Two Vital IRS Audit Flags for Physicians

For Doctors and all Investors

By Hayden Adams

Image result for irs

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Red Flag #1: Under reporting income

Generally speaking, all income is taxable unless it’s specifically excluded, as is the case with certain gifts and inheritances. In most instances, the income you earn will be reported to both you and the government on an information return, such as a Form 1099 or W-2. If the income you report doesn’t match the IRS’s records, you could face problems down the road—so be sure you include the income from all of the following forms that are applicable to your situation:

  • 1099-B: The form on which financial institutions report capital gains.
  • 1099-DIV: The form on which financial institutions report dividends.
  • 1099-MISC: The form used to report various types of income, such as royalties, rents, payments to independent contractors, and numerous other types of income.
  • 1099-R:The form on which financial institutions report withdrawals from tax-advantaged retirement accounts.
  • Form 1099-INT: The form on which financial institutions report interest income.
  • Form SSA-1099:The form on which the Social Security Administration reports Social Security benefits (a portion of which may be taxable, depending on your level of income).
  • Form W-2:The form on which employers report total annual compensation, payroll taxes, contributions to retirement accounts, and other information.

If you receive an inaccurate statement of income, immediately contact the responsible party to request a corrected form and have them resend the documents to both you and the IRS as soon as possible to avoid delaying your tax return. Also, be aware that you must report income for which there is no form, such as renting out your vacation home.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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Red Flag #2: Misreporting investment gains

When you sell an investment, you’ll need to know both the cost basis (what you paid for the investment) and the sale price to determine your net gain or loss. The cost basis of your investment may need to be adjusted to account for commissions, fees, stock splits, or other events, which could help reduce your taxable gain or increase your net loss.

Financial institutions are required to adjust your investments’ cost basis and provide that information on a Form 1099. However, brokerages aren’t required to report the cost basis for investments purchased prior to a certain date, which means you’ll be responsible for supplying that information (see the table below). Be sure to keep records of all investment purchases and sales—even those for which your brokerage is responsible.

Your reporting responsibility

Depending on security type and date of purchase, you—rather than your brokerage—could be responsible for reporting the cost basis of your investment to the IRS.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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Security typeInvestor’s responsibility if
Stocks (including real estate investment trusts)Acquired before 01/01/2011
Mutual funds, exchange-traded funds, and dividend reinvestment plansAcquired before 01/01/2012
Other specified securities, including most bonds, derivatives, and options

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PODCAST: Medicare Financial Matters

WHAT COUNTS AS INCOME SOURCES?

BY CMS

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CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors : Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™ book cover

RISK MANAGEMENT: https://www.routledge.com/Risk-Management-Liability-Insurance-and-Asset-Protection-Strategies-for/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781498725989

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Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

FINANCIAL PLANNING: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

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PODCAST: Healthcare Stocks, Investing & IPOs?

By Eric Bricker MD

Healthcare Stock and IPO Investing Can Be Confusing. The Story of Privia Health is a Good Case Study in Understanding the Underlying Economics in Healthcare Investing:

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

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What is Medical Practice FINANCIAL RATIO ANALYSIS?

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BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Financial ratio analysis typically involves the calculation of ratios that are financial and operational measures representative of the financial status of a clinic or medical practice enterprise.  These ratios are evaluated in terms of their relative comparison to generally established industry norms, which may be expressed as positive or negative trends for that industry sector. The ratios selected may function as several different measures of operating performance or financial condition of the subject entity.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Common types of financial indicators that are measured by ratio analysis include:

  • Liquidity. Liquidity ratios measure the ability of an organization to meet cash obligations as they become due, i.e., to support operational goals. Ratios above the industry mean generally indicate that the organization is in an advantageous position to better support immediate goals.  The current ratio, which quantifies the relationship between assets and liabilities, is an indicator of an organization’s ability to meet short-term obligations.  Managers use this measure to determine how quickly assets are converted into cash.
  • Activity. Activity ratios, also called efficiency ratios, indicate how efficiently the organization utilizes its resources or assets, including cash, accounts receivable, salaries, inventory, property, plant, and equipment.  Lower ratios may indicate an inefficient use of those assets.
  • Leverage. Leverage ratios, measured as the ratio of long-term debt to net fixed assets, are used to illustrate the proportion of funds, or capital, provided by shareholders (owners) and creditors to aid analysts in assessing the appropriateness of an organization’s current level of debt.  When this ratio falls equal to or below the industry norm, the organization is typically not considered to be at significant risk.
  • Profitability. Indicates the overall net effect of managerial efficiency of the enterprise. To determine the profitability of the enterprise for benchmarking purposes, the analyst should first review and make adjustments to the owner(s) compensation, if appropriate.  Adjustments for the market value of the “replacement cost” of the professional services provided by the owner are particularly important in the valuation of professional medical practices for the purpose of arriving at an ”economic level” of profit.

The selection of financial ratios for analysis and comparison to the organization’s performance requires careful attention to the homogeneity of data. Benchmarking of intra-organizational data (i.e., internal benchmarking) typically proves to be less variable across several different measurement periods.

However, the use of data from external facilities for comparison may introduce variation in measurement methodology and procedure. In the latter case, use of a standard chart of accounts for the organization or recasting the organization’s data to a standard format can effectively facilitate an appropriate comparison of the organization’s operating performance and financial status data to survey results.

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Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

MORE: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

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PODCAST: “The Hospital” Book Review

By Brian Alexander

If You Like Michael Lewis Books, You’ll Love This

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US DEBT BUSTERS: The 1 TRILLION DOLLAR Coin

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BY MORNING BREW

The Legend of the $1 Trillion Platinum Coin

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You may have heard that a deadline to suspend the debt ceiling is rapidly approaching, and if lawmakers don’t do anything it could lead to “economic catastrophe,” in the words of Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen.

But what if we told you there was a solution to the debt ceiling fiasco so crazy…it just might work?

The solution: Yellen could have the Treasury mint a $1 trillion platinum coin, deposit it at the Fed to “retire” loads of US federal debt, and then enable the government to carry on with business as usual without having to worry about defaulting on its existing debt.

But can the Treasury really do that? Yes. According to Section 31 US Code § 5112

  • “The Secretary may mint and issue platinum bullion coins and proof platinum coins in accordance with such specifications, designs, varieties, quantities, denominations, and inscriptions as the Secretary, in the Secretary’s discretion, may prescribe from time to time.”

The law is crystal clear, and has been deemed kosher by numerous academics. “The statute clearly does authorize the issuance of trillion-dollar coins,” Laurence Tribe, a Harvard Law professor, told Washington Monthly back in 2013.

In fact, nothing says we have to stop at $1 trillion. Yellen could go big with a $10 trillion coin, hypothetically. As Bloomberg’s Joe Weisenthal explains, none of this would lead to inflation because it’s merely an “accounting trick”—not an influx of money into the economy.

Have we tried this before? The $1 trillion platinum coin idea seems to pop up every time the US faces a debt ceiling crunch. It was first introduced by a Georgia lawyer in 2010 and gained traction during the debt-ceiling crisis of 2011.

Things really turned up in 2013, when the government was…you guessed it, facing another debt ceiling deadline. The hashtag #MintTheCoin became popular on Twitter, and economists like Paul Krugman advocated for unleashing the coin. “If we have a crisis over the debt ceiling, it will be only because the Treasury Department would rather see economic devastation than look silly for a couple of minutes,” he wrote.

But each time the $1 trillion coin is mentioned as a way of resolving debt ceiling problems, the people in charge dismiss it as a distraction from Congress doing its job. “Neither the Treasury nor the Federal Reserve believes that the law can or should be used to produce platinum coins for the purpose of avoiding an increase in the debt limit,” The Treasury wrote during…well, yes, another debt ceiling emergency in 2015.

As for our current predicament, the Biden administration rejected the minting of the $1 trillion coin yet again last week.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Bottom line: Perhaps some enterprising future Treasury Secretary will manifest the platinum coin into existence, but for now it remains as mythical as Camelot.

MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/09/21/what-is-the-us-debt-ceiling/

COINS: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/2-democrats-say-they-want-to-mint-a-coin-to-solve-the-debt-ceiling-showdown-and-save-the-us-from-catastrophic-default/ar-AAOXLcU?li=BBnb7Kz

GOVERNMENT Rxn: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/heres-what-would-happen-if-washington-doesnt-prevent-a-government-shutdown/ar-AAODYi5?li=BBnb7Kz

Your comments are appreciated.

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What Exactly is a PONZI SCHEME; etc?

AND OTHER INVESTING SCAMS!

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

A Ponzi scheme (/ˈpɒnzi/, Italian: [ˈpontsi]) is a form of fraud that lures investors and pays profits to earlier investors with funds from more recent investors. Recall Bernie Madoff.

More: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2010/06/04/the-madoff-circle/

The scheme leads victims to believe that profits are coming from legitimate business activity (e.g., product sales or successful investments), and they remain unaware that other investors are the source of funds. A Ponzi scheme can maintain the illusion of a sustainable business as long as new investors contribute new funds, and as long as most of the investors do not demand full repayment and still believe in the non-existent assets they are purported to own.

Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ponzi_scheme

A pyramid scheme is a business model that recruits members via a promise of payments or services for enrolling others into the scheme, rather than supplying investments or sale of products. As recruiting multiplies, recruiting becomes quickly impossible, and most members are unable to profit; as such, pyramid schemes are unsustainable and often illegal.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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How to Spot and Protect Yourself From Investment Fraud

Pyramid schemes have existed for at least a century in different guises. Some multi-level marketing plans have been classified as pyramid schemes.

And, there are MANY other schemes in the financial services sector.

MORE: https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/other/are-you-about-to-be-the-victim-of-a-ponzi-scheme/ar-BB1cqabu?li=BBnb7Kz

Front Running: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2018/02/06/what-is-front-running/

Churning: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/07/23/churning-front-running-and-pumping-dumping/

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MEDICAL RISK MANAGEMENT: https://www.routledge.com/Risk-Management-Liability-Insurance-and-Asset-Protection-Strategies-for/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781498725989

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What is the US DEBT CEILING?

IN BRIEF

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Invite Dr. Marcinko | The Leading Business Education Network for Doctors,  Financial Advisors and Health Industry Consultants

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

What is the domestic national debt ceiling? 

A cap on how much the US government can borrow to finance its operations. 

  • It was introduced during World War I so that Congress wouldn’t have to approve every bond issuance by the Treasury Department as it had done previously—freeing up more time for name-calling. 
  • The debt ceiling has been suspended dozens of times over the years, including 3x during the Trump administration. 

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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Debt Ceiling: Definition, Current Status

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Without suspending the debt ceiling, the US wouldn’t be able to borrow money to pay its bills—and things would get ugly if that happened. The federal government would have to slash spending for programs like Medicaid, local governments would find it harder to borrow, and financial markets could go haywire.

In short, a failure to act would “produce widespread economic catastrophe,” Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen wrote in the Wall Street Journal. 

Important note: The debt ceiling doesn’t account for new spending, like the $3.5 trillion proposal the Democrats have on the table. Instead, it’s about spending Congress has already authorized, such as paying out Social Security. Over the years, the debt ceiling has become a “political weapon,” according to the AP, as each party tries to blame the other for their spending habits and for heaping more debt on the US. 

IRS: https://home.treasury.gov/policy-issues/financial-markets-financial-institutions-and-fiscal-service/debt-limit

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CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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The STEP-UP In Investment Value?

Understanding the TAX loophole of a ‘step up’ in BASIS value

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

The term “step-up” refers to the difference in value and tax liability that an asset has when it is acquired and when it is transferred to an inheritor.

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CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

EXAMPLE #2: The proverbial millionaire Doctor Joe, for example, could buy a home for $350,000 and sell it for $1 million, after which he’d pay taxes on the $650,000 gain. But if Dr. Joe passes the home onto his daughter Ella, and she has it appraised at $1 million, its value has taken a “step up” in value to $1 million. If Ella sells the home for $1 million or less, she wouldn’t owe anything in taxes.

ASSESSMENT: For billionaires like Jeff Bezos, Bill Gates and Elon Musk who earn far more through their investments than their salaries, this loophole is a perfect way to shield their wealth. Intergenerational wealth has contributed to surging inequality in America, which grew wider during the pandemic. Since 2019, the wealth of the top 400 richest people in the US increased by $1.4 trillion, per research from Gabriel Zucman and Emmanuel Saez, a pair of left-leaning economists at the University of California, Berkeley.

“Often, for these people, wealth accumulates tax-free their entire lives,” Frank Clemente, executive director at the left-leaning advocacy group Americans for Tax Fairness, opined. President Joe Biden proposed ending this loophole and making billionaires “pay their fair share,” so why does it look like his party won’t touch it?

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What is the KIDDIE TAX?

VITAL FOR PHYSICIAN PARENTS TO UNDERSTAND

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Do your children have income-generating assets in a custodial account?

If so, be sure you understand the so-called kiddie tax.

This law was passed to discourage wealthier individuals from transferring assets to their children to take advantage of their lower tax rates. The kiddie tax has seen many iterations but current rules tax a minor child’s unearned income—including capital gains distributions, dividends, and interest income—at the parents’ tax rate if it exceeds the annual limit ($2,200 in 2021).

The Kiddie Tax - Baker Holtz

The tax applies to dependent children under the age of 18 at the end of the tax year (or full-time students younger than 24) and works like this:

  • The first $1,100 of unearned income is covered by the kiddie tax’s standard deduction, so it isn’t taxed.
  • The next $1,100 is taxed at the child’s marginal tax rate.
  • Anything above $2,200 is taxed at the parents’ marginal tax rate.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

So – If your child also has earned income, say from a summer job or legitimate work in your medical office or practice, the rules become more complicated.

To learn more, see IRS Publication 929

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The DUPONT Decomposition Equation for ROI

D.D.E. FOR HOSPITALS AND HEALTHCARE ORGANIZATIONS

DEM blue

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP

[Editor-in-Chief] http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

According to the Dupont Decomposition Equation – which involves the conglomeration of net operating income, revenues, expenses and average operating assets – ROI and economic profit is increased in three prioritized ways:

  1. Cost and expense reductions.
  2. Revenue increases [Rev]
  3. Reduced average operating assets [AOO]

Note: ROI = NOI / Rev X Rev / AOO

Cost and expense reductions

Although many hospitals have reduced expenses, postponed projects and put clinical or information technology projects on hold because of the MU conundrum, this may be unwise and quality may suffer. And, mental health care programs are almost always the first cost center to be reduced in tough times.

Upgrades today, especially with concurrent marketing and advertising promotions, may well be considered a strategic competitive advantage, and at bargain basement prices for those with cash or credit. This cost reduction is easy because it gives the biggest buck-bang in the ROI equation, and is the first line of ROI augmentation by savvy administrators and CEOs. It is also intuitive and wholly “wrung-out” in the marketplace, to date.

Revenue increases

On the other hand, revenues can usually be only incrementally increased by improving services like emergency care, urgent care, wellness, out-patient and/or surgical departments. This is the more difficult part of the equation and yields a positive, but lesser return in the ROI equation.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

DuPont Formula: Learn More At Accounting Play

Three Modern Collections Rules for Hospitals

The following medical practice procedures will markedly increase upfront office collections:  

  • Train staff to handle exceptions. What is your policy if the patient payment is significant? Will you allow 25% payments—one today and three over the next three months? Communicate your policy to all staff. What will you do if a patient shows up without an insurance card? There will be other exceptions. Train employees to call the appropriate practice-management contact when an exception does not fit in the categories you provide and make sure those managers are responsive.
  • Understand that not everyone will shine in collections. The value of this new front-desk function should be reflected in job descriptions and wages. Track staff performance and hold employees accountable for collection goals. The most successful practices collect in the 90% range.
  • Provide professional signage that states your basic policy. “Payments are due at time of service.” Avoid typewritten, lengthy explanations taped to walls or desks that look like clutter.

Reduced average operating assets

Finally, any delay in updating facilities – while easy and may reduce operating assets – there is little ROI advantage and profit potential. Of course, facility asset upgrades mean borrowing funds through tax-exempt bonds – the main source of debt for most hospitals – and is currently difficult or impossible in this climate. Loans from banks, private investors, angels, venture capitalists or other financial institutions are similarly difficult to obtain. Thus, this part of the equation may often be neglected; as is the case now.

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What is the “SAVER’S CREDIT”?

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

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Sponsor: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

The saver’s credit is a tax credit that’s intended to promote retirement savings among low- and moderate-income workers. It can reduce an eligible taxpayer’s federal income taxes when they save in a qualified retirement plan. It may be especially useful to medical students, nurses, interns, residents and fellows.

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IRS Releases Plan Limits for 2020 - Montgomery Retirement Plan Advisors

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In 2021, the maximum credit is worth $1,000 for individuals and $2,000 for married couples filing jointly, although it phases out for higher earners. To qualify for the credit, individuals must have an adjusted gross income of $32,500 or less. The income threshold for married couples is $65,000.

Because the credit is non-refundable, eligible taxpayers are able to use it to effectively reduce their tax bill to zero – but it cannot provide them with a tax refund.

IRS: https://www.irs.gov/retirement-plans/plan-participant-employee/retirement-savings-contributions-savers-credit

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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Three [3] Must Know Technical ROTH IRA RULES

ALERT FOR PHYSICIANS AND ALL INVESTORS

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1. You can trade actively in a Roth IRA

Some physician investors may be concerned that they can’t actively trade in a Roth IRA. But there’s no rule from the IRS that says you can’t do so. So you won’t get in legal trouble if you do.

But there may be some extra fees if you trade certain kinds of investments. For example, while brokers won’t charge you if you trade in and out of stocks and most ETFs on a short-term basis, many mutual fund companies will charge you an early redemption fee if you sell the fund. This fee is usually assessed only if you’ve owned the fund for fewer than 30 days.

2. Any gains are tax-free – forever

The ability to avoid taxes on your investments is an incredible benefit. You’ll be able to escape – perfectly legally – taxes on dividends and capital gains. Not surprisingly, this superpower makes the Roth IRA very popular, but to enjoy its benefits, you must abide by a few rules.

The Roth IRA limits you to a $6,000 maximum annual contribution (for 2021), and you won’t be able to withdraw earnings from the account until retirement age (59 1/2) or later and after owning the account for at least five years. However, you can withdraw your contributions to the account without being taxed at any time, but you won’t be able to replace those contributions later.

The Roth IRA offers a number of other benefits and retirement savers should look into it.

3. You can’t use margin in an IRA

Many traders use margin in their accounts. With a margin loan, the broker extends you capital to invest beyond what you actually own. It’s a useful tool, especially if you’re trading frequently. Unfortunately, margin loans are not available in IRA accounts.

For frequent traders the ability to trade on margin is not just about magnifying your returns. It’s also about having the ability to sell a position and immediately buy another. In a cash account (like a Roth IRA), you have to wait for a transaction to settle, and that takes a couple days. In the meantime you’re unable to trade with that money even though it’s credited to your account.

PLUS A FOURTH RULE

4. You don’t get to deduct losses

If you’re trading in a taxable brokerage account, you’ll get a tax write-off if you make a losing investment. Some investors even make sure they’re getting the largest write-off they can using a process called tax-loss harvesting. They scoop up that benefit and then even repurchase the stock or fund later (after 30 days) if they think it’s poised to rise in the future.

But if you’re trading in a Roth IRA, you won’t get the ability to write off losses. Changes to the tax code in 2017 eliminated the ability to claim any benefit from losses in an IRA account.

CITATION: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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What is a Roth IRA? | Meridian Financial Partners

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The “BUSINESS” of Transformational Medical Practice Skills

[3rd] THIRD EDITION

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On Excess IRA and Roth IRA Contributions

BY DAN MOISAND CFP®

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READ HERE: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/other/i-contributed-too-much-to-my-ira-and-roth-ira-%e2%80%94-what-now/ar-AANP1IP?li=BBnb7Kz

MORE: https://www.irs.gov/retirement-plans/plan-participant-employee/retirement-topics-ira-contribution-limits

EDITOR’S NOTE: Colleague Dan Moisand contributed to our textbook on “Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors.”

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PODCAST: Confessions of a Hospital Chief Financial Officer

HOSPITAL FINANCES REVEALED

By Eric Bricker MD

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CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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HOSPITALS: Management, Operations and Strategies

Tools, Templates and Case Studies

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Financial Management Strategies for Hospitals and Healthcare Organizations

TEXTBOOK RELEASE AND REVIEW

Reviews

Navigating a course where sound organizational management is intertwined with financial acumen requires a strategy designed by subject-matter experts. Fortunately, Financial Management Strategies for Hospital and Healthcare Organizations: Tools, Techniques, Checklists and Case Studiesprovides that blueprint.
―David B. Nash, MD, MBA,Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University

It is fitting that Dr. David Edward Marcinko, MBA, CMP™ and his fellow experts have laid out a plan of action in Financial Management Strategies for Hospital and Healthcare Organizationsthat physicians, nurse-executives, administrators, institutional CEOs, CFOs, MBAs, lawyers, and healthcare accountants can follow to help move healthcare financial fitness forward in these uncharted waters.
―Neil H. Baum, MD, Tulane Medical School

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SECOND OPINIONS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

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AGI: What it is – How it Works?

ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME

https://healthcarefinancials.files.wordpress.com/2018/06/david-edward-marcinko.png

BY Dr. DAVID EDWARD MARCINKO MBA CMP®

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

The U.S. individual tax return is based around the concepts of Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) and Taxable Income (TI).  AGI is the amount that shows up at the bottom of page one of Form 1040, individual income tax return.  It is the sum of all of the taxpayer’s income less certain allowed adjustments (like alimony, one-half of self-employment taxes, a percentage of self-employed health insurance, retirement plan contributions and IRAs, moving expenses, early withdrawal penalties and interest on student loans).  This amount is important because it is used to calculate various limitations within the area of itemized deductions (e.g., medical deductions: 10 percent of AGI; miscellaneous itemized deductions: 2 percent of AGI). 

When a healthcare professional taxpayer hears the phrase “an above the line deduction”, the line being referenced is the AGI line on the tax return.  Generally, it is better for a deduction to be an above the line deduction, because that number helps a taxpayer in two ways.  First, it reduces AGI, and second, since it reduces AGI, it is also reducing the amounts of limitations placed on other deductions as noted above.

Obviously, if there is an above the line there is also a “below the line” deduction.  These below the line deductions are itemized deductions (or the standard deduction if itemizing is not used) plus any personal exemptions allowed. AGI less these deductions provides the taxable income on which income tax is actually calculated. All of that being said, it is better for a deduction to be an above the line deduction. Although this is a bit dry, it helps to understand the concepts in order to know where items provide the most benefit to the medical professional taxpayer.

                            PERSONAL TAXATION CALCULATIONS

Gross Income (all income, from whatever source derived, including illegal activities, cash, indirect for the benefit of, debt forgiveness, barter, dividends, interest, rents, royalties, annuities, trusts, and alimony payments-no more)

    Less non-taxable exclusions (municipal bonds, scholarships, inheritance, insurance

                                            proceeds, social security and unemployment income [full or

                                            partial exclusion], etc.).

Total Income

    Less Deductions for AGI (alimony, IRA contributions, capital gains, 1/2 SE tax,

                                               moving, personal, business and investment expenses, and

                                               penalties, etc.). 

Adjusted Gross Income (bottom Form 1040)

    Less Itemized Deductions from AGI, (medical, charitable giving, casualty,

involuntary conversions, theft, job and miscellaneous expenses, etc.), or

    Less Standard Deduction (based on filing status)

    Less Personal Exemptions (per dependents, subject to phase outs)

Taxable Income

   Calculate Regular Tax

      Plus Additional Taxes (AMT, etc.)

      Minus Credits (child care, foreign tax credit, earned income housing, etc.)

      Plus Other Taxes

Total Tax Due

YOUR THOUGHTS ARE APPRECIATED.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Thank You

***

***

RISK FACTORS COMMON TO PHYSICIANS

SOME COMMON RISK FACTORS FOR MEDICAL COLLEAGUES TO APPRECIATE

BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

AN INCOMPLETE LIST = T.N.T.C.

  • Do you and or any family members drive a vehicle?
  • Do you have employees?
  • Do you have a professional malpractice exposure?
  • Do you have legal responsibility to protect medical, EMRs or personal and patient financial data?
  • Are you married and do you have assets not protected by a prenuptial agreement?
  • Do you have a current tax obligation?
  • Do you own a business?
  • Are you a board member, officer, or director of a corporation, foundation, religious or educational organization?
  • Do you engage in activities like hunting, flying, boating, etc?
  • Do you have business or domestic partners whose actions create joint and several liabilities for you?
  • Do you have personal guarantees on real estate or for business loans; or family members?
  • Do you have tail liability for professional services performed in the past?
  • Have you made specific legal or financial representations that others have relied upon in a business context?
  • What kind and what dollar amount of insurance and legal planning have you implemented against these exposures?

***

FOREWORD BY J. WESLEY BOYD MD PhD MA

[Professor of Psychiatry Harvard and Yale University]

***

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts and comments are appreciated.

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Risk-Management-Liability-Insurance-and-Asset-Protection-Strategies-for/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781498725989

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

THANK YOU

***

Personal BUDGET Rules for Doctors

Personal Physician Budgeting Rules

BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Budgeting is probably one of the greatest tools in building wealth. However, it is also one of the greatest weaknesses among physicians who tend to live a certain lifestyle. This includes living in an exclusive neighborhood, driving an expensive car, wearing imported suits and a fine watch, all of which do not lend themselves to expense budgeting. Only one in ten medical professionals has a personal budget. Fear, or a lack of knowledge, is a major cause of procrastination.

The following guidelines will assist in this microeconomic endeavor:

  1. Set reasonable goals and estimate annual income. Do not keep large amounts of cash at     home, or in the office. Deposit it in a money market account for safety and interest.
  1. Do not pay bills early, do not have more taxes withheld from your salary than you owe, and develop spending estimates and budget fixed expenses first. Fixed expenses are usually contractual, and may include housing, utilities, food, telephone, social security, medical, debt repayment, homeowner’ or renter’s insurance, auto, life and disability insurance, and maintenance, etc.
  1. Make variable expenses a priority. Variable expenses are not usually contractual, and may include clothing, education, recreational, travel, vacation, gas, entertainment, gifts, furnishings, savings, investments, etc.
  1. Trim variable expenses by 10-15 percent, and fixed expenses, when possible. Ultimately, all fixed expenses get paid and become variable in the long run.
  1. Use carve-out or set-asides for big ticket items and differentiate “wants from needs.”
  1. Know the difference between saving and investing. Savers tend to be risk adverse and     investors understand risk and takes steps to mitigate it.
  1. Determine shortfalls or excesses with the budget period.
  1. Track actual expenses.
  1. Calculate both income and expenses as a percentage of the total, and determine if there    is a better way to allocate resources. Then, review the budget on a monthly basis to determine if there is a variance. Determine if the variance was avoidable, unavoidable, or a result of inaccurate assumptions, and take needed corrective action.

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How to budget for medical expenses

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Verify Your Budget and Follow a Financial Plan

The process of establishing a budget relies heavily on guesswork, and the use of software or “apps”, that seamlessly track expenditures and help your budget and your financial plan become more of reality. Most doctors underestimate their true expenses, so lumping and best guesses on expense usually prove very inaccurate. Personal financial software and mobile phone applications make the verification of budgets easier. Once your personal accounts are setup, free apps like MINT.com will let give you a detailed report on where your money is going and the adjustments you must make. Few professions make larger contributions to the Internal Revenue Service than physicians and the medical profession. It is very important to categorize different budget categories not only to be proactive about your expenses, but also to accurately reflect the effect your different expenditures have on your real savings capability. All expense dollars are not equal.

For example, a mortgage payment, which is mostly interest expense in the early years, is likewise mostly tax deductible. Spending money on your family vacation is typically not tax deductible. Itemized deductions, which are deductions that a US taxpayer can claim on their tax return in order to reduce their Adjustable Gross Income (AGI), may include such costs as property taxes, vehicle registration fees, income taxes, mortgage expense, investment interest, charitable contributions, medical expenses (to the extent the expenses exceed 10% of the taxpayers AGI) and more.

Employing a qualified certified medical planneR® that utilizes a cash-flow based financial planning software program may help the physician identify their actual after-tax projected cash flow and more accurately plan their future.

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

THANK YOU

***

TAX DEDUCTIONS: Home Ownership Simplified

Take Full Advantage Of These Tax Deductions

DR. DAVID EWARD MARCINKO MBA CMP®

CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

The housing market is HOT right now. Lumbar and wood is expensive. Inflation is emerging. So, owning a home can be very lucrative. Seriously, owning a home can not only give you a cheaper monthly payment than renting but in many cases, the tax benefits make the decision a no-brainer.

Citation: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Home ownership falls for first time in a century - Telegraph

Here are a few of the larger deductions that you need to be sure to take:

Interest you pay on your mortgage: If you own a home and don’t have a mortgage greater than $750,000, you can deduct the interest you pay on the loan. This is one of the biggest benefits to owning a home versus renting–as you could get massive deductions at tax time. The limit used to be $1 million, but the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (TCJA) reduced the limit and made some clarifications on deducting interest from a home equity line of credit.

Property taxes: Another awesome benefit to owning a home is the ability to deduct your property taxes. Before TCJA, the rules were a little more flexible and you were able to deduct the entirety of your property taxes. Now things have a changed a bit. Under the new law, you can deduct up to $10,000. The deduction for state and local income taxes was combined with the deduction for state and local property taxes, too.

Tax incentives for energy-efficient upgrades: While most of the tax incentives for making energy-efficient upgrades to your home have gone away, there are still a couple worth noting. You can still claim tax deductions on solar energy–both for electric and water heating equipment, through 2021. The longer you wait, though, the less money you’ll get back. Here’s the percentage of equipment you can deduct, based on time of installation:

Between January 1, 2017, and December 31, 2019 – 30% of the expenditures are eligible for the credit
Between January 1, 2020, and December 31, 2020 – 26%
Between January 1, 2021, and December 31, 2021 – 22%

ASSESSMENT: But, is now the best time to buy a home? Your thoughts are appreciated.

Rent V. Buy: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2017/03/14/the-apartment-rent-vs-home-buy-decision/

MDs: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2012/02/15/is-home-renting-for-chumps/

DIY Textbooks: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/04/29/why-are-certified-medical-planner-textbooks-so-darn-popular/

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

THANK YOU

***

HOSPITAL EMPLOYER PROVIDED TRANSPORTATION BENEFITS

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP©

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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COST COMPARISONS

Example 1: Dr. Kurt purchases an automobile for $15,000.

His hospital business use is 80% and he drives 20,000 total miles per year.  Operating costs for the year, including gasoline, oil, insurance, maintenance, repairs, and license fees, are $4,000. If Kurt owns the car for five years, ownership will cost $35,000 ($4,000 x 5 = $20,000, $20,000 + $15,000 = $35,000), or $7,000 per year. For, each personal use mile costs $1.75 (100% -80% = 20%, 20% x 20,000 miles = 4,000 miles, $7,000/4,000 miles = $1.75). Kurt’s employer reimburses him 34.5 cents per mile for the business-related miles. As a result, the business use of the car is only partially reimbursed (16,000 business miles x 34.5 cents = $5,520).  

However, the business usage costs Kurt $5,600(80% of $7,000). Kurt subsidizes the employer 9.25 cents per mile ($7,000 – $5,520 = $1,480, $1,480 /16,000 = 9.25 cents). Kurt’s total cost of ownership is $1.84 per mile, or $36,850 ($1.88 x 20,000 personal miles over the five-year life).

1

Example 2: Dr. Ben uses a hospital employer-provided vehicle 4,000 miles per year in 2003.

He reimburses the employer 34.5 cents per mile. His cost for five years is $6,900 (5y x 4,000 = 20,000 miles, 20,000 miles x 34.5 = $6,900).

Beginning on January 1st 2013, the standard mileage rates for the use of a car (also vans, pickups or panel trucks) were:

  • 56.5 cents per mile for business miles driven
  • 24 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes
  • 14 cents per mile driven in service of charitable organizations

Note the dramatic contrast, from the employee’s perspective, between the above two examples, of the company reimbursing the employee for business use of his personal car, versus the employee reimbursing the company for personal use of the vehicle.

The business, medical, and moving expense rates decrease one-half cent from the 2013 rates.  The charitable rate is based on statute.

Source: http://www.irs.gov

2

ASSESSMENT: Your updated thoughts in modernity are appreciated.

ORDER Textbook: https://www.amazon.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-Advisors/dp/1482240289/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418580820&sr=8-1&keywords=david+marcinko

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

THANK YOU

***

On DISPOSABLE and Other “Next-Gen” Credit Cards

Touring with Marcinko | The Leading Business Education ...

BY DR. DAVID EDWARD MARCINKO MBA CMP®

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

‘Chip & Pin’ Technology

Disposable credit cards are the newest innovation to help reduce fraud and assumed identity scams on e-commerce based websites. As with traditional credit cards, these cards are numbered, but used only once. Then, electronically they are erased so that there is nothing left in the merchant’s database for hackers to steal.

But, in 2014, Congress began looking at new ways to keep personal credit card information safe after several high-profile security breaches at some of America’s top retailers.

WHY? Current credit cards use easy to hack magnetic strip technology from the 1960s. Many consumers want more secure “pin & chip” cards which have been in use in Europe for years. Even though micro-chip technology costs billions to implement, merchants are moving in that direction as they issue new cards to consumers. Most modern polls show nearly half of all people surveyed are extremely concerned about the safety of their personal credit card information.

Burner Cards: Similar to a burner phone or “throwaway” social media account, burner credit cards are temporary, virtual credit cards that are not your “main” credit card. The bank or burner card app will give you a temporary number that links back to your main credit card which you can use for online purchases.

An ANonymous Credit Card provides an extreme degree of privacy and prevents the tracking of your expenses by a spouse, people with bad intentions or government monitoring agencies. It is important to realize that there are plenty of legitimate reasons for wanting to buy something discreetly through an Anonymous Credit Card.

Credit Card Mistakes to Avoid

No number has as far-reaching an impact on your money as your credit scores.

Here are some obstacles, physicians and all of us, should dodge on the road to financial security:

  • Don’t pay for a credit card repair service.
  • Don’t miss a payment.
  • Don’t max out your card.
  • Don’t take a cash-advance.
  • Don’t skip using your cards.
  • Don’t chase interest rates.
  • Don’t apply for several credit cards all at once.
  • Don’t co-sign a loan.
  • Don’t spread our car or mortgage payments.

Citation: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Denied Credit

If you are denied a credit card, you have the right to obtain a credit report free from the agency which denied you. Your request must be made in writing and within thirty-sixty days. Consumer credit is governed by the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA).  The regulations are issued by and enforced by the Federal Trade Commission. Certain states offer consumers additional rights.  Credit reporting agencies are referred to as a “consumer reporting agency”.

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

THANK YOU

***

ASK A FINANCIAL ADVISOR? About Company “Vesting”

A YOUNG PHYSICIAN INQUIRES ABOUT NON-PUBLIC COMPANY SHARES AND VESTING?

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QUESTION: I am a physician and work for a startup healthcare IT company with shares in a non-public company that vests over time. What does that mean, and will the shares only be worth something if we go public or are acquired?

Shelly from Boston, MA

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ANSWER: In most cases, startups dangle equity compensation over employees like a just-out-of-reach cupcake in front of a treadmill. Vesting means some condition needs to be met before you fully own your shares, whether it’s staying at the company for a period of time, reaching a target valuation, or both.

Once your shares have fully vested, you’d think you can finally cash in. But that’s not always the case. It’s a hassle to sell private company shares because there are far fewer buyers compared to selling shares in a publicly traded company. 

If you want to sell your stake before the company goes public, you can ask the execs at your company to buy back your shares. If they say no—and they might, because once they let one employee sell, it’s hard to turn down others—you need another buyer, like an outside investor.

There are eBay-like marketplaces for selling private company shares, but it’s not like posting a picture of your old iPod and offering free shipping. You can only sell to accredited investors (aka hedge funds and other rich folks), and your company needs to authorize the sale. 

It’s way easier to sell your shares if and when your company goes public or is acquired by another company.

Thanks for the query.

Citation: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

***

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

THANK YOU

***

Capital Gains Tax Non-Sense?

Please Stow Your Outrage About a Capital Gains Tax Hike!

There is no evidence for any of the calamities that opponents argue would befall the economy and markets.

See the source image
By Scott Sumner

To anyone with knowledge of public finance theory, reading media reports of capital gains taxation is almost painful. Here’s an example from Bloomberg:

A group of economists recently argued in the Chicago Booth Review that the prevailing wisdom among scorekeepers that the revenue-maximizing rate is about 30% may be misplaced — and could allow for an even higher rate. A pair of Princeton University economists published research in December showing that hikes may raise “substantially more tax revenue” than scorekeepers currently believe and that the revenue-maximizing rate may be about 40% — almost exactly where Biden’s proposal falls.

Economists and analysts have also made the case that cuts in capital gains rates have a negligible impact on investment decisions and economic growth. (Though, like much around capital gains, that debate isn’t entirely settled.)

LINK: https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2021-04-26/stow-your-outrage-about-a-capital-gains-tax-hike?srnd=premium&sref=XgZBm7li

Your thoughts are appreciated.

THANK YOU

DICTIONARY: Health Economics and Finance

Product Details

FOREWORD: https://healthcarefinancials.files.wordpress.com/2007/10/dr-getzen.pdf

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On Joe Biden’s Capital Gains Tax Proposal

A Proposal for Now

By Joel Lee

President Biden will soon propose nearly doubling the capital gains tax for wealthy people to 39.6%, according to Bloomberg.

PS: Wealthy people = individuals earning $1 million or more.

Biden is expected to announce the tax hike next week as part of the pitch for his “American Families Plan,” the highly anticipated sequel to the $2.3 trillion infrastructure proposal he released a few weeks ago. 

  • To pay for the first plan, which includes spending on bridges and broadband, Biden wants to hike taxes on corporations.
  • To pay for his second proposal, which includes spending on childcare and paid leave for workers, he wants to hike taxes on wealthy investors.

NOTE: Physicians and all investors knew this dramatic hike was coming (the proposal was in candidate Biden’s tax plan), but the report jarred Wall Street nonetheless. It could lead to a lot of asset sales before 2021’s out.

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

Your thoughts are appreciated.

THANK YOU

***

A Decade of Corporate Profit VERSUS Tax Receipts

CIRCA 2010 – 2019

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Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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On the Unintended Consequences of High Taxes on the Rich

On the two types of tax increases

[By Rick Kahler CFP®]

Two types of tax increases are being promoted by several presidential candidates and members of Congress. The less common idea, which I wrote about recently, is a wealth tax on net worth. The more common proposal is a significant increase in income taxes.

Presidential candidate Bernie Sanders favors a progressive income tax that tops out at 54.2% on incomes over $10 million. Not to be outdone, Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez supports increasing the income tax on the same group to 70%.

If you think these proposals are so radical that only the most liberal of voters would support them, a poll conducted by Hill-HarrisX in January 2019 found that 59% of all voters favored a 70% tax bracket. The survey asked 1001 registered voters if they favored a 70% top rate for “the 10 millionth dollar and beyond for individuals making $10 million a year or more in reportable income.” While predictably most Democrats polled—71%—favored the steep increase, 60% of Independents and 45% of Republicans also supported it.

When you consider how popular the notion of a 70% top income bracket is, it isn’t a stretch by any means to imagine these same voters in the 2020 election giving control of Congress and the Presidency to politicians favorable to hiking taxes. The chance of seeing such massive increases on the wealthy goes from a remote possibility to a real probability.

Promoters of the anticipated windfall revenues from such a tax want to redistribute the proceeds to fund things like free college education, affordable health care for all, high speed rail trains, and converting existing buildings to comply with “green” regulations.

While all these outcomes are well intended, perhaps even desirous, before we forge ahead it may be a good idea to consider unforeseen consequences. Let’s look at how past attempts to fund massive government benefits by raising taxes on the rich have worked.

France

In 2012 France raised the top tax bracket to 75% on individuals earning over $1 million. French economist Thomas Piketty, who really wanted to see the tax at 80%, was so exuberant about the move that he predicted many other countries would follow suit.

Government officials estimated that tax revenues would soar to 30 billion euros in 2013. They were roughly half right: revenues came in at 16 billion euros. One of the reasons the tax revenue windfall didn’t develop was a consequence that politicians had not considered. The wealthy packed their bags and moved, taking their investments and income with them.

By 2015, around 2.5 million French citizens lived in the U.K., Belgium, Singapore, and other countries that had much more competitive tax rates. The French economy ground to a halt, growth stagnated, and unemployment soared to 10%. In 2015 France repealed the ill-fated tax.

England

According to The Times of London in March 2019, one-third of British billionaires have left the country because of high taxes, most in the last ten years.

Maryland

The state of Maryland has had a similar experience due to high state and municipal taxes. In October 2013, the Maryland Public Policy Institute reported on throngs of wealthy retirees  “moving out of Maryland to save money on taxes and leave more to their children. This is costing the state millions in tax revenue.”

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Assessment

If the U.S. enacts a similar tax, it is foolish to assume the outcome will be any different. A plethora of other countries with great amenities and competitive tax rates will appeal to those affected by the tax. Tax policies that regard the wealthy primarily as sources of revenue rather than investors in their communities do little to keep those citizens anchored at home.

And so, your thoughts are appreciated.

***

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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Small Companies Get Tax Breaks, Too!

How can this possibly be fair?

By Rick Kahler MS CFP®

An April 29th headline in The New York Times got my attention: “Profitable Giants Like Amazon pay $0 in Corporate Taxes. Some Voters Are Sick of It.” My immediate reaction was outrage. Amazon had a 0% tax rate. My company’s overall tax rate was 24%, and its net profit was less than 0.000025% of Amazon’s. How can this possibly be fair?

The Times article, by Stephanie Saul and Patricia Cohen, gave few specifics but left the impression that Amazon simply gets out of paying taxes on its profits because of a legal, but unfair, manipulation of the tax code afforded only to wealthy corporations, leaving the heavy lifting to the rest of us poor saps.

I wanted to know how Amazon did it, so I did some research

First, let’s put the $11.1 billion profit into perspective. The past 18 months are the first time Amazon has shown any meaningful profit since 2011. Many of those years saw them losing billions of dollars.

The total value (market capitalization) that shareholders have invested in Amazon is $954 billion as of April 29, 2019. That means the 2018 profit of $11.1 billion represents an earnings yield of 1.16% return on investors’ money. The average earnings yield on a large US company is 4.5%, significantly higher than Amazon’s. While $11.1 billion sounds like a lot of money in dollar terms, when viewed in the amount of money it takes to generate those profits, Amazon’s financials are significantly subpar.

Amazon reduced their taxes to zero by primarily doing four things:

  1. They reinvested their profits in equipment and buildings, and were able to deduct a portion of these expenses. They will have to repay the taxes they deferred on these purchases when they sell the equipment or property. And the money spent was not available for distribution to their shareholders.
  2. They received a tax credit for spending on research and development. This credit is an incentive for any company to help offset the high risk of the up-front costs of developing new ideas, not all of which pay off.
  3. They paid some employees in the form of stock, rather than cash. While still a real cost to the company, this is used to minimize cash outflows, while giving employees an opportunity to reap the rewards of their hard work in future profits.
  4. In their start-up years, Amazon lost billions of dollars. Out of fairness, the tax code allows any business to carry losses over into future years to offset profits, when and if they ever materialize. This type of “write off” is real money that was lost.

The article cited a carpet layer who had a profit of $18,000 and paid more in taxes than Amazon. He was so upset at this injustice that he joined the Socialist Party.

The article failed to mention that many of the same write-offs used by Amazon were available to him, too. If his business was incorporated, the tax bill on his profits was probably 21%, or $3,780. If he had reinvested his profit in a new carpet cleaning machine, had losses from previous years to carry forward, spent money on developing a new type of carpet cleaner, or paid his employees in stock, he would have paid nothing in taxes.

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Assessment

Critics of big corporations might say such strategies would not be realistic for a one-person company. Yet I have seen many small business owners use them, particularly carrying forward losses that result from the essential start-up costs. The corporate tax code generally applies equally to all businesses and is meant to encourage small companies as well as large ones to take the risks necessary to create new jobs.

Conclusion

Your thoughts are appreciated.

***

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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Consider Taxes Before Retiring Abroad

Physicians Considering Retirement in Another Country?

By Rick Kahler CFP®

One way for a retiring doctor to stretch a retirement nest egg is to relocate your retirement nest. Finding a place with a lower cost of living can include considering retirement in another country.

International Living

According to International Living, Panama is one of the best options for Americans looking for affordable living costs, good medical services, and an appealing climate. Costa Rica, Mexico, and Belize are also good possibilities.

Before you pack your sunhat and flip-flops and head for a low-cost retirement haven like Panama, however, take a look at all the factors affecting your retirement income and expenses. One of those is taxes.

Taxes

Moving out of the country does not mean your tax bill to the US government or your current state will decrease. Short of giving up your US passport, there is nothing you can do to escape paying US taxes on your income, even if you don’t live in the US. We are one of two countries worldwide—the other is Eritrea—that taxes our citizens based on both residence and citizenship.

You might assume, however, that moving out of the country would end your liability for state income taxes. That isn’t always the case. Some states still want to tax your income even though you don’t live there. According to Vincenzo Villamena in a December 2018 article for International Living magazine titled “How to Minimize Your State Tax Bill as an Expat,” it’s especially problematic if you end up returning to your old address in the state and start filing an income tax return. Eventually, he says, “the state will see the gap” and may require you to pay taxes on the missing years.

You have nothing to worry about if you live in one of the seven states with no income tax: South Dakota, Wyoming, Nevada, Washington, Texas, Florida, and Alaska. Tennessee and New Hampshire aren’t bad, either, as they don’t tax your earnings but they do tax your investment income. Most other states will let you off the hook if you submit evidence that your residence is in another country and you haven’t lived in the state for a while.

Then there are the states that won’t let go of their former residents easily. Those are California, Virginia, New Mexico, South Carolina, North Carolina, Massachusetts, and Maryland. Assuming that when you leave you will be coming back, they require that you continue to pay state tax on your income.

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Solutions?

The solution to this issue takes a little financial planning and some extra time. The best way to escape paying taxes to a state you no longer live in is to move to a state with no income tax first before relocating abroad. You must prove to your old state that you have left and have no intention of ever coming back.

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This means moving for real—cutting as many ties to your old state as possible and establishing as many as possible in your new state. You will want to sell your home, close bank accounts, cancel any mailing addresses, change healthcare providers and health insurance companies (including Medicare), be sure no dependents remain in the state, and register to vote and get a driver’s license in the new state. As a final good-bye you will want to notify the tax authorities that you are filing a final tax return for your last year that you lived in the state.

Assessment

In case you need a good state from which to launch your leap into expat status, consider South Dakota. Not only would my income tax-free home state let you go easily, it would welcome you back if you should decide to return to the US.

Your thoughts are appreciatedBook of Month

[PHYSICIAN FOCUSED FINANCIAL PLANNING AND RISK MANAGEMENT COMPANION TEXTBOOK SET]

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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Two Different Personal IRA Investing Strategies?

Based on Tax Considerations?

 

 

 

 

 

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA

LINK: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

One personal investing strategy is to place more conservative investments (those with lower expected returns) in a tax-deferred traditional IRA, 401-k, 403-b or similar, and more aggressive (higher-earning) assets in a taxable brokerage account or Roth IRA.

WHY? Each account is thus working hard but in very different ways.

HOW? The conservative funds in the traditional IRA or retirement accounts would fill any needs for safety as they grow more slowly – and the higher tax rate won’t take out as big of a bite.

Meanwhile, the more aggressive funds in a taxable brokerage accounts would grow more quickly, but be taxed at a lower rate.

Assessment: Any thoughts?

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MORE FOR DOCTORS:

“Insurance & Risk Management Strategies for Doctors” https://tinyurl.com/ydx9kd93

“Fiduciary Financial Planning for Physicians” https://tinyurl.com/y7f5pnox

“Business of Medical Practice 2.0” https://tinyurl.com/yb3x6wr8

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Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

 

 

2019 Tax Deductions and Credits

Update on Tax Reform

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Conclusion

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Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements.

Book Marcinko: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

Subscribe: MEDICAL EXECUTIVE POST for curated news, essays, opinions and analysis from the public health, economics, finance, marketing, IT, business and policy management ecosystem.

DOCTORS:

“Insurance & Risk Management Strategies for Doctors” https://tinyurl.com/ydx9kd93

“Fiduciary Financial Planning for Physicians” https://tinyurl.com/y7f5pnox

“Business of Medical Practice 2.0” https://tinyurl.com/yb3x6wr8

HOSPITALS:

“Financial Management Strategies for Hospitals” https://tinyurl.com/yagu567d

“Operational Strategies for Clinics and Hospitals” https://tinyurl.com/y9avbrq5

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Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

Hospital Spending VERSUS Federal Tax Rates

CIRCA 2010 – 2026

[By staff reporters]

 

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Assessment

Your thoughts are appreciated.

RESOURCES:

“Insurance & Risk Management Strategies for Doctors” https://tinyurl.com/ydx9kd93

“Fiduciary Financial Planning for Physicians” https://tinyurl.com/y7f5pnox

“Business of Medical Practice 2.0” https://tinyurl.com/yb3x6wr8

THANK YOU

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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ATTN: S-Corporation shareholders

Dear S-Corporation shareholder,

[By Cindy Freking, CPA]

The year is coming to an end and we would like to send you a few important reminders.

Be certain that you have taken an adequate salary from your S-Corporation. The practice of taking cash distributions from your S-Corporation without drawing a salary or without drawing an adequate salary is increasingly being challenged by the IRS. The IRS is winning.

If the company is paying your health insurance premiums, please be sure that those premiums will be included in your W-2. If they are not, you will lose the self-employed health insurance deduction that is available to you on your own personal income tax return.

Assessment

If you need help to determine your salary, the appropriateness of your salary and the health insurance premiums that should be included in your taxable wages, please contact your local CPA.

Have a wonderful holiday!

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements.

Book Marcinko: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

Subscribe: MEDICAL EXECUTIVE POST for curated news, essays, opinions and analysis from the public health, economics, finance, marketing, IT, business and policy management ecosystem.

DOCTORS:

“Insurance & Risk Management Strategies for Doctors” https://tinyurl.com/ydx9kd93

“Fiduciary Financial Planning for Physicians” https://tinyurl.com/y7f5pnox

“Business of Medical Practice 2.0” https://tinyurl.com/yb3x6wr8

***

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

HOW SHOULD THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT BE FINANCED?

The “BENEFIT” PRINCIPLE Versus “ABILITY-TO-PAY” PRINCIPLE OF TAXATION

[By staff reporters]

OK; the 2018 mid-term elections are over. So, where do you stand on federal taxation? Let’s review the very basics.

The Lindahl Tax

A “Lindahl Tax” is a form of taxation conceived by Erik Lindahl in which individuals pay for public goods according to their marginal benefits. In other words, they pay according to the amount of satisfaction or utility they derive from the consumption of an additional unit of the public good.

It can be seen as an individual’s share of the collective tax burden of an economy. The optimal level of a public good is that quantity at which the willingness to pay for one more unit of the good, taken in totality for all the individuals is equal to the marginal cost of supplying that good. Lindahl tax is the optimal quantity times the willingness to pay for one more unit of that good at this quantity.

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Lindahl Benefit Principle. Those that benefit the most from a particular program should pay the most for that program (Lindahl Tax principle at work). Fuel Tax to finance road construction. Ability-to-Pay Principle. Those who have the greatest ability to pay should be required to pay the most. Horizontal equity. Vertical equity.

Ability-to-Pay Tax

An “Ability-to-Pay Tax” is exactly what it says with both horizontal and vertical components.

Ability-to-pay taxation is a progressive taxation principle that maintains that taxes should be levied according to a taxpayer’s ability to pay. Ability-to-pay taxation is a progressive taxation principle that maintains that taxes should be levied according to a taxpayer’s ability to pay.

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Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements.

Book Marcinko: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

Subscribe: MEDICAL EXECUTIVE POST for curated news, essays, opinions and analysis from the public health, economics, finance, marketing, IT, business and policy management ecosystem.

DOCTORS:

“Insurance & Risk Management Strategies for Doctors” https://tinyurl.com/ydx9kd93

“Fiduciary Financial Planning for Physicians” https://tinyurl.com/y7f5pnox

“Business of Medical Practice 2.0” https://tinyurl.com/yb3x6wr8

HOSPITALS:

“Financial Management Strategies for Hospitals” https://tinyurl.com/yagu567d

“Operational Strategies for Clinics and Hospitals” https://tinyurl.com/y9avbrq5

***

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

How You Can Deduct Your Medical Expenses

Reduce Taxes, Bunch Deductions

By Rick Kahler MSFS CFP®

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Want to save a bunch under the new federal income tax laws? Try bunching your deductions.

The new tax law doubles the standard deduction and eliminates most miscellaneous deductions. It takes a lot more of the limited allowable deductions left to reach the threshold for itemizing deductions instead of using the standard amount.

This means fewer Americans will be able to itemize. A Jan 18, 2018 post by Dena Bunis at AARP.com quotes Mark Mazur, director of the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center: “We’ve estimated that about 30 percent itemized in 2017, and we think that’s going to go down to about the 10 percent range going forward.”

By “bunching” donations and tax payments into alternating years, you may still be able to itemize your deductions every other year. The three main deductions you may be able to bunch are property and state income taxes (up to a cap of $10,000), charitable donations, and medical expenses.

Example:

Here’s how bunching works for a single person. Let’s assume you have $11,500 of deductions every year. This will not put you over the $12,000 threshold, so you will take the $12,000 standard deduction every year. However, if you can bunch all those deductions into alternate years, you could deduct $23,000 one year and take the standard deduction the next year. Depending on your top income tax bracket, bunching might save you a tidy $1,100 to $4,070 every other year. (If you are married, just double these numbers.)

One of the easiest expenses to bunch in South Dakota is property taxes. Most property owners pay the first half of the prior year’s taxes in April and the second half in October. However, county treasurers will allow you to pay your taxes in full on January 1 of each year. So, every other year you write a check to the county treasurer on December 31, bunching two years of property taxes into one year.

Charitable donations can also be easily bunched. You might simply double your donations one year and skip them the next (let smaller charities that rely on your contributions know you’re doing this). Or you could use a donor advised fund (DAF). These funds allow you to make sizeable charitable donations without even knowing which charities you want to support or when. The fund managers keep your money invested until you direct them when and to whom to disburse it. If you give $6,000 a year to your church, for example, you could bunch two or more years of giving into one year and then have the DAF release the funds annually.

Medical deductions in excess of a percentage of your income (7.5% in 2018; 10% in 2019 and after) can be deducted if you itemize. Bunching elective procedures and other expenses into one year may put you over the threshold every other year.

AARP says that you may be surprised at some of the medical costs that are deductible. Those that are eligible include:

·         Out-of-pocket payments for prescription drugs and fees to doctors, dentists, chiropractors, psychiatrists, psychologists, podiatrists, physical or occupational therapists

·         Health and long-term care insurance premiums

·         Payments to nursing homes and other long-term care facilities

·         Inpatient alcohol and drug treatment programs

·         Modifications made to your home for medical reasons

·         Transportation to and from medical appointments

·         Dentures, prescription eyeglasses, hearing aids, and DME such as wheelchairs

·         Smoking-cessation and weight-loss programs related to a specific disease.

Assessment

Obviously, the potential for tax savings from bunching deductions will vary considerably. You may want to investigate what impact it could have for you. At least on alternate years, the savings might make you a happier taxpayer.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements.

Book Marcinko: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

Subscribe: MEDICAL EXECUTIVE POST for curated news, essays, opinions and analysis from the public health, economics, finance, marketing, IT, business and policy management ecosystem.

DOCTORS:

“Insurance Risk Management Strategies for Doctors” https://tinyurl.com/ydx9kd93

“Fiduciary Financial Planning for Physicians” https://tinyurl.com/y7f5pnox

“Business of Medical Practice 2.0” https://tinyurl.com/yb3x6wr8

HOSPITALS:

“Financial Management Strategies for Hospitals” https://tinyurl.com/yagu567d

“Operational Strategies for Clinics and Hospitals” https://tinyurl.com/y9avbrq5

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

2018 – 2021 HSA Contribution Limits

Inflation Adjustments for the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

On March 5, 2018, the IRS released Revenue Procedure 2018-18 (as part of Bulletin 2018-10). Due to changes made in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, certain adjustments needed to be made to inflation amounts.

The includes a reduction in the maximum family HSA contribution for those with family coverage under an HDHP from $6,900 to a new limit of $6,850 for calendar year 2018. The single contribution limit remains unchanged at $3,450 per year.

This reduction affects employees participating in an HSA Plan who have elected to contribute more than $6,850 for family coverage in 2018.

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Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

About the Laffer Curve

What it is – How it works
By staff reporters

DEFINITION:

In economics, the Laffer curve is a representation of the relationship between rates of taxation and the resulting levels of government revenue.

The Laffer curve claims to illustrate the concept of taxable income elasticity—i.e., taxable income will change in response to changes in the rate of taxation. http://www.HealthDictionarySeries.org

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HISTORY:

The Laffer Curve is a theory developed by supply-side economist Arthur Laffer to show the relationship between tax rates and the amount of tax revenue collected by governments.

The curve is used to illustrate Laffer’s main premise that the more an activity such as production is taxed, the less of it is generated. Likewise, the less an activity is taxed, the more of it is generated.

MORE: https://www.investopedia.com/terms/l/laffercurve.asp

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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https://www.crcpress.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

On The Tax Cut and Jobs Act (TCJA)

The Tax Cut and Jobs Act (TCJA)

By Rick Kahler CFP®

The Tax Cut and Jobs Act (TCJA) has generated a lot of media hype, much of which is coming from the extreme wings of both political parties and much of which is simply not true.

Here is some perspective

When he signed the bill President Trump called it “the largest tax cuts in our history”. This is not so.

According to a November 2, 2017, article in Reuters, the largest personal tax cuts in U.S. history came from Presidents Warren Harding and Calvin Coolidge, both Republicans. In 1922, the top tax rate was 73 percent. By 1925, it was only 25 percent.

Under Presidents John Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson, both Democrats, the tax cuts of 1964 and 1965 cut the top rate from 91 percent to 70 percent. The 1986 Reagan cuts lowered the top rate from 70 percent to 28 percent.

In comparison, the Trump cuts reduced the top rate from 39.6% to 37%, a miniscule 6.6% drop.

The new tax rules do mean some significant changes 

The good news is that the standard deduction will nearly double and the maximum child tax credit will increase from $1000 to $2000. But almost nowhere do you read about the bad news: the current personal exemptions will go away.

For 2017, an individual can take the $6350 standard deduction plus the $4050 personal exemption for a total of $10,400 (plus $4050 for each dependent). For 2018, this is $12,000, only $1,600 more in deductions. This means a median tax savings of about $192 per person, and only if you don’t itemize.

The even worse news

Home office expenses, moving expenses to relocate for a new job, casualty and gambling losses, unreimbursed business expenses, tax preparation software, tax preparation fees, and investment advisory fees will no longer be deductible on Schedule A.

This tax act has been labeled as terrible for the middle class and wonderful for the uber-rich. I don’t see that either claim is true. It appears to me that the winners (not “big winners”) are the middle class. Yes, the uber-rich also get a small 6.6% reduction—hardly a big deal compared to the cuts of 23% to 73% under Kennedy, Reagan, Harding, and Coolidge.

Corporate taxes

The real impact of the TCJA is its reductions on corporate taxes, not personal taxes. Taxes on C-corporations are cut from 34% to 21% (a 38% reduction). What isn’t reported is that reducing America’s corporate income tax has had bipartisan support for several years. The current US rate of 34% is the highest in developed countries, when the average global corporate tax rate is 22.6%.

Those who attack “big corporations that will just pass tax savings on to investors” tend to forget that 43% of Americans invest in these same corporations, including those with 401(k), IRA, or 403(b) retirement plans.

You also probably haven’t read that the new law actually raises taxes on corporations with taxable incomes of under $50,000, from 15% to 21% (a 38% increase). These corporations are those most generally owned by the Main Street business person.

The TCJA helps tax payers that are sole proprietors, partners and shareholders of S-corporations, LLCs and partnerships, which pass profits or losses through to be taxed in the taxpayer’s personal tax brackets. The new law allows most of these pass-through entities to exclude 20% of their profit from taxes. However, if you are in the profession of law, accounting, medicine, or financial planning, or are a professional musician or athlete, the exclusion probably doesn’t apply.

Assessment-Irony

Finally, for the 51% of Americans who pay taxes, the TCJA adds an unbelievable amount of complexity to an already complex tax code.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements.

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The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2018

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

By Robert Whirley CPA

Congress has enacted the biggest tax reform law in thirty years, one that will make fundamental changes in the way you, your family and your business calculate your federal income tax bill, and the amount of federal tax you will pay. Since most of the changes will go into effect next year, there’s still a narrow window of time before year-end to soften or avoid the impact of crackdowns and to best position yourself for the tax breaks that may be heading your way.

Attached you will find summaries of the various provisions. We have tried to make sure these are final given the fact that the law changed three times in 24 hours.

Here’s a quick rundown of last-minute moves you should think about making

Lower tax rates coming. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act will reduce tax rates for many taxpayers, effective for the 2018 tax year. Additionally, many businesses, including those operated as pass-through, such as partnerships, may see their tax bills cut.

The general plan of action to take advantage of lower tax rates next year is to defer income into next year. Some possibilities follow:

• . . . If you are about to convert a regular IRA to a Roth IRA, postpone your move until next year. That way you’ll defer income from the conversion until next year and have it taxed at lower rates.

• . . . Earlier this year, you may have already converted a regular IRA to a Roth IRA but now you question the wisdom of that move, as the tax on the conversion will be subject to a lower tax rate next year. You can unwind the conversion to the Roth IRA by doing a recharacterization—making a trustee-to-trustee transfer from the Roth to a regular IRA. This way, the original conversion to a Roth IRA will be cancelled out. But you must complete the recharacterization before year-end. Starting next year, you won’t be able to use a recharacterization to unwind a regular-IRA-to-Roth-IRA conversion.

• . . . If you run a business that renders services and operates on the cash basis, the income you earn isn’t taxed until your clients or patients pay. So if you hold off on billings until next year—or until so late in the year that no payment will likely be received this year—you will likely succeed in deferring income until next year.

• . . . If your business is on the accrual basis, deferral of income till next year is difficult but not impossible. For example, you might, with due regard to business considerations, be able to postpone completion of a last-minute job until 2018, or defer deliveries of merchandise until next year (if doing so won’t upset your customers). Taking one or more of these steps would postpone your right to payment, and the income from the job or the merchandise, until next year. Keep in mind that the rules in this area are complex and may require a tax professional’s input.

• . . . The reduction or cancellation of debt generally results in taxable income to the debtor. So if you are planning to make a deal with creditors involving debt reduction, consider postponing action until January to defer any debt cancellation income into 2018.

Disappearing or reduced deductions, larger standard deduction. Beginning next year, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act suspends or reduces many popular tax deductions in exchange for a larger standard deduction.

Here’s what you can do about this right now:

• Individuals (as opposed to businesses) will only be able to claim an itemized deduction of up to $10,000 ($5,000 for a married taxpayer filing a separate return) for the total of (1) state and local property taxes; and (2) state and local income taxes. To avoid this limitation, pay the last installment of estimated state and local taxes for 2017 no later than Dec. 31, 2017, rather than on the 2018 due date. But don’t prepay in 2017 a state income tax bill that will be imposed next year – Congress says such a prepayment won’t be deductible in 2017. However, Congress only forbade prepayments for state income taxes, not property taxes, so a prepayment on or before Dec. 31, 2017, of a 2018 property tax installment is apparently OK.

• The itemized deduction for charitable contributions won’t be chopped. But because most other itemized deductions will be eliminated in exchange for a larger standard deduction (e.g., $24,000 for joint filers), charitable contributions after 2017 may not yield a tax benefit for many because they won’t be able to itemize deductions. If you think you will fall in this category, consider accelerating some charitable giving into 2017.

• The new law temporarily boosts itemized deductions for medical expenses. For 2017 and 2018 these expenses can be claimed as itemized deductions to the extent they exceed a floor equal to 7.5% of your adjusted gross income (AGI). Before the new law, the floor was 10% of AGI, except for 2017 it was 7.5% of AGI for age-65-or-older taxpayers. But keep in mind that next year many individuals will have to claim the standard deduction because many itemized deductions have been eliminated. If you won’t be able to itemize deductions after this year, but will be able to do so this year, consider accelerating “discretionary” medical expenses into this year. For example, before the end of the year, get new glasses or contacts, or see if you can squeeze in expensive dental work such as an implant.

IRS

Other year-end strategies

Here are some other last minute moves that can save tax dollars in view of the new tax law:

• The new law substantially increases the alternative minimum tax (AMT) exemption amount, beginning next year. There may be steps you can take now to take advantage of that increase. For example, the exercise of an incentive stock option (ISO) can result in AMT complications. So, if you hold any ISOs, it may be wise to postpone exercising them until next year. And, for various deductions, e.g., depreciation and the investment interest expense deduction, the deduction will be curtailed if you are subject to the AMT. If the higher 2018 AMT exemption means you won’t be subject to the 2018 AMT, it may be worthwhile, via tax elections or postponed transactions, to push such deductions into 2018.

• Like-kind exchanges are a popular way to avoid current tax on the appreciation of an asset, but after Dec. 31, 2017, such swaps will be possible only if they involve real estate that isn’t held primarily for sale. So if you are considering a like-kind swap of other types of property, do so before year-end. The new law says the old, far more liberal like-kind exchange rules will continue apply to exchanges of personal property if you either dispose of the relinquished property or acquire the replacement property on or before Dec. 31, 2017.

• For decades, businesses have been able to deduct 50% of the cost of entertainment directly related to or associated with the active conduct of a business. For example, if you take a client to a nightclub after a business meeting, you can deduct 50% of the cost if strict substantiation requirements are met. But under the new law, for amounts paid or incurred after Dec. 31, 2017, there’s no deduction for such expenses. So if you’ve been thinking of entertaining clients and business associates, do so before year-end.

• Under current rules, alimony payments generally are an above-the line deduction for the payor and included in the income of the payee. Under the new law, alimony payments aren’t deductible by the payor or includible in the income of the payee, generally effective for any divorce decree or separation agreement executed after 2017. So if you’re in the middle of a divorce or separation agreement, and you’ll wind up on the paying end, it would be worth your while to wrap things up before year end. On the other hand, if you’ll wind up on the receiving end, it would be worth your while to wrap things up next year.

• The new law suspends the deduction for moving expenses after 2017 (except for certain members of the Armed Forces), and also suspends the tax-free reimbursement of employment-related moving expenses. So if you’re in the midst of a job-related move, try to incur your deductible moving expenses before year-end, or if the move is connected with a new job and you’re getting reimbursed by your new employer, press for a reimbursement to be made to you before year-end.

• Under current law, various employee business expenses, e.g., employee home office expenses, are deductible as itemized deductions if those expenses plus certain other expenses exceed 2% of adjusted gross income. The new law suspends the deduction for employee business expenses paid after 2017. So, we should determine whether paying additional employee business expenses in 2017, that you would otherwise pay in 2018, would provide you with an additional 2017 tax benefit.

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Also, now would be a good time to talk to your employer about changing your compensation arrangement—for example, your employer reimbursing you for the types of employee business expenses that you have been paying yourself up to now, and lowering your salary by an amount that approximates those expenses. In most cases, such reimbursements would not be subject to tax.

Assessment

Please keep in mind that I’ve described only some of the year-end moves that should be considered in light of the new tax law.

Robert Whirley & Associates, LLC + ProActive Advisory
11675 Rainwater Drive
Suite 430, Bldg 600
Alpharetta, GA 30009
http://www.WhirleyProactive.com
770.932.1919
770.932.1192 (fax)

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An End of Year Financial Check List

Important for your Financial Health

By Patrick Bourbon CFA

The last few weeks of the year are often a mad rush so we thought that it is a good time to share this checklist of important items to consider before the calendar year ends, all related to your investments and finances so that you can reach your goals and dreams faster.

1. Review your IRA – 401(k) / 403(b) retirement accounts – Are you on track for a comfortable retirement?
2. Start tax planning! It’s not too early to think about taxes – Asset location & Tax efficiency
3. Rebalance your portfolio
4. Harvest your capital losses
5. Check your emergency fund
6. Review your insurance policies
7. Contribute to your Health Spending Account
8. Take your Required Minimum Distribution
9. Contribute to your 529 Plan
10. Determine your net worth
11. Check your credit score
12. Check your beneficiaries
13. Update your estate plan
14. Maximize your business deductions
15. Spending and automated savings – You want to look ahead

Assessment

Short and sweet.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, urls and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements.

Book Marcinko: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

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A Social Security Taxation Synopsis

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By Vanguard Services

Infographic on Social Security Taxation

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social_security_infographic_112016

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Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™  Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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The New Social Security Wage Base for 2017

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Social Security wage base increases to $127,200 for 2017

[By Robert Whirley CPA & Associates, LLC + ProActive Advisory]

The Social Security Administration has announced that the wage base for computing the Social Security tax (OASDI) in 2017 will increase to $127,200.

The Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) imposes two taxes on employers, employees, and self-employed workers—one for Old Age, Survivors and Disability Insurance (OASDI; commonly known as the Social Security tax), and the other for Hospital Insurance (HI; commonly known as the Medicare tax).

For 2017, the FICA tax rate for employers is 7.65%—6.2% for OASDI and 1.45% for HI.

For 2017, an employee will pay:

  1. 6.2% Social Security tax on the first $127,200 of wages (maximum tax is $7,886.40 [6.2% of $127,200]), plus
  2. 1.45% Medicare tax on the first $200,000 of wages ($250,000 for joint returns; $125,000 for married taxpayers filing a separate return), plus
  3. 2.35% Medicare tax (regular 1.45% Medicare tax + 0.9% additional Medicare tax) on all wages in excess of $200,000 ($250,000 for joint returns; $125,000 for married taxpayers filing a separate return). (Code Sec. 3101(b)(2))

For 2017, the self-employment tax imposed on self-employed people is:

  • 12.4% OASDI on the first $127,200 of self-employment income, for a maximum tax of $15,772.80 (12.40% of $127,200); plus
  • 2.90% Medicare tax on the first $200,000 of self-employment income ($250,000 of combined self-employment income on a joint return, $125,000 on a separate return), (Code Sec. 1401(a), Code Sec. 1401(b)), plus
  • 3.8% (2.90% regular Medicare tax + 0.9% additional Medicare tax) on all self-employment income in excess of $200,000 ($250,000 of combined self-employment income on a joint return, $125,000 for married taxpayers filing a separate return). (Code Sec. 1401(b)(2))
  • There is a maximum amount of compensation subject to the OASDI tax, but no maximum for HI.

IRS

Conclusion

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Key Hospital Employee Benefits

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For KEY Hospital Employees

By PERRY D’ALESSIO; CPA

[D’Alessio Tocci & Pell LLP]

Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA CMP®

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Effective January 1st 2014, the limitation on the annual benefit under a defined benefit plan under Section 415(b)(1)(A) was increased from $205,000 to $210,000.

For a participant who separated from service before January 1st 2014, the limitation for defined benefit plans under Section 415(b)(1)(B) is computed by multiplying the participant’s compensation limitation, as adjusted through 2013, by 1.0155.

The limitation for defined contribution plans under Section 415(c)(1)(A) is increased in 2014 from $51,000 to $52,000.

The Code provides that various other dollar amounts are to be adjusted at the same time and in the same manner as the dollar limitation of Section 415(b)(1)(A). These dollar amounts and the adjusted amounts are as follows:

  • The limitation under Section 402(g)(1) on the exclusion for elective deferrals described in Section 402(g)(3) is increased to $17,500.
  • The annual compensation limit under Sections 401(a)(17), 404(l), 408(k)(3)(C), and 408(k)(6)(D)(ii) is increased from $255,000 to $260,000.
  • The dollar limitation under Section 416(i)(1)(A)(i) concerning the definition of key employee in a top-heavy plan is increased from $165,000 to $170,000.
  • The dollar amount under Section 409(o)(1)(C)(ii) for determining the maximum account balance in an employee stock ownership plan subject to a 5‑year distribution period is increased from $1,035,000 to $1,050,000, while the dollar amount used to determine the lengthening of the 5‑year distribution period is increased from $205,000 to $210,000.
  • The limitation used in the definition of highly compensated employee under Section 414(q)(1)(B) is increased from to $115,000.
  • The dollar limitation under Section 414(v)(2)(B)(i) for catch-up contributions to an applicable employer plan other than a plan described in Section 401(k)(11) or Section 408(p) for individuals aged 50 or over is increased from $5,000 to $5,500. The dollar limitation under Section 414(v)(2)(B)(ii) for catch-up contributions to an applicable employer plan described in Section 401(k)(11) or Section 408(p) for individuals aged 50 or over remains unchanged at $2,500.
  • The annual compensation limitation under Section 401(a)(17) for eligible participants in certain governmental plans that, under the plan as in effect on July 1, 1993, allowed cost‑of‑living adjustments to the compensation limitation under the plan under Section 401(a)(17) to be taken into account, is increased from $380,000 to $385,000.
  • The compensation amount under Section 408(k)(2)(C) regarding simplified employee pensions (SEPs) is increased from $500 to $550.
  • The limitation under Section 408(p)(2)(E) regarding SIMPLE retirement accounts is increased from to $12,000.
  • The limitation on deferrals under Section 457(e)(15) concerning deferred compensation plans of state and local governments and tax-exempt organizations is increased to $17,500.
  • The compensation amounts under Section 1.61‑21(f)(5)(i) of the Income Tax Regulations concerning the definition of “control employee” for fringe benefit valuation purposes is increased from $100,000 to $105,000.  The compensation amount under Section 1.61‑21(f)(5)(iii) is increased from $205,000 to $210,000.
  • The Code also provides that several pension-related amounts are to be adjusted using the cost-of-living adjustment under Section 1(f)(3). These dollar amounts and the adjustments are as follows:
  • The adjusted gross income limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(A) for determining the retirement savings contribution credit for married taxpayers filing a joint return is increased from $35,500 to $36,000; the limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(B) is increased from $38,500 to $39,000; and the limitation under Sections 25B(b)(1)(C) and 25B(b)(1)(D), from $59,000 to $60,000.
  • The adjusted gross income limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(A) for determining the retirement savings contribution credit for taxpayers filing as head of household is increased from $26,6250 to $27,000; the limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(B) is increased from $28,875 to $29,250; and the limitation under Sections 25B(b)(1)(C) and 25B(b)(1)(D), from $44,250 to $45,000.
  • The adjusted gross income limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(A) for determining the retirement savings contribution credit for all other taxpayers is increased from $17,750 to $18,000; the limitation under Section 25B(b)(1)(B) is increased from $19,250 to $19,500; and the limitation under Sections 25B(b)(1)(C) and 25B(b)(1)(D), from $29,500 to $30,000.
  • The applicable dollar amount under Section 219(g)(3)(B)(i) for determining the deductible amount of an IRA contribution for taxpayers who are active participants filing a joint return or as a qualifying widow(er) is increased from $95,000 to $96,000. The applicable dollar amount under Section 219(g)(3)(B)(ii) for all other taxpayers (other than married taxpayers filing separate returns) is increased from $59,000 to $60,000. The applicable dollar amount under Section 219(g)(7)(A) for a taxpayer who is not an active participant but whose spouse is an active participant is increased from $178,000 to $181,000.
  • The adjusted gross income limitation under Section 408A(c)(3)(C)(ii)(I) for determining the maximum Roth IRA contribution for married taxpayers filing a joint return or for taxpayers filing as a qualifying widow(er) is increased from $178,000 to $181,000. The adjusted gross income limitation under Section 408A(c)(3)(C)(ii)(II) for all other taxpayers (other than married taxpayers filing separate returns) is increased from $112,000 to $114,000.

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IRS

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Assessment

Administrators of defined benefit or defined contribution plans that have received favorable determination letters should not request new determination letters solely because of yearly amendments to adjust maximum limitations in the plans.

Source: http://www.irs.gov/newsroom/article/0,,id=187833,00.html

Conclusion

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 Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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On Corporate Taxes

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Erik Hare

[By Erik Hare]

What is a fair corporate tax?

It’s a hot political topic, but one loaded with a tremendous amount of mis-information. On the left, it’s common to cite “loopholes” which allow corporations to “offsh…

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Corporate Taxes

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Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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Don’t forget 1st. Quarter Estimated Tax

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Andrew Schwartz

By Andrew Schwartz CPA

Doctors –Don’t forget 1st Quarter Estimated Tax payments for 2016; due April 18th.

‘Estimated Tax’

Estimated taxes are usually paid on a quarterly basis. If the estimated taxes that are paid do not equal at least 90% of the taxpayer’s actual tax liability (or 100% or 110% of the taxpayer’s prior-year liability, depending on the level of adjusted gross income), then interest and penalties are assessed against the delinquent amount.

Don’t forget- 1st Quarter Estimated Tax

IRS

Conclusion

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Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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Tax Changes for 2015-16

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By Robert Whirley CPA

[Whirley & Associates, LLC]

Alpharetta, GA

Doctors – Be Aware!

As tax filing season rapidly approaches I wanted to provide you with a few key items to note for 2015 and 2016.  If you are interested I can send you my full list of tax changes for 2015 and 2016 – I warn you, it’s 19 pages long – and this is only my short list.

Welcome to the New Year 2016! 

  • For 2015, the standard mileage rate for business travel is 57.5¢ (54¢ for 2016).
  • The simplified per diem rates for post-Sept. 30, 2015 travel are $275 for high-cost areas and $185 for all other localities (up from $259 and $172).
  • For 2015 and 2016, a HDHP for health savings account (HSA) purposes is a health plan with an annual deductible that is not less than $1,300 for individual coverage and $2,600 for family coverage. Maximum out-of-pocket expenses can’t exceed $6,450 for individual coverage for 2015 ($6,550 for 2016) and $12,900 for family coverage for 2015 ($13,100 for 2016). The maximum annual HSA deductible contribution is the sum of the monthly contribution limits, based on eligibility and health plan coverage on the first day of the month. The monthly limit is 1/12 of the indexed amount for self-only coverage ($3,350 for 2015 and 2016) and for family coverage ($6,650 for 2015 and $6,750 for 2016).
  • Enhanced expensing—in the form of increased limitations and treatment of certain real property as Code Sec. 179 property—was made permanent, as was the ability to revoke a Code Sec. 179 election without IRS’s consent.
  • The mileage rate for use of a car for qualified medical transportation is 23¢ per mile for expenses paid or incurred in 2015 (19¢ for 2016).
  • Bonus first-year depreciation was retroactively extended through 2019 with a number of modifications, including a gradual reduction over that time (50% for qualified property placed in service in 2015 through 2017, 40% for 2018, and 30% for 2019).
  • The de minimis safe harbor for taxpayers that don’t have an applicable financial statement was raised from $500 to $2,500. – For items expensed as miscellaneous supplies.
  • For contributions by individuals (including ranchers and farmers), the increased charitable deduction for qualified conservation easements was made permanent.
  • 15-year straight-line cost recovery for qualified leasehold improvements, qualified restaurant buildings and improvements, and qualified retail improvements was made permanent.
  • Education Tax Breaks:
  • The American Opportunity tax credit (AOTC) was made permanent. It was also made subject to heightened verification processes and paid-preparer due diligence requirements in order to reduce the number of improper payments.
  • The up-to-$250 above-the-line deduction for teachers’ out-of-pocket classroom-related expenses was made permanent.

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IRS

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The above-the-line deduction for qualified tuition and related expenses was retroactively extended through 2016.

  • Starting in 2015, the definition of “qualified higher education expenses” for Sec. 529 qualified tuition programs includes certain computer and technology-based costs.
  • For tax years beginning after June 29, 2015, taxpayers must receive a Form 1098-T from the educational institution containing all required information in order to claim the AOTC, the above-the-line deduction for higher education expenses, or the Lifetime Learning Credit.
  • For 2015 and 2016, the AOTC phases out at the same level of modified AGI—over $80,000 ($160,000 for a joint return).
  • For 2015 and 2016, the maximum AOTC/Hope Scholarship Credit is $2,500.
  • For 2015, the Lifetime Learning credit phases out for taxpayers with modified AGI in excess of $55,000 ($110,000 for a joint return). For 2016, the corresponding figures are $55,000 and $111,000.
  • For 2015, the higher education exclusion for savings bond income phases out ratably for taxpayers with modified AGI between $77,200 and $92,200 ($115,750 to $145,750 for joint filers). For 2016, the corresponding ranges are $77,550 to $92,550, and $116,300 to $146,300.
  • For 2015 and 2016, the deduction for interest paid on qualified higher education loans phases out ratably for taxpayers with modified AGI between $65,000 and $80,000 ($130,000 and $160,000 for joint filers).

Assessment

Just days into 2016 and you’re also facing pressures bearing down on your payroll operations. Are you ready to meet them? For example:

  • You’re not done with tax year 2015 … yet. There are FUTA credit reductions to determine and budget for, the impact of tax extenders legislation to consider (including retroactive reinstatement of parity between mass transit benefits and parking benefits), and more.
  • Major tax reform is probably off the table for now. But don’t let that fool you. New federal laws increase payroll tax penalties, change the due dates for your corporate returns and yank passports from individuals with tax debts. Of course, Payroll will bear the brunt of these new laws.
  • The IRS has issued a raft of payroll tax regulations, and proposed regulations from the Department of Labor will ratchet up the amount employees must earn to be exempt from overtime. Finally, the IRS and its sister agencies continue to issue guidance on compliance with the Affordable Care Act.
  • There’s a key FLSA case pending before the U.S. Supreme Court. Word on the street is that it may continue to permit class action lawsuits for unpaid overtime.

Conclusion

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Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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Congress Passes Permanent Tax Provisions

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By Cindy Freking CPA

[Tax Manager ]

cfreking@whirleyproactive.com

Late on December 15th, a bipartisan agreement was reached on tax extenders—i.e., the 50 or so temporary tax provisions that are routinely extended by Congress on a one- or two-year basis—and numerous other tax provisions in the “Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act of 2015” (the Act). This agreement makes permanent many of the individual and business extenders and contains provisions on Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs), IRS administration and the Tax Courts and miscellaneous other provisions.

Below are some provisions that have been made permanent:

DEPRECIATION & EXPENSING PROVISIONS

  • The Act makes permanent the $500,000 expensing limitation and $2 million phase out amounts under Code Section 179
  • For property placed in service after Dec 31, 2015, the Act provides that air conditioning and heating units are now eligible for expensing
  • Assets for which the De Minimis election applies are not counted in determining the Code Section 179 expensing election or the ceiling
  • 15 Year Write off for Qualified Leasehold , Retail Improvements & Restaurant Property

INDIVIDUALS

  • American Opportunity Credit
  • Enhanced Earned Income Tax Credit
  • Above the line Educator Expenses
  • Exclusion for Employer Provided Mass Transit & Parking
  • State and Local Sales deduction
  • Liberalized rules for Qualified Conservation Contributions
  • Nontaxable IRA transfers to eligible charities

BUSINESSES

  • Research & Development credit & offset now available against taxes in addition to income taxes
  • Reduction in S-Corporation recognition period for Built in Gains Tax
  • Exclusion of 100% Gain on certain small business stock
  • Enhanced deduction for Food Inventory
  • Differential Wage Payment Credit (active duty employees)

Assessment

The above provides a brief overview of the Act. There are various provisions that have been extended through 2016 and 2019 and other miscellaneous provisions. If you need additional information or have questions, please contact your CPA.

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IRS

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Conclusion

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Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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Three common misunderstandings and reality checks about the ACA’s Cadillac tax

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Beginning in 2018

[By Grant Thornton]

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3-misconceptions-about-the-affordable-care-acts-cadillac-tax-1-638

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