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The POWER of Three

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Rick Kahler MS CFP

By Rick Kahler MSFS CFP®

At a recent workshop sponsored by the Center for Action and Contemplation, I was introduced to a principle that could be a helpful way to frame and change hurtful money behaviors. It’s based on the work of Adrian Bejan, a professor of mechanical engineering at Duke University, whose Constructal Law describes the physics of life as a flow system.

Flow Systems

Flow systems consist of three interweaving forces: affirming (what moves or flows), denying (what opposes or resists), and reconciling (what brings the first two into a new relationship).

With a sailboat, for example, the affirming force is the wind. The denying force is the rudder. The reconciling force is the helmsman who figures out how to bring the two oppositional forces together. When the helmsman finds the right balance between the wind and the rudder, the boat sails forward. Without the helmsman there is no forward progress, and a sailboat floats aimlessly.

Law of Three

In human interaction, philosophers often refer to this principle as the Law of Three. One place we can see it is in the US government. We have an affirming force (a Democratic Senator, say) that proposes a bill and the denying force (perhaps a Republican House member) that opposes it. The result is gridlock unless the third reconciling force (perhaps moderate members of both parties) can merge mutually acceptable pieces of both the affirming and denying forces into new legislation.

It’s important to recognize that no force is inherently good or bad, and neither is the reconciliation always positive. For example, Hitler was the reconciling force of the two opposing forces in pre-WWII Germany.

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SIB flow chart

The key to transformation—creating a new system or behavior—is becoming aware of the two conflicting forces and finding a way forward

***

How can we apply the Law of Three to our finances?

Take the example of a chronic overspender who tried for years to reduce his spending and live within his means. The problem was his love for “big boy” toys. There wasn’t a boat, ATV, motorcycle, or power tool that didn’t call to him. Predictably, like a sailboat without a helmsman, his financial ship was blown about aimlessly and in danger of sinking deeper and deeper in debt.

When he learned about the Law of Three, he initially thought the affirming force was his desire for financial solvency and the resisting force was his penchant for the toys. Actually it was just the opposite. The affirming force was his unrestrained desire for the toys and the resisting force was the nagging reminder of financial insolvency. He came to recognize that the missing third force was a conscious relationship with the toys.

He had a long-time pattern of struggling with the desire, unsuccessfully trying to resist it, and feeling ashamed and guilty when he finally gave in and bought the new toy. His first step toward change was to notice what went on emotionally when he began craving another toy, and he identified a pattern of feeling empty, lonely, and anxious at those times. Focusing on the anticipation of buying the new toy pushed aside the difficult feelings. He also came to see that he found much of his identity as the guy with the newest toy.

Assessment

With financial therapy, he was able to reconcile the historical causes of those emotions with the desire for the toys and financial solvency. This shift allowed him to greatly reduce his spending on toys but still occasionally and consciously buy one. He was able to live within his budget and begin funding a retirement plan. Becoming able to apply the reconciling force allowed him to move forward with his financial goals. 

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

***

 

Are You a One Percenter?

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Well … Are you Doctor?

Rick Kahler MS CFP

By Rick Kahler MSFS CFP

What would it take for you to become a one percenter? How much net worth would put you in the wealthiest one percent in the United States?

In a recent discussion with a colleague, I suggested this number was $1.2 million. He said $9 million. Turns out the real answer, which is surprisingly hard to find, probably falls somewhere in between $1.2 million and $9 million. I have read several articles that put it in the range of $3 to $5 million.

Joshua Kennon, author of The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Investing, 3rd Edition, discusses this topic in more detail in an article posted to his blog in September 2011. He cites several sources and points out the differing methods used by the Federal Reserve Board (which uses the $9 million figure) and the IRS (which favors $1.2 million) to arrive at their numbers.

Regardless of the net worth needed to enter the top 1%, the media usually focuses on the amount of a household’s annual income as what really determines what makes someone rich. We know the income of the rich is growing faster than the income of the poor and middle class. What isn’t reported as often is that the percentage of Americans considered “rich” is also increasing by leaps and bounds. This is different from the rich getting richer. This means an increasing number of Americans are joining the ranks of the rich and the upper middle class.

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In June 2016, Stephen J. Rose, a nationally recognized labor economist affiliated with the Income and Benefits Policy Center at the Urban Institute, published a report titled “The Growing Size and Incomes of the Upper Middle Class.” His research covered a 36-year period from 1979 through 2014. He found that the number of households earning $350,000 or more a year (adjusted for inflation) increased eighteen times, from 0.1% of the population in 1979 to 1.8% in 2014. The upper middle class, those households earning between $100,000 to $350,000, increased two and one-half times, from 12.9% to 29.4%.

With more people earning more money and moving into the rich and upper middle class categories, it would stand to reason that fewer people would be left in the categories of middle class, lower middle class, and poor. The middle class, households earning $50,000 to $100,000, shrank from 38.8% to 32.0%. The lower middle class, households earning from $30,000 to $50,000, declined from 23.9% to 17.1%. The poor, households earning under $30,000, contracted from 24.3% to 19.8%.

Good News?

That is really good news. It means that today, the average American is earning more money than was the case 36 years ago. Perhaps our economic system isn’t as broken as some would have us believe.

With so many political candidates and activists focused on issues like income inequality, it’s easy to assume that more and more Americans are sinking to the bottom economically. Before making such assumptions, it’s important to factor in real data like that cited in Rose’s report.

The plight of those who unfortunately remain on the bottom is a real concern that deserves attention. Yet it is only one part of the whole picture. Many others are able to move upward, an individual and societal accomplishment that is worth celebrating.

Assessment

Instead of taking more from those who do succeed, it would be more useful to focus on what we can do to help others emulate them. The middle and upper middle classes tend to receive less attention than either the poor or the rich, yet these categories make up the majority of Americans. There is always room for others to join them. 

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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***

“Honey, we need to talk … about estate planning.”

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Rick Kahler MS CFP

By Rick Kahler MS CFP®

Supposedly, the most frightening words one spouse can hear from the other are, “Honey, we need to talk.” Even more frightening, however, is, “Honey, we need to talk about estate planning.”

What can you do if you want to get serious about estate planning, but your spouse doesn’t?

Here are a few suggestions:

  1. Consider ways to persuade a reluctant spouse to participate

First, give up nagging. In my years of financial planning, I’ve seen how ineffective it is from either an advisor or a spouse.

Instead, it might be worthwhile to do some research and show your spouse some of the specific consequences of not planning. Depending on the complexity of your circumstances, you may find it worthwhile to consult an attorney, accountant, or financial advisor. You can also find a great deal of helpful information, such as state probate and intestacy laws, online.

If you have no wills, find out how your state laws distribute assets when someone dies without a will. Show your spouse how that distribution would affect your family. In many cases, intestacy laws are still designed around a traditional one-marriage-with-children family structure. They may fail to provide for members of families that don’t fit that mold—for example, by disregarding stepchildren and step grandchildren.

If you have wills but made them years ago, take a close look at their provisions. Show your spouse—with numbers, if you can—exactly who would benefit and who would not. Your spouse may be persuaded to take action if he or she sees the specific ways that yesterday’s wills don’t provide for today’s family. Even if this accomplishes nothing beyond convincing your spouse to destroy an outdated will, it may be worthwhile. An outdated will, in some cases, can be worse than none at all.

It’s quite likely that neither of these approaches will succeed. This leaves you with the next-best option.

  1. Do what you can on your own

With your own separate property, you can do any estate planning you want, including executing a will and setting up a living trust. I would also strongly encourage you to execute powers of attorney for financial and health decisions.

However, you might be surprised at the limits on estate planning for assets you consider yours. One important provision is that married people cannot name anyone except each other as beneficiaries on retirement plans without the spouse’s permission. Suppose, for example, you would like to name your children from a previous marriage as beneficiaries on a retirement account as a way of providing fairly for them if your spouse died intestate. You would need your spouse’s consent to do so.

Also, a will executed by one spouse does not affect assets held jointly or in trust, annuities, retirement plans, or individually held bank or brokerage accounts that have a TOD (transfer on death) provision.

Assuming you cannot persuade your spouse to participate in estate planning, and assuming you have done whatever individual planning you can, there’s one more step you can take.

  1. Educate yourself.

Do your best to create and maintain a complete inventory of assets you and your spouse hold jointly, as well as your separate retirement accounts, insurance policies, and other individual assets. Include account locations, approximate balances, and access information. Having this information will be invaluable if you end up as the administrator of your spouse’s estate.

Ironically, the person who benefits most from your separate estate planning may be your non-planning spouse. Yet doing whatever you can-will also help you be prepared, just in case you need to deal with the consequences of your spouse’s lack of planning.

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death

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Assessment

Some basic; but important thoughts.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

***

On the DOL’s New Fiduciary Rule

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By Rick Kahler MSFS CFP®

Rick Kahler MS CFPThe Department of Labor’s groundbreaking new Fiduciary Rule may change the legal responsibilities of advisors who sell financial products for consumers’ retirement accounts.

Financial services industry pundits aren’t sure whether the new rule is a giant step in the right direction or a successful dodging of a bullet by Wall Street.

Original Intent

The original intent was to require those selling financial products for retirement plans to act as fiduciaries—advisors required to put clients’ interests ahead of their own.

One proposed provision was a “restricted asset list” which would have banned the sale of high-commission products like private REITs and annuities to IRAs and other retirement plans. Wall Street brokers were “expecting a punch in the face that would force a dramatic overhaul of how they dealt with their customers,” notes Joshua Brown, CEO of Ritholtz Wealth Management, in an April 6 article at Fortune.com.

As adopted, the final rule allows financial salespeople to still sell all the controversial illiquid high-commissioned products they currently sell, as long as the brokerage firm can document the product is in the client’s best interest. Brown says this amounts to a “love tap.”

The Pundits

Bob Veres, editor of Inside Information, sees the new Fiduciary Rule as still a big win for consumers and fiduciary advisors. In an April 8 column, he writes, “professional financial planners and advisors have achieved a victory, and the Wall Street and independent broker-dealer service models have been dealt a blow.”

Veres argues that the new fiduciary duty to act in the client’s best interest will by itself preclude financial salespeople from justifying the sale of high-commissioned products in IRAs. He also points out that salespeople will no longer be allowed to receive “fat commissions” for recommending annuities and non-traded REITS, and therefore are unlikely to recommend these products.

Financial planner and writer Michael Kitces [a friend of this ME-P and advocate of iMBA’s online Certified Medical Planner® fiduciary focused professional charter education certification program] suggests the DOL’s concession allowing the current questionable financial products to still be purchased by IRAs may be “a brilliantly executed strategy of conceding to the financial services industry the exact parts that didn’t actually matter in the long run . . . yet keeping the key components that mattered the most,” the fiduciary duty to the client.

MORE: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Brown believes salespeople will continue recommending higher-cost products “so long as a justification can be made for their being recommended (quality, performance, etc.).”

He adds, “Advisors will still be able to sell the proprietary products of their own firm so long as they can enunciate the reason why these products are in their customers’ “best interests” – a hurdle whose height will probably be adjusted on a case-by-case basis as no one really knows what it means yet.”

Kitces contends the new law will ultimately give the consumer the power through the courts to define what is and isn’t in their best interests. He points out:

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PetreGloveimage-300x200

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“In other words, while the DOL fiduciary rule didn’t outright regulate what Wall Street can and cannot do, it did change the legal standard by which those actions will be judged and ensure that eventually the courts will have the opportunity to rule on these fiduciary conflicts.”

While the new rule only applies to retirement assets, Veres and Brown see it as a step toward requiring a fiduciary standard for all investment advice. I tend to agree.

Assessment

Since so many small investors hold retirement accounts, applying a fiduciary standard to those investments may help more consumers understand the difference between fiduciary advisors and product salespeople. As the industry moves toward full compliance with the rule by the April 2017 deadline, we may see an increase in consumer demand for financial advisors who put clients’ interests first.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™  Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

***

Seeking the “Perfect” Investment

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If I only had a crystal ball

Rick Kahler MS CFP

By Rick Kahler MS CFP®  http://www.KahlerFinancial.com

“If I only had a crystal ball.” Every investor has probably made this wish from time to time; even physician-executives. We would all like a way to avoid the emotional pain and anxiety that are sure to come when our portfolios lose value due to inevitable market downturns.

The Pain – The Pain

Surely a perfect investment would spare us that pain. Suppose a mutual fund manager with a crystal ball knew which 10% of the 500 largest U. S. stocks would earn the highest returns for each upcoming five-year period. Investing only in those stocks should ensure gain with no pain.

According to an article by Bob Veres, editor of Inside Information, someone has looked back over more than 80 years to track such a hypothetical perfect fund. Alpha Architect, a research company, divided the 500 largest U.S. stocks into deciles and imagined a fund investing in only the 10% known to have the highest returns for the next five years. Beginning January 1, 1927, the hypothetical portfolio was adjusted every five years. If you could have purchased it then and held it to the end of 2009, you would have earned just under 29% a year. Lots of gain, no pain at all, right?

Enter the Bear

Except for the particularly bad bear market that started in 1929, when you would have seen your investment plummet 75.96%. Or the one-year period starting at the end of March 1937, when the fund would have fallen more than 44%.

Or, the nine more times over the years that the fund dropped by 20% or more. It lost 22% in 1974 when the S&P 500 was up 20%. In 2000-2001 you’d have watched it plummet 34% while the S&P 500 was only down 21%. Or how about the 20% drop from the end of September through the end of November 2002, at a time when the S&P 500 was sailing along with a 15% positive return.

Yes, the long-term returns in this “perfect” investment were amazing. The full ride, however, offered many opportunities for anxiety and even terror, when investors would have been strongly tempted to bail.

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brain

***

Alpha Architect

Alpha Architect concluded that even if God—who presumably doesn’t need a crystal ball to have perfect foresight—were running this mutual fund, He would have lost a lot of investors. During the rough patches, many would have lost faith in His management skill.

Investors who are ultimately successful learn to hang on through thick and thin, knowing that markets eventually recover. Yet even if we could choose a perfect investment, staying with it for the long term is a challenge.

Speed Demons

One of the reasons market declines are so frightening is that they happen much faster than market gains.

Ben Carlson, author of A Wealth of Common Sense: Why Simplicity Trumps Complexity in Any Investment Plan, looked at all the bear markets and bull markets going back to 1928. The bull market rallies averaged 57% returns, while bear markets averaged losses of 24%. The bull markets lasted an average of 474 days. The bear market drops were more intense, compressed into an average of just 232 days before the next upturn.

Even when, by percentage, the gains far outweigh the losses, the more gradual pace of the bull markets doesn’t attract our attention in the same way as the heart-stopping downturns of bear markets.

Assessment

Veres calls the Alpha Architect research “a lesson in humility and patience.” We can’t look into the future with a real crystal ball. However, looking back at market patterns with an imaginary one can help us protect ourselves from our own tendency to bail out in the face of adversity.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

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  Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™  Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

[Dr. Cappiello PhD MBA] *** [Foreword Dr. Krieger MD MBA]

Front Matter with Foreword by Jason Dyken MD MBA

***

Understanding Your Real Rate of Return [RROR]

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Some Modern ROR versus RORR Musings

Rick Kahler MS CFPBy Rick Kahler MS CFP®

http://www.KahlerFinancial.com

Is there anything more important than the overall rate of return you earn on your investment portfolio?

Yes, there is. It’s the real rate of return.

Past Half Decade

Over the past five years, even diversified portfolios have earned relatively low returns. Many investors are fearful that this has significantly reduced the income they can expect to receive upon retirement.

To see whether that fear is justified, let’s look at some numbers. Based on a model portfolio I follow that holds nine different asset classes, the average return for the past three years (after all fees and expenses) was 2.45%. The five-year return was a little better at 2.67%. However, the seven-year return was 5.62%.

If an expected long-term (10 years or more) overall return on the same portfolio was 5.00%, at first glance it appears the portfolio slightly exceeded its expectation for seven years, but fell considerably short the last three and five years.

Now – Take a Second Glance

But, if there is a first glance, you know there is a second glance coming. And that second glance highlights a seemingly obscure fact that changes the picture considerably. In every future return expectation, there is also another estimate that rarely is mentioned, but which is as important as the rate of return. This is the rate of inflation.

While the long-term expected overall return was 5.00%, the long-term expected rate of inflation was 3.00%. That means there was an expectation the investments would earn 2.00% above the rate of inflation.

This is known as the real rate of return (RROR) and it’s far more important than the overall rate of return.

For example, if the projected inflation rate was 4%, the expected real rate of return would have been 1%. At a projected inflation rate of 6%, the real rate of return would have actually been negative.

Most financial planners base their projections of a client’s retirement income on the real rate of return. A real rate of return of 2% is very common.

The Real Rate of Return

Taking into account the real rate of return, what has actually happened over the past three, five, and seven years? Overall expected returns have definitely been lower over the past three and five years. So has the rate of inflation. While the estimated inflation rate was 3.00%, the actual inflation rate was significantly lower, at 0.78% for the past three years and 1.03% for the past five. Subtracting these numbers from the overall rate of return (2.45% for three years and 2.67 for five years) gives us the real rates of return: 1.68% and 1.64% for the last three and five years. Compared with the estimated real return of 2.00%, this is slightly lower but still close to hitting the target.

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stock market

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Looking at the seven-year real rate of return, things go from “ok” to “phenomenal.” While the overall rate of return of 5.62% was higher than the expected return of 5.00%, the inflation rate was 1.03% instead of the expected 3.00%. This resulted in a real rate of return of 4.59%, more than double the expected real rate of return.

Bottom Line

The bottom line is that those investors who have been in the market for seven years will have more to spend in retirement than previously projected. In investment circles, this is called a home run.

For physician investors discouraged by recent overall return numbers, a second look might give you cause to cheer up. If you’ve invested in a diversified portfolio, rebalanced, and stayed the course during market crashes, things may be better than they seem.

Assessment

Thanks to one of the lowest inflation rates in modern history, you could be further ahead than you thought.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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On Socially Responsible Investing

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Balancing profits, people and the planet

Rick Kahler MS CFP

By Rick Kahler MS CFP®  http://www.KahlerFinancial.com

Balancing profits, people, and the planet can be tricky. Many physicians and other investors prefer to put their funds into companies that not only make money, but that also reflect the investors’ values. Some take this concept, often described as “socially conscious” or “socially responsible” investing, very seriously. There are also financial advisors who specialize in this niche.

Yet investing in companies whose values align with your own is not as simple as it may seem.

Business owners and corporate executives

In my experience with business owners and corporate executives, most of them take an interest in bettering the people who work with them, the planet, and their own lives. They run their companies with integrity. They don’t break the law. They respect their customers and don’t take advantage of them, but give them fair value in exchange for their money. They offer compensation and working conditions that will attract and retain good employees. Ultimately, they understand that ethical business practices are not only the right thing to do, but the best way to run profitable businesses.

But, how do you as an investor know whether a company is bettering  people and the planet while it is making a profit? One method is to choose companies in which to invest by using some type of socially responsible screening. Such screening looks to exclude companies producing products that harm people or the earth, or companies judged to have poor corporate cultures.

The challenges

One challenge with using such screens is that we don’t all have the same definitions of what may be socially or morally offensive. Investor A may not want to own stock in oil or mining companies. Investor B may be concerned about goods produced in unsafe working conditions. Investor C may not want to support companies that sell tobacco or alcohol.

A second challenge is that companies change. They may expand, diversify, or merge with other companies until it’s difficult to pinpoint their values, products, and company culture. A company may sell a lot of great products that do a lot of good for people, but have one division that produces a product some investors may find offensive. And it’s even harder to screen for companies that have good cultures—especially since there’s no clear definition of a “good” culture.

Choices

Investors can choose mutual funds that include only socially responsible companies, but any such fund is almost guaranteed to include companies that you would otherwise exclude.

If you are serious about investing only in companies that support your values, it’s essential to research them before you invest and monitor them regularly to ensure their practices or products don’t change. You also may find it necessary to give companies or SRI funds a little leeway—settling for perhaps 95% compliance with your values rather than insisting on 100%.

But sadly, even if you could invest your money in the shares of companies that totally support your values, doing so may not have much impact on that company, its people, or the planet. One reason for this is that your investment is likely to be a miniscule fraction of the company’s stock.

In addition, most often when we invest in stocks, we do not buy shares directly from the company. We buy shares, through a stock exchange, that are being sold by other investors. The profits or losses involved in trading those stocks accrue to the third-party buyers and sellers. They don’t directly affect the company’s bottom line.

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gv

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Assessment

For most small investors, making a difference through socially responsible investing may be an illusory goal. Its only real impact may be to help us feel better about ourselves.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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