line-up

A brief description for some of these financial designations [not degrees] follows:

  • AAMS – Accredited Asset Management Specialist
  • AEP – Accredited Estate Planner
  • AFC – Accredited Financial Counselor
  • AIF – Accredited Investment Fiduciary
  • AIFA – Accredited Investment Fiduciary Auditor
  • APP – Asset Protection Planner
  • BCA – Board Certified in Annuities
  • BCAA – Board Certified in Asset Allocation
  • BCE – Board Certified in Estate Planning
  • BCM – Board Certified in Mutual Funds
  • BCS – Board Certified in Securities
  • C3DWP – 3 Dimensional Wealth Practitioners
  • CAA – Certified Annuity Advisor
  • CAC – Certified Annuity Consultant
  • CAIA – Chartered Alternative Investment Analyst
  • CAM – Chartered Asset Manager
  • CAS – Chartered Annuity Specialist
  • CCPS – Certified College Planning Specialist
  • CDFA – Certified Divorce Financial Analyst
  • CEA – Certified Estate Advisor
  • CEBS – Certified Employee Benefit Specialist
  • CEP – Certified Estate Planner
  • CEPP – Chartered Estate Planning Practitioner
  • CFA – Chartered Financial Analyst
  • CFE – Certified Financial Educator
  • CFG – Certified Financial Gerontologist
  • CFP – Certified Financial Planner
  • CFPN – Christian Financial Professionals Network 
  • CFS – Certified Fund Specialist
  • CIC – Chartered Investment Counselor
  • CIMA – Certified Investment Analyst
  • CIMC – Certified Investment Management Consultant
  • CLTC – Certified in Long Term Care
  • CMFC – Chartered Mutual Fund Counselor
  • CMP – Certified Medical Planner™
  • CPC – Certified Pension Consultant
  • CPHQ – Certified Professional in Healthcare Quality
  • CPHQ – Certified Physician in Healthcare Quality
  • CPM – Chartered Portfolio Manager
  • CRA – Certified Retirement Administrator
  • CRC – Certified Retirement Counselor
  • CRFA – Certified Retirement Financial Advisor
  • CRP – Certified Risk Professional
  • CRPC – Chartered Retirement Planning Counselor
  • CRPS – Chartered Retirement Plan Specialist
  • CSA – Certified Senior Advisor
  • CSC – Certified Senior Consultant
  • CSFP – Certified Senior Financial Planner
  • CSS – Certified Senior Specialist
  • CTEP – Chartered Trust and Estate Planner
  • CTFA – Certified Trust and Financial Advisor
  • CWC – Certified Wealth Counselor
  • CWM – Chartered Wealth Manager
  • CWPP – Certified Wealth Preservation Planner
  • ECS –  Elder Care Specialist
  • FAD – financial Analyst Designate
  • FIC – Fraternal Insurance Counselor
  • FLMI – Fellow Life Management Institute
  • FRM – Financial Risk Manager
  • FSS – Financial Services Specialist
  • LIFA – Licensed Insurance Financial Analyst
  • MFP – Master Financial Professional
  • MSFS – Masters of Science Financial Service Degree
  • PFS – Personal Financial Specialist
  • PPC – Professional Plan Consultant
  • QFP – Qualified Financial Planner
  • REBC – Registered Employee Benefits Consultant
  • RFA – Registered Financial Associate
  • RFC – Registered Financial Consultant
  • RFG – Registered Financial Gerontologist
  • RFP – Registered Financial Planner
  • RFS – Registered Financial Specialist
  • RHU – Registered Health Underwriter
  • RPA – Registered Plans Associate
  • WMS – Wealth Management Specialist

This list is intentionally incomplete and it is not intended to be an endorsement of any credential by the Institute of Medical Business Advisors, Inc www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com

Alphabet Soup

Obviously, these “professional” designations spread across multiple industries. For example there is an alphabet of designations in the brokerage and securities field, another alphabet in the insurance industry and within the insurance industry, designations exist for those who meet face to face with prospective customers, another for those who provide client service and yet another in underwriting the various insurance products. Certainly when the designations are complied in a list such as that above, they present a dizzying array of apparent qualifications.

Assessment

While in general, education for the financial service [and medical] professional is good for everybody, there are certain things that you should do as proper due diligence to protect your family and your financial assets. What are they?

Disclaimer: I am also founder of the Certified Medical Planner™ online educational program in health economics for financial advisors and medical management consultants. www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

LEXICONS: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko
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HOSPITALS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781466558731
CLINICS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439879900
ADVISORS: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org
BLOG: www.MedicalExecutivePost.com

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RECAST: An Interview with Fiduciary Bennett Aikin AIF®

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On Financial Fiduciary Accountability

[By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA & Prof. Hope Rachel Hetico; RN, MHA, CMP™]

[By Ann Miller; RN, MHA]

Currently, there is a growing dilemma in the financial sales and services industry. It goes something like this:

  • What is a financial fiduciary?
  • Who is a financial fiduciary?
  • How can I tell if my financial advisor is a fiduciary?

Now, in as much as this controversy affects laymen and physician-investors alike, we went right to the source for up-to-date information regarding this often contentious topic, for an email interview and Q-A session, with Ben Aikin.ben-aikin

About Bennett Aikin AIF® and fi360.com

Bennett [Ben] Aikin is the Communications Coordinator for fi360.com. He oversees all communications for fi360. His responsibilities include messaging, brand management, copyrights and trademarks, and publications. Mr. Aikin received his BA in English from Virginia Tech in 2003 and is currently an MS candidate in Journalism from Ohio University.

Q. Medical Executive Post 

You have been very helpful and gracious to us. So, let’s get right to it, Ben. In the view of many; attorneys, doctors, CPAs and the clergy are fiduciaries; most all others who retain this title seem poseurs; sans documentation otherwise.

A. Mr. Aikin

You are correct. Attorneys, doctors and clergy are the prototype fiduciaries. They have a clear duty to put the best interests of their clients, patients, congregation, etc., above their own. [The duty of a CPA isn’t as clear to me, although I believe you are correct]. Furthermore, this is one of the first topics we address in our AIF training programs, and what we call the difference between a profession and an industry.  The three professions you name have three common characteristics that elevate them from an industry to a profession:

  1. Recognized body of knowledge
  2. Society depends upon practitioners to provide trustworthy advice
  3. Code of conduct that places the clients’ best interests first

Q. Medical Executive Post 

It seems that Certified Financial Planner®, Chartered Financial Analysts, Registered Investment Advisors and their representatives, Registered Representative [stock-brokers] and AIF® holders, etc, are not really financial fiduciaries, either by legal statute or organizational charter. Are we correct, or not? Of course, we are not talking ethics or morality here. That’s for the theologians to discuss.

A. Mr. Aikin

One of the reasons for the “alphabet soup”, as you put it in one of your white papers [books, dictionaries and posts] on financial designations, is that while there is a large body of knowledge, there is no one recognized body of knowledge that one must acquire to enter the financial services industry.  The different designations serve to provide a distinguisher for how much and what parts of that body of knowledge you do possess.  However, being a fiduciary is exclusively a matter of function. 

In other words, regardless of what designations are held, there are five things that will make one a fiduciary in a given relationship:

  1. You are “named” in plan or trust documents; the appointment can be by “name” or by “title,” such as CFO or Head of Human Resources
  2. You are serving as a trustee; often times this applies to directed trustees as well
  3. Your function or role equates to a professional providing comprehensive and continuous investment advice
  4. You have discretion to buy or sell investable assets
  5. You are a corporate officer or director who has authority to appoint other fiduciaries

So, if you are a fiduciary according to one of these definitions, you can be held accountable for a breach in fiduciary duty, regardless of any expertise you do, or do not have. This underscores the critical nature of understanding the fiduciary standard and delegating certain duties to qualified “professionals” who can fulfill the parts of the process that a non-qualified fiduciary cannot.

Q. Medical Executive Post 

How about some of the specific designations mentioned on our site, and elsewhere. I believe that you may be familiar with the well-known financial planner, Ed Morrow, who often opines that there are more than 98 of these “designations”? In fact, he is the founder of the Registered Financial Consultants [RFC] designation. And, he wrote a Foreword for one of our e-books; back-in-the-day. His son, an attorney, also wrote as a tax expert for us, as well. So, what gives?

A. Mr. Aikin

As for the specific designations you list above, and elsewhere, they each signify something different that may, or may not, lend itself to being a fiduciary: For example:

• CFP®: The act of financial planning does very much imply fiduciary responsibility.  And, the recently updated CFP® rules of conduct does now include a fiduciary mandate:

• 1.4 A certificant shall at all times place the interest of the client ahead of his or her own. When the certificant provides financial planning or material elements of the financial planning process, the certificant owes to the client the duty of care of a fiduciary as defined by CFP Board. [from http://www.cfp.net/Downloads/2008Standards.pdf]

•  CFA: Very dependent on what work the individual is doing.  Their code of ethics does have a provision to place the interests of clients above their own and their Standards of Practice handbook makes clear that when they are working in a fiduciary capacity that they understand and abide by the legally mandated fiduciary standard.

• FA [Financial Advisor]: This is a generic term that you may find being used by a non-fiduciary, such as a broker, or a fiduciary, such as an RIA.

• RIA: Are fiduciaries.  Registered Investment Advisors are registered with the SEC and have obligations under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 to provide services that meet a fiduciary standard of care.

• RR: Registered Reps, or stock-brokers, are not fiduciaries if they are doing what they are supposed to be doing.  If they give investment advice that crosses the line into “comprehensive and continuous investment advice” (see above), their function would make them a fiduciary and they would be subject to meeting a fiduciary standard in that advice (even though they may not be properly registered to give advice as an RIA).

• AIF designees: Have received training on a process that meets, and in some places exceeds, the fiduciary standard of care.  We do not require an AIF® to always function as a fiduciary. For example, we allow registered reps to gain and use the AIF® designation. In many cases, AIF designees are acting as fiduciaries, and the designation is an indicator that they have the full understanding of what that really means in terms of the level of service they provide.  We do expect our designees to clearly disclose whether they accept fiduciary responsibility for their services or not and advocate such disclosure for all financial service representatives.

Q. Medical Executive Post 

Your website, http://www.fi360.com, seems to suggest, for example, that banks/bankers are fiduciaries. We have found this not to be the case, of course, as they work for the best interests of the bank and stockholders. What definitional understanding are we missing?

A. Mr. Aikin

Banks cannot generally be considered fiduciaries.  Again, it is a matter of function. A bank may be a named trustee, in which case a fiduciary standard would generally apply.  Banks that sell products are doing so according to their governing regulations and are “prudent experts” under ERISA, but not necessarily held to a fiduciary standard in any broader sense.

Q. Medical Executive Post 

And so, how do we rectify the [seemingly intentional] industry obfuscation on this topic. We mean, our readers, subscribers, book and dictionary purchasers, clients and colleagues are all confused on this topic. The recent financial meltdown only stresses the importance of understanding same.

For example, everyone in the industry seems to say they are the “f” word. But, our outreach efforts to contact traditional “financial services” industry pundits, CFP® practitioners and other certification organizations are continually met with resounding silence; or worse yet; they offer an abundance of parsed words and obfuscation but no confirming paperwork, or deep subject-matter knowledge as you have kindly done. We get the impression that some FAs honesty do-not have a clue; while others are intentionally vague.

A. Mr. Aikin

All of the evidence you cite is correct.  But that does not mean it is impossible to find an investment advisor who will manage to a fiduciary standard of care and acknowledge the same. The best way to rectify confusion as it pertains to choosing appropriate investment professionals is to get fiduciary status acknowledged in writing and go over with them all of the necessary steps in a fiduciary process to ensure they are being fulfilled. There also are great resources out there for understanding the fiduciary process and for choosing professionals, such as the Department of Labor, the SEC, FINRA, the AICPA’s Personal Financial Planning division, the Financial Planning Association, and, of course, Fiduciary360.

We realize the confusion this must cause to those coming from the health care arena, where MD/DO clearly defines the individual in question; as do other degrees [optometrist, clinical psychologist, podiatrist, etc] and medical designations [fellow, board certification, etc.]. But, unfortunately, it is the state of the financial services industry as it stands now.

Q. Medical Executive Post 

It is as confusing for the medical community, as it is for the lay community. And, after some research, we believe retail financial services industry participants are also confused. So, what is the bottom line?

A. Mr. Aikin

The bottom line is that lay, physician and all clients have a right to expect and demand a fiduciary standard of care in the managing of investments. And, there are qualified professionals out there who are providing those services.  Again, the best way to ensure you are getting it is to have fiduciary status acknowledged in writing, and go over the necessary steps in a fiduciary process with them to ensure it is being fulfilled.

Q. Medical Executive Post 

The “parole-evidence” rule, of contract law, applies, right? In dealing with medical liability situations, the medics and malpractice attorneys have a rule: “if it wasn’t written down, it didn’t happen.”  

A. Mr. Aikin

An engagement contract accepting fiduciary status should trump a subsequent attempt to claim the fiduciary standard didn’t apply. But, to reiterate an earlier point, if someone acts in one of the five functional fiduciary roles, they are a fiduciary whether they choose to acknowledge it or not.  I have attached a sample acknowledgement of fiduciary status letter with copies of our handbook, which details the fiduciary process we instruct in our programs, and our SAFE, which is basically a checklist that a fiduciary should be able to answer “Yes” to every question to ensure the entire fiduciary process is being covered.

Q. Medical Executive Post 

It is curious that you mention checklists. We have a post arguing that very theme for doctors and hospitals as they pursue their medial error reduction, and quality improvement, endeavors. And, we applaud your integrity, and wish only for clarification on this simple fiduciary query?

A. Mr. Aikin

Simple definition: A fiduciary is someone who is managing the assets of another person and stands in a special relationship of trust, confidence, and/or legal responsibility.

Q. Medical Executive Post 

Who is a financial fiduciary and what, if any, financial designation indicates same?

A. Mr. Aikin

Functional definition: See above for the five items that make you a fiduciary.

Financial designations that unequivocally indicate fiduciary duty: Short answer is none, only function can determine who is a fiduciary. 

Q. Medical Executive Post 

Please repeat that?

A. Mr. Aikin

Financial designations that indicate fiduciary duty: none. It is the function that determines who is a fiduciary.  Now, having said that, the CFP® certification comes close by demanding their certificants who are engaged in financial planning do so to a fiduciary standard. Similarly, other designations may certify the holder’s ability to perform a role that would be held to a fiduciary standard of care.  The point is that you are owed a fiduciary standard of care when you engage a professional to fill that role or they functionally become one.  And, if you engage a professional to fill a non-fiduciary role, they will not be held to a fiduciary standard simply because they have a particular designation.  One of the purposes the designations serve is to inform you what roles the designation holder is capable of fulfilling.

It is also worth keeping in mind that just being a fiduciary doesn’t equate to a full knowledge of the fiduciary standard. The AIF® designation indicates having been fully trained on the standard.

Q. Medical Executive Post 

Yes, your website mentions something about fiduciaries that are not aware of same! How can this be? Since our business model mimics a medical model, isn’t that like saying “the doctor doesn’t know he is doctor?” Very specious, with all due respect!

A. Mr. Aikin

I think it is first important to note that this statement is referring not just to investment professionals.  Part of the audience fi360 serves is investment stewards, the non-professionals who, due to facts and circumstances, still owe a fiduciary duty to another.  Examples of this include investment committee members, trustees to a foundation, small business owners who start 401k plans, etc.  This is a group of non-sophisticated investors who may not be aware of the full array of responsibilities they have. 

However, even on the professional side I believe the statement isn’t as absurd as it sounds.  This is basically a protection from both ignorant and unscrupulous professionals.  Imagine a registered representative who, either through ignorance or design, begins offering comprehensive and continuous investment advice.  Though they may deny or be unaware of the fact, they have opened themselves up to fiduciary liability. 

Q. Medical Executive Post 

Please clarify the use of arbitration clauses in brokerage account contracts for us. Do these disclaim fiduciary responsibility? If so, does the client even know same?

A. Mr. Aikin

By definition, an engagement with a broker is a non-fiduciary relationship.  So, unless other services beyond the scope of a typical brokerage account contract are specified, fiduciary responsibility is inherently not applicable.  Unfortunately, I do imagine there are clients who don’t understand this. Furthermore, AIF® designees are not prohibited from signing such an agreement and there are some important points to understand the reasoning.

First, by definition, if you are entering into such an agreement, you are entering into a non-fiduciary relationship. So, any fiduciary requirement wouldn’t apply in this scenario.

Second, if this same question were applied into a scenario of a fiduciary relationship, such as with an RIA, this would be a method of dispute resolution, not a practice method. So, in the event of dispute, the advisor and investor would be free to agree to the method of resolution of their choosing. In this scenario, however, typically the method would not be discussed until the dispute itself arose.

Finally, it is important to know that AIF/AIFA designees are not required to be a fiduciary. It is symbolic of the individuals training, knowledge and ongoing development in fiduciary processes, but does not mean they will always be acting as a fiduciary.

Q. Medical Executive Post 

Don’t the vast majority of arbitration hearings find in favor of the FA; as the arbitrators are insiders, often paid by the very same industry itself?

A. Mr. Aikin

Actual percentages are reported here: http://www.finra.org/ArbitrationMediation/AboutFINRADR/Statistics/index.htm However, brokerage arbitration agreements are a dispute resolution method for disputes that arise within the context of the securities brokerage industry and are not the only means of resolving differences for all types of financial advisors.  Investment advisers, for example, are subject to respond to disputes in a variety of forums including state and federal courts.  Clients should look at their brokerage or advisory agreement to see what they have agreed to. If you wanted to go into further depth on this question, we would recommend contacting Brian Hamburger, who is a lawyer with experience in this area and an AIFA designee. Bio page: http://www.hamburgerlaw.com/attorneys/BSH.htm.

Q. Medical Executive Post 

What about our related Certified Medical Planner® designation, and online educational program for financial advisors and medical management consultants? Is it a good idea – reasonable – for the sponsor to demand fiduciary accountability of these charter-holders? Cleary, this would not only be a strategic competitive advantage, but advance the CMP™ mission to put medical colleagues first and champion their cause www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org above all else. 

A. Mr. Aikin

I think it is a good idea for any plan sponsor to demand fiduciary status be acknowledged from anyone engaged to provide comprehensive and continuous investment advice.  I also think it is a good idea to be proactive in verifying that the fiduciary process is being followed.

Q. Medical Executive Post 

Is there anything else that we should know about this topic?

A. Mr. Aikin

Yes, a further note about fi360’s standards. I wrote generically about the fiduciary standard, because there is one that is defined by multiple sources of regulation, legislation and case law.  The process defined in our handbooks, we call a Fiduciary Standard of Excellence, because it covers that minimum standard and also best practice standards that go above and beyond.  All of our Practices, which comprise that standard, are legally substantiated in our Legal Memoranda handbook, which was written by Fred Reish’s law firm, who is considered a leading ERISA attorney.

Additional resources:

Q. Medical Executive Post 

Thank you so much for your knowledge and willingness to frankly share it with the Medical-Executive-Post.

Assessment

All are invited to continue the conversation with Mr. Aikin, asynchronously online, or thru this contact information:

fi360.com
438 Division Street
Sewickley, PA 15143
412-741-8140 Phone
866-390-5080 Toll-free phone
412-741-8142 Fax

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

LEXICONS: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko
PRACTICES: www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com
HOSPITALS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781466558731
CLINICS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439879900
ADVISORS: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org
BLOG: www.MedicalExecutivePost.com

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Did Public Health Fail America During the Pandemic?

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By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA

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LINK: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/how-public-health-failed-america/ar-AAXid2L?li=BBnb7Kz

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CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/publichealthgateway/publichealthservices/essentialhealthservices.html

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GO FUND ME: Medical Campaigns Reveal a Big Problem with Health Care

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By Jules Lipoff, MD: Senior fellow at the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics and an assistant professor of clinical dermatology at Perelman School of Medicine, both of the University of Pennsylvania. Erica Mark, medical student at the University of Virginia, contributed to this article. The opinions expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of the University of Pennsylvania Health System or the Perelman School of Medicine.

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If you follow the news or your social media feed, you know that crowdsourcing medical expenses is increasingly popular for financing health care costs. In fact, you might have contributed to one; 22 percent of American adults report donating to GoFundMe medical campaigns.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/082610254

As of 2021, approximately $650 million, or about one-third of all funds raised by GoFundMe, went to medical campaigns. That staggering amount of money highlights how dysfunctional our health care system is, forcing people to resort to crowdsourcing to afford their medical care — but it’s not surprising. In the United States, 62 percent of bankruptcies are related to medical costs. This should be a wake-up call to address and reform the system further.

Related: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/12/30/does-crowd-sourcing-democratize-the-health-care-insurance-system/

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ESSAY: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/gofundme-medical-campaigns-reveal-a-big-problem-with-health-care/ar-AAXabGB?li=BBnbfcL

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PODCAST: The Dartmouth Atlas of Healthcare

Geographic Variation in Spine Surgery

By Dr. Eric Bricker MD

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MORE: https://www.dartmouthatlas.org/

John Wennberg MD: https://tdi.dartmouth.edu/about/our-people/directory/john-e-wennberg-md-mph

CHECKLISTS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2009/01/20/a-homer-simpson-moment-of-clarity-on-medical-quality/

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Why 75+ Years of American Finance Should Matter to Physician Investors

A Graphic Presentation [1861-1935] with Commentary from the Publisher

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko FACFAS MBA CPHQ CMP™

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

As our private iMBA Inc clients, ME-P subscribers, textbook and dictionary purchasers, seminar attendees and most ME-P readers know, Ken Arrow is my favorite economist. Why?

About Kenneth J. Arrow, PhD

Well, in 1972, Nobel Laureate Kenneth J. Arrow, PhD shocked Academe’ by identifying health economics as a separate and distinct field. Yet, the seemingly disparate insurance, asset allocation, econometric, statistical and portfolio management principles that he studied have been transparent to most financial professionals and wealth management advisors for years; at least until now.

Nevertheless, to informed cognoscenti, they served as predecessors to the modern healthcare advisory era. In 2004, Arrow was selected as one of eight recipients of the National Medal of Science for his innovative views. And, we envisioned the ME-P at that time to present these increasingly integrated topics to our audience.

Healthcare Economics Today

Today – as 2022 passes – savvy medical professionals, management consultants and financial advisors are realizing that the healthcare industrial complex is in flux; along with the Russian war, domestic inflation and this dynamic may be reflected in the overall flagging economy.

Like many laymen seeking employment, for example, physicians are frantically searching for new ways to improve office revenues and grow personal assets, because of the economic dislocation that is Managed Care, Medi Care and Obama Care [ACA], the depressed business cycle, etc.

Moreover, the largest transfer of wealth in US history is – or was – taking place as our lay elders and mature doctors sell their practices or inherit parents’ estates. Increasingly, the artificial academic boundary between the traditional domestic economy, financial planning and contemporaneous medical practice management is blurring.

I’m Not a Cassandra

Yet, I am no gloom and doom Cassandra like I have been accused, of late. I am not cut from the same cloth as a Jason Zweig, Jeremy Grantham or Nouriel Roubini PhD, for example.

However, I do subscribe to the philosophy of Hope for the Best – Plan for the Worst.

And so dear colleagues, I ask you, “Are the latest swings in the economic, healthcare and financial headlines making you wonder when it will ever stop?”

The short answer is: “It will never stop” because what’s been happening isn’t any “new normal”; it’s just the old normal playing out before a new audience; sans the war.

What audience?

The next-generation of investors, FAs, management consultants and the medical professionals of Health 2.0.

How do I know all this?

History tells me so! Just read this work, and opine otherwise, or reach a different conclusion.

Evidence from the American Financial Scene, circa 1861-1935

The work was created by L. Merle Hostetler in 1936, while he was at Cleveland College of Western Reserve University (now known as Case Western Reserve University). I learned of him while in B-School, back in the day.

At some point after it was printed, he added the years 1936-1938. Mr. Hostetler became a Financial Economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland in 1943. In 1953 he was made Director of Research. He resigned from the Bank in 1962 to work for Union Commerce Bank in Cleveland. He died in 1990.

The volume appears to be self published and consists of a chart, approximately 85′ long, fan-folded into 40 pages with additional years attached to the last page. It also includes a “topical index” to the chart and some questions of technical interest which can be answered by the chart.

Link: http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/75years

Assessment

And so, as with Sir John Templeton’s [whose son is an MD] four most dangerous words in investing (It’s different this time), Hostetler effectively illustrates that it wasn’t so different in his era, and maybe—just maybe—it isn’t so different today for all these conjoined fields.

Conclusion      

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. While not exactly a “sacred cow,” there is a current theory that investors will experience higher volatility and lower global returns for the foreseeable future.

In fact, it has gained widespread acceptance, from the above noted Cassandra’s and others, as problems in Europe persist and threats of a double-dip recession loom. But, how true is this notion; really?

Is Hostetler correct, or not; and why?

Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

DOCTORS:

“Insurance & Risk Management Strategies for Doctors” https://tinyurl.com/ydx9kd93

“Fiduciary Financial Planning for Physicians” https://tinyurl.com/y7f5pnox

“Business of Medical Practice 2.0” https://tinyurl.com/yb3x6wr8

HOSPITALS:

“Financial Management Strategies for Hospitals” https://tinyurl.com/yagu567d

“Operational Strategies for Clinics and Hospitals” https://tinyurl.com/y9avbrq5

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Book Marcinko for your Next Financial Planning Seminar, Meeting or Medical Business Event 

By Ann Miller RN MHA

Professor and physician executive David Edward Marcinko MBBS DPM MBA MEd BSc CMP® is originally from Loyola University MD, Temple University in Philadelphia and the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in PA; Oglethorpe University, and Atlanta Hospital & Medical Center in GA; and the Aachen City University Hospital, Koln-Germany. He is one of the most innovative global thought leaders in health care business and entrepreneurship today.

Dr. Marcinko is a multi-degreed educator, board certified physician, surgical fellow, hospital medical staff President, Chief Education Officer and philanthropist with more than 400 published papers; 5,150 op-ed pieces and over 125+ international presentations to his credit; including the top 10 biggest pharmaceutical companies and financial services firms in the nation. He is also a best-selling Amazon author with 30 published text books in four languages [National Institute of Health, Library of Congress and Library of Medicine].

Dr. Marcinko is past Editor-in-Chief of the prestigious “Journal of Health Care Finance”, and a former Certified Financial Planner®, who was named “Health Economist of the Year” in 2001. He is a Federal and State court approved expert witness featured in hundreds of peer reviewed medical, business, management and trade publications [AMA, ADA, APMA, AAOS, Physicians Practice, Investment Advisor, Physician’s Money Digest and MD News].

As a licensed insurance agent, RIA and SEC registered endowment fund manager, Dr. Marcinko is Founding Dean of the fiduciary focused CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER® chartered designation education program; as well as Chief Editor of the HEALTH DICTIONARY SERIES® Wiki Project. His professional memberships include: ASHE, AHIMA, ACHE, ACME, ACPE, MGMA, FMMA and HIMSS.

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Ethics in Modern Healthcare

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The Access to Medical Care Dilemma

By David E. Marcinko MBA

By Render S. Davis; MHA, CHE

[Certified Healthcare Executive]

Crawford Long Hospital at Emory University

Atlanta, Georgia, USA

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In his book, “Back to Reform”, author Charles Dougherty writes that “cost containment is the goal for the healthy.  Access is the goal for the sick.” 

A Meaningless Distinction

So, for an increasing number of Americans, the concerns experienced in-vitro, in-vivo, or described on this Medical Executive-Post blog, are almost meaningless because they are, for the most part, outside the structure of the current health care system. Why?

  • Employers are downsizing staff or cutting out health insurance benefits in an effort to be financially successful in a global economy.
  • Demands for greater government accountability in the expenditure of tax dollars have brought about increasingly more stringent eligibility requirements for safety-net programs like Medicaid. 
  • As insurance becomes more expensive or government programs undergo budget cuts, people are being excised from the system.
  • New competitive demands have fostered unprecedented consolidations, mergers, and closures of healthcare facilities.

This shake-out may have served to greatly reduce the overcapacity that plagued the system, but it has been done with greater emphasis on cutting costs than on fostering efficiency and effectiveness in creating a true system of care delivery. 

The Healthcare Commodity Issue

Those who view health care as little different from any other commodity available through the free market see the present access concerns as simply a byproduct of the inevitable restructuring of the system. While they argue that we must adhere to market solutions to solve our health care access problems, others demand a different approach calling for governmental national health insurance or some form of subsidized care providing at least a basic level of treatment for all citizens. 

Moreover, while Americans continue to proudly tout that we do not explicitly ration care as do some other countries (notably Great Britain and Canada); we tacitly accept a health care system that implicitly excludes citizens who are unable to overcome financial barriers to access.

Care Access Issues

Access to care represents the most visible issue at the very foundation of the ethical principle of justice. 

In their text, “Principles of Biomedical Ethics”, authors Thomas Beauchamp, Ph.D. and James F. Childress, Ph.D. point out that “justice” is subject to interpretation and may even be evoked to support the positions of parties in direct opposition.

A Philosophical Mixed Bag

For example, those who support the predominant principle of distributive justice – the fair allocation of resources based on laws or cultural rules – still must decide on what basis these resources will be used. 

On the other hand, this mix-ed bad of philosophical thoughts include among others:

  • Utilitarians, who argue for resource distribution based on achieving the “greatest good for the greatest number.”
  • Libertarians, who believe that recipients of resources should be those who have made the greatest contributions to the production of those resources – a free market approach to distribution.
  • Egalitarians, that support the distribution of resources based on the greatest need, irrespective of contribution or other considerations. 

Consequently, developing a system of access based on “justice” will be fraught with enormous difficulty.

The Current System

In the current health care environment, access to medical care is approaching crisis levels as increasing malpractice insurance premiums are driving physicians from high-risk specialties such as obstetrics, emergency medicine, and surgery in record numbers. 

The impact is most dramatic in rural and under-served areas of the country where sole-practitioners and small group practices are discontinuing services, leaving local citizens with no choice but to forego care or travel greater distances to regional medical centers to find necessary treatment. 

At the same time, significant budget cuts at both the federal and state levels have seriously eroded funding for Medicaid, leaving this especially-vulnerable segment of the population with even fewer options than before.

Issues Moving to the Forefront

Two areas of the medical care access dilemma are moving to the forefront.

1. The first is in emergency medicine.

An initial study by the Federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cited statistics showing that in the decade ending in 2001, emergency room visits increased 20 percent, while the number of emergency departments shrank 15 percent. Increasingly, hospitals have closed emergency departments due to increasing costs, staffing shortages, and declining payments for services. This crisis comes at a time when post 9/11 fears of terrorism and global disease outbreaks like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) have placed an even greater burden on the delivery of emergency services.  It continues and is exacerbated, even today.

For example, Arthur Kellerman, MD, former director of emergency services at Atlanta’s Grady Memorial Hospital, the city’s only level one trauma center, writes that “the situation is alarming and has been for some time… It’s unconscionable that we are not coming to terms with the Achilles’ heel of our health care system.”

2. The second area that will grow in significance is in the area of genetic testing.

As technological capabilities improve, medicine’s ability to examine an individual’s genetic makeup will open up remarkable opportunities to predict a person’s susceptibility to certain diseases or handicapping conditions. From a scientific standpoint, we are on the threshold of an extraordinary new era in medicine, where identifications of and treatments for potential illnesses may begin before the person is even born.

“Medicine’s Iceberg”

However, there is a more troubling access side to the potential of genetic testing as noted by Johns Hopkins University president, Dr. William R. Brody. He described genetic testing as “medicine’s iceberg,” where serious dangers for access to care are lurking beneath the surface. 

According to Brody, heated debate has already begun regarding the value of genetic information to insurance companies who could use the information to determine premium levels, even the overall insurability, for individuals and/or families with a member identified through testing as predisposed to a catastrophic and/or potentially expensive medical condition.

In this scenario, infants manifesting a genetic predisposition to certain illnesses or potential behavior disorders may find themselves faced with lifelong un-insurability based on the results of prenatal genetic testing.

Assessment

Furthermore, Brody persuasively argues that the potential of this technology, regardless of the incredible scientific potential it offers, could lead to dramatically diminished access to health insurance for tens of thousands of individuals and families and bring about an “end to private health insurance as we know it.”  He suggests that some form of community-rated, universal health insurance may be the only reasonable alternative to assure that Americans at all levels, from indigent and working poor, to the most affluent, may receive needed, basic medical care. 

CONCLUSION

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My Pragmatic Philosophy of Education

It is NOT the Boyer Model

[By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA]

The Boyer Model of Education and Scholarship

OK – I may subscribe to the Boyer Model but with several specific personal variations which I will keep propriety and not disclose here. But, I will discuss my teaching pragmatism, below.

Definition

Boyer’s Model of scholarship and education is an academic model advocating expansion of the traditional definition of scholarship and research into four types of scholarship. It was introduced in 1990 by Ernest Boyer.

According to Boyer, traditional research, or the scholarship of discovery, had been the center of academic life and crucial to an institution’s advancement but it needed to be broadened and made more flexible to include not only the new social and environmental challenges beyond the campus but also the reality of contemporary life.

His vision was to change the research mission of universities by introducing the idea that scholarship needed to be redefined.

MORE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boyer%27s_model_of_scholarship

ME: Dr. Marcinko Teaching Philosophy

ENTER MY PRAGMATISM

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DEAN: Dean 3.0 Philosophy

Assessment

So, what do you think?

Conclusion

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The Emerging Role of Chief Diversity Officer [CDO] 2.0

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By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA MEd

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

My history

I came of age on the mean inner city streets of Baltimore, Maryland and developed a special interest in diversity, inclusion and urban renewal at a young age.

Today, I resonate with the identity of human capital educational leadership; small classes or teams; engaged students and stakeholders; parents and teachers; research and development; and a motivated staff inculcating life-long learning initiatives and critical thinking skills.

Career

Yet, I am not a career opportunist seeking incremental advancement through the halls of academia. Rather, I am a culturally sensitive and bi-racial physician-executive who senses there are deep, but often untapped, human resources embedded within many universities. If true; they are best released by an externally recruited champion of diversity and inclusion.

A Chief Diversity Officer [CDO]; if you will.

This includes a respect for values that celebrate the unique attributes, characteristics and perspectives that make each person who they are; ethnicity; gender; gender identity; language differences; nationality; parental status; physical, mental and developmental abilities; race; religion; sexual orientation; skin color; socio-economic status; work and behavioral styles; the perspectives of each individual DNA shaped by their nation, experiences and culture—and more.

Even when people appear the same on the outside, they are different.

Importantly, such inclusion includes a strategy to leverage diversity.

  • Diversity always exists in social systems.
  • Inclusion, on the other hand, must be created.

In order to leverage diversity, an environment must be created where people feel supported, listened to and able to do their personal best; for example:

The BAKKE DECISION

Historically, and for me, an important ruling on affirmative action by the Supreme Court in 1978 was the BAKKE Case. Allan Bakke, a white man, was denied admission to a medical school that had admitted black candidates with weaker academic credentials. Bakke contended that he was a victim of racial discrimination. The Court ruled Bakke had been illegally denied admission to the medical school, but also that medical schools were entitled to consider race as an admission factor.

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My story

As Department Chair and Residency Director at a local hospital, I was credited with accepting the first women residents and African Americans into our post-graduate education and surgical training program.

So, at this level of blended pedagogy, andragogy and heutagogy, my mission is to be a modern guide on the side; not bombastic sage on the stage. Moreover, this CDO 2.0 position holds special gravitas in order to set the tone for the future growth of inclusion and diversity thru example; in words and deeds.

Assessment

Frankly, I don’t see the CDO role as a mere “job”. It is a calling that requires a “hands-on” ambassador — helping to advise and lead in all related matters. As the sage once opined:

There is no limit to what you can accomplish if you don’t care who gets the credit!

Conclusion

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Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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Dr. Eric Bricker Explains How Medicare Can Take Money Back from Hospitals if it Wants. If the Hospital Thinks Medicare is Being Unfair, the Appeals Process Takes 3 Years!

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Related: On Medicare Bureaucratization

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R.I.P. Paul Edward Farmer MD PhD

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By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA

[Editor-in-Chief]

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Paul Edward Farmer MD PhD

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Paul Edward Farmer (October 26, 1959 – February 21, 2022) was an American medical anthropologist and physician. Farmer held an MD and PhD from Harvard University, where he was the Kolokotrones University Professor and the chair of the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He was the co-founder and chief strategist of Partners In Health (PIH), an international non-profit organization that since 1987 has provided direct health care services and undertaken research and advocacy activities on behalf of those who are sick and living in poverty. He was professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Global Health Equity at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Paul and his colleagues in the U.S. and abroad have pioneered novel community-based treatment strategies that demonstrate the delivery of high-quality health care in resource-poor settings in the U.S. and abroad. Their work is documented in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization, The Lancet, The New England Journal of Medicine, Clinical Infectious Diseases, British Medical Journal, and Social Science and Medicine.

Dr. Farmer had written extensively on health and human rights, the role of social inequalities in the distribution and outcome of infectious diseases, and global health.

He was known as “the man who would cure the world,” as described in the book Mountains Beyond Mountains by Tracy Kidder. The story of Partners In Health is also told in the 2017 documentary Bending the Arc. He was a proponent of liberation theology.

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MORE: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/paul-farmer-global-health-care-pioneer-dies-at-62/ar-AAU8wJj?li=BBnb7Kz

HARVARD: https://ghsm.hms.harvard.edu/faculty-staff/paul-farmer

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Rest in Peace

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