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On Business Ownership

No Self-Indulgent Path to Success

repeat

No Self-Indulgent Path to Success

By Rick Kahler CFP® 

http://www.MedicalExecutivePost.com

“Most of my friends assume that business owners spend their money and time on cocaine and hookers.”

This jaw-dropping quote came from a young man I was talking with recently about money, investing, and running a business. I was shocked; this was a money script I had never heard.I asked if he was serious. He was. I asked if any of the friends with this belief were raised by a parent who owned a business. He thought for a moment and said, “No, not one.”

This conversation reminded me of a government employee who once told me, “Any person who succeeds in business had to do so illegally by embracing corruption and dishonesty.” He, too, was serious.

I was dumbfounded by both of these encounters. My experience of being raised by parents who owned a small business, and then going into business for myself, was quite different from these perceptions.

My father started his own business when I was four years old. I witnessed him working long hours. I remember the times when business was so bad he would have to borrow money to pay the bills and keep the doors open. Later in life I learned his business rarely made a profit and was just able to pay his salary.

He never shared with his employees how tight money was. When I went to work for him as a teenager, I remember listening to the talk around the water cooler. They all assumed he made far more money than what I knew was true.

***

***

In the years since, I have discovered many misperceptions about people who own real estate, are in business, or who have accumulated wealth.

The first misperception is that someone who owns real estate or a business has actually accumulated wealth. My 40 years of experience in financial planning has taught me that many, if not most, business owners would make more money working for someone else. And real estate owners accumulate wealth slowly. Most of them, myself included, struggle through some lean years with short or even negative cash flow until they finally pay off their mortgages.

Certainly, real estate or business owners who  persevere over the long term can become wealthy. Being wealthy, according to various studies, is defined as having a minimum net worth of somewhere between five million and twenty million dollars.

About 80% of millionaires own their own businesses. They put in long hours, often in careers they love enough so that work becomes play. The average business owner puts in about 70 hours a week. They are five times more likely than non-business owners to be “always available” via e-mail, four times more likely to work nights, and three times more likely to be in the office or store on weekends.

This is the way one successful business owner described it: “Our company will celebrate its 50th anniversary next year. Probably the first 30 years were spent working 70-100 hour weeks at below minimum wage and dumping every extra penny back into the business. I would say it’s only been the last 10 years that we have begun to reap the financial rewards that we spent 40 years striving to attain, still working 60-70 hour weeks. I acknowledge our work habits may in part be a result of being stubborn Norwegians that don’t think anyone else can do things right, but most successful small business owners I know have pretty much dedicated their life to become successful.”

Assessment

This focus and work ethic are what it takes to succeed at business ownership. It’s not a mindset that includes blowing money and time on cocaine and hookers.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

***

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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Dig Deeper Than CFP® To Find a Financial Planner

CFP® is a Designation  – Not a Guarantee!

By Rick Kahler CFP®

I have long recommended that consumers look for a Certified Financial Planning (CFP) certificant when shopping for a financial planner.

But don’t stop there. A CFP is no guarantee that someone is a competent, ethical, fiduciary professional. It only ensures that you are choosing from a pool of 85,000 financial services providers who are educated in the technical aspects of financial planning. It doesn’t mean the person is engaged in financial planning, is a fiduciary, or has a spotless ethical history.

In a troubling Wall Street Journal article on August 9, 2019, columnist Jason Zwieg writes that the “CFP Board’s online search directory neglected to inform the public that thousands of planners listed” have known “customer complaints, criminal histories, financial problems or regulatory proceedings.”

“Among these CFPs were 499 who have faced criminal charges, 324 who left a previous firm amid allegations of misconduct, 323 who had been disciplined or investigated by regulators and 68 who filed bankruptcy within the past 10 years,” Zweig notes. Yet none were ever disciplined by the CFP Board.

Let’s not lose perspective—these “bad apples” amount to less than 2% of CFP certificants. Every profession has those few who use its licensing and credentialing as a cover to manipulate, deceive, and abuse consumers. No amount of regulation or oversight will ever eliminate all the crooks.

In addition, you cannot simply assume because a professional has a certain license, designation, or formal degree that they are competent. In the graduate class I teach at Golden Gate University, not all students earn As and Bs. Many earn Cs. A few earn Ds and Fs. While I am not sure the D and F group ever graduate, I am sure I would not want them doing my financial planning without convincing evidence that their poor performance in my class was a one-off due to extenuating circumstances.

As the consumer, you cannot know if a prospective financial planner was that student. Nor can you know if they have a tainted criminal background, unless you dig deeper.

That digging includes looking for any past criminal or disciplinary charges brought by licensing agencies. It also includes determining whether the advisor is legally bound to a fiduciary standard—required to put your interests ahead of theirs—but has any conflicts of interest, especially by making a significant amount of their income from commissions on the sale of financial products.

Here are a few tips for digging deeper:

  1. Go to brokercheck.finra.org to see if FINRA has brought disciplinary actions against the advisor.
  2. Go to the SEC’s website to look for disciplinary actions.
  3. Have the prospective advisor sign a written disclosure that you are a client and they have a fiduciary duty to put your interests above their own, rather than a customer where they have no such obligation and will usually put the interests of their company first. Many advisors, especially those not legally bound to be fiduciaries, don’t understand the difference, so insist on getting this assurance in writing.
  4. Have the prospective advisor sign a statement disclosing what percentage of their company’s gross revenues comes from fees charged to clients.  These might be paid as hourly fees, annual retainers, or separate charges for advice. The lower the percentage of income from fees, the greater the chance of a significant conflict of interest. I recommend finding firms receiving over 90% of gross revenue from fees; I prefer 100% because such firms advertise themselves as “fee-only” or will offset any commissions against a flat fee.

Assessment

To find a trustworthy financial planner, I still recommend the CFP designation. Just remember that it’s a starting point, not a guarantee.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

***

MY ADVISORY BUSINESS MODEL SYNOPSIS

HOW I EARN – AND YOU PROFIT!

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA

My fee is $250 per hour prorated, so you only pay for the time used. This fee covers almost any medical practice management, insurance and risk management, personal financial planning or investment-related topic, including document review, phone consultation, research, and written investment strategies.

I also offer a special program for first-time potential clients called a Physician Practice-Portfolio Second Opinion™.  This all-inclusive $450 program takes about two hours in total and includes a pre-call document review, 60-minute phone consultation, and summary with observations and recommendations.

Docotor colleagues find this to to be a good value because their questions are answered under one fee.

So, it does not matter if you are a new, mid-career or mature practitioner, or where your money is invested or how much you have invested. Simply, I serve along side you as a fiduciary by upholding a duty of loyalty, fairness and good faith in all decision making.

At your professional service!

THANK YOU
Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA MEd CMP™
Certified Medical Planner
phone: 770-448-0769
MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

***

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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InVesting Temperament and Tolerance Shenanigans

Financial Advisors Evaluating Malarkey

cropped-dem

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA

Courtesy: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Evaluating “Sham” Risk Aversion Determination Methodologies

BACK STORY: You visit a local financial advisor as a prospective client. S/he gives you a form to complete that purports to discern your investing risk tolerance?

FORM: It says: “Please indicate by ranking the items below from 1 to 4, with 1 being the most descriptive and 4 being the least descriptive”.

LINK: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2009/12/28/risk-aversion-and-investment-alternatives/

EPIPHANY: After reviewing the form, you realize it is a superfluous one-size-fits-all risk reduction mechanism for the advisor. You identify the sheer malarkey of the exercise and leave in disgust. You ruminate to yourself – “there must be a better way,”

MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2017/10/24/on-investing-risk-tolerance/

And so, colleague Rick Kahler MSFS CFP® suggests alternative methods.

MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2017/10/18/on-retirement-planning-risks/

Your thoughts are appreciated.

***

***

BUSINESS, FINANCE AND ECONOMICS TEXTBOOKS FOR DOCTORS:

1 – https://lnkd.in/ebWtzGg

2 – https://lnkd.in/ezkQMfR

3 – https://lnkd.in/ewJPTJs

THANK YOU

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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The Buridan’s Ass Paradox

Analysis of Paralysis

[By Staff reporters]

Buridan’s ass is an illustration of a paradox in philosophy in the conception of free will. It refers to a hypothetical situation wherein a donkey that is equally hungry and thirsty is placed precisely midway between a stack of hay and a pail of water. Since the paradox assumes the ass will always go to whichever is closer, it dies of both hunger and thirst since it cannot make any rational decision between the hay and water. A common variant of the paradox substitutes two identical piles of hay for the hay and water; the ass, unable to choose between the two, dies of hunger.

The paradox is named after the 14th-century French philosopher Jean Buridan, whose philosophy of moral determinism it satirizes. Although the illustration is named after Buridan, philosophers have discussed the concept before him, notably Aristotle who used the example of a man equally hungry and thirsty, and Al-Ghazali who used a man faced with the choice of equally good dates.

***

***

A version of this situation appears as metastability in digital electronics, when a circuit must decide between two states based on an input that is in itself undefined (neither zero nor one). Metastability becomes a problem if the circuit spends more time than it should in this “undecided” state, which is usually set by the speed of the clock the system is running at.

LINK: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buridan%27s_ass

VIDEO: https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=buridan+ass&&view=detail&mid=EEF2FE452D2F761CFF99EEF2FE452D2F761CFF99&&FORM=VRDGAR

Assessment: Your thoughts are appreciated.

***

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

[Dr. Cappiello PhD MBA] *** [Foreword Dr. Krieger MD MBA]

Front Matter with Foreword by Jason Dyken MD MBA

Book of Month

Are Bonds Worth Some Excitement?

Bonds an Investment Class Worth Some Excitement, Today?

By Rick Kahler CFP®

“One thing I definitely don’t want in my portfolio is bonds,” a prospective client told me a few weeks ago. “Bonds are boring and don’t give good returns.”

Her confidence in her money script that bonds had no place in her portfolio was palpable. However, her understanding of the role bonds play in a portfolio was incomplete. I restrained myself from launching into a lecture on the importance of bonds and simply replied, “While it is true bonds can be boring, sometimes they can be phenomenally exciting.”

Certainly stocks, commodities, and real estate investments are generally much more exciting. They are many times more volatile than bonds; in just a year it’s possible they might even gain or decline 50% in value. Meanwhile, individually held bonds and their mutual funds can crank out predictable coupon yields quarter after quarter after quarter, with one-third of the volatility of stocks. The cost of the lower volatility is that the long-term returns on bonds tend to be half to a third that of stocks.

However, the bond market right now is anything but boring. So far this year, while stocks are back to prices roughly where they were in early 2018, a sharp fall in interest rates has caused bond investors to reap some significant capital gains. Bonds have an inverse relationship with interest rates. The value of most bonds increases when interest rates decline and go down when interest rates rise.

***

Bonds

***

How significant are the gains in bonds?

Since the beginning of 2019, investors in the 30-year Treasury bond have seen gains (interest plus price appreciation) of 26.4%. That would be an outstanding full year’s return for stocks. According to the Bloomberg Barclay’s U.S. Aggregate Bond Index, long-term bonds overall have generated a 23.5% return. Investment grade corporate bonds have returned 14.1%, while the 10-year Treasury note has gained 12.6%.

Market observers have predicted for the last decade or so that bond rates have nowhere to go but up. What we’re seeing currently is a yield on the ten-year Treasury note of just under 1.47%. At the end of 2018 it was more than 3%.

Will we see more of the same? It’s very hard to imagine that same 10-year Treasury falling another 1.5%—to zero yield. So the smart money says that most of the gains have already been taken, and anybody looking for 20-plus percent returns in long bonds going forward is just chasing them after the fact when returns are dropping.

But how smart is smart?

Just in case you agree and think interest rates have nowhere to go but up, consider that many countries in Europe actually have negative interest rates, where the investor or depositor pays to loan their money to organizations or banks. Another 1.5% fall to 0% interest rates could deliver similar 20% bond returns.

Lessons Learned

The lesson here is that even if you think of bonds as the boring part of your portfolio, there are times when they can add a little more kick to your returns than you might have expected. And in times of falling equity markets, they are an invaluable buffer against big losses. Still, with the long term probability that bonds produce a return half that of equities, there is a significant chance that they won’t sustain the 20-plus percent returns as rates stabilize and increase at some point in the future.

Unlike the misinformed prospect I visited with, most investors over the age of 40 can benefit by having a substantial slice of their investment portfolio in bonds. Whether their returns are typically boring or occasionally exciting, bonds are an important asset class for diversified investors.

Assessment: Your thoughts are appreciated.

***

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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WHAT IS THE PURPOSE OF A “Modern” CORPORATION?

An Emerging New Definition?

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA

When I was in business school back-in-the day, I studied the late great economist Milton Friedman Ph.D who opined that the purpose of a corporation was to enhance shareholder value, in an ethical and legal manner; period? Shareholders could then do what they wished with profits; if any. Charitable giving or Selfish intent, etc!

Now, for those of you who haven’t had time to review the recent seismic tome from The Business Roundtable Announcement this week, let me review why this is as big a moment as the Larry Fink BlackRock letter.

  • The Business Roundtable, a group of chief executive officers of nearly 200 major U.S. corporations, issues a statement with a new definition of the “purpose of a corporation.” Seven [7] refused to sign.
  • The reimagined idea of a corporation drops the age-old notion that they function first and foremost to serve their shareholders and maximize profits.
  • Investing in employees, delivering value to customers, dealing ethically with suppliers and supporting outside communities are now at the forefront of American business goals; ie., community good.

MORE: https://www.forbes.com/sites/afdhelaziz/2019/08/23/the-power-of-purpose-milton-friedman-is-rolling-in-his-grave/#6ed8506f7532

DEFINITION: A shareholder or stockholder is an individual or institution (including a corporation) that legally owns a share of stock in a public or private corporation. Shareholders are the owners of a limited company. They buy shares which represent part ownership of a company.

DEFINITION: A stakeholder as defined in its first usage in a 1963 internal memorandum at the Stanford Research Institute, are “those groups without whose support the organization would cease to exist.” The theory was later developed and championed by R. Edward Freeman in the 1980s.

LINK: https://www.cnbc.com/2019/08/19/the-ceos-of-nearly-two-hundred-companies-say-shareholder-value-is-no-longer-their-main-objective.html

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The Conundrum [real or perceived]

Shareholders are ever stakeholders in a corporation, but stakeholders are not always shareholders. A shareholder possesses part of a public company through shares of stock, while a stakeholder has a concern in the performance of a company for reasons other than stock performance or appreciation; ie., community good.

QUERY: So, exactly who will determine community good? And, who selects the stakeholders? Haven’t socially responsible companies, stocks, mutual funds and ETFs, etc., been in existence for decades? Is Professor Friedman rolling in his grave? OR, is this condundrum just linguistic gymnastics?

***

***

LINK: https://www.amazon.com/Dictionary-Health-Economics-Finance-Marcinko/dp/0826102549/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1254413315&sr=1-6

Your thoughts are appreciated.

***

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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Invite Dr. Marcinko

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