ME-P Speaking Invitations

Dr. David E. Marcinko is at your Service

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Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP® enjoys personal coaching and public speaking and gives as many talks each year as possible, at a variety of medical society and financial services conferences around the country and world.

These have included lectures and visiting professorships at major academic centers, keynote lectures for hospitals, economic seminars and health systems, keynote lectures at city and statewide financial coalitions, and annual keynote lectures for a variety of internal yearly meetings.

His talks tend to be engaging, iconoclastic, and humorous. His most popular presentations include a diverse variety of topics and typically include those in all iMBA, Inc’s textbooks, handbooks, white-papers and most topics covered on this blog.

CONTACT: Ann Miller RN MHA

MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

Ph: 770-448-0769

Abbreviated Topic List: https://healthcarefinancials.files.wordpress.com/2009/02/imba-inc-firm-services.pdf

Second Opinions: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

DIY Textbooks: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/04/29/why-are-certified-medical-planner-textbooks-so-darn-popular/

THANK YOU

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PODCAST: Physician WEDDING Costs

 The Economics of Weddings for Medical Professionals

The average wedding costs about $ 25,525 and medical professionals often spend much more.

Destination Weddings - Dynamic Roadshow

QUERY: Do you want a big wedding party for your family and friends, or an earlier retirement for yourself?

PODCAST: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XQBRHJ7aGbM

Your thoughts are appreciated.

THANK YOU

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Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

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HEDGE FUNDS: History in Brief

ABOUT | DAVID EDWARD MARCINKO

BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

The investment profession has come a long way since the door-to-door stock salesmen of the 1920s sold a willing public on worthless stock certificates. The stock market crash of 1929 and ensuing Great Depression of the 1930s forever changed the way investment operations are run. A bewildering array of laws and regulations sprung up, all geared to protecting the individual investor from fraud. These laws also set out specific guidelines on what types of investment can be marketed to the general public – and allowed for the creation of a set of investment products specifically not marketed to the general public. These early-mid 20th century lawmakers specifically exempted from the definition of “general public,” for all practical purposes, those investors that meet certain minimum net worth guidelines.

The lawmakers decided that wealth brings the sophistication required to evaluate, either independently or together with wise counsel, investment options that fall outside the mainstream. Not surprisingly, an investment industry catering to such wealthy individuals, such as doctors and healthcare professionals, and qualifying institutions has sprung up.

EARLY DAYS

The original hedge fund was an investment partnership started by A.W. Jones in 1949. A financial writer prior to starting his investment management career, Mr. Jones is widely credited as being the prototypical hedge fund manager. His style of investment in fact gave the hedge fund its name – although Mr. Jones himself called his fund a “hedged fund.” Mr. Jones attempted to “hedge,” or protect, his investment partnership against market swings by selling short overvalued securities while at the same time buying undervalued securities. Leverage was an integral part of the strategy. Other managers followed in Mr. Jones’ footsteps, and the hedge fund industry was born.

In those early days, the hedge fund industry was defined by the types of investment operations undertaken – selling short securities, making liberal use of leverage, engaging in arbitrage and otherwise attempting to limit one’s exposure to market swings. Today, the hedge fund industry is defined more by the structure of the investment fund and the type of manager compensation employed.

The changing definition is largely a sign of the times. In 1949, the United States was in a unique state. With the memory of Great Depression still massively influencing common wisdom on stocks, the post-war euphoria sparked an interest in the securities markets not seen in several decades. Perhaps it is not so surprising that at such a time a particularly reflective financial writer such as A.W. Jones would start an investment operation featuring most prominently the protection against market swings rather than participation in them. 

Citation: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Apart from a few significant hiccups – 1972-73, 1987 and 2006-07 being most prominent – the U.S. stock markets have been on quite a roll for quite a long time now. So today, hedge funds come in all flavors – many not hedged at all. Instead, the concept of a private investment fund structured as a partnership, with performance incentive compensation for the manager, has come to dominate the mindscape when hedge funds are discussed. Hence, we now have a term in “hedge fund” that is not always accurate in its description of the underlying activity. In fact, several recent events have contributed to an even more distorted general understanding of hedge funds.

During 1998, the high profile Long Term Capital Management crisis and the spectacular currency losses experienced by the George Soros organization both contributed to a drastic reversal of fortune in the court of public opinion for hedge funds. Most hedge fund managers, who spend much of their time attempting to limit risk in one way or another, were appalled at the manner with which the press used the highest profile cases to vilify the industry as dangerous risk-takers. At one point during late 1998, hedge funds were even blamed in the lay press for the currency collapses of several developing nations; whether this was even possible got short thrift in the press.

Needless to say, more than a few managers have decided they did not much appreciate being painted with the same “hedge fund” brush. Alternative investment fund, private investment fund, and several other terms have been promoted but inadequately adopted. As the memory of 1998 and 2007 fades, “hedge fund” may once again become a term embraced by all private investment managers.

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ASSESSMENT: Physicians, and all investors, should be aware, however, that several different terms defining the same basic structure might be used. Investors should therefore become familiar with the structure of such funds, independent of the label. The Securities Exchange Commission calls such funds “privately offered investment companies” and the Internal Revenue Service calls them “securities partnerships.”

Your thoughts are appreciated.

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

THANK YOU

***

ASK A FINANCIAL ADVISOR? About Company “Vesting”

A YOUNG PHYSICIAN INQUIRES ABOUT NON-PUBLIC COMPANY SHARES AND VESTING?

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QUESTION: I am a physician and work for a startup healthcare IT company with shares in a non-public company that vests over time. What does that mean, and will the shares only be worth something if we go public or are acquired?

Shelly from Boston, MA

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ANSWER: In most cases, startups dangle equity compensation over employees like a just-out-of-reach cupcake in front of a treadmill. Vesting means some condition needs to be met before you fully own your shares, whether it’s staying at the company for a period of time, reaching a target valuation, or both.

Once your shares have fully vested, you’d think you can finally cash in. But that’s not always the case. It’s a hassle to sell private company shares because there are far fewer buyers compared to selling shares in a publicly traded company. 

If you want to sell your stake before the company goes public, you can ask the execs at your company to buy back your shares. If they say no—and they might, because once they let one employee sell, it’s hard to turn down others—you need another buyer, like an outside investor.

There are eBay-like marketplaces for selling private company shares, but it’s not like posting a picture of your old iPod and offering free shipping. You can only sell to accredited investors (aka hedge funds and other rich folks), and your company needs to authorize the sale. 

It’s way easier to sell your shares if and when your company goes public or is acquired by another company.

Thanks for the query.

Citation: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

THANK YOU

***

INFLATION Is Here!

But for How Long?

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Vitaliy N. Katsenelson, CFA

[CEO & Chief Investment Officer]

READERS

DEFINITION: In economics, inflation (or less frequently, price inflation) is a general rise in the price level of an economy over a period of time. When the general price level rises, each unit of currency buys fewer goods and services; consequently, inflation reflects a reduction in the purchasing power per unit of money – a loss of real value in the medium of exchange and unit of account within the economy. The opposite of inflation is deflation, a sustained decrease in the general price level of goods and services. The common measure of inflation is the inflation rate, the annualized percentage change in a general price index, usually the consumer price index, over time.

CITATION: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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DEAR READERS

This essay is going to be long.
I blame inflation, be it transitory or not, for inflating its length. 

The number one question I am asked by clients, friends, readers, and random strangers is, are we going to have inflation? 

I think about inflation on three timelines: short, medium, and long-term

The pandemic disrupted a well-tuned but perhaps overly optimized global economy and time-shifted the production and consumption of various goods. For instance, in the early days of the pandemic automakers cut their orders for semiconductors. As orders for new cars have come rolling back, it is taking time for semiconductor manufacturers, who, like the rest of the economy, run with little slack and inventory, to produce enough chips to keep up with demand. A $20 device the size of a quarter that goes into a $40,000 car may have caused a significant decline in the production of cars and thus higher prices for new and used cars. (Or, as I explained to my mother-in-law, all the microchips that used to go into cars went into a new COVID vaccine, so now Bill Gates can track our whereabouts.)

Here is another example. The increase in new home construction and spike in remodeling drove demand for lumber while social distancing at sawmills reduced lumber production – lumber prices spiked 300%. Costlier lumber added $36,000 to the construction cost of a house, and the median price of a new house in the US is now about $350,000.

The semiconductor shortage will get resolved by 2022, car production will come back to normal, and supply and demand in the car market will return to the pre-pandemic equilibrium. High prices in commodities are cured by high prices. High lumber prices will incentivize lumber mills to run triple shifts. Increased supply will meet demand, and lumber prices will settle at the pre-pandemic level in a relatively short period of time. That is the beauty of capitalism! 

Most high prices caused by the time-shift in demand and supply fall into the short-term basket, but not all. It takes a considerable amount of time to increase production of industrial commodities that are deep in the ground – oil, for instance. Low oil prices preceding the pandemic were already coiling the spring under oil prices, and COVID coiled it further. It will take a few years and increased production for high oil prices to cure high oil prices. Oil prices may also stay high because of the weaker dollar, but we’ll come back to that.

Federal Reserve officials have told us repeatedly they are not worried about inflation; they believe it is transitory, for the reasons I described above. We are a bit less dismissive of inflation, and the two factors that worry us the most in the longer term are labor costs and interest rates. 

Let’s start with labor costs 

During a garden-variety recession, companies discover that their productive capacity exceeds demand. To reduce current and future output they lay off workers and cut capital spending on equipment and inventory. The social safety net (unemployment benefits) kicks in, but not enough to fully offset the loss of consumer income; thus demand for goods is further reduced, worsening the economic slowdown. Through millions of selfish transactions (microeconomics), the supply of goods and services readjusts to a new (lower) demand level. At some point this readjustment goes too far, demand outstrips supply, and the economy starts growing again.

This pandemic was not a garden-variety recession 

The government manually turned the switch of the economy to the “off” position. Economic output collapsed. The government sent checks to anyone with a checking account, even to those who still had jobs, putting trillions of dollars into consumer pockets. Though output of the economy was reduced, demand was not. It mostly shifted between different sectors within the economy (home improvement was substituted for travel spending). Unlike in a garden-variety recession, despite the decline in economic activity (we produced fewer widgets), our consumption has remained virtually unchanged. Today we have too much money chasing too few goods– that is what inflation is. This will get resolved, too, as our economic activity comes back to normal.

But …

Today, though the CDC says it is safe to be inside or outside without masks, the government is still paying people not to work. Companies have plenty of jobs open, but they cannot fill them. Many people have to make a tough choice between watching TV while receiving a paycheck from big-hearted Uncle Sam and working. Zero judgement here on my part – if I was not in love with what I do and had to choose between stacking boxes in Amazon’s warehouse or watching Amazon Prime while collecting a paycheck from a kind uncle, I’d be watching Sopranos for the third time. 

To entice people to put down the TV remote and get off the couch, employers are raising wages. For instance, Amazon has already increased minimum pay from $15 to $17 per hour. Bank of America announced that they’ll be raising the minimum wage in their branches from $20 to $25 over the next few years. The Biden administration may not need to waste political capital passing a Federal minimum wage increase; the distorted labor market did it for them. 

These higher wages don’t just impact new employees, they help existing employees get a pay boost, too. Labor is by far the biggest expense item in the economy. This expense matters exponentially more from the perspective of the total economy than lumber prices do. We are going to start seeing higher labor costs gradually make their way into higher prices for the goods and services around us, from the cost of tomatoes in the grocery store to the cost of haircuts.

Only investors and economists look at higher wages as a bad thing. These increases will boost the (nominal) earnings of workers; however, higher prices of everything around us will negate (at least) some of the purchasing power. 

Wages, unlike timber prices, rarely decline. It is hard to tell someone “I now value you less.” Employers usually just tell you they need less of your valuable time (they cut your hours) or they don’t need you at all (they lay you off and replace you with a machine or cheap overseas labor). It seems that we are likely going to see a one-time reset to higher wages across lower-paying jobs. However, once the government stops paying people not to work, the labor market should normalize; and inflation caused by labor disbalance should come back to normal, though increased higher wages will stick around.

There is another trend that may prove to be inflationary in the long-term: de-globalization.  Even before the pandemic the US set plans to bring manufacturing of semiconductors, an industry deemed strategic to its national interests, to its shores. Taiwan Semiconductor and Samsung are going to be spending tens of billions of dollars on factories in Arizona.  

The pandemic exposed the weaknesses inherent in just-in-time manufacturing but also in over reliance on the kindness of other countries to manufacture basic necessities such as masks or chemicals that are used to make pharmaceuticals.  Companies will likely carry more inventory going forward, at least for a while.  But more importantly more manufacturing will likely come back to the US. This will bring jobs and a lot of automation, but also higher wages and thus higher costs.  

If globalization was deflationary, de-globalization is inflationary  

We are not drawing straight-line conclusions, just yet. A lot of manufacturing may just move away from China to other low-cost countries that we consider friendlier to the US; India and Mexico come to mind.  

And then we have the elephant in the economy – interest rates, the price of money. It’s the most important variable in determining asset prices in the short term and especially in the long term. The government intervention in the economy came at a significant cost, which we have not felt yet: a much bigger government debt pile. This pile will be there long after we have forgotten how to spell social distancing
 
The US government’s debt increased by $5 trillion to $28 trillion in 2020 – more than a 20% increase in one year! At the same time the laws of economics went into hibernation: The more we borrow the less we pay for our debt, because ultra-low interest rates dropped our interest payments from $570 billion in 2019 to $520 billion in 2020. 

That is what we’ve learned over the last decade and especially in 2020: The more we borrow the lower interest we pay. I should ask for my money back for all the economics classes I took in undergraduate and graduate school.

This broken link between higher borrowing and near-zero interest rates is very dangerous. It tells our government that how much you borrow doesn’t matter; you can spend (after you borrow) as much as your Republican or Democratic heart desires. 

However, by looking superficially at the numbers I cited above we may learn the wrong lesson. If we dig a bit deeper, we learn a very different lesson: Foreigners don’t want our (not so) fine debt. It seems that foreign investors have wised up: They were not the incremental buyer of our new debt – most of the debt the US issued in 2020 was bought by Uncle Fed. Try explaining to your kids that our government issued debt and then bought it itself. Good luck.

Let me make this point clear: Neither the Federal Reserve, nor I, nor a well-spoken guest on your business TV knows where interest rates are going to be (the total global bond market is bigger even than the mighty Fed, and it may not be able to control over interest rates in the long run). But the impact of what higher interest rates will do the economy increases with every trillion we borrow. There is no end in sight for this borrowing and spending spree (by the time you read this, the administration will have announced another trillion in spending). 

Let me provide you some context about our financial situation 


The US gross domestic product (GDP) – the revenue of the economy – is about $22 trillion, and in 2019 our tax receipts were about $3.5 trillion. Historically, the-10 year Treasury has yielded about 2% more than inflation. Consumer prices (inflation) went up 4.2% in April. Today the 10-year Treasury pays 1.6%; thus the World Reserve Currency debt has a negative 2.6% real interest rate (1.6% – 4.2%). 

These negative real (after inflation) interest rates are unlikely to persist while we are issuing trillions of dollars of debt. But let’s assume that half of the increase is temporary and that 2% inflation is here to stay. Let’s imagine the unimaginable. Our interest rate goes up to the historical norm to cover the loss of purchasing power caused by inflation. Thus it goes to 4% (2 percentage points above 2% “normal” inflation). In this scenario our federal interest payments will be over $1.2 trillion (I am using vaguely right math here). A third of our tax revenue will have to go to pay for interest expense. Something has to give. It is not going to be education or defense, which are about $230 billion and $730 billion, respectively. You don’t want to be known as a politician who cut education; this doesn’t play well in the opponent’s TV ads. The world is less safe today than at any time since the end of the Cold War, so our defense spending is not going down (this is why we own a lot of defense stocks). 

The government that borrows in its own currency and owns a printing press will not default on its debt, at least not in the traditional sense. It defaults a little bit every year through inflation by printing more and more money. Unfortunately, the average maturity of our debt is about five years, so it would not take long for higher interest expense to show up in budget deficits. 

Money printing will bring higher inflation and thus even higher interest rates

If things were not confusing enough, higher interest rates are also deflationary 

We’ve observed significant inflation in asset prices over the last decade; however, until this pandemic we had seen nothing yet. Median home prices are up 17% in one year. The wild, speculative animal spirits reached a new high during the pandemic. Flush with cash (thanks to kind Uncle Sam), bored due to social distancing, and borrowing on the margin (margin debt is hitting a 20-year high), consumers rushed into the stock market, turning this respectable institution (okay, wishful thinking on my part) into a giant casino. 

It is becoming more difficult to find undervalued assets. I am a value investor, and believe me, I’ve looked (we are finding some, but the pickings are spare). The stock market is very expensive. Its expensiveness is setting 100-year records. Except, bonds are even more expensive than stocks – they have negative real (after inflation) yields.

But stocks, bonds, and homes were not enough – too slow, too little octane for restless investors and speculators. Enter cryptocurrencies (note: plural). Cryptocurrencies make Pets.com of the 1999 era look like a conservative investment (at least it had a cute sock commercial). There are hundreds if not thousands of crypto “currencies,” with dozens created every week. (I use the word currency loosely here. Just because someone gives bits and bytes a name, and you can buy these bits and bytes, doesn’t automatically make what you’re buying a currency.)

“The definition of a bubble is when people are making money all out of proportion to their intelligence or work ethic.”

By Mike Burry MD
[The Big Short]

I keep reading articles about millennials borrowing money from their relatives and pouring their life savings into cryptocurrencies with weird names, and then suddenly turning into millionaires after a celebrity CEO tweets about the thing he bought. Much ink is spilled to celebrate these gamblers, praising them for their ingenious insight, thus creating ever more FOMO (fear of missing out) and spreading the bad behavior.

Unfortunately, at some point they will be writing about destitute millennials who lost all of their and their friends’ life savings, but this is down the road. Part of me wants to call this a crypto craziness a bubble, but then I think, Why that’s disrespectful to the word bubble, because something has to be worth something to be overpriced. At least tulips were worth something and had a social utility. (I’ll come back to this topic later in the letter).

But ….

When interest rates are zero or negative, stocks of sci-fi-novel companies that are going to colonize and build five-star hotels on Mars are priced as if El Al (the Israeli airline) has regular flights to the Red Planet every day of the week except on Friday (it doesn’t fly on Shabbos). Rising interest rates are good defusers of mass delusions and rich imaginations. 

In the real economy, higher interest rates will reduce the affordability of financed assets. They will increase the cost of capital for businesses, which will be making fewer capital investments. No more 2% car loans or 3% business loans. Most importantly, higher rates will impact the housing market. 

Up to this point, declining interest rates increased the affordability of housing, though in a perverse way: The same house with white picket fences (and a dog) is selling for 17% more in 2021 than a year before, but due to lower interest rates the mortgage payments have remained the same. Consumers are paying more for the same asset, but interest rates have made it affordable.

At higher interest rates housing prices will not be making new highs but revisiting past lows. Declining housing prices reduce consumers’ willingness to improve their depreciating dwellings (fewer trips to Home Depot). Many homeowners will be upside down in their homes, mortgage defaults will go up… well, we’ve seen this movie before in the not-so-distant past. Higher interest rates will expose a lot of weaknesses that have been built up in the economy. We’ll be finding fault lines in unexpected places – low interest has covered up a lot of financial sins.

And then there is the US dollar, the world’s reserve currency. Power corrupts, but the unchallenged and unconstrained the power of being the world’s reserve currency corrupts absolutely. It seems that our multitrillion-dollar budget deficits will not suddenly stop in 2021. With every trillion dollars we borrow, we chip away at our reserve currency status (I’ve written about this topic in great detail, and things have only gotten worse since). And as I mentioned above, we’ve already seen signs that foreigners are not willing to support our debt addiction. 

A question comes to mind.
Am I yelling fire where there is not even any smoke? 

Higher interest rates is anything but a consensus view today. Anyone who called for higher rates during the last 20 years is either in hiding or has lost his voice, or both. However, before you dismiss the possibility of higher rates as an unlikely plot for a sci-fi novel, think about this. 

In the fifty years preceding 2008, housing prices never declined nationwide. This became an unquestioned assumption by the Federal Reserve and all financial players. Trillions of dollars of mortgage securities were priced as if “Housing shall never decline nationwide” was the Eleventh Commandment, delivered at Temple Sinai to Goldman Sachs. Or, if you were not a religious type, it was a mathematical axiom or an immutable law of physics. The Great Financial Crisis showed us that confusing the lack of recent observations of a phenomenon for an axiom may have grave consequences. 

Today everyone (consumers, corporations, and especially governments) behaves as if interest rates can only decline, but what if… I know it’s unimaginable, but what if ballooning government debt leads to higher interest rates? And higher interest rates lead to even more runaway money printing and inflation? 

This will bring a weaker dollar 

A weaker US dollar will only increase inflation, as import prices for goods will go up in dollar terms. This will create an additional tailwind for commodity prices. 

If your head isn’t spinning from reading this, I promise mine is from having written it. 

To sum up: A lot of the inflation caused by supply chain disruption that we see today is temporary. But some of it, particularly in industrial commodities, will linger longer, for at least a few years. Wages will be inflationary in the short-term and will reset prices higher, but once the government stops paying people not to work, wage growth should slow down. Finally, in the long term a true inflationary risk comes from growing government borrowing and budget deficits, which will bring higher interest rates and a weaker dollar with them, which will only make inflation worse and will also deflate away a lot of assets.

THE END

Your thoughts are appreciated.

THANK YOU

***
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WHITHER THE CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER™ MARKS?

Wither the CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER™ Professional Certification?

CMP logo

DEAR INVESTMENT ADVISORS, CPAs, FINANCIAL PLANNERS, FINANCIAL ADVISORS & INSURANCE AGENTS

We believe that:

If you do not have a market niche; you are not deeply informed
If you are not deeply informed; you can’t different yourself
If you can’t differentiate yourself; you can’t differentiate price
If you can’t differentiate price; you have no market power
If you have no market power; you have no unique knowledge
If you have no unique knowledge; you have fewer profits

If you have fewer profits; you are not likely a CMP™

CMP

PROGRAM CURRICULUM: Enter the CMPs

POPULAR BOOKS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/04/29/why-are-certified-medical-planner-textbooks-so-darn-popular/

Dean Gene Schmuckler PhD MBA MEd CTS
http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

THANK YOU

***

What is a REIT, Really?

REITs – The Margarine of Real Estate Investing

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By Dr. Dennis Bethel MD

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Just like real estate, butter has been around for thousands of years.  Sometime in the 1800’s someone decided that there was a need for something that looked like butter, tasted similar to butter, but wasn’t butter.  Along came margarine.  Real estate investment trusts (REITs) are the margarine of the real estate investing world.

NAREIT, the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts, answers the question

What is a REIT?” in the following way:

“A REIT, or Real Estate Investment Trust, is a type of real estate company modeled after mutual funds.  REITs were created by Congress in 1960 to give all Americans – not just the affluent – the opportunity to invest in income producing real estate in a manner similar to how many Americans invest in stocks and bonds through mutual funds.  Income-producing real estate refers to land and the improvements on it – such as apartments, offices or hotels.  REITs may invest in the properties themselves, generating income through the collection of rent or they may invest in mortgages or mortgage securities tied to the properties, helping to finance the properties and generating interest income.”

While REITs typically own real estate, investors in REITs do not.  REITs are paper assets that represent interest in a company that owns and operates income producing properties.  In essence they are real estate flavored stock.  As such, REITs are generally highly correlated with the stock market.

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TERMINOLOGY

When discussing REITs, you encounter the following terminology – public, private, traded, and non-traded.  Public REITs can be designated as non-traded or traded depending on whether or not they are traded on a stock exchange.

Since traded REITs are traded on the stock exchange, they enjoy a high degree of liquidity just like any other stock.  Unfortunately, traded REITs tend to follow the economic cycles and can closely correlate with the stock market.  This can lead to a higher degree of volatility than what is usually seen with physical real estate.  Additionally, they do not afford the investor the tax-advantages that come with investments in physical real estate.

MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2017/11/15/on-non-traded-real-estate-investment-trusts-reits/

Private REITs and non-traded public REITs are not traded on an exchange.  These are usually offered to accredited investors through broker-dealer networks.  These REITs are illiquid and generally have high fees.  They have been plagued with transparency issues as well as conflicts of interest.  Valuation of this stock is difficult and can be misleading to the investor.  Due diligence is very important as the quality of non-traded REITs can vary widely.

MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2014/06/13/why-i-hate-non-publicly-traded-reits/

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts and comments are appreciated.

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors : Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™ book cover

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Risk-Management-Liability-Insurance-and-Asset-Protection-Strategies-for/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781498725989

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

THANK YOU

***

Financing LONG-TERM CARE Needs?

AGING AND RETIREMENT

Long-term care (LTC) may not be the first thing individuals or couples think about as they approach retirement, but the costs for those who needs it can disrupt and derail retirement security. A good plan for long-term care requires many decisions over an extended period of time, and well before retirement.

In this article, Milliman consultant Robert Eaton discusses the major considerations and options for financing LTC needs in retirement.

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ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

THANK YOU

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER: https://www.routledge.com/Risk-Management-Liability-Insurance-and-Asset-Protection-Strategies-for/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781498725989

***

What is Corporate “BOOK VALUE” & “PAR VALUE”?

TWO INVESTING DIFFERENCES = TWO QUICK THOUGHTS

BY DR. DAVID EDWARD MARCINKO MBA CMP®

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BOOK-VALUE: Cost of capital assets minus accumulated depreciation for a healthcare [corporation], or other organization.

The net asset value of a [healthcare] companies common stock. This is calculated by dividing the net tangible assets of the company (minus the par value of any preferred stock the company has) by the number of common shares outstanding.

****

PAR VALUE: For common stock, the value on the books of the corporation. It has little to do with market value or even the original price of shares at first issuance.

The difference between par and the price at first issuance is carried on the books of a corporation as “paid-in capital” or “capital surplus.”

***

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ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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Invite Professor Marcinko to Your Next Seminar or Event

See You Soon

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Colleagues know that I enjoy personal coaching and public speaking and give as many talks each year as possible, at a variety of medical society and financial services conferences around the country and world. All in a Corona safe environment.

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These include lectures and visiting professorships at major academic centers, keynote lectures for hospitals, economic seminars and health systems, end-note lectures at city and statewide financial coalitions, and annual lectures for a variety of internal yearly meetings.

LIVE or PODCAST enabled, as well.

Topics Link: imba-inc-firm-services

Teleconference: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2020/10/14/me-marcinko-and-my-avatar/

My Fond Farewell to Tuskegee University

And so, we appreciate your consideration.

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EM: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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***

FORM ADV is a Must Read for Selecting a Financial “Advisor”

Form ADV – The Essential Document

Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA - WEGO Health Awards Nominee

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP©

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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Under law, financial advisors and planners must provide you with a form ADV Part II or a brochure that covers the same information.  Even if a brochure is provided, ask for the ADV.  While it is acceptable, even desirable, for the brochure to be easier to read than the ADV, the ADV is what is filed with the appropriate state or SEC.  If the brochure reads more like a slick sales brochure or the information in the brochure glosses over the items on the ADV to a high degree, one should consider eliminating the advisor from consideration.

FIDUCIARY: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2020/06/15/the-new-fiduciary-rule/

Registering with a state or SEC gives an advisor a fiduciary duty to the client.  This is a high standard under the law. 

There are several types of advisors who are exempt from registering and filing an ADV. 

First, there are registered representatives (brokers).  Brokers have a fiduciary responsibility to their firms regardless of whether they are statutory employees or independent contractors. Not the client.

Second are attorneys and accountants whose advice is “incidental” to their legal or accounting practices. But, why would one hire someone whose advice is “incidental” to his primary profession?  A top-notch advisor is a full-time professional and should be registered.  One should insist that their advisor be registered.

CFP: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2016/11/18/why-we-cannot-assume-cfp-equals-fiduciary/

The ADV will describe the advisor’s background and employment history, including any prior disciplinary issues.  It will describe the ownership of the firm and outline how the firm and advisor are compensated.  Any referral arrangements will be described.  If an advisor has an interest in any of the investments to be recommended, it must be listed as well as the fee schedule.  There is also a description of the types of investments recommended and the types of research information that is used.

ASSESSMENT: A review of the ADV should result in an alignment of what the advisor said during the interview and what is filed with the regulators.  If there is a clear discrepancy, choose another advisor.  If it is unclear, discuss the issue with the advisor.

Your thoughts and comments are appreciated.

Form ADV | Moneygrow.com | Registered Investment Advisor ...

SEC Headquarters
100 F Street, NE
Washington, DC 20549
(202) 942-8088

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***

The BUSINESS [Economic] CYCLE: What is it Really?

Of BUll and Bear Markets, too!

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By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

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The business cycle is also known as the economic cycle and reflects the expansion or contraction in economic activity. Understanding the business cycle and the indicators used to determine its phases may influence investment or economic business decisions and financial or medical planning expectations. Although often depicted as the regular rising and falling of an episodic curve, the business cycle is very irregular in terms of amplitude and duration.

Moreover, many elements move together during the cycle and individual elements seldom carry enough momentum to cause the cycle to move. However, elements may have a domino effect on one another, and this is ultimately drives the cycle.  We can also have a large positive cycle, coincident with a smaller but still negative cycle, as seen in the current healthcare climate of today.

  1. First Phase: Trough to Recovery (production driven)

Scenario: A depressed GNP leads to declining industrial production and capacity utilization. Decreased workloads result in improved labor productivity and reduced labor (unit) costs until actual producer (wholesale) prices decline.

  1. Second Phase: Recovery to Expansion (consumer driven)

Scenario: CPI declines (due to reduced wholesale prices) and consumer real income rises, improving consumer sentiment and actual demand for consumer goods.

  1. Third Phase: Expansion to Peak (production driven)

Scenario: GNP rises leading to increased industrial production and capacity utilization. But, labor productivity declines and unit labor costs and producer (wholesale) prices rise.

  1. Fourth Phase: Peak to Contraction (consumer driven)

Scenario: CPI rises making consumer real income and sentiment erode until consumer demand, and ultimately purchases, shrink dramatically.  Recessions may occur and economists have an alphabet used to describe them.

For example, with a V, the drop and recovery is quick. For U, the economy moves up more sluggishly from the bottom. A W is what you would expect: repeated recoveries and declines. An L shaper recession describes a prolonged dry economic spell or even depression.


NOTE: Historically, contractions have had a shorter duration than expansions.

Bull and Bear Markets for Medical Professionals

A bull market is generally one of rising stock prices, while a bear market is the opposite. There are usually two bulls for every one bear market over the long term.

More specifically, a bear market is defined as a drop of twenty percent or more in a market index from its high, and can vary in duration and severity.  While a bull market has no such threshold requirement to exist, other than they exist between these two periods of sharp decline.

Whither the Bear?

As a doctor, your action plan in a bear market depends on many variables, with perhaps your age being the most important:

In your 30s:

  • Pay off debts, school or practice loans.
  • Invest in safe money market mutual funds, cash or CDs.
  • Start retirement plan or 401-K account.

In your 40s:

  • Increase your pension plan or 401-K contributions.
  • Stay weighted more toward equity investments.
  • Review your goals, risk tolerance and portfolio.

In your 50s:

  • Position assets for ready cash instruments.
  • Diversify into stock, bonds and cash.

Retirement:

  • Maintain 3 years of ready cash living expenses.
  • Reduce, but still maintain your exposure to equities.

ASSESSMENT: So, where are we right now in the economic business cycle? Your thoughts are appreciated.

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OVER HEARD IN THE FINANCIAL ADVISOR’S LOUNGE

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“TAKE THE FIDUCIARY PLEDGE”

FINANCIAL ADVISORS LOUNGE AT iMBA, Inc.

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DEFINITION: A fiduciary is a person who holds a legal or ethical relationship of trust with one or more other parties (person or group of persons).

Typically, a fiduciary prudently takes care of money or other assets for another person. One party, for example, a corporate trust company or the trust department of a bank, acts in a fiduciary capacity to another party, who, for example, has entrusted funds to the fiduciary for safekeeping or investment. Likewise, financial advisers, financial planners, and asset managers, including managers of pension plans, endowments, and other tax-exempt assets, are considered fiduciaries under applicable statutes and laws.

In a fiduciary relationship, one person, in a position of vulnerability, justifiably vests confidence, good faith, reliance, and trust in another whose aid, advice, or protection is sought in some matter. In such a relation good conscience requires the fiduciary to act at all times for the sole benefit and interest of the one who trusts.

CITATION: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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[Fiduciary Pledge]*

I, the undersigned, ___________________________ (“financial advisor”), pledge to always put the best interests of _______________________________ (“client”) first, no matter what.

As such, I will disclose in writing the following material facts and any conflicts of interest (actual and/or perceived) that may arise in our business relationship:

  • All commission, fees, loads, and expenses, in advance, client will pay as a result of my advice and recommendations;
  • All commission and commissions I receive as a result of my advice and recommendations;
  • The maximum fee discount allowed by my firm and the largest fee discount I give to other customers;
  • The fee discount client is receiving;
  • Any recruitment bonuses and other recruitment compensation I have or will receive from my firm;
  • Fees I paid to others for the referral of client to me;
  • Fees I have or will receive for referring client to any third-parties; and
  • Any other financial conflicts of interest that could reasonably compromise the impartiality of my advice and recommendations.

Jeff Kuest MBA CFA CFP®

[CounterPoint Capital Advisors]

*© 2011-2015. All rights reserved. Courtesy permission with personal communication from Jeff Kuest, MBA, CFA, CFP®

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

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***

Join the ME-P and Become a CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER™

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Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

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[PHYSICIAN FOCUSED FINANCIAL PLANNING AND RISK MANAGEMENT COMPANION TEXTBOOK SET]

  Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

***

Preferred VERSUS Common Stock?

Is there a Difference?

What is the Difference?

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By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

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A common stock is the least senior of securities issued by a company. 

A preferred stock, in contrast, is slightly more senior to common stock, since dividends owed to the preferred stockholders should be paid before distributions are made to common stockholders. 

However, distributions to preferred stockholders are limited to the level outlined in the preferred stock agreement (i.e., the stated dividend payments).  Like a fixed income security, preferred stocks have a specific periodic payment that is either a fixed dollar amount or an amount adjusted based upon short-term market interest rates. 

However, unlike fixed income securities, preferred stocks typically do not have a specific maturity date and preferred stock dividend payments are made from the corporation’s after tax income rather than its pre-tax income.  Likewise, dividends paid to preferred stockholders are considered income distributions to the company’s equity owners rather than creditors, so the issuing corporation does not have the same requirement to make dividend distributions to preferred stockholders. 

So, preferred stock is generally referred to as a “hybrid” security, since it has elements similar to both fixed income securities (i.e., a stated periodic payments) and equity securities (i.e., shareholders are considered owners of the issuing company rather than creditors). 

Convertible preferred stocks (and convertible corporate bonds) are also considered hybrid securities since they have both equity and fixed income characteristics.   A convertible security whether a preferred stock or a corporate bond, generally includes a provision that allow the security to be exchanged for a given number of common stock shares in the issuing corporation. The holder of a convertible security essentially owns both the preferred stock (or the corporate bond) and an option to exchange the preferred stock (or corporate bond) for shares of common stock in the company. 

ASSESSMENT: Thus, at times the convertible security may behave more like the issuing company’s common stock than it does the issuing company’s preferred stock (or corporate bonds), depending upon how close the common stock’s market price is to the designated conversion price of the convertible security.

CITATION: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Your thoughts are appreciated.    

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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On Bill Gates, Doctors and Divorce – Oh My!

OF COMMON CAUSE WITH TOO MANY PHYSICIANS?

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Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

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Bill Gates has been a business hero for me for the past 35 years. I even met him, once briefly back in the day. So, the marital union of the Microsoft Founder and Melinda French seemed perfect, and their marriage stood the test of time as it neared the three-decade mark, a rare feat in the world of A-list couples.

Sadly, when they announced their split on Twitter this week, many were shocked, even heartbroken. People reflected on their own marriages and wondered how they could make it work if the Gates’ could not.

And collectively, we found we cared about the split — a lot. 

But, what about physician colleagues and divorce?

Do we doctors have some common cause with Bill and Melinda?

Divorce for Physicians What You Should Know - bidti.org

MEDIATION: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2016/02/11/a-step-wise-approach-to-the-divorce-mediation-process-for-mds/

QDRO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2008/05/19/what-is-a-qdro/

SETTLEMENTS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2008/05/28/doctors-and-divorce-settlements/

PRACTICE VALUE: https://healthcarefinancials.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/medical-practice-valuation-blunders1.pdf

BUY-SELL: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2008/07/03/marital-dissolution-buy-sell-agreements-and-practice-value/

GREY DIVORCE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2019/10/21/older-divorcing-medical-professionals/

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated

***

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Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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***

What is a Non-Fungible Token?

About NFTs

[By staff reporters]

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According to Wikipedia, a non-fungible token (NFT) (previously referred to as Bitcoin 2.0) is a unit of data stored on a digital ledger, called a blockchain, that certifies a digital asset to be unique and therefore not interchangeable. NFTs can be used to represent items such as photos, videos, audio, and other types of digital files. Access to any copy of the original file, however, is not restricted to the buyer of the NFT. While copies of these digital items are available for anyone to obtain, NFTs are tracked on blockchains to provide the owner with a proof of ownership that is separate from copyright.

In 2021, there has been increased interest in using NFTs. Blockchains like Ethereum, Flow, and Tezos have their own standards when it comes to supporting NFTs, but each works to ensure that the digital item represented is authentically one-of-a-kind. NFTs are now being used to commodify digital assets in art, music, sports, and other popular entertainment. Most NFTs are part of the Ethereum blockchain; however, other blockchains can implement their own versions of NFTs.

Crypto Currency Basics: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2014/01/23/understanding-currencies-bitcoins/

Carbon Footprint!

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CARBON

The NFT market value tripled in 2020, reaching more than $250 million. The rise of NFT transactions has also led to increased environmental criticism. The computation-heavy processes associated with proof-of-work blockchains, the type primarily used for NFTs, require high energy inputs that are contributing to global warming. The carbon emissions produced by the energy needed to maintain these blockchains has forced some in the NFT market to rethink their carbon footprint.

Your thoughts are appreciated.

BITCOIN: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2014/01/23/understanding-currencies-bitcoins/

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***

On Psychology, Financial Planning and Investing Bias

Psychological Biases Affecting Financial Planning and Investing

Dr. Marcinko at Johns Hopkins University

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

[Editor-in-Chief]

Sponsored: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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The following are some of the most common psychological biases.  Some are learned while others are genetically determined (and often socially reinforced).  While this essay focuses on the financial implications of these biases, they are prevalent in most areas in life.

[A] Incentives

It is broadly accepted that incenting someone to do something is effective, whether it be paying office staff a commissions to sell more healthcare products, or giving bonuses to office employees if they work efficiently to see more HMO patients.  What is not well understood is that the incentives cause a sub-conscious distortion of decision-making ability in the incented person.  This distortion causes the affected person – whether it is yourself or someone else – to truly believe in a certain decision, even if it is the wrong choice when viewed objectively.  Service professionals, including financial advisors and lawyers, are affected by this bias, and it causes them to honestly offer recommendations that may be inappropriate, and that they would recognize as being inappropriate if they did not have this bias.  The existence of this bias makes it important for each one of us to examine our incentive biases and take extra care when advising physician clients, or to make sure we are appropriately considering non-incented alternatives.

[B] Denial

Denial is a well known, but under-appreciated, psychological force.  Physicians, clients and professionals (like everyone else) are prone to the mistake of ignoring a painful reality, like putting off an unpleasant call (thus prolonging a problematic situation and potentially making it worse) or not opening account statements because of the desire not to see quantitative proof of losses.  Denial also manifests itself by causing human beings to ignore evidence that a mistake has been made.  If you think of yourself as a smart person (and what professional doesn’t?), then evidence pointing to the conclusion that a mistake has been made will call into question that belief, causing cognitive dissonance.  Our brains function to either avoid cognitive dissonance or to resolve it quickly, usually by discounting or rationalizing the disconfirming evidence. Not surprisingly, colleagues at Kansas State University and elsewhere, found that financial denial, including attempts to avoid thinking about or dealing with money, is associated with lower income, lower net worth, and higher levels of revolving credit.

[C] Consistency and Commitment Tendency

Human beings have evolved – probably both genetically and socially – to be consistent.  It is easier and safer to deal with others if they honor their commitments and if they behave in a consistent and predictable manner over time. This allows people to work together and build trust that is needed for repeat dealings and to accomplish complex tasks.  In the jungle, this trust was necessary to for humans to successfully work as a team to catch animals for dinner, or fight common threats.  In business and life it is preferable to work with others who exhibit these tendencies.  Unfortunately, the downside of these traits is that people make errors in judgment because of the strong desire not to change, or be different (“lemming effect” or “group-think”).  So the result is that most people will seek out data that supports a prior stated belief or decision and ignore negative data, by not “thinking outside the box”.  Additionally, future decisions will be unduly influenced by the desire to appear consistent with prior decisions, thus decreasing the ability to be rational and objective.  The more people state their beliefs or decisions, the less likely they are to change even in the face of strong evidence that they should do so.  This bias results in a strong force in most people causing them to avoid or quickly resolve the cognitive dissonance that occurs when a person who thinks of themselves as being consistent and committed to prior statements and actions encounters evidence that indicates that prior actions may have been a mistake.  It is particularly important therefore for advisors to be aware that their communications with clients and the press clouds the advisor’s ability to seek out and process information that may prove current beliefs incorrect.  Since this is obviously irrational, one must actively seek out negative information, and be very careful about what is said and written, being aware that the more you shout it out, the more you pound it in.

[D] Pattern Recognition

On a biological level, the human brain has evolved to seek out patterns and to work on stimuli-response patterns, both native and learned.  What this means is that we all react to something based on our prior experiences that had shared characteristics with the current stimuli.  Many situations have so many possible inputs that our brains need to take mental short cuts using pattern recognition we would not gain the benefit from having faced a certain type of problem in the past.  This often-helpful mechanism of decision-making fails us when past correlations or patterns do not accurately represent the current reality, and thus the mental shortcuts impair our ability to analyze a new situation.  This biologic and social need to seek out patterns that can be used to program stimuli-response mechanisms is especially harmful to rational decision-making when the pattern is not a good predictor of the desired outcome (like short term moves in the stock market not being predictive of long term equity portfolio performance), or when past correlations do not apply anymore.

[E] Social Proof

It is a subtle but powerful reality that having others agree with a decision one makes, gives that person more conviction in the decision, and having others disagree decreases one’s confidence in that decision.  This bias is even more exaggerated when the other parties providing the validating/questioning opinions are perceived to be experts in a relevant field, or are authority figures, like people on television.  In many ways, the short term moves in the stock market are the ultimate expression of social proof – the price of a stock one owns going up is proof that a lot of other people agree with the decision to buy, and a dropping stock price means a stock should be sold.  When these stressors become extreme, it is of paramount importance that all participants in the financial planning process have a clear understanding of what the long-term goals are, and what processes are in place to monitor the progress towards these goals.  Without these mechanisms it is very hard to resist the enormous pressure to follow the crowd; think social media.

[F] Contrast

Sensation, emotion and cognition work by contrast.  Perception is not only on an absolute scale, it also functions relative to prior stimuli.  This is why room temperature water feels hot when experienced after being exposed to the cold.  It is also why the cessation of negative emotions “feels” so good.  Cognitive functioning also works on this principle.  So one’s ability to analyze information and draw conclusions is very much related to the context with in which the analysis takes place, and to what information was originally available.  This is why it is so important to manage one’s own expectations as well as those of clients.  A client is much more likely to be satisfied with a 10% portfolio return if they were expecting 7% than if they were hoping for 15%.

[G] Scarcity

Things that are scarce have more impact and perceived value than things present in abundance.  Biologically, this bias is demonstrated by the decreasing response to constant stimuli (contrast bias) and socially it is widely believed that scarcity equals value.  People who feel an opportunity may “pass them by” and thus be unavailable are much more likely to make a hasty, poorly reasoned decision than they otherwise would.  Investment fads and rising security prices elicit this bias (along with social proof and others) and need to be resisted.  Understanding that analysis in the face of perceived scarcity is often inadequate and biased may help professionals make more rational choices, and keep clients from chasing fads.

[H] Envy / Jealousy

This bias also relates to the contrast and social proof biases.  Prudent financial and business planning and related decision-making are based on real needs followed by desires.  People’s happiness and satisfaction is often based more on one’s position relative to perceived peers rather than an ability to meet absolute needs.  The strong desire to “keep up with the Jones” can lead people to risk what they have and need for what they want.  These actions can have a disastrous impact on important long-term financial goals.  Clear communication and vivid examples of risks is often needed to keep people focused on important financial goals rather than spurious ones, or simply money alone, for its own sake.

[I] Fear

Financial fear is probably the most common emotion among physicians and all clients. The fear of being wrong – as well as the fear of being correct! It can be debilitating, as in the corollary expression on fear: the paralysis of analysis.

According to Paul Karasik, there are four common investor and physician fears, which can be addressed by financial advisors in the following manner:

  • Fear of making the wrong decision: ameliorated by being a teacher and educator.
  • Fear of change: ameliorated by providing an agenda, outline and/or plan.
  • Fear of giving up control: ameliorated by asking for permission and agreement.
  • Fear of losing self-esteem: ameliorated by serving the client first and communicating that sentiment in a positive manner.

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Psychological Traps

Now, as human beings, our brains are booby-trapped with psychological barriers that stand between making smart financial decisions and making dumb ones. The good news is that once you realize your own mental weaknesses, it’s not impossible to overcome them. 

In fact, Mandi Woodruff, a financial reporter whose work has appeared in Yahoo! Finance, Daily Finance, The Wall Street Journal, The Fiscal Times and the Financial Times among others; related the following mind-traps in a September 2013 essay for the finance vertical Business Insider; as these impediments are now entering the lay-public zeitgeist:

  • Anchoring happens when we place too much emphasis on the first piece of information we receive regarding a given subject. For instance, when shopping for a wedding ring a salesman might tell us to spend three months’ salary. After hearing this, we may feel like we are doing something wrong if we stray from this advice, even though the guideline provided may cause us to spend more than we can afford.
  • Myopia makes it hard for us to imagine what our lives might be like in the future. For example, because we are young, healthy, and in our prime earning years now, it may be hard for us to picture what life will be like when our health depletes and we know longer have the earnings necessary to support our standard of living. This short-sightedness makes it hard to save adequately when we are young, when saving does the most good.
  • Gambler’s fallacy occurs when we subconsciously believe we can use past events to predict the future. It is common for the hottest sector during one calendar year to attract the most investors the following year. Of course, just because an investment did well last year doesn’t mean it will continue to do well this year. In fact, it is more likely to lag the market.
  • Avoidance is simply procrastination. Even though you may only have the opportunity to adjust your health care plan through your employer once per year, researching alternative health plans is too much work and too boring for us to get around to it. Consequently, we stick with a plan that may not be best for us.
  • Loss aversion affected many investors during the stock market crash of 2008. During the crash, many people decided they couldn’t afford to lose more and sold their investments. Of course, this caused the investors to sell at market troughs and miss the quick, dramatic recovery.
  • Overconfident investing happens when we believe we can out-smart other investors via market timing or through quick, frequent trading. Data convincingly shows that people who trade most often under-perform the market by a significant margin over time.
  • Mental accounting takes place when we assign different values to money depending on where we get it from. For instance, even though we may have an aggressive saving goal for the year, it is likely easier for us to save money that we worked for than money that was given to us as a gift.
  • Herd mentality makes it very hard for humans to not take action when everyone around us does. For example, we may hear stories of people making significant profits buying, fixing up, and flipping homes and have the desire to get in on the action, even though we have no experience in real estate.
https://images.routledge.com/common/jackets/crclarge/978149872/9781498725989.jpg

Textbook Order: https://www.routledge.com/Risk-Management-Liability-Insurance-and-Asset-Protection-Strategies-for/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781498725989

Your thoughts are appreciated.

THANK YOU

***

New Wave FIN-TECH Business Models?

FINANCIAL SERVICES: New business models and big opportunities

By MIT Technology Review

CMP logo

Courtesy: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

The financial services industry is turning to bold initiatives to propel from pandemic response to business growth. And, among financial services institutions, 62% are looking to ramp up tech investments, and another 62% expect to move IT and business functions to the cloud, compared with 46% across industries.

For example, in a recent report, Nucleus Research found that cloud deployments deliver four times the return on investment as on-premises deployments do.

Link: https://www.technologyreview.com/2021/04/29/1023266/new-business-models-big-opportunity-financial-services/?mc_cid=3ae91e4c2b&mc_eid=72aee829ad

INDUSTRY RELATED: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2014/09/24/is-the-financial-services-industry-all-fed-up/

TRANSFORMATION: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2016/12/28/the-most-transformational-era-in-financial-services-since-the-1980s/

Your thoughts are appreciated.

THANK YOU

***

My Investing “Sell” Principle

The Renaissance of Pipelines

Vitaliy N. Katsenelson, CFA - YouTube

By Vitaliy N. Katsenelson, CFA

A client recently asked me whether there is a difference in our sell discipline between high and low growth companies.

Selling is one of the hardest parts of investing. I wrote a lot on the subject in the past, but let’s zoom in on how our selling practice differs between high-growth companies with long runways for compounding and slow-growth companies.

LINK: https://contrarianedge.com/our-sell-discipline/

AUDIO: https://investor.fm/the-renaissance-of-pipelines-and-our-sell-discipline-ep-113

Your thoughts are appreciated.

EDITOR’S NOTE: It has been a few years since I spoke with my colleague Vitaliy. But, I read his newsletters and blog regularly and suggest all ME-P readers do the same.

Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA

[Editor-in-Chief]

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners(TM)

BOOK: https://www.amazon.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-Advisors/dp/1482240289/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418580820&sr=8-1&keywords=david+marcinko

THANK YOU

***

HYPER-INFLATION 2021?

Inflated Fears of “Rigged” Markets and Hyperinflation

[By Rick Kahler CFP®]

BIO: Rick Kahler resides in Rapid City, South Dakota and is a fee-only financial planner.

MORE: https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/personalfinance/is-inflation-about-to-trash-your-investments/ar-BB1fZg72

Your thoughts are appreciated.

EDITOR’S NOTE: It has been a few years since I spoke with my colleague Rick. But, I read his newsletters and blog regularly and suggest all ME-P readers do the same.

Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA

[Editor-in-Chief]

TEXTBOOK:

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER: https://www.amazon.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-Advisors/dp/1482240289/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418580820&sr=8-1&keywords=david+marcinko

THANK YOU

***

On All Things “Fiduciary”

My Journey From Financial Advisor to Journalist to Fiduciary Ambassador

By Kathleen M. McBride, AIFA® [Founder, Fiduciarypath, LLC]

EDITOR’S NOTE: Kathleen M. McBride, AIFA®, Founder, Fiduciarypath, LLC and CEFEX-certified analyst, talks about her journey from advisor to journalist to fiduciary ambassador.

Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA

[Editor-in-Chief]

Image result for fiduciary

LINK: https://www.fi360.com/blog/post/all-things-fiduciary

Your thoughts are appreciated.

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER: https://www.amazon.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-Advisors/dp/1482240289/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418580820&sr=8-1&keywords=david+marcinko

THANK YOU

***

The CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER® Charter Designation Program

Join Our Mailing List 

CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER® CHARTER DESIGNATION PROGAM

[A Continuing Education Portal for Financial Advisors]

By Ann Miller RN MHA

An Information Technology Educational Futurist

Today, colleges and universities are finally beginning to identify students who are adept at learning online and reward the top achievers and professors. Employers, graduate and medical schools are beginning to troll MOOCs [massive open online courses] seeking viable job, and academic, candidates.

In fact, when I last checked, the nation’s public health administration and related B-student were enrolled in more than 118 online programs. MOOCs offer greater access for a larger number of students, at significantly lower costs than on-site programs.

By the same token, technology like Blackboard®, Cernage, and eXplorance, Kalture and related must be used to full potential. Smart phones, PCs and tablets, videos, interactive games, AI simulators and related apps with Skype®-like virtual classrooms and cloud storage are obvious embellishments to online initiatives. 

An Executive Education Pioneer 

Moreover, it is increasingly imperative that technology be used to expand the universe of targeted adult-learners. This is for aspiring professionals and business executives, or those already in the workforce.

Estimates by Business Week suggest that adult executive education in the US is a $900 million annual business with approximately 80 percent provided by university schools. Beside the educational benefits, monetary dividends are reaped as open enrollment eases matriculation access. Similar programs at the Wharton School, Darden, Harvard and the Goizueta Business School at Emory University charge premium rates for the implied institutional moniker.

ENTER the CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER® charter designation

According to industry pundit: Mike Kitces MSFS CFP CLU ChFC EA

The CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER™ charter designation program was created by Dr. David Marcinko (who edited the Financial Planning Handbook for Physicians and Advisors” [1st and 2nd editions”] AND “The Business of Medical Practice [1st, 2nd and 3rd editions]. It is intended for those financial advisors, medical management consultants or healthcare CXOs who aim specifically serve physicians and the allied healthcare and medical community.

http://www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com

Out content focuses not only on the risk management, insurance, investment and financial planning issues relevant to all independent or employed physicians, but also provides an understanding of the business, economic and financial aspects of medical practice management so that CMP™ charter holders can help their physician clients achieve the next level of businesses in the modern era.

“The informed voice of a new generation of fiduciary advisors for healthcare”

 Like medical professionals, all licensed Certified Medical Planner™ charter-holders are required to act in accordance with governing regulations. They are required to sign a Code-of-Ethics attestation confirming the intent to run their advisory and/or management consulting business according to a strict set of fiduciary standards. 

PROGRESS: After several years of proof-of-concept preparation, we secured the website URL: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org complete with copyrighted logo and launched. We now have about 60 graduates under a quarter-semester business model with 3 mandated proprietary textbooks, case models, test questions and checklists, and 3 recommended proprietary dictionary handbooks which we produced and copyrighted.

Our strategic competitive advantage [SCA] is four-fold: fiduciary status, asynchronous education with “live” instructors, deep curriculum granularity and requisite undergraduate degree.

PRODUCT LINE EXTENSION: Our course materials are kept updated thru our website platform: http://www.MedicalExecutivePost.com with half million readers / subscribers

Full Disclosure: We are currently under non-disclosure agreements [NDA] with a VC firm located in Durham, NC that acquires, invests and operates a portfolio of educational and healthcare media, market intelligence, online certification programs and associated businesses.

NOTE: We would consider a revenue sharing relationship with a major University SBE in order to quickly achieve scale, automate the program and establish a scholarship fund.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

Product DetailsProduct DetailsProduct Details

***

How to become a board CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER®

HOW TO BECOME A BOARD

CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER®

[Two Program Matriculation Options Available]

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

CURRICULUM: Enter CPMs

[PHYSICIAN FOCUSED FINANCIAL PLANNING AND RISK MANAGEMENT COMPANION TEXTBOOK SET]

  Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™     Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

***

Less Pain at the 2021 Easter Sunday Pump? Well, Maybe!

HAPPY EASTER 2021

This ME-P was originally posted in 2014 and updated annually since then.

Join Our Mailing List

A Visual Guide to How Increasing Gas Prices are Burning Away the American Pocketbook

By Mint.com

Assessment

The times and gas prices have changed since 2014 – when we first started to track this; haven’t they?

***

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Please review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest ME-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured. Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Sponsors Welcomed: And, credible sponsors and like-minded advertisers are always welcomed. Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2007/11/11/advertise

Product Details  Product Details

***

“Reasons” to Sell Stock

[By staff reporters]

***

THE PHYSIOLOGIC v. PSYCHOLOGIC FINANCIAL PLANNING DIVIDE

THE PHYSIOLOGIC v. PSYCHOLOGIC FINANCIAL PLANNING DIVIDE
Courtesy: https://lnkd.in/eBf-4vY

Holistic Life Planning, Behavioral Economics & Trading Addiction

Psychology Behavioral Economics Finance

INVITATION: https://lnkd.in/d2SefCY

SPEAKING TOPIC LIST: https://lnkd.in/e7WrDj9

MY “AVATAR”: https://lnkd.in/d6BU-TQ

BUSINESS, FINANCE, INVESTING AND INSURANCE TEXTS FOR DOCTORS:
1 – https://lnkd.in/ebWtzGg
2 – https://lnkd.in/ezkQMfR
3 – https://lnkd.in/ewJPTJs
THANK YOU
***

Book Dr. Marcinko for your Next Seminar!

Book Marcinko

Join Our Mailing List

Book Speaker Dr. David E. Marcinko CMP® MBA for your Next Medical, Pharma, Hospital, University or Financial Services Seminar or Personal and Corporate Coaching Sessions 

dr-david-marcinko11

Dr. David Edward Marcinko, editor-in-chief, is a next-generation apostle of Nobel Laureate Kenneth Joseph Arrow PhD, as a health-care economist, insurance advisor, financial advisor, risk manager, and board-certified surgeon from Temple University in Philadelphia.

In the past, he edited eight practice-management books, three medical textbooks and manuals in four languages, five financial planning yearbooks, dozens of interactive CD-ROMs, and three comprehensive health-care administration dictionaries.

Internationally recognized for his clinical work, he is a past endowed chair; professor of health economics, finance and public health policy management; and distinguished visiting professor of surgery as a Bachelor of Medicine–Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) degree recipient from Marien Hospital in Aachen, Germany.

He provides litigation support and expert witness testimony in state and federal court, with medical publications archived in the Library of Congress and the Library of Medicine at the National Institutes of Health.

***

iMBA, Inc Seminar Topics

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DEM avatar

***

[PHYSICIAN FOCUSED FINANCIAL PLANNING AND RISK MANAGEMENT COMPANION TEXTBOOK SET]

  Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

***

[HOSPITAL OPERATIONS, ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT COMPANION TEXTBOOK SET]

Product DetailsProduct Details

[Foreword Dr. Phillips MD JD MBA LLM] *** [Foreword Dr. Nash MD MBA FACP]

***

[PRIVATE MEDICAL PRACTICE BUSINESS MANAGEMENT TEXTBOOK – 3rd.  Edition]

Product Details

  [Foreword Dr. Hashem MD PhD] *** [Foreword Dr. Silva MD MBA]

***

https://davidedwardmarcinko.com/speaking/

***

Health Economics and Finance

THE BUSINESS OF MEDICAL PRACTICE AND HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT

BUSINESS, FINANCE, INVESTING AND INSURANCE TEXTS FOR DOCTORS:
1 – https://lnkd.in/ebWtzGg
2 – https://lnkd.in/ezkQMfR
3 – https://lnkd.in/ewJPTJs

HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT & BUSINESS TEXTS FOR PHYSICIANS AND CXOs:

1 – https://lnkd.in/eEf-xEH 2 – https://lnkd.in/e2ZmewQ

“DICTIONARY OF TERMS FOR THE BUSINESS OF MEDICINE”
DHEF: https://lnkd.in/dqdbWM9
DHIMC: https://lnkd.in/e9AmEhd
DHITS: https://lnkd.in/eWx3WjZ
MORE: https://lnkd.in/eVGcji5

THANK YOU
******

What Up – the PPI?

EXACTLY WHAT IS THE PRODUCER PRICE INDEX [PPI]?
Courtesy: https://lnkd.in/eBf-4vY
ECONOMICS INFORMATION FOR PHYSICIAN COLLEAGUES
Web: https://lnkd.in/eVGcji5

DEFINITION: The PPI is a group of indexes that measure the change, over time, in the prices received by domestic producers of goods and services. It measures price changes from the perspective of the seller rather than the consumer, as with the CPI. The CPI would include imported goods, while the PPI is relevant to U.S. producers, and therefore would not include imports.

The PPI measures over 10,000 products and services. It reports the price changes prior to the retail level. This information is useful to the government in formulating fiscal and monetary policies. The data gathered from the PPI is often used in escalating purchase and sales contracts. That is the dollar amount to be paid at some time in the future.

NOTE: Long-term managed medical care contracts of the future will seek escalation clauses for increases in prices.
DHEF: https://lnkd.in/dqdbWM9

BUSINESS, FINANCE, INVESTING AND INSURANCE TEXTS FOR DOCTORS:
1 – https://lnkd.in/ebWtzGg
2 – https://lnkd.in/ezkQMfR
3 – https://lnkd.in/ewJPTJs
Thank You
***

WHAT IS COMMON STOCK “PAR” VALUE?

WHAT IS COMMON STOCK “PAR” VALUE?

Courtsey: https://lnkd.in/eBf-4vY
DHEF: https://lnkd.in/dqdbWM9

DEFINITION:

For common stock, the value on the books of the corporation. It has little to do with market value or even the original price of shares at first issuance. The difference between par and the price at first issuance is carried on the books of a corporation as “paid-in capital” or “capital surplus.”

Par value for preferred stocks is also liquidating value and the value on which dividends (expressed as a percentage) are paid, generally $100 per share.

BUSINESS, FINANCE, INVESTING AND INSURANCE TEXTS FOR DOCTORS:
1 – https://lnkd.in/ebWtzGg
2 – https://lnkd.in/ezkQMfR
3 – https://lnkd.in/ewJPTJs
THANK YOU
***

COMPREHENSIVE FINANCIAL PLANNING FOR PHYSICIANS & ADVISORS 2.0

COMPREHENSIVE FINANCIAL PLANNING FOR PHYSICIANS & ADVISORS 2.0
Courtesy: https://lnkd.in/eBf-4vY

BEST PRACTICES OF LEADING CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNERs®
Website: https://lnkd.in/eVGcji5

BUSINESS, FINANCE, INVESTING AND INSURANCE TEXTS FOR DOCTORS:
1 – https://lnkd.in/ebWtzGg
2 – https://lnkd.in/ezkQMfR
3 – https://lnkd.in/ewJPTJs

“DICTIONARY OF TERMS FOR THE BUSINESS OF MEDICINE”
DHEF: https://lnkd.in/dqdbWM9
DHIMC: https://lnkd.in/e9AmEhd
DHITS: https://lnkd.in/eWx3WjZ

Thank You
***

WHAT IS A CLOSED-END MUTUAL FUND

ON OPEN AND CLOSED MUTUAL FUNDS

By staff reporters

A closed-end fund (CEF) or closed-ended fund is a collective investment model based on issuing a fixed number of shares which are not redeemable from the fund.

Unlike open-end funds, new shares in a closed-end fund are not created by managers to meet demand from investors. Instead, the shares can be purchased and sold only in the market, which is the original design of the mutual fund, which predates open-end mutual funds but offers the same actively-managed pooled investments.

***

 

***

BUSINESS, FINANCE, INVESTING AND INSURANCE TEXTS FOR DOCTORS
1 – https://lnkd.in/ebWtzGg
2 – https://lnkd.in/ezkQMfR
3 – https://lnkd.in/ewJPTJs
THANK YOU
***

ABOUT THE Institute of Medical Business Advisors, Inc

About iMBA, Inc

By Staff Reporters

iMBA Inc., is a healthcare consulting and financial planning analytics firm specializing in medical practice management and physician alignment.

Our mission is to empower physician colleagues and healthcare organizations to drive clarity, improve performance, and create accountability.

Our team combines a cross-section of skill-sets including public and population health, financial operations, business intelligence, and data science.

And, our diverse background of experience includes advanced academic training, economic and financial research, global marketing, management consulting, and entrepreneurial spirit.

INSTITUTE WEB: www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com

***

SCHEDULE A MEDICAL PRACTICE & FINANCIAL PLANNING CONSULTATION TODAY!
Courtesy: https://lnkd.in/eBf-4vY
For Doctors – By Doctors – Confidential – Video Conference
WEB: https://lnkd.in/eVGcji5

BUSINESS, FINANCE, INVESTING AND INSURANCE TEXTS FOR DOCTORS:
1 – https://lnkd.in/ebWtzGg
2 – https://lnkd.in/ezkQMfR
3 – https://lnkd.in/ewJPTJs

HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT TEXTS FOR PHYSICIAN CXOs:
1 – https://lnkd.in/eEf-xEH
2 – https://lnkd.in/e2ZmewQ

DICTIONARY OF TERMS FOR THE BUSINESS OF MEDICINE:
DHEF: https://lnkd.in/dqdbWM9
DHIMC: https://lnkd.in/e9AmEhd
DHITS: https://lnkd.in/eWx3WjZ

INVITATION: https://lnkd.in/d2SefCY
SPEAKING TOPIC LIST: https://lnkd.in/e7WrDj9
MY “AVATAR“: https://lnkd.in/d6BU-TQ

***

DR. DAVID EDWARD MARCINKO MBA CMP®

[Chief Executive Officer]

***

CONTACT: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com
Thank You
***

Physician Coaching – Next Generation

PHYSICIAN COACHING FOR PRACTICE MANAGEMENT & FINANCIAL PLANNING
Courtesy: https://lnkd.in/eBf-4vY
For Doctors – By Doctors – Confidential – Video Conference
WEB: https://lnkd.in/eVGcji5

BUSINESS, FINANCE, INVESTING AND INSURANCE TEXTS FOR DOCTORS:
1 – https://lnkd.in/ebWtzGg
2 – https://lnkd.in/ezkQMfR
3 – https://lnkd.in/ewJPTJs

HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT TEXTS FOR PHYSICIAN CXOs:
1 – https://lnkd.in/eEf-xEH
2 – https://lnkd.in/e2ZmewQ

DICTIONARY OF TERMS FOR THE BUSINESS OF MEDICINE
DHEF: https://lnkd.in/dqdbWM9
DHIMC: https://lnkd.in/e9AmEhd
DHITS: https://lnkd.in/eWx3WjZ

INVITATION: https://lnkd.in/d2SefCY
SPEAKING TOPIC LIST: https://lnkd.in/e7WrDj9
MY “AVATAR”: https://lnkd.in/d6BU-TQ

Thank You
***

Help a Veteran with “Pro Bono” Medical Care -OR- Financial Planning Advice

Join Our Mailing List 

[By Staff Reporters]

As a doctor, you have a unique position in society and the ability to help your fellow man/woman during the most frail, jubilant and sacred times of human life; even unto the end.

HELP a Veteran today!

***

Veteran's Day 2012

VETERAN’S DAY 2019

***

Assessment

Similarly, as a financial advisor, you have a unique position in society and the ability to help your fellow man/woman during their most financially fragile times of life; even unto the end.

So, be a fiduciary advisor; not just a Registered Representative, commissioned sales person, or agent.

HELP a Veteran today!

More: Are You Providing Pro Bono Financial Advice? [Voting Poll and Survey]

MORE: VA Cost Accounting

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

***

Although this book targets physicians, I was pleased to see that it also addressed the risk management, financial planning and employment benefit needs of nurses; physical, respiratory, and occupational therapists; CRNAs, hospitalists, and other members of the health care team….highly readable, practical, and understandable.

Captain CASH Unit Iraq [retired] – Cecelia T. Perez RN [Hospital Operating Room Manager, Ellicott City, Maryland

perez-x-mass

***

Ex-Dividends

WHAT IS THE “EX-DIVIDEND” STOCK DATE?
Courtesy: https://lnkd.in/eBf-4vY

DEFINITION: Occurs when dividends are declared by a company’s board of directors, they are payable on a certain date (“payable date”) to shareholders recorded on the company’s books as of a stated earlier date (“record date”).
DHEF: https://lnkd.in/dqdbWM9

Purchasers of the stock on or after the record date are not entitled to receive the recently declared dividend, so the ex-dividend date is the number of days it takes to settle a trade before the record date (currently three business days). A stock’s price on its ex-dividend date appears in the newspaper with an X beside it.

BUSINESS, FINANCE, INVESTING AND INSURANCE TEXTS FOR DOCTORS:
1 – https://lnkd.in/ebWtzGg
2 – https://lnkd.in/ezkQMfR
3 – https://lnkd.in/ewJPTJs
THANK YOU
***

***

COACHING MEDICAL COLLEAGUES IN BUSINESS & FINANCIAL PLANNING

COACHING MEDICAL COLLEAGUES IN BUSINESS & FINANCIAL PLANNING
https://lnkd.in/eBf-4vY
For Doctors – By Doctor Colleagues – Confidential Mentoring

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP

BUSINESS, FINANCE, INVESTING AND INSURANCE TEXTS FOR DOCTORS:
1 – https://lnkd.in/ebWtzGg
2 – https://lnkd.in/ezkQMfR
3 – https://lnkd.in/ewJPTJs

DICTIONARY OF TERMS FOR THE BUSINESS OF MEDICINE
DHEF: https://lnkd.in/dqdbWM9
DHIMC: https://lnkd.in/e9AmEhd
DHITS: https://lnkd.in/eWx3WjZ

INVITATION: https://lnkd.in/d2SefCY
SPEAKING TOPIC LIST: https://lnkd.in/e7WrDj9
MY “AVATAR”: https://lnkd.in/d6BU-TQ

Thank You
***

***

Submit a Financial Advisor Prospecting Video to the ME-P [Experts Invited]

Welcome Financial Advisors: An Invitation to Prospect & Promote Your Self

Join Our Mailing List

Healthcare Prospecting with FAs in Mind

  • Would you like to present your self or firm, your strategic competitive advantage, and your value proposition to the medical community?
  • Would you like to share some unique financial planning, financial advisory or health economics pearls with your colleagues?
  • Would you like to see a new financial product or service in action before you start using it in your practice, or recommending it to physician clients?
  • Would you like to introduce yourself and prospect to the HNW medical community, for free?

If so …

Join your ME-P peers and colleagues. Get free access to on-demand videos and other presentations from leading financial advisors [FAs] and brought to you by www.MedicalExecutivePost.com.

The ME-P is your source for the best online-exclusive content in the financial advisory marketing, and financial planning e-prospecting space, for all healthcare professionals [physicians, podiatrists, osteopaths, dentists, chiropractors, nurses, medical CXOs, etc].

How to Submit a Video

To submit a personal or product presentation video [pod-cast], sponsor a video [pod-cast], or inquire about specific advertising on the ME-P, please contact Ann Miller RN MHA at: 770.448.0769 or MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

Video Formats

Acceptable 5-12 minute video formats include: Flash (in either SWF or FLA), MPEG, MP4, QuickTime or AVI. Submission of a podcast/video does not guarantee publishing on the ME-P website. FA submitted videos are subject to review by the Executive Editor. Company submitted videos are subject to review by the Publisher and Executive Editor.

SAMPLE PODCAST

In this encore podcast, Somnath Basu PhD MBA examines how the recent economic turmoil has changed financial planning clients’ attitudes and expectations.

White Paper: AgeBander

Dr. Basu is a popular ME-P contributor, commentator and “thought-leader”.

Basu Video Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jzAkB8h5v3Q

Copyright

Copyright © 2011 by the Institute of Medical Business Advisors, Inc www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com All rights reserved, USA. Opinions expressed by authors are their own and not necessarily those of iMBA Inc, the editorial staff, or any member of the editorial advisory board.

Privacy

ME-P and iMBA Inc pledges always to respect the privacy and anonymity of its users and participants. The information (the names, email addresses or any other contact information, personal or financial data) provided to us by our visitors in their registrations and communications with us is securely stored and not shared with any third party. We are committed to working with the Internet community in cultivating and maintaining trust between all its members.

PROSPECTING MADE EASY

PHYSICIANS: www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com
PRACTICE: www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com
ADVISORS: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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The New “Fiduciary” Rule

 Really? Whose side is your financial advisor on?

 

 

 

 

 

By Rick Kahler CFP®

If it weren’t already hard enough to understand whose side your financial advisor is on, it got more complicated on June 9, 2017. As of that date, all financial advisors who sell products are required to forego any sales agenda and give advice that would benefit their clients or customers (called “fiduciary advice”).

Does this sound too good to be true? It is!

This rule only pertains to rollovers into an IRA from a qualified plan like a 401(k), and only to the investment recommendations for that IRA account.

Any other account is still fair game for stuffing full of high-commission and high-fee products that mainly benefit salespeople and their companies.

Also, in case you think your IRA is now protected from high-cost products, there’s one more catch. Salespeople are not required to look out for your best interests if they explain to you how and why they intend to give advice that instead primarily benefits themselves and their brokerage company.

While this new law will probably confuse consumers more than it helps, it may be a first step toward something larger.

Here is the sad truth

Most Americans believe they already receive objective, fiduciary advice. The overwhelming odds are that they don’t.

You face odds of ten to one that your advisor is a salesperson who is not required to put your financial interests first. Most Americans purchase their investments from the half a million brokers who earn commissions if they can convince you to buy an expensive alternative to the thriftier, better-performing investment options on the market. That’s more than ten times the number of advisors who adhere to a fiduciary standard. Government research estimates that consumers lost $17 billion a year to conflicted advice in the recommendations related to retirement plans made by brokers and sales agents posing as advisors.

The bottom line is that at best, only one out of every ten financial advisors puts your interests first. The actual number of real fiduciary advisors may actually be even lower than this discouraging figure.

A Study

A mystery shopper study in the Boston area found that only 2.4% of the “advisors” it surveyed (most were almost certainly brokers) made what most would consider to be fiduciary recommendations.

On the other side, 85% advocated switching out of a thrifty portfolio with excellent funds into something a bit more self-serving.

The Brokerage industry

The brokerage industry—that is, the larger Wall Street firms, independent broker-dealer organizations and life insurance organizations—repeatedly fought the fiduciary rule in court, arguing, in some cases, that their brokers and insurance agents shouldn’t be held to this standard. The courts refused to block the rule.

It gets worse

Brokers are held to a sales standard, but it’s a very low one that is appropriately known as “compliance.” They are required to “know their customer” and to make investment recommendations that would be “suitable” to someone in that customer’s circumstances.

In addition, a new study found that 8% of all brokers have a record of serious misconduct, and nearly half of those were kept on at their firms even after getting caught.

Assessment

There is one simple way to determine whether you’re working with somebody you can trust. Ask your advisor directly to provide a written and signed one-page statement that he or she will act in your best interests.

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If the broker hems and haws, hold onto your wallet or purse. Chances are any recommendations you receive will cost you money, a cost only disclosed somewhere deep in the fine print of whatever agreement you sign. If the advisor signs the statement, chances are you will receive fiduciary advice. 

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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WHAT IS THE VELOCITY OF MONEY?

It’s the Rate of [Physician] Circulation and Consumption

Courtesy: https://lnkd.in/eBf-4vY

The VM is a measure of the number of times that the average unit of currency is used to purchase goods and services within a given time period. The concept relates the size of economic activity to a given money supply. This speed of money exchange is one of the variables that determine inflation.

VM is the ratio of gross national product (GNP) to a country’s money supply. The more often money changes hands, the greater the level of commerce. The VM is determined by money supply, interest rates, inflation, commerce and the Federal Reserve.

LINK: https://lnkd.in/eZxrhtp

Physicians, like most consumers, tend to hold less money as interest rates and inflation increase, and therefore the velocity of money increases.

ESSAY: https://lnkd.in/e6TvuVM

VM is reduced when people increase money holdings in periods of low interest rates and low inflation; the opposite when rates and inflation are high.

CMP® CURRICULUM: https://lnkd.in/eDTRHex

Assessment: Comments appreciated.

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BUSINESS, FINANCE, INVESTING AND INSURANCE TEXTS FOR DOCTORS:
1 – https://lnkd.in/ebWtzGg
2 – https://lnkd.in/ewJPTJs
THANK YOU
***

FREE BUSINESS CONSULTATIONS & FINANCIAL ADVISORY OPINIONS

iMBA Inc, NOW OFFERING FREE BUSINESS CONSULTATIONS & FINANCIAL ADVISORY OPINIONS FOR MEDICAL COLLEAGUES & ENTREPRENEURS

Courtesy: https://lnkd.in/eVGcji5

By Ann Miller RN MHA CMP®

[Executive Director]

After an overwhelming initial response, the Institute of Medical Business Advisors [iMBA, Inc] is again offering free 60 minute phone or video consultations and second opinions to doctors, nurses and medical colleagues on a limited scheduling and time basis, during the current Corona Virus outbreak 24/7.

REGULAR SERVICE: https://lnkd.in/dw7FHyP Professional fees are waved during this time of crisis. According to Professor and CEO Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP, “this is our small way to help give back to colleagues who are vital to the US public health system and wellness of the country.” Topics include a plethora of personal financial planning and / or medical practice management and entrepreneurial business issues.

TOPIC LIST: https://lnkd.in/e7WrDj9

TO SCHEDULE: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com B

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BUSINESS, FINANCE, INVESTING & INSURANCE TEXTS FOR DOCTORS

1 – https://lnkd.in/ebWtzGg

2 – https://lnkd.in/ezkQMfR

3 – https://lnkd.in/ewJPTJs

PHYSICIAN-EXECUTIVES AND MEDICAL CXOs:

1 – https://lnkd.in/eEf-xEH

2 – https://lnkd.in/e2ZmewQ

THANK YOU

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FREE FINANCIAL & BUSINESS ADVISORY CONSULTATIONS

iMBA IS NOW OFFERING FREE FINANCIAL & BUSINESS ADVISORY CONSULTATIONS

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By Ann Miller RN MHA CMP®
[Executive Director]
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The Institute of Medical Business Advisors [iMBA, Inc] is now offering free 30 minute phone or Skype® video consultations and second opinions to physicians, nurses and medical colleagues, on a limited scheduling and time basis, during the current Corona Virus outbreak 24/7.
***
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According to Professor and CEO Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA, “this is our small way to help give back to colleagues who are so clinically vital to the US public health system and wellness of the country.” Topics include a plethora of personal financial planning and / or medical practice management business issues.
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SCHEDULE A CONSULT:
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BUSINESS, FINANCE, INVESTING AND INSURANCE TEXTS FOR DOCTORS
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FOR PHYSICIAN-EXECUTIVES AND MEDICAL CXOs
THANK YOU
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Another CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER® “In The News”

YAHOO Finance!

Courtesy: http://www.MedicalExecutivePost.com

“The extensive experience of our professional team allows us to implement a rigorous process to identify ‘Best in Class’ opportunities in our focus areas,” said Amaury Cifuentes CFP®, CMP® one of the firm’s founders. “We assist in providing capital, innovative solutions and strategic expertise to our portfolio throughout the investment cycle.”

LINK: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

The partners in the firm include:

Amaury Cifuentes, CFP®, CMP® has 30 years of experience in banking and finance; financial planning and investments with an emphasis on business lending, real estate and private investments. He is a Certified Medical Planner®, giving him an enhanced knowledge of the medical industry’s specific needs.

LINK: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/bluekey-wealth-advisors-announces-formation-150000988.html

Assessment: Your congratulations are appreciated.

TEXTS FOR PHYSICIAN EXECUTIVES AND HOSPITAL CXOs:

1 – https://lnkd.in/eEf-xEH

2 – https://lnkd.in/e2ZmewQ

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TEXTS FOR PHYSICIANS AND ADVISORS

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

THANK YOU

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Physician “Life-Style Creep”

We Must Avoid It!

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA

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MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

Conclusion: Your thoughts are appreciated.

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 Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™ Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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Understanding Leases

 An Important Money Skill

By Rick Kahler CFP

“Some days adulting is a pain.” What parent of college-age children hasn’t heard something similar from their kids? The transition from kid to adult is a necessary process toward living a fulfilled and meaningful life, but it isn’t easy or smooth.

This is especially true when it comes to money. Mastering money skills can be a challenge even for older adults.

One of the earliest opportunities to learn adult financial skills comes with renting an apartment. Before you sign that first lease—or any lease—it’s important to understand it. A lease is a legal document that sets out obligations and rights for both landlord and tenant.

One of the most important features of a lease is the length of the agreement. Your lease could be “month-to-month” or for a specific period like a few months or even several years. The most common residential lease terms are six months to one year.

There are pluses and minuses to both types. A month-to-month lease gives the renter the minimum commitment and maximum flexibility. Usually, if you want to move out for whatever reason, you just need to give the landlord a 30-day notice. Unlike a longer-term lease, there is no penalty for “breaking” the lease unless you fail to give even a 30-day notice.

So why wouldn’t a tenant always want a month-to-month lease? Many tenants don’t understand that the flexibility goes both ways. If a landlord chooses to stop leasing the property, finds a tenant willing to pay higher rent, or decides to sell the property, all the lease requires is a 30-day notice for the current tenant to move out. A tenant must accept that risk.

A recent local example concerned 11 house renters who lived on the campus of the Star Academy, a former state-owned property near Custer, SD.  Some of the tenants had rented for 14 years with month-to-month leases. When the state foreclosed on the property it gave the tenants 30-day notices to move. This was not received well by the renters, who faced the prospect of immediately having to find new places to live in a town with a limited supply of housing. Fortunately, the governor reversed the decision and gave the renters six months to find new housing.

As shocking and heartless as this move might have seemed to the renters, it was completely within the rights of the landlord, just as it would have been completely within the rights of any of the tenants to do the same.

It’s easy to get lulled to sleep by a month-to-month lease, especially when a tenant has lived in the property for year after year. However, if the prospect of having to vacate your home in 30 days is not appealing, it would be a really good idea to ask the landlord for a longer lease.

Assessment:

Before signing a lease, consider how long you are willing to commit to living in the property. What will best serve your situation? For some, it may be a lease that expires at the end of a school year, or in a year, or even in three to five years if you see no reason that you will need to move anytime soon. Be aware that by signing the lease, you agree to stay and to pay rent until the time is up.

Also understand that, unless the lease specifically states otherwise, neither you nor the landlord are bound to renew when the lease expires. So it’s important to renegotiate a new lease well before the current lease expires.

Before signing any lease, read it carefully. Ask clarifying questions. Be sure you understand the legal commitment you are making.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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An Entrepreneurial Mindset Can Hinder Wealth Building

“Help Wanted: Entrepreneur”

By RICK KAHLER, CFP

You have probably never seen an ad like this, because entrepreneurs are not hired. They hire themselves. Merriam-Webster defines an entrepreneur as “a person who starts a business and is willing to risk loss in order to make money” or “one who organizes, manages, and assumes the risks of a business or enterprise.”

God bless entrepreneurs. Without them our world would look much different. We would probably still be living in caves, hunting with clubs, and eating raw meat. They create companies from scratch. In so doing, they create jobs and take significant monetary risks of a business failure.

They also stand to gain substantial rewards for success, but that success is far from guaranteed. Few people realize that most entrepreneurs fail in their attempts in business. According to Investopedia, 50% of all new businesses fail in 5 years, 66% in 10 years, and 75%  in 15 years.

Given those statistics, the entrepreneurs who succeed must be rich, right? A study by Career Explorer found that the average full-time salary of an entrepreneur is $43,240 a year. To put this into perspective, the average starting salary for a graduating four-year degree student at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology is $63,354. Maybe there should be a song, “Mamas, don’t let your babies grow up to be entrepreneurs.”

My experience, however, is that it really doesn’t matter what Mama says. The entrepreneurial mindset is somewhat inextinguishable. While there have been some attempts at teaching entrepreneurial skills, it’s hard to teach grit, determination, and perseverance, coupled with a good dose of fantasy thinking and denial. It’s really hard to “tell” an entrepreneur anything.

Fittingly, entrepreneurs love to invest in their own companies. Investment advisors call such holdings “tangible” investments, ones you can see and touch. Tangible investments include start-up businesses, family-owned businesses, and all types of directly owned real estate. They are inherently non-diversified and illiquid. Typically, entrepreneurs have the vast portion of their net worth tied up in their businesses. It’s incredibly rare to find one with a stash of cash or any type of liquid portfolio or retirement plan.

Why? The entrepreneurial mindset. First, entrepreneurs don’t believe in traditional diversification. Why settle for earning an average of 5% a year when you can earn ten times that in your business? Never mind that the chance of losing it all is three to one. Most entrepreneurs firmly believe they are the one guaranteed to succeed even though the deck is stacked against them.

Second is that since 75% of businesses ultimately fail, most entrepreneurs are losing, not making, money. They are perennially cash-poor and need every dollar they can find to fund their negative cash flows. Even those who are making money rarely have any liquid investments because entrepreneurs are always looking for new ventures, which of course, need funding.

One of the most difficult tasks I face is persuading a successful entrepreneur to take some hard-earned “chips” off the table and sock away a low-risk, diversified nest egg to assure a comfortable retirement. The only ones I’ve convinced to do that were older entrepreneurs who had owned their companies for well over 15 years and were under five years from retirement. All the younger entrepreneurs to whom I have given that advice have refused the notion. All have eventually lost 75% to 90% of their net worth and, sadly, the opportunity to secure their future.

The entrepreneurial mindset of determination and perseverance can bring significant financial rewards. Expanding that mindset to include a broader, more diversified view of investing for the future can turn those rewards into long-term financial independence.

Assessment: Your thoughts are appreciated.

BUSINESS, FINANCE, INVESTING & INSURANCE TEXTS FOR DOCTORS:

1 – https://lnkd.in/ebWtzGg

2 – https://lnkd.in/ezkQMfR

3 – https://lnkd.in/ewJPTJs

THANK YOU

***

MY ADVISORY BUSINESS MODEL SYNOPSIS

HOW I EARN – AND YOU PROFIT!

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA

My fee is $250 per hour prorated, so you only pay for the time used. This fee covers almost any medical practice management, insurance and risk management, personal financial planning or investment-related topic, including document review, phone consultation, research, and written investment strategies.

I also offer a special program for first-time potential clients called a Physician Practice-Portfolio Second Opinion™.  This all-inclusive $450 program takes about two hours in total and includes a pre-call document review, 60-minute phone consultation, and summary with observations and recommendations.

Docotor colleagues find this to to be a good value because their questions are answered under one fee.

So, it does not matter if you are a new, mid-career or mature practitioner, or where your money is invested or how much you have invested. Simply, I serve along side you as a fiduciary by upholding a duty of loyalty, fairness and good faith in all decision making.

At your professional service!

THANK YOU
Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA MEd CMP™
Certified Medical Planner
phone: 770-448-0769
MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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Financial Planning Advice that Changed My Life

A PODCAST

By Vitaliy Katsenelson CFA

One of the best wedding gifts I received was lunch with my friend, Mark. Here, I reflect on the financial advice Mark gave me then, and how it could help young people like my son Jonah settle into adulthood with a lot more forward-thinking.

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You can read this article online at:

 https://contrarianedge.com/personal-finance-advice-that-changed-my-life/

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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Financial Stress in Times of Transition

Financial Stress Adaptation

By Rick Kahler CFP®

Stress is what happens when something you care about is at stake. This definition comes from Susan Bradley, CFP, author of Sudden Money and a specialist in the financial aspect of life transitions.

The stress around these transitions is a common reason that people seek out financial advice. We tend to be driven to consult advisors as a result of stressful changes in our lives, such as a divorce, a sudden money event like an inheritance or insurance settlement, an investment or job loss, retirement, or the death of a loved one.

While all these life events certainly have financial components, it’s almost always the emotional components of the change—how we respond to them—that are the cause of the stress.

Any change includes three stages: an ending, a period of passage while we relate and adapt to the change, and a new beginning. This period of transition can be fraught with emotion and behaviors that can trip us up in many ways, including financially.

Susan identifies nine such emotions and behaviors that she sees commonly in people in transition.

1. Lack of identity. If the transition results in the loss of a familiar role—spouse or employee, for example—you may struggle with “Who am I now? “There is often confusion and ambivalence about the future, and an inability to make decisions.

2. Confusion/Overwhelm/Fog. There is a sense of defeat by everything. You may physically slump, have a glazed-over look, and ask others to repeat a lot. It’s hard to understand, be present, respond, focus, or move forward.

3. Hopelessness. You may have a sense of having given up, not being in control of your fate, or being a victim. It may seem that there is nothing you can do to change yourself or the outcome. Financial decision-making is very difficult.

4. Invincibility. This can happen with a big positive change in your finances. You may think everything is going to turn out fine. You may feel euphoric, confident, and smarter than your advisors. You may spend more and take greater investment risks.

5. Mental and Physical Fatigue. Change can be exhausting, and the exhaustion can go undetected by others and even yourself. You may have difficulty following an agenda and tasks.

6. Numb/Withdrawn. You may feel ambivalent about and indifferent to exploring the changes in your life, what you want, and what the future may hold. You don’t give much feedback and are withdrawn and non-expressive. You may miss or not return phone calls or emails. The planning process often comes to a standstill.

7. Narrow or Fractured Focus. You may either be preoccupied with one area that excludes everything else or have an inability to focus on anything. In either case, focusing on what’s important becomes difficult or impossible.

8. Inconsistent Behavior. This is the inability to hold to one position. Instead, you may change your mind repeatedly or switch between opposite positions. You are uncertain and often embrace opposites in your wants and desires in the same breath. Making decisions become impossible.

9. Combative. You may hold on to feelings of anger, resentment, victimization, and rage regardless of the facts. You are outwardly emotionally expressive and challenging. You don’t respond well to logic and practicality. A combative person doesn’t have problems making decisions, but does have difficulty making good decisions that are in their best interests.

Assessment

Emotions and behaviors like these are generally temporary. Financial decisions made in the midst of transition-based stress, though, can have lasting negative consequences. The support of trustworthy advisors can be invaluable in navigating through both painful and joyful life changes.

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Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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