RISK MANAGEMENT & LIABILITY PROTECTION FOR PHYSICIANS

And … Their Insurance Agents and Financial Advisors

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

DEM avatar

By DR. DAVID EDWARD MARCINKO MBA CMP®

CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

***

https://images.routledge.com/common/jackets/amazon/978149872/9781498725989.jpg

***

BOOK REVIEW

It is not uncommon for practicing physicians to have more than a dozen separate insurance policies to protect their medical practice and personal assets. Yet, most doctors understand very little about their policies.BOOK REVIR

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™explains to physicians and insurance professionals the background, theory, and practicalities of medical risk management, asset protection methods, and insurance planning.

The book presents information in a manner that is convenient and highly useful for busy medical practitioners. It discusses the medical records revolution and addresses concerns regarding cloud computing, data security, and technological threats.

The book covers modern health law and policy, including fraud and abuse, workplace-violence, Medicare compliance, HIPAA regulations, AR protection strategies with internal controls, P4P and value based care, insurance and reputation management, and how the ARA legislation is impacting physician practices. It also includes case models and examples that provide you with a real-world understanding of how to recognize and reduce personal and medical practice risks.

With time at a premium for all, and so much information packed into one well-organized resource, this book is a must-read for every physician and financial advisor that serves the health care sector. The book will help physicians make better decisions about the risks they face and will help financial advisors improve the value they provide to their clients who are doctors.

MORE = ORDER HERE: https://www.routledge.com/Risk-Management-Liability-Insurance-and-Asset-Protection-Strategies-for/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781498725989

THANK YOU

***

FOR DOCTORS ONLY: Secure an Unbiased Second Opinion

Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA

Certified Medical Planner®

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

CMP logo

***

FINANCIAL PLANNING

CAREER DEVELOPMENT

MEDICAL PRACTICE BUY IN / OUT

INVESTMENT ANALYSIS

PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT

MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS

PRACTICE APPRAISALS AND VALUATIONS

RETIREMENT PLANNING

***

CONTACT: Ann Miller RN MHA

EMAIL: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

PHONE: 770-448-0769

What is the “SAVER’S CREDIT”?

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

CMP logo

Sponsor: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

The saver’s credit is a tax credit that’s intended to promote retirement savings among low- and moderate-income workers. It can reduce an eligible taxpayer’s federal income taxes when they save in a qualified retirement plan. It may be especially useful to medical students, nurses, interns, residents and fellows.

****

IRS Releases Plan Limits for 2020 - Montgomery Retirement Plan Advisors

***

In 2021, the maximum credit is worth $1,000 for individuals and $2,000 for married couples filing jointly, although it phases out for higher earners. To qualify for the credit, individuals must have an adjusted gross income of $32,500 or less. The income threshold for married couples is $65,000.

Because the credit is non-refundable, eligible taxpayers are able to use it to effectively reduce their tax bill to zero – but it cannot provide them with a tax refund.

IRS: https://www.irs.gov/retirement-plans/plan-participant-employee/retirement-savings-contributions-savers-credit

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

YOUR THOUGHTS AND COMMENTS ARE APPRECIATED.

***

ORDER: https://www.amazon.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-Advisors/dp/1482240289/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418580820&sr=8-1&keywords=david+marcinko

Thank You

***

Over Heard in the DOCTOR’S LOUNGE

On “Hard Working” HMO Physicians

CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

***

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

One of my favorite patients told me this anecdote as he recalled the story of the old man who spent a day watching his physician son treating HMO patients in the office. 

The doctor had been working at his usual feverish pace all morning, and although he was working hard, bitterly complained to his dad that he was not making as much money as he used to.

Finally, the old man interrupted him and said,

“Son, why don’t you just treat the sick patients?” 

The doctor-son looked annoyed at his father, and responded,

“Dad, can’t you see, I don’t have time to treat just the sick ones.”

***

COMMENTS ARE APPRECIATED.

***

***

Three [3] Must Know Technical ROTH IRA RULES

ALERT FOR PHYSICIANS AND ALL INVESTORS

***

1. You can trade actively in a Roth IRA

Some physician investors may be concerned that they can’t actively trade in a Roth IRA. But there’s no rule from the IRS that says you can’t do so. So you won’t get in legal trouble if you do.

But there may be some extra fees if you trade certain kinds of investments. For example, while brokers won’t charge you if you trade in and out of stocks and most ETFs on a short-term basis, many mutual fund companies will charge you an early redemption fee if you sell the fund. This fee is usually assessed only if you’ve owned the fund for fewer than 30 days.

2. Any gains are tax-free – forever

The ability to avoid taxes on your investments is an incredible benefit. You’ll be able to escape – perfectly legally – taxes on dividends and capital gains. Not surprisingly, this superpower makes the Roth IRA very popular, but to enjoy its benefits, you must abide by a few rules.

The Roth IRA limits you to a $6,000 maximum annual contribution (for 2021), and you won’t be able to withdraw earnings from the account until retirement age (59 1/2) or later and after owning the account for at least five years. However, you can withdraw your contributions to the account without being taxed at any time, but you won’t be able to replace those contributions later.

The Roth IRA offers a number of other benefits and retirement savers should look into it.

3. You can’t use margin in an IRA

Many traders use margin in their accounts. With a margin loan, the broker extends you capital to invest beyond what you actually own. It’s a useful tool, especially if you’re trading frequently. Unfortunately, margin loans are not available in IRA accounts.

For frequent traders the ability to trade on margin is not just about magnifying your returns. It’s also about having the ability to sell a position and immediately buy another. In a cash account (like a Roth IRA), you have to wait for a transaction to settle, and that takes a couple days. In the meantime you’re unable to trade with that money even though it’s credited to your account.

PLUS A FOURTH RULE

4. You don’t get to deduct losses

If you’re trading in a taxable brokerage account, you’ll get a tax write-off if you make a losing investment. Some investors even make sure they’re getting the largest write-off they can using a process called tax-loss harvesting. They scoop up that benefit and then even repurchase the stock or fund later (after 30 days) if they think it’s poised to rise in the future.

But if you’re trading in a Roth IRA, you won’t get the ability to write off losses. Changes to the tax code in 2017 eliminated the ability to claim any benefit from losses in an IRA account.

CITATION: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

***

What is a Roth IRA? | Meridian Financial Partners

****

Book Marcinko: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

YOUR COMMENTS ARE APPRECIATED.

Thank You

***

The “Mutual” VERSUS “Stock”Company?

QUICK DEFINITIONINVESTING BASICS

MUTUAL COMPANY:  A company that has no capital stock or stockholders.  Rather, it is owned by its policy-owners and managed by a board of directors chosen by the policy-owners. 

Any earnings, in addition to those necessary for the operation of the company and contingency reserves, are returned to the policy-owners in the form of policy dividends.

See the source image

STOCK COMPANY: A joint-stock company is a business entity in which shares of the company’s stock can be bought and sold by shareholders.

Each shareholder owns company stock in proportion, evidenced by their shares (certificates of ownership). Shareholders are able to transfer their shares to others without any effects to the continued existence of the company.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

****

RELATED TEXTS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/04/29/why-are-certified-medical-planner-textbooks-so-darn-popular/

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

THANK YOU!

****

How We INVEST IN INFLATION?

STRATEGIES AND MITIGATION

Finding investments to weather the storm. Strategies and ways to mitigate inflation risk, including investing in businesses with pricing power, capital intensity, and investing abroad.

By Vitaliy Katsenelson CFA

COMMENTS ARE APPRECIATED.

Thank You

***

***

The FIDUCIARY OATH for “Financial Advisors”

“Will you sign a fiduciary oath?”

PHYSICIAN COLLEAGUES AND MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS ASK

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

CMP

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

https://certifiedmedicalplannerdotorg1.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/cmp-logo17.jpg

“SIGN IT -OR- FORGET IT”

Asking a “Financial Advisor” if they’re a fiduciary isn’t always enough to hire them. People can “ice skate” around that terminology and give fuzzy or unclear answers to that question. Instead, you may consider asking them to sign a fiduciary oath.

“If someone is fee-only, not “fee-based”, they shouldn’t have a problem signing a document stating how they get compensated.” “If someone is, for example, a broker dealer, insurance agent or investment advisor who works on commissions, they probably wouldn’t be allowed to sign it.” Just say NOT to contract arbitration clauses, too! As well as “Dual Registration”. Remember Bernie Lawrence Madoff.

THE FIDUCIARY OATH

This one-page document outlines five fiduciary principles a financial adviser must follow to put the client’s interests ahead of their own. They include acting with prudence, not misleading the client, avoiding conflicts of interest, and disclosing and managing unavoidable conflicts.

The oath, meant to be printed out and signed by an adviser, has been around for several years. But recent events, such as the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals striking down the DOL rule, have increased the urgency to get it into circulation.

“With the 5th Circuit ruling, it is just so important to have this oath out there because it states fiduciary principles,” said Ms. P. Houlihan, president of Houlihan Financial Resource Group. “The oath is the answer, given that the DOL rule is gone.”

***

;,nbv

 fiduciaryoath_individual

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements.

Book Marcinko: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

Subscribe: MEDICAL EXECUTIVE POST for curated news, essays, opinions and analysis from the public health, economics, finance, marketing, IT, business and policy management ecosystem.

DOCTORS:

“Insurance & Risk Management Strategies for Doctors” https://tinyurl.com/ydx9kd93

“Fiduciary Financial Planning for Physicians” https://tinyurl.com/y7f5pnox

“Business of Medical Practice 2.0” https://tinyurl.com/yb3x6wr8

HOSPITALS:

“Financial Management Strategies for Hospitals” https://tinyurl.com/yagu567d

“Operational Strategies for Clinics and Hospitals” https://tinyurl.com/y9avbrq5

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

 ***

COMMENTS ARE APPRECIATED.

Thank You

***

How Stock-Brokers Execute Trades

What Every Physician-Investor Should Know

Join Our Mailing List

And … Why Trade Execution Isn’t Instantaneous!

By Dr. Gary L. Bode MSA CPA CMP [Hon]; PC

Dr. Gary Bode; CPA, MSA, CMP

Many physician investors who trade through online brokerage accounts assume they have a direct connection to the securities markets.

But, they don’t. When you press “enter,” your order is sent over the Internet to your broker – who in turn decides which market to send it to for execution. A similar process occurs when you call your broker to place a trade.

While trade execution is usually seamless and quick, it does take time. And prices can change quickly, especially in fast-moving markets. Because price quotes are only for a specific number of shares, MD investors may not always receive the price they saw on their screen or the price their broker quoted over the phone. By the time your order reaches the market, the price of the stock could be slightly – or very – different.

Note: No SEC regulations require a trade to be executed within a set period of time. But if firms advertise their speed of execution, they must not exaggerate or fail to tell investors about the possibility of significant delays.

Tip: To avoid buying or selling a stock at a price higher or lower than you wanted, place a limit order rather than a market order. A limit order is an order to buy or sell a security at a specific price. A buy limit order can only be executed at the limit price or lower, and a sell limit order can only be executed at the limit price or higher. When you place a market order, you can’t control the price at which your order will be filled.

Example: You want to buy the stock of a “hot” IPO that was initially offered at $9, but don’t want to end up paying more than $20 for the stock. Place a limit order to buy the stock at any price up to $20. By entering a limit order rather than a market order, you will not be caught buying the stock at $90 and then suffering immediate losses as the stock drops later in the day or the weeks ahead.

***

technology-medicine

***

Caution: Your limit order may never be executed because the market price may quickly surpass your limit before your order can be filled. But by using a limit order you also protect yourself from buying the stock at too high a price. 

More:

ABOUT

Dr. Gary L. Bode was Chief Executive Officer of Comprehensive Practice Accounting, Inc., a firm specializing in providing tax solutions to medical professionals. Originally, he was a board certified podiatrist and managing partner of a multi-office medical practice for a decade before earning his Master of Science degree in Accounting from the University of North Carolina. He then served as Chief Financial Officer [CFO] for a private mental healthcare facility. Today, Dr. Bode is a nationally known Certified Public Accountant, financial author, educator, and speaker. Areas of expertise include producing customized managerial accounting reports, practice appraisals and valuations, restructurings, and innovative financial accounting as well as proactive tax positioning and tax return preparation for healthcare facilities. He has been quoted in Newsweek.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners(TM)* 8

Does Money REALLY Buy Happiness?

Maybe IT CAN

Psychological Considerations

***

Money Can Buy Happiness After All, According to New Study

***

R&D 2010: https://www.pnas.org/content/107/38/16489

R&D 2021: https://www.pnas.org/content/118/4/e2016976118

DEM: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2020/12/11/the-science-of-happiness/

YOUR THOUGHTS AND COMMENTS ARE APPRECIATED.

Thank You

***

On Excess IRA and Roth IRA Contributions

BY DAN MOISAND CFP®

***

See the source image

***

READ HERE: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/other/i-contributed-too-much-to-my-ira-and-roth-ira-%e2%80%94-what-now/ar-AANP1IP?li=BBnb7Kz

MORE: https://www.irs.gov/retirement-plans/plan-participant-employee/retirement-topics-ira-contribution-limits

EDITOR’S NOTE: Colleague Dan Moisand contributed to our textbook on “Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors.”

***

YOUR THOUGHTS AND COMMENTS ARE APPRECIATED.

Thank You

***

PODCAST: Why Bitcoin is a “Once-in-a-Species” Asset Class

In this episode, DWealthMuse host, Dara Albright, and guest Jeff Ross, CIO of Vailshire Capital Management, discuss why bitcoin may just be that once-in-a-species asset class that saves the planet from economic and, yes, even environmental ruin.

This episode is loaded with so many great insights including:

See the source image
  • Why Jeff believes bitcoin’s investment risk has evaporated;
  • How bitcoin fits into Warren Buffet’s investment thesis;
  • Two characteristics bitcoin skeptics share: a lack of understanding and deep ties to the traditional banking system;
  • Why bitcoin is a dishonest politician’s worst nightmare;
  • Why every modern retirement portfolio should have bitcoin exposure;
  • Why regulatory scrutiny may be turning away from bitcoin and heading straight towards ethereum and altcoins;
  • How bitcoin could solve the world’s energy problems;
  • Why we may be nearing the end of the Keynesian economic experiment;
  • How bitcoin forces an honest unit of accounting by governments;
  • Why fiat is destined to self-destruct while bitcoin is designed to appreciate in time;
  • Whether bitcoin can reach a new all-time high by Jeff’s August 29th birthday and cross 100,000 by Dara’s December 24th birthday?

PODCAST: https://dwealthmuse.podbean.com/e/episode25bitcoinbulls/

Your comments are appreciated.

THANK YOU

****

Dr. Dave Marcinko at YOUR Service in 2021

Join Our Mailing List

Book Marcinko for your next Seminar, Meeting or Medical Business Event 

By Ann Miller RN MHA

Professor and physician executive David Edward Marcinko MBBS DPM MBA MEd BSc CMP® is originally from Loyola University MD, Temple University in Philadelphia and the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in PA; Oglethorpe University, and Atlanta Hospital & Medical Center in GA; and the Aachen City University Hospital, Koln-Germany. He is one of the most innovative global thought leaders in health care business and entrepreneurship today.

Dr. Marcinko is a multi-degreed educator, board certified physician, surgical fellow, hospital medical staff President, Chief Education Officer and philanthropist with more than 400 published papers; 5,150 op-ed pieces and over 125+ international presentations to his credit; including the top 10 biggest pharmaceutical companies and financial services firms in the nation. He is also a best-selling Amazon author with 30 published text books in four languages [National Institute of Health, Library of Congress and Library of Medicine].

Dr. Marcinko is past Editor-in-Chief of the prestigious “Journal of Health Care Finance”, and a former Certified Financial Planner®, who was named “Health Economist of the Year” in 2001. He is a Federal and State court approved expert witness featured in hundreds of peer reviewed medical, business, management and trade publications [AMA, ADA, APMA, AAOS, Physicians Practice, Investment Advisor, Physician’s Money Digest and MD News].

As a licensed insurance agent, RIA and SEC registered endowment fund manager, Dr. Marcinko is Founding Dean of the fiduciary focused CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER® chartered designation education program; as well as Chief Editor of the HEALTH DICTIONARY SERIES® Wiki Project. His professional memberships include: ASHE, AHIMA, ACHE, ACME, ACPE, MGMA, FMMA and HIMSS.

Dr. Marcinko is a MSFT Beta tester, Google Scholar, “H” Index favorite and one of LinkedIn’s “Top Cited Voices”.

Book Marcinko

David Edward Marcinko (2)

Join Our Mailing List

FINANCIAL PLANNING: Strategies for Doctors and Advisors

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

***

***

RELATED TEXTS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/04/29/why-are-certified-medical-planner-textbooks-so-darn-popular/

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

THANK YOU!

***

National “Financial Awareness Day” 2021

MAKE IT EVERYDAY FOR PHYSICIANS AND MEDICAL COLLEAGUES

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

***

Use National Financial Awareness Day to your Advantage

Aug. 14th is National Financial Awareness Day. Financial awareness is about more than just understanding the basics on how money works. It’s also about evaluating your own budget, savings and investments to make sure your finances are working for your needs.

HERE: https://nationaltoday.com/national-financial-awareness-day/

So if it’s been a while since your last financial “check up,” National Financial Awareness Day can be the extra push you’ve needed to finally take a look under the hood.

***

***

RELATED TEXTS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/04/29/why-are-certified-medical-planner-textbooks-so-darn-popular/

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

Second Opinions: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

THANK YOU!

***

SECOND OPINIONS: Physician Financial Planning, Investing, Medical Practice Management and Business Valuations; etc!

BY DR. DAVID EDWARD MARCINKO MBA CMP

***

Financial Planning for Medical Professionals

HERE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

CONTACT: Ann Miller RN MHA

email: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

THANK YOU

****

FINANCIAL PLANNING: Strategies for Doctors and their Advisors

BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

CMP logo

REVIEWS:

Written by doctors and healthcare professionals, this textbook should be mandatory reading for all medical school students—highly recommended for both young and veteran physicians—and an eliminating factor for any financial advisor who has not read it. The book uses jargon like ‘innovative,’ ‘transformational,’ and ‘disruptive’—all rightly so! It is the type of definitive financial lifestyle planning book we often seek, but seldom find.
LeRoy Howard MA CMPTM,Candidate and Financial Advisor, Fayetteville, North Carolina

I taught diagnostic radiology for over a decade. The physician-focused niche information, balanced perspectives, and insider industry transparency in this book may help save your financial life.
Dr. William P. Scherer MS, Barry University, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

This book was crafted in response to the frustration felt by doctors who dealt with top financial, brokerage, and accounting firms. These non-fiduciary behemoths often prescribed costly wholesale solutions that were applicable to all, but customized for few, despite ever-changing needs. It is a must-read to learn why brokerage sales pitches or Internet resources will never replace the knowledge and deep advice of a physician-focused financial advisor, medical consultant, or collegial Certified Medical Planner™ financial professional.
—Parin Khotari MBA,Whitman School of Management, Syracuse University, New York

In today’s healthcare environment, in order for providers to survive, they need to understand their current and future market trends, finances, operations, and impact of federal and state regulations. As a healthcare consulting professional for over 30 years supporting both the private and public sector, I recommend that providers understand and utilize the wealth of knowledge that is being conveyed in these chapters. Without this guidance providers will have a hard time navigating the supporting system which may impact their future revenue stream. I strongly endorse the contents of this book.
—Carol S. Miller BSN MBA PMP,President, Miller Consulting Group, ACT IAC Executive Committee Vice-Chair at-Large, HIMSS NCA Board Member

This is an excellent book on financial planning for physicians and health professionals. It is all inclusive yet very easy to read with much valuable information. And, I have been expanding my business knowledge with all of Dr. Marcinko’s prior books. I highly recommend this one, too. It is a fine educational tool for all doctors.
—Dr. David B. Lumsden MD MS MA,Orthopedic Surgeon, Baltimore, Maryland

There is no other comprehensive book like it to help doctors, nurses, and other medical providers accumulate and preserve the wealth that their years of education and hard work have earned them.
—Dr. Jason Dyken MD MBA,Dyken Wealth Strategies, Gulf Shores, Alabama

I plan to give a copy of this book written
by doctors and for doctors’ to all my prospects, physician, and nurse clients. It may be the definitive text on this important topic.
—Alexander Naruska CPA,Orlando, Florida

Health professionals are small business owners who need to apply their self-discipline tactics in establishing and operating successful practices. Talented trainees are leaving the medical profession because they fail to balance the cost of attendance against a realistic business and financial plan. Principles like budgeting, saving, and living below one’s means, in order to make future investments for future growth, asset protection, and retirement possible are often lacking. This textbook guides the medical professional in his/her financial planning life journey from start to finish. It ranks a place in all medical school libraries and on each of our bookshelves.
—Dr. Thomas M. DeLauro DPM,Professor and Chairman – Division of Medical Sciences, New York College of Podiatric Medicine

Physicians are notoriously excellent at diagnosing and treating medical conditions. However, they are also notoriously deficient in managing the business aspects of their medical practices. Most will earn $20-30 million in their medical lifetime, but few know how to create wealth for themselves and their families. This book will help fill the void in physicians’ financial education. I have two recommendations: 1) every physician, young and old, should read this book; and 2) read it a second time!
—Dr. Neil Baum MD,Clinical Associate Professor of Urology, Tulane Medical School, New Orleans, Louisiana

I worked with a Certified Medical Planner™ on several occasions in the past, and will do so again in the future. This book codified the vast body of knowledge that helped in all facets of my financial life and professional medical practice.
Dr. James E. Williams DABPS, Foot and Ankle Surgeon, Conyers, Georgia

This is a constantly changing field for rules, regulations, taxes, insurance, compliance, and investments. This book assists readers, and their financial advisors, in keeping up with what’s going on in the healthcare field that all doctors need to know.
Patricia Raskob CFP® EA ATA, Raskob Kambourian Financial Advisors, Tucson, Arizona

I particularly enjoyed reading the specific examples in this book which pointed out the perils of risk … something with which I am too familiar and have learned (the hard way) to avoid like the Black Death. It is a pleasure to come across this kind of wisdom, in print, that other colleagues may learn before it’s too late— many, many years down the road.
Dr. Robert S. Park MD, Robert Park and Associates Insurance, Seattle, Washington

Although this book targets physicians, I was pleased to see that it also addressed the financial planning and employment benefit needs of nurses; physical, respiratory, and occupational therapists; CRNAs, hospitalists, and other members of the health care team….highly readable, practical, and understandable.
Nurse Cecelia T. Perez RN, Hospital Operating Room Manager, Ellicott City, Maryland

Personal financial success in the PP-ACA era will be more difficult to achieve than ever before. It requires the next generation of doctors to rethink frugality, delay gratification, and redefine the very definition of success and work–life balance. And, they will surely need the subject matter medical specificity and new-wave professional guidance offered in this book. This book is a ‘must-read’ for all health care professionals, and their financial advisors, who wish to take an active role in creating a new subset of informed and pioneering professionals known as Certified Medical Planners™.
—Dr. Mark D. Dollard FACFAS, Private Practice, Tyson Corner, Virginia

As healthcare professionals, it is our Hippocratic duty to avoid preventable harm by paying attention. On the other hand, some of us are guilty of being reckless with our own financial health—delaying serious consideration of investments, taxation, retirement income, estate planning, and inheritances until the worry keeps one awake at night. So, if you have avoided planning for the future for far too long, perhaps it is time to take that first step toward preparedness. This in-depth textbook is an excellent starting point—not only because of its readability, but because of his team’s expertise and thoroughness in addressing the intricacies of modern investments—and from the point of view of not only gifted financial experts, but as healthcare providers, as well … a rare combination.
Dr. Darrell K. Pruitt DDS, Private Practice Dentist, Fort Worth, Texas

This text should be on the bookshelf of all contemporary physicians. The book is physician-focused with unique topics applicable to all medical professionals. But, it also offers helpful insights into the new tax and estate laws, fiduciary accountability for advisors and insurance agents, with investing, asset protection and risk management, and retirement planning strategies with updates for the brave new world of global payments of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Starting out by encouraging readers to examine their personal ‘money blueprint’ beliefs and habits, the book is divided into four sections offering holistic life cycle financial information and economic education directed to new, mid-career, and mature physicians.

This structure permits one to dip into the book based on personal need to find relief, rather than to overwhelm. Given the complexity of modern domestic healthcare, and the daunting challenges faced by physicians who try to stay abreast of clinical medicine and the ever-evolving laws of personal finance, this textbook could not have come at a better time.
—Dr. Philippa Kennealy MD MPH, The Entrepreneurial MD, Los Angeles, California

Physicians have economic concerns unmatched by any other profession, arriving ten years late to the start of their earning years. This textbook goes to the core of how to level the playing field quickly, and efficaciously, by a new breed of dedicated Certified Medical Planners™. With physician-focused financial advice, each chapter is a building block to your financial fortress.
Thomas McKeon, MBA, Pharmaceutical Representative, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

An excellent resource … this textbook is written in a manner that provides physician practice owners with a comprehensive guide to financial planning and related topics for their professional practice in a way that is easily comprehended. The style in which it breaks down the intricacies of the current physician practice landscape makes it a ‘must-read’ for those physicians (and their advisors) practicing in the volatile era of healthcare reform.
—Robert James Cimasi, MHA ASA FRICS MCBA CVA CM&AA CMP™, CEO-Health Capital Consultants, LLC, St. Louis, Missouri

Rarely can one find a full compendium of information within a single source or text, but this book communicates the new financial realities we are forced to confront; it is full of opportunities for minimizing tax liability and maximizing income potential. We’re recommending it to all our medical practice management clients across the entire healthcare spectrum.
Alan Guinn, The Guinn Consultancy Group, Inc., Cookeville, Tennessee

Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP™ and his team take a seemingly endless stream of disparate concepts and integrate them into a simple, straightforward, and understandable path to success. And, he codifies them all into a step-by-step algorithm to more efficient investing, risk management, taxation, and enhanced retirement planning for doctors and nurses. His text is a vital read—and must execute—book for all healthcare professionals and physician-focused financial advisors.
Dr. O. Kent Mercado, JD, Private Practitioner and Attorney, Naperville, Illinois

Kudos. The editors and contributing authors have compiled the most comprehensive reference book for the medical community that has ever been attempted. As you review the chapters of interest and hone in on the most important concerns you may have, realize that the best minds have been harvested for you to plan well… Live well.
Martha J. Schilling; AAMS® CRPC® ETSC CSA, Shilling Group Advisors, LLC, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

I recommend this book to any physician or medical professional that desires an honest no-sales approach to understanding the financial planning and investing world. It is worthwhile to any financial advisor interested in this space, as well.
David K. Luke, MIM MS-PFP CMP™, Net Worth Advisory Group, Sandy, Utah

Although not a substitute for a formal business education, this book will help physicians navigate effectively through the hurdles of day-to-day financial decisions with the help of an accountant, financial and legal advisor. I highly recommend it and commend Dr. Marcinko and the Institute of Medical Business Advisors, Inc. on a job well done.
Ken Yeung MBA CMP™, Tseung Kwan O Hospital, Hong Kong

I’ve seen many ghost-written handbooks, paperbacks, and vanity-published manuals on this topic throughout my career in mental healthcare. Most were poorly written, opinionated, and cheaply produced self-aggrandizing marketing drivel for those agents selling commission-based financial products and expensive advisory services. So, I was pleasantly surprised with this comprehensive peer-reviewed academic textbook, complete with citations, case examples, and real-life integrated strategies by and for medical professionals. Although a bit late for my career, I recommend it highly to all my younger colleagues … It’s credibility and specificity stand alone.
Dr. Clarice Montgomery PhD MA,Retired Clinical Psychologist

In an industry known for one-size-fits-all templates and massively customized books, products, advice, and services, the extreme healthcare specificity of this text is both refreshing and comprehensive.
Dr. James Joseph Bartley, Columbus, Georgia

My brother was my office administrator and accountant. We both feel this is the most comprehensive textbook available on financial planning for healthcare providers.
Dr. Anthony Robert Naruska DC,Winter Park, Florida

***

NVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

Thank You

***

Personal Financial Planning for Physicians and Medical Colleagues

ME Inc = Going it Alone but with a Team

BY DR. DAVID EDWARD MARCINKO MBA CMP®

CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

The physician, nurse, or other medical professional should easily recognize that there are a vast array of opportunities, obstacles, and pitfalls when it comes to managing one’s finances.  Still, with some modicum of effort, the basic aspects of insurance, investments, taxes, accounting, portfolio management, retirement and estate planning, debt reduction, asset protection and practice management can be largely self-taught. Yet, it is realized that nuances and subtleties can make a well-intentioned financial plan fall short.  The devil truly is in the details.  Moreover, none of these areas can be addressed in isolation. It is common for a solution in one area to cause a new set of problems in another. 

Accordingly, most health care practitioners would be well served to hire [independent, hourly compensated and prn] financial help. Unlike some medical problems, financial issues may not cause any “pain” or other obvious symptoms.  Medical professionals tend to have far more complex financial situations than most lay people. Despite the complexities of the new world of health reform, far too many either do nothing; or give up all control totally, to an external advisor. This either/or mistake can be costly in many ways, and should be avoided. 

In reality, and at various time in their careers, the medical professional needs a team comprised of at least a financial analyst, lawyer, management consultant, risk manager [actuary, mathematician or insurance counselor] and accountant. At various points in time, each member of the team, or significant others, will properly assume a role of more or less importance, but the doctor must usually remain the “quarterback” or leader; in the absence of a truly informed other, or Certified Medical Planner™.

This is necessary because only the doctor has the personal self-mandate with skin in the game, to take a big picture view.  And, rightly or wrongly, investments dominate the information available regarding personal finance and the attention of most physicians.  One is much more likely to need or want to discuss the financial markets with their financial advisor than private letter rulings by the IRS, or with their estate planning attorney or tax accountant. While hiring for expertise is a good idea, there is sinister way advisors goad doctors into using all their retail services; all of the time. That artifice is – the value of time. 

True integrated physician focused and financial planning is at its core a service business, not a product or sales endeavor. And, increasingly money is more likely to be at the top of the list for providers as the healthcare environment is contracting.

So, eschewing the quarterback model of advice, and choosing to self-educate thru this book and elsewhere, may be one of the best efforts a smart physician can make.

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

RELATED TEXTS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/04/29/why-are-certified-medical-planner-textbooks-so-darn-popular/

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

THANK YOU!

*****

COMPREHENSIVE FINANCIAL PLANNING STRATEGIES

For Doctors and Advisors

BOOK REVIEWS WITH FOREWORD

Reviews

Written by doctors and healthcare professionals, this textbook should be mandatory reading for all medical school students―highly recommended for both young and veteran physicians―and an eliminating factor for any financial advisor who has not read it. The book uses jargon like ‘innovative,’ ‘transformational,’ and ‘disruptive’―all rightly so! It is the type of definitive financial lifestyle planning book we often seek, but seldom find.
LeRoy Howard MA CMPTM,Candidate and Financial Advisor, Fayetteville, North Carolina

I taught diagnostic radiology for over a decade. The physician-focused niche information, balanced perspectives, and insider industry transparency in this book may help save your financial life.
Dr. William P. Scherer MS, Barry University, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

This book was crafted in response to the frustration felt by doctors who dealt with top financial, brokerage, and accounting firms. These non-fiduciary behemoths often prescribed costly wholesale solutions that were applicable to all, but customized for few, despite ever-changing needs. It is a must-read to learn why brokerage sales pitches or Internet resources will never replace the knowledge and deep advice of a physician-focused financial advisor, medical consultant, or collegial Certified Medical Planner™ financial professional.
―Parin Khotari MBA,Whitman School of Management, Syracuse University, New York

In today’s healthcare environment, in order for providers to survive, they need to understand their current and future market trends, finances, operations, and impact of federal and state regulations. As a healthcare consulting professional for over 30 years supporting both the private and public sector, I recommend that providers understand and utilize the wealth of knowledge that is being conveyed in these chapters. Without this guidance providers will have a hard time navigating the supporting system which may impact their future revenue stream. I strongly endorse the contents of this book.

―Carol S. Miller BSN MBA PMP,President, Miller Consulting Group, ACT IAC Executive Committee Vice-Chair at-Large, HIMSS NCA Board Member

This is an excellent book on financial planning for physicians and health professionals. It is all inclusive yet very easy to read with much valuable information. And, I have been expanding my business knowledge with all of Dr. Marcinko’s prior books. I highly recommend this one, too. It is a fine educational tool for all doctors.

―Dr. David B. Lumsden MD MS MA,Orthopedic Surgeon, Baltimore, Maryland

There is no other comprehensive book like it to help doctors, nurses, and other medical providers accumulate and preserve the wealth that their years of education and hard work have earned them.
―Dr. Jason Dyken MD MBA,Dyken Wealth Strategies, Gulf Shores, Alabama

I plan to give a copy of this book written
by doctors and for doctors’ to all my prospects, physician, and nurse clients. It may be the definitive text on this important topic.
―Alexander Naruska CPA,Orlando, Florida

Health professionals are small business owners who need to apply their self-discipline tactics in establishing and operating successful practices. Talented trainees are leaving the medical profession because they fail to balance the cost of attendance against a realistic business and financial plan. Principles like budgeting, saving, and living below one’s means, in order to make future investments for future growth, asset protection, and retirement possible are often lacking. This textbook guides the medical professional in his/her financial planning life journey from start to finish. It ranks a place in all medical school libraries and on each of our bookshelves.
―Dr. Thomas M. DeLauro DPM,Professor and Chairman – Division of Medical Sciences, New York College of Podiatric Medicine

Physicians are notoriously excellent at diagnosing and treating medical conditions. However, they are also notoriously deficient in managing the business aspects of their medical practices. Most will earn $20-30 million in their medical lifetime, but few know how to create wealth for themselves and their families. This book will help fill the void in physicians’ financial education. I have two recommendations: 1) every physician, young and old, should read this book; and 2) read it a second time!
―Dr. Neil Baum MD,Clinical Associate Professor of Urology, Tulane Medical School, New Orleans, Louisiana

I worked with a Certified Medical Planner™ on several occasions in the past, and will do so again in the future. This book codified the vast body of knowledge that helped in all facets of my financial life and professional medical practice.
Dr. James E. Williams DABPS, Foot and Ankle Surgeon, Conyers, Georgia

***

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

***

YOUR THOUGHTS ARE APPRECIATED.

SECOND OPINIONS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

Thank You

CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER™ Designation: A.I. Allows Adult Learners Take Control

“Robo-Examiners” Let CMP™ Candidates Take Control

Dr. David Marcinko MBA CMP™
[Founding CEO and President]

Enter the CMPs

cmp

The concept of a self-taught and student motivated, but automated outcomes driven classroom may seem like a nightmare scenario for those who are not comfortable with computers. Now everyone can breathe a sigh of relief, because the Institute of Medical Business Advisors just launched an “automated” final examination review protocol that requires no programming skill whatsoever.

In fact, everything is designed to be very simple and easy to use. Once a student’s examination “blue-book” is received, computerized “robotic reviewers” correct student assignments and quarterly test answers. This automated examination model lets the robots correct tests and exams, while the students concentrate on guided self-learning.

READ: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2020/07/09/robo-examiners-let-cmp-candidates-take-control/

MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2020/06/16/discover-the-best-medical-risk-management-and-insurance-planning-practices-of-leading-cmps/

Your thoughts and comments are appreciated.

THANK YOU

***

“Churning”, “Front Running” and “Pumping & Dumping”

BE ALERT AND BE AWARE

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

https://certifiedmedicalplannerdotorg1.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/cmp-logo17.jpg

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Front Running (Definition, Examples) | How Traders Use it?

Churning: The practice of a provider seeing a patient more often than is medically necessary, primarily to increase revenue through an increased number of visits. A practice, in violation of SEC rules, where a salesperson affects a series of transactions in a customer’s account which are excessive in size and/or frequency in relation to the size and investment objectives of the account. An insurance agent who is churning an account is normally seeking to maximize the income (in commissions, sales credits or mark-ups) derived from the account.  

FRONT-RUNNING: Form of market manipulation where a broker/dealer delays processing of a large customer trade in an underlying security until the firm can execute an options trade in that security in anticipation of the client’ s trade impact on the underlying security.

Pump and dump: A a form of securities fraud that involves artificially inflating the price of an owned stock through false and misleading positive statements, in order to sell the cheaply purchased stock at a higher price. Once the operators of the scheme “dump” their overvalued shares, the price falls and investors lose their money.

Citation: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Your comments are appreciated.

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

THANK YOU

***

On Purchasing Individual BONDS!

A Seldom Discussed Investing Topics for Doctors and All Investors Until Now?

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

MARKET ALERT: Investors fled into the bond market Monday, pulling the yield on the closely watched 10-year Treasury to its lowest since February, with investors dashing out of equities on fears that rising COVID-19 infections will threaten recovery in the world’s largest economy.

CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Now – Trading individual bonds is not like trading stocks. Stocks can be bought at uniform prices and are traded through exchanges. Most bonds trade over the counter, and individual brokers price them.  But, price transparency has gotten better in the last decade. 

For example, in 1999, the bond markets gained clearness from the House of Representatives’ Bond Price Competition Improvement Act of 1999. Responding to this pioneering law, the site http://www.investinginbonds.com was established. This site provides current prices on bonds that have traded more than four times the previous day. With the advent of Investinginbonds.com and real-time reporting of many trades, investors are much better off today.  Many well regarded brokers including Schwab, Ameritrade, and Fidelity Investments now have dedicated websites devoted to bond trading and pricing. 

Fidelity Investments chose to disclose its fee structure for all bonds, making it clear what it will cost you per trade. Fidelity charges $1 per bond trade. Some on-line brokers charge a flat fee as well, ranging from $10.95 at Zions Direct to $45 at TD Ameritrade. Depending on the number of bonds trading, one may be more complimentary than another. The trading fee disclosures, however, do not divulge the spreads between the buy and sell price embedded in the transaction that some dealer is making in the channel. Keep in mind that only by comparison shopping can assist you in finding the best transaction price, after all fees are taken into account. Other sites may not charge any fee, but rather embed the profit in the spread.

Despite the difficulty in pricing and transparency, investing in individual bonds offers several rewards over purchasing bond mutual funds.

First, bond mutual funds never mature.

Second, you know exactly what you will be receiving in interest each year.  You will also know the exact maturity date. 

Furthermore, your individual investment is protected against interest rate risk, at least over the full term to maturity.  Both individual bonds and bond funds share interest-rate risk (the risk of locking up an investment at a given rate, only to see rates rise). This pushes bond prices down.  At least with an individual bond, you can re-invest it at the higher, market rate once the bond matures.

But, the lack of a fixed maturity date on a bond mutual fund causes an open ended problem; there is no promise of the original investment back.  Short of default, an individual bond will return all principal and pay all interest assuming you hold it to maturity.  Bond funds are not likely to default as most funds maintain positions in hundreds of individual bonds.  The force of interest rate risk to individual bond or bond mutual fund prices depends on the maturity of a bond investment: the longer the maturity of a bond or bond fund (average), the more the price will drop due to rising rates. This is known as duration.

Duration is a statistical term that measures the price sensitivity to yield, is the primary measurement of a bond or bond fund’s sensitivity to interest rate changes.  Duration indicates approximately how much the price of a bond or bond fund will adjust in the reverse direction given a rise in interest rates. For instance, an individual bond with an average duration of five years will fall in value approximately 5% if rates rise by 1% and the opposite is accurate as well.

Although stated in years, duration is not simply a gauge of time. Instead, duration signals how much the price of your bond investment is likely to oscillate when there is an up or down movement in interest rates. The higher the duration number, the more susceptible your bond investment will be to changes in interest rates.  If you have money in a bond or bond fund that holds primarily long-term bonds, expect the value of that fund to decline, perhaps significantly, when interest rates rise. The higher a bond’s duration, the greater its sensitivity to interest rates alterations. This means fluctuations in price, whether positive or negative, will be more prominent.

For example, a bond fund with 10-year duration will diminish in value by 10 percent if interest rates increase by one percent. On the other hand, the bond fund will rise in value by 10 percent if interest rates descend by one percent. The important concept to remember is once you recognize a bond’s or bond fund’s duration, you can forecast how it will react to a change in interest rates.

UPDATE:

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note, which serves as a benchmark for interest rates across the US economy, fell for an eighth straight day last week to below 1.3%—the lowest level since February. And, the 10-year yield fell to 1.181% with an intra-day low of 1.176% yesterday, which was the lowest since February 11.

Since bond prices and yields move in opposite directions, falling yields signal higher demand for Treasuries.

Why it matters: At the most basic level, the 10-year yield is a key indicator of investors’ confidence in future US economic growth. As the Delta variant spreads and threatens to slow the economic recovery, the fall in yields means investors are souring on a mega growth spurt and snapping up safer assets rather than riskier stocks.

What does this mean for inflation? Because investors sell bonds when they think inflation is coming, the runup in bond prices means the worst of Wall Street’s inflation concerns may be over. “It feels like we have moved from thinking inflation will be transitory, to fearing growth will be transitory,” Art Hogan, chief marketing strategist at National Securities, said.

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER Textbook: https://www.amazon.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-Advisors/dp/1482240289/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418580820&sr=8-1&keywords=david+marcinko

SECOND OPINIONS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

THANK YOU

***

FINANCIAL PLANNING AND INVESTING FOR PHYSICIANS: Purchase Textbook Today & Relax Tomorrow

“MANIC MONDAY” 2021

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

YOUR THOUGHTS ARE APPRECIATED

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

CMP logo

THANK YOU

***

FINANCIAL PLANNING: Strategies for Physicians and their Advisors

A Textbook Review

SECOND OPINIONS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

CMP logo

THANK YOU

***

STOCKS: A Very Skewed Market “Boom”

PRICES CHANGES FOR THE LAST SEVEN YEARS

***

***

Your thoughts are appreciated.

SECOND OPINIONS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

***

The BUSINESS [Economic] CYCLE: What is it Really?

Of BUll and Bear Markets, too!

See the source image

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

The business cycle is also known as the economic cycle and reflects the expansion or contraction in economic activity. Understanding the business cycle and the indicators used to determine its phases may influence investment or economic business decisions and financial or medical planning expectations. Although often depicted as the regular rising and falling of an episodic curve, the business cycle is very irregular in terms of amplitude and duration.

Moreover, many elements move together during the cycle and individual elements seldom carry enough momentum to cause the cycle to move. However, elements may have a domino effect on one another, and this is ultimately drives the cycle.  We can also have a large positive cycle, coincident with a smaller but still negative cycle, as seen in the current healthcare climate of today.

  1. First Phase: Trough to Recovery (production driven)

Scenario: A depressed GNP leads to declining industrial production and capacity utilization. Decreased workloads result in improved labor productivity and reduced labor (unit) costs until actual producer (wholesale) prices decline.

  1. Second Phase: Recovery to Expansion (consumer driven)

Scenario: CPI declines (due to reduced wholesale prices) and consumer real income rises, improving consumer sentiment and actual demand for consumer goods.

  1. Third Phase: Expansion to Peak (production driven)

Scenario: GNP rises leading to increased industrial production and capacity utilization. But, labor productivity declines and unit labor costs and producer (wholesale) prices rise.

  1. Fourth Phase: Peak to Contraction (consumer driven)

Scenario: CPI rises making consumer real income and sentiment erode until consumer demand, and ultimately purchases, shrink dramatically.  Recessions may occur and economists have an alphabet used to describe them.

For example, with a V, the drop and recovery is quick. For U, the economy moves up more sluggishly from the bottom. A W is what you would expect: repeated recoveries and declines. An L shaper recession describes a prolonged dry economic spell or even depression.


NOTE: Historically, contractions have had a shorter duration than expansions.

Bull and Bear Markets for Medical Professionals

A bull market is generally one of rising stock prices, while a bear market is the opposite. There are usually two bulls for every one bear market over the long term.

More specifically, a bear market is defined as a drop of twenty percent or more in a market index from its high, and can vary in duration and severity.  While a bull market has no such threshold requirement to exist, other than they exist between these two periods of sharp decline.

Whither the Bear?

As a doctor, your action plan in a bear market depends on many variables, with perhaps your age being the most important:

In your 30s:

  • Pay off debts, school or practice loans.
  • Invest in safe money market mutual funds, cash or CDs.
  • Start retirement plan or 401-K account.

In your 40s:

  • Increase your pension plan or 401-K contributions.
  • Stay weighted more toward equity investments.
  • Review your goals, risk tolerance and portfolio.

In your 50s:

  • Position assets for ready cash instruments.
  • Diversify into stock, bonds and cash.

Retirement:

  • Maintain 3 years of ready cash living expenses.
  • Reduce, but still maintain your exposure to equities.

ASSESSMENT: So, where are we right now in the economic business cycle? Your thoughts are appreciated.

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.amazon.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-Advisors/dp/1482240289/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418580820&sr=8-1&keywords=david+marcinko

SECOND OPINIONS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

THANK YOU

***

Are Today’s Doctors Desperate?

Emotions Rise with Healthcare Reform

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™

[Publisher-in-Chief]

NOTE:  I penned this essay more than a decade ago.dem2

Managed care is a prospective payment method where medical care is delivered regardless of the quantity or frequency of service, for a fixed payment, in the aggregate. It is not traditional fee-for-service medicine or the individual personal care of the past, but is essentially utilitarian in nature and collective in intent. Will new-age healthcare reform be even more draconian?

Unhappy Physicians

There are many reasons why doctors are professionally and financially unhappy, some might even say desperate, because of managed care; not to mention the specter of healthcare reform from the Obama administration. For example:

  • A staggering medical student loan debt burden of $100,000-250,000 is not unusual for new practitioners. The federal Health Education Assistance Loan (HEAL) program reported that for the Year 2000, it squeezed significant repayment settlements from its Top 5 list of deadbeat doctor debtors. This included a $303,000 settlement from a New York dentist, $186,000 from a Florida osteopath, $158,000 from a New Jersey podiatrist, $128,000 from a Virginia podiatrist, and $120,000 from a Virginia dentist. The agency also excluded 303 practitioners from Medicare, Medicaid, and other federal healthcare programs and had their cases referred for nonpayment of debt.
  • Because of the flagging economy, medical school applications nationwide have risen. “Previously, there were a lot of different opportunities out there for young bright people”; according to Rachel Pentin-Maki; RN, MHA”; not so today. In fact, Physicians Practice Digest recently stated, “Medicine is fast becoming a job in which you work like a slave, eke out a middle class existence, and have patients, malpractice insurers, and payers questioning your motives.” Remarkably, the Cornell University School of Continuing Education has designed a program to give prospective medical school students a real-world peek, both good and bad.

The Ripple Effects of Managed Care and Reform

“Many people who are currently making a great effort and investment to become doctors may be heading for a role and a way of life that are fundamentally different from what they expect and desire,” according to Stephen Scheidt, MD, director of the $1,000 Cornell fee program; why?

  • Fewer fee-for-service patients and more discounted patients.
  • More paperwork and scrutiny of decisions with lost independence and morale.
  • Reputation equivalency (i.e., all doctors in the plan must be good), or commoditization (i.e., a doctor is a doctor is a doctor).
  • The provider is at risk for (a) utilization and acuity, (b) actuarial accuracy, (c) cost of delivering medical care, and (d) adverse patient selection.
  • Practice costs are increasing beyond the core rate of inflation.
  • Medicare reimbursements are continually cut.

Mad Obama

Early Opinions

Richard Corlin MD, opined back in 2002 that “these are circumstances that cannot continue because we are going to see medical groups disappearing.” Furthermore, he stated, “This is an emergency that lawmakers have to address.” Such cuts also stand to hurt physicians with private payers since commercial insurers often tie their reimbursement schedules to Medicare’s resources. “That’s the ripple effect here,” says Anders Gilberg, the Washington lobbyist for the Medical Group Management Associations (MGMA).

Assessment

And so, some desperate doctors are pursing these sources of relief, among many others:

  • A growing number of doctors are abandoning traditional medicine to start “boutique” practices that are restricted to patients who pay an annual retainer of $1,500 and up for preferred services and special attention. Franchises for the model are also available.
  • Regardless of location, the profession of medicine is no longer ego-enhancing or satisfying; some MDs retire early or leave the profession all together. Few recommend it, as a career anymore.

Assessment

To compound the situation, it is well known that doctors are notoriously poor investors and do not attend to their own personal financial well being, as they expertly minister to their patients’ physical illnesses.

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Tell us what you think? Are you a desperate doctor? Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos 

References:

  1. www.managedcaremagazine.com/archives/9809/9809/.qna_dickey.shtml
  2. www.hrsa.dhhs.gov/news-pa/heal.htm
  3. www.bhpr.hrsa.gov/dsa/sfag/health-professions/bk1prt4.htm
  4. Pamela L. Moore, “Can We All Just Get Along: Bridging the Generation Gap, Physicians Practice Digest (May/June 2001).

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ON THE ROAD AGAIN: Public Speaking, Opining and Assigning

Dr. David Edward Marcinko is Speaking Up

Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP® enjoys personal coaching and public speaking and gives as many talks each year as possible, at a variety of medical society and financial services conferences around the country and world.

These have included lectures and visiting professorships at major academic centers, keynote lectures for hospitals, economic seminars and health systems, keynote lectures at city and statewide financial coalitions, and annual keynote lectures for a variety of internal yearly meetings.

His talks tend to be engaging, iconoclastic, and humorous. His most popular presentations include a diverse variety of topics and typically include those in all iMBA, Inc’s textbooks, handbooks, white-papers and most topics covered on this blog.

***

Recognizing the Differences between Healthcare and Other ...

INVITATIONS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

CONTACT: Ann Miller RN MHA

MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

Ph: 770-448-0769

Second Opinions: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

DIY Textbooks: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/04/29/why-are-certified-medical-planner-textbooks-so-darn-popular/

THANK YOU

***

What is EBITDA?

Earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization

A company’s earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization is an accounting measure calculated using a company’s earnings, before interest expenses, taxes, depreciation, and amortization are subtracted, as a proxy for a company’s current operating profitability. Though often shown on an income statement, it is not considered part of the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles by the SEC.

Citation: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

EBITDA Formula | Calculator (Examples with Excel Template)

READ: https://www.investopedia.com/terms/e/ebitda.asp

Your thoughts and comments are appreciated.

THANK YOU

***

Personal BUDGET Rules for Doctors

Personal Physician Budgeting Rules

BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Budgeting is probably one of the greatest tools in building wealth. However, it is also one of the greatest weaknesses among physicians who tend to live a certain lifestyle. This includes living in an exclusive neighborhood, driving an expensive car, wearing imported suits and a fine watch, all of which do not lend themselves to expense budgeting. Only one in ten medical professionals has a personal budget. Fear, or a lack of knowledge, is a major cause of procrastination.

The following guidelines will assist in this microeconomic endeavor:

  1. Set reasonable goals and estimate annual income. Do not keep large amounts of cash at     home, or in the office. Deposit it in a money market account for safety and interest.
  1. Do not pay bills early, do not have more taxes withheld from your salary than you owe, and develop spending estimates and budget fixed expenses first. Fixed expenses are usually contractual, and may include housing, utilities, food, telephone, social security, medical, debt repayment, homeowner’ or renter’s insurance, auto, life and disability insurance, and maintenance, etc.
  1. Make variable expenses a priority. Variable expenses are not usually contractual, and may include clothing, education, recreational, travel, vacation, gas, entertainment, gifts, furnishings, savings, investments, etc.
  1. Trim variable expenses by 10-15 percent, and fixed expenses, when possible. Ultimately, all fixed expenses get paid and become variable in the long run.
  1. Use carve-out or set-asides for big ticket items and differentiate “wants from needs.”
  1. Know the difference between saving and investing. Savers tend to be risk adverse and     investors understand risk and takes steps to mitigate it.
  1. Determine shortfalls or excesses with the budget period.
  1. Track actual expenses.
  1. Calculate both income and expenses as a percentage of the total, and determine if there    is a better way to allocate resources. Then, review the budget on a monthly basis to determine if there is a variance. Determine if the variance was avoidable, unavoidable, or a result of inaccurate assumptions, and take needed corrective action.

***

How to budget for medical expenses

***

Verify Your Budget and Follow a Financial Plan

The process of establishing a budget relies heavily on guesswork, and the use of software or “apps”, that seamlessly track expenditures and help your budget and your financial plan become more of reality. Most doctors underestimate their true expenses, so lumping and best guesses on expense usually prove very inaccurate. Personal financial software and mobile phone applications make the verification of budgets easier. Once your personal accounts are setup, free apps like MINT.com will let give you a detailed report on where your money is going and the adjustments you must make. Few professions make larger contributions to the Internal Revenue Service than physicians and the medical profession. It is very important to categorize different budget categories not only to be proactive about your expenses, but also to accurately reflect the effect your different expenditures have on your real savings capability. All expense dollars are not equal.

For example, a mortgage payment, which is mostly interest expense in the early years, is likewise mostly tax deductible. Spending money on your family vacation is typically not tax deductible. Itemized deductions, which are deductions that a US taxpayer can claim on their tax return in order to reduce their Adjustable Gross Income (AGI), may include such costs as property taxes, vehicle registration fees, income taxes, mortgage expense, investment interest, charitable contributions, medical expenses (to the extent the expenses exceed 10% of the taxpayers AGI) and more.

Employing a qualified certified medical planneR® that utilizes a cash-flow based financial planning software program may help the physician identify their actual after-tax projected cash flow and more accurately plan their future.

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

THANK YOU

***

JULY FOURTH WEEKEND READING LIST 2021

Happy Independence Weekend Greetings to our Readers and Subscribers for 2021

Product Details

From the Medical Executive-Post

***

Product Details
Product Details
Product Details
Product Details
Product Details
Product Details
Product Details

Rate this:

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™
Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

CONTACT: Ann Miller RN MH

[Executive Director]

MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

THANK YOU

***

UNICORNS: Successful Private Companies?

The Healthcare, IT AND FINANCIAL SectorS

Where Are The World's Unicorn Companies? - CITI I/O

DEFINITION: A private, non-public, company valued at more than a billion dollars.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Now, just five months into 2021, there were 199 new companies that reached unicorn status (a private company with a $1+ billion valuation), eclipsing the 163 companies that reached unicorn status in all of 2020, according to Crunchbase data shared with Emerging Tech Brew. And it’s not just a pandemic rebound: That figure is higher than any full-year total over the last nine years. 

Landscape lowdown 

After a 2020 full of stagnation and uncertainty, the VC scene is making up for lost time and then some. 

“Many of the concerns…that ground deal making to a halt have largely been alleviated in what many investors see as a new normal,” Joshua Chao, venture capital analyst at PitchBook told us. “We’re now seeing VCs invest in companies outside of their immediate networks and it’s just full steam ahead on deal making and fundraising.” 

Deena Shakir, partner at Lux Capital, said VCs are branching out of their traditional comfort zones to chase opportunities, leading to stiff competition and unprecedented valuations.

  • “Everyone [is] inching further upstream and downstream than their normal sweet spot,” Shakir said. “Hedge funds [are] now leading seed deals and seed funds [are] participating in growth deals.”

Why so exuberant? Blame the same Big Acceleration society underwent since Covid hit: the shift to digital. Tami Hutchinson, VP at Intel Capital, told us the pandemic-fueled digital transformation has now become “a critical must-have for all enterprises,” creating opportunities for startups to serve that need.

Health Care: Health care, financial services, and privacy and security are the most popular sectors for new $1+ billion companies, per Crunchbase. Shakir echoed that idea, saying Lux is most excited by deals at the intersections of “clinical data and AI, hardware and software, care delivery and clinical insights, [and] physical and digital security.”

More proof…

  • In Q1 2021, digital health startups amassed a record $6.7 billion in funding, on pace to eclipse the $14 billion raised in all of 2020.
  • On the fintech side, Webull, the Chinese-owned Robinhood rival, reached unicorn status in February after a $150 million funding round.
  • Israeli cybersecurity firm Wiz is an example of a fresh unicorn in the space—it was valued at $1.7 billion as of May 2021.

Looking ahead…VCs say it’s a safe bet to assume that more billion-dollar companies are on the horizon this year.

“For entrepreneurs, this is possibly one of the most founder-friendly periods we’ve seen in several years—all-time highs for valuations across the board coupled with all-time lows for deals,” Chao said.

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts and comments are appreciated.

THANK YOU

***

Some Retirement Statistics and Questions for Physicians

Transitioning to the End of Your Medical Career

 BY DR. DAVID EDWARD MARCINKO MBA CMP®

CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

With the PP-ACA, increased compliance regulations and higher tax rates impending from the Biden administration – not to mention the corona pandemic, venture capital based healthcare corporations and telehealth – physicians are more concerned about their retirement and retirement planning than ever before; and with good reason. After payroll taxes, dividend taxes, limited itemized deductions, the new 3.8% surtax on net investment income and an extra 0.9% Medicare tax, for every dollar earned by a high earning physician, almost 50 cents can go to taxes!

Introduction

Retirement planning is not about cherry picking the best stocks, ETFs or mutual funds or how to beat the short term fluctuations in the market. It’s a disciplined long term strategy based on scientific evidence and a prudent process. You increase the probability of success by following this process and monitoring on a regular basis to make sure you are on track.

General Surveys

According to a survey from the Employee Benefit Research Institute [EBRI] and Greenwald & Associates; nearly half of workers without a retirement plan were not at all confident in their financial security, compared to 11 percent for those who participated in a plan, according to the 2014 Retirement Confidence Survey (RCS).

In addition, 35 percent of workers have not saved any money for retirement, while only 57 percent are actively saving for retirement. Thirty-six percent of workers said the total value of their savings and investments—not including the value of their home and defined benefit plan—was less than $1,000, up from 29 percent in the 2013 survey. But, when adjusted for those without a formal retirement plan, 73 percent have saved less than $1,000.

Debt is also a concern, with 20 percent of workers saying they have a major problem with debt. Thirty-eight percent indicate they have a minor problem with debt. And, only 44 percent of workers said they or their spouse have tried to calculate how much money they’ll need to save for retirement. But, those who have done the calculation tend to save more.

The biggest shift in the 24 years has been the number of workers who plan to work later in life. In 1991, 84 percent of workers indicated they plan to retire by age 65, versus only 9 percent who planned to work until at least age 70. In 2014, 50 percent plan on retiring by age 65; with 22 percent planning to work until they reach 70.

Physician Statistics

Now, compare and contrast the above to these statistics according to a 2018 survey of physicians on financial preparedness by American Medical Association [AMA] Insurance. The statistics are still alarming:

  • The top personal financial concern for all physicians is having enough money to retire.
  • Only 6% of physicians consider themselves ahead of schedule in retirement preparedness.
  • Nearly half feel they were behind
  • 41% of physicians average less than $500,000 in retirement savings.
  • Nearly 70% of physicians don’t have a long term care plan.
  • Only half of US physicians have a completed estate plan including an updated will and Medical directives.

Retired MD Doctor Retirement Gift Idea Retiring - Doctor ...

Thoughts to Ponder

And so, to help make your golden years comfortable and worry free, here are ten important retirement questions for all physicians to consider:

  1. How much money do you need to retire?
  2. What is your retirement cash flow?
  3. What is your retirement vision?
  4. How to stay on retirement track?
  5. How to maximize retirement plan contributions such as 401(k) or 403(b)?
  6. How to maximize retirement income from retirement plans?
  7. What are some other retirement plan savings options?
  8. What is your retirement plan and investing style?
  9. What is the role of social security in retirement planning?
  10. How to integrate retirement with estate planning?

The opinion of a competent Certified Medical Planner® can assist.

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts, comments and input are appreciated.

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER Textbook: https://www.amazon.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-Advisors/dp/1482240289/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418580820&sr=8-1&keywords=david+marcinko

SECOND OPINIONS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

THANK YOU

***

On Finding PHYSICIAN FOCUSED Financial Advice?

OVER HEARD IN THE DOCTOR’S LOUNGE

Michigan Association of Osteopathic Family Physicians ...

The financial planner is a like juggler, trying to keep a variety of balls simultaneously in the air.  Each aspect of practice becomes critical, just as action is needed. 

Some of the activities of operating a successful financial planning practice generally attract more attention than others, such as marketing and advertising, closing engagements, and office administration.  Because product review, selection and implementation are often related to advisor compensation, they attract a great deal of the financial juggler’s concentration. 

But, the heart of financial planning, niche advice, often receives little attention.  Not because it is unimportant, it just doesn’t seem immediately and predictably urgent.  Here, that ball does not seem to be dropping so rapidly. 

However, retaining clients and receiving referrals from other professionals is very dependent on the quality of the advice delivered.  And, the first line of protection from practitioner liability exposure is to not deliver incorrect or incomplete advice. 

But, where does the financial advisor turn for ideas and organized research in the healthcare sector? 

Edwin P. Morrow; CFPTM, CLU, ChFC, RFC

edwin

[Middletown, Ohio, USA]

ORDER Textbook: https://www.amazon.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-Advisors/dp/1482240289/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418580820&sr=8-1&keywords=david+marcinko

THANK YOU

***

TAX DEDUCTIONS: Home Ownership Simplified

Take Full Advantage Of These Tax Deductions

DR. DAVID EWARD MARCINKO MBA CMP®

CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

The housing market is HOT right now. Lumbar and wood is expensive. Inflation is emerging. So, owning a home can be very lucrative. Seriously, owning a home can not only give you a cheaper monthly payment than renting but in many cases, the tax benefits make the decision a no-brainer.

Citation: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Home ownership falls for first time in a century - Telegraph

Here are a few of the larger deductions that you need to be sure to take:

Interest you pay on your mortgage: If you own a home and don’t have a mortgage greater than $750,000, you can deduct the interest you pay on the loan. This is one of the biggest benefits to owning a home versus renting–as you could get massive deductions at tax time. The limit used to be $1 million, but the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (TCJA) reduced the limit and made some clarifications on deducting interest from a home equity line of credit.

Property taxes: Another awesome benefit to owning a home is the ability to deduct your property taxes. Before TCJA, the rules were a little more flexible and you were able to deduct the entirety of your property taxes. Now things have a changed a bit. Under the new law, you can deduct up to $10,000. The deduction for state and local income taxes was combined with the deduction for state and local property taxes, too.

Tax incentives for energy-efficient upgrades: While most of the tax incentives for making energy-efficient upgrades to your home have gone away, there are still a couple worth noting. You can still claim tax deductions on solar energy–both for electric and water heating equipment, through 2021. The longer you wait, though, the less money you’ll get back. Here’s the percentage of equipment you can deduct, based on time of installation:

Between January 1, 2017, and December 31, 2019 – 30% of the expenditures are eligible for the credit
Between January 1, 2020, and December 31, 2020 – 26%
Between January 1, 2021, and December 31, 2021 – 22%

ASSESSMENT: But, is now the best time to buy a home? Your thoughts are appreciated.

Rent V. Buy: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2017/03/14/the-apartment-rent-vs-home-buy-decision/

MDs: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2012/02/15/is-home-renting-for-chumps/

DIY Textbooks: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/04/29/why-are-certified-medical-planner-textbooks-so-darn-popular/

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

THANK YOU

***

ME-P Speaking Invitations

Dr. David E. Marcinko is at your Service

thumbnail_IMG_1663.edit1

Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP® enjoys personal coaching and public speaking and gives as many talks each year as possible, at a variety of medical society and financial services conferences around the country and world.

These have included lectures and visiting professorships at major academic centers, keynote lectures for hospitals, economic seminars and health systems, keynote lectures at city and statewide financial coalitions, and annual keynote lectures for a variety of internal yearly meetings.

His talks tend to be engaging, iconoclastic, and humorous. His most popular presentations include a diverse variety of topics and typically include those in all iMBA, Inc’s textbooks, handbooks, white-papers and most topics covered on this blog.

CONTACT: Ann Miller RN MHA

MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

Ph: 770-448-0769

Abbreviated Topic List: https://healthcarefinancials.files.wordpress.com/2009/02/imba-inc-firm-services.pdf

Second Opinions: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

DIY Textbooks: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/04/29/why-are-certified-medical-planner-textbooks-so-darn-popular/

THANK YOU

***

PODCAST: Physician WEDDING Costs

 The Economics of Weddings for Medical Professionals

The average wedding costs about $ 25,525 and medical professionals often spend much more.

Destination Weddings - Dynamic Roadshow

QUERY: Do you want a big wedding party for your family and friends, or an earlier retirement for yourself?

PODCAST: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XQBRHJ7aGbM

Your thoughts are appreciated.

THANK YOU

***

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

***

HEDGE FUNDS: History in Brief

ABOUT | DAVID EDWARD MARCINKO

BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

The investment profession has come a long way since the door-to-door stock salesmen of the 1920s sold a willing public on worthless stock certificates. The stock market crash of 1929 and ensuing Great Depression of the 1930s forever changed the way investment operations are run. A bewildering array of laws and regulations sprung up, all geared to protecting the individual investor from fraud. These laws also set out specific guidelines on what types of investment can be marketed to the general public – and allowed for the creation of a set of investment products specifically not marketed to the general public. These early-mid 20th century lawmakers specifically exempted from the definition of “general public,” for all practical purposes, those investors that meet certain minimum net worth guidelines.

The lawmakers decided that wealth brings the sophistication required to evaluate, either independently or together with wise counsel, investment options that fall outside the mainstream. Not surprisingly, an investment industry catering to such wealthy individuals, such as doctors and healthcare professionals, and qualifying institutions has sprung up.

EARLY DAYS

The original hedge fund was an investment partnership started by A.W. Jones in 1949. A financial writer prior to starting his investment management career, Mr. Jones is widely credited as being the prototypical hedge fund manager. His style of investment in fact gave the hedge fund its name – although Mr. Jones himself called his fund a “hedged fund.” Mr. Jones attempted to “hedge,” or protect, his investment partnership against market swings by selling short overvalued securities while at the same time buying undervalued securities. Leverage was an integral part of the strategy. Other managers followed in Mr. Jones’ footsteps, and the hedge fund industry was born.

In those early days, the hedge fund industry was defined by the types of investment operations undertaken – selling short securities, making liberal use of leverage, engaging in arbitrage and otherwise attempting to limit one’s exposure to market swings. Today, the hedge fund industry is defined more by the structure of the investment fund and the type of manager compensation employed.

The changing definition is largely a sign of the times. In 1949, the United States was in a unique state. With the memory of Great Depression still massively influencing common wisdom on stocks, the post-war euphoria sparked an interest in the securities markets not seen in several decades. Perhaps it is not so surprising that at such a time a particularly reflective financial writer such as A.W. Jones would start an investment operation featuring most prominently the protection against market swings rather than participation in them. 

Citation: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Apart from a few significant hiccups – 1972-73, 1987 and 2006-07 being most prominent – the U.S. stock markets have been on quite a roll for quite a long time now. So today, hedge funds come in all flavors – many not hedged at all. Instead, the concept of a private investment fund structured as a partnership, with performance incentive compensation for the manager, has come to dominate the mindscape when hedge funds are discussed. Hence, we now have a term in “hedge fund” that is not always accurate in its description of the underlying activity. In fact, several recent events have contributed to an even more distorted general understanding of hedge funds.

During 1998, the high profile Long Term Capital Management crisis and the spectacular currency losses experienced by the George Soros organization both contributed to a drastic reversal of fortune in the court of public opinion for hedge funds. Most hedge fund managers, who spend much of their time attempting to limit risk in one way or another, were appalled at the manner with which the press used the highest profile cases to vilify the industry as dangerous risk-takers. At one point during late 1998, hedge funds were even blamed in the lay press for the currency collapses of several developing nations; whether this was even possible got short thrift in the press.

Needless to say, more than a few managers have decided they did not much appreciate being painted with the same “hedge fund” brush. Alternative investment fund, private investment fund, and several other terms have been promoted but inadequately adopted. As the memory of 1998 and 2007 fades, “hedge fund” may once again become a term embraced by all private investment managers.

See the source image

ASSESSMENT: Physicians, and all investors, should be aware, however, that several different terms defining the same basic structure might be used. Investors should therefore become familiar with the structure of such funds, independent of the label. The Securities Exchange Commission calls such funds “privately offered investment companies” and the Internal Revenue Service calls them “securities partnerships.”

Your thoughts are appreciated.

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

THANK YOU

***

ASK A FINANCIAL ADVISOR? About Company “Vesting”

A YOUNG PHYSICIAN INQUIRES ABOUT NON-PUBLIC COMPANY SHARES AND VESTING?

***

***

QUESTION: I am a physician and work for a startup healthcare IT company with shares in a non-public company that vests over time. What does that mean, and will the shares only be worth something if we go public or are acquired?

Shelly from Boston, MA

****

ANSWER: In most cases, startups dangle equity compensation over employees like a just-out-of-reach cupcake in front of a treadmill. Vesting means some condition needs to be met before you fully own your shares, whether it’s staying at the company for a period of time, reaching a target valuation, or both.

Once your shares have fully vested, you’d think you can finally cash in. But that’s not always the case. It’s a hassle to sell private company shares because there are far fewer buyers compared to selling shares in a publicly traded company. 

If you want to sell your stake before the company goes public, you can ask the execs at your company to buy back your shares. If they say no—and they might, because once they let one employee sell, it’s hard to turn down others—you need another buyer, like an outside investor.

There are eBay-like marketplaces for selling private company shares, but it’s not like posting a picture of your old iPod and offering free shipping. You can only sell to accredited investors (aka hedge funds and other rich folks), and your company needs to authorize the sale. 

It’s way easier to sell your shares if and when your company goes public or is acquired by another company.

Thanks for the query.

Citation: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

***

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

THANK YOU

***

INFLATION Is Here!

But for How Long?

See the source image

Vitaliy N. Katsenelson, CFA

[CEO & Chief Investment Officer]

READERS

DEFINITION: In economics, inflation (or less frequently, price inflation) is a general rise in the price level of an economy over a period of time. When the general price level rises, each unit of currency buys fewer goods and services; consequently, inflation reflects a reduction in the purchasing power per unit of money – a loss of real value in the medium of exchange and unit of account within the economy. The opposite of inflation is deflation, a sustained decrease in the general price level of goods and services. The common measure of inflation is the inflation rate, the annualized percentage change in a general price index, usually the consumer price index, over time.

CITATION: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

***

See the source image

***

DEAR READERS

This essay is going to be long.
I blame inflation, be it transitory or not, for inflating its length. 

The number one question I am asked by clients, friends, readers, and random strangers is, are we going to have inflation? 

I think about inflation on three timelines: short, medium, and long-term

The pandemic disrupted a well-tuned but perhaps overly optimized global economy and time-shifted the production and consumption of various goods. For instance, in the early days of the pandemic automakers cut their orders for semiconductors. As orders for new cars have come rolling back, it is taking time for semiconductor manufacturers, who, like the rest of the economy, run with little slack and inventory, to produce enough chips to keep up with demand. A $20 device the size of a quarter that goes into a $40,000 car may have caused a significant decline in the production of cars and thus higher prices for new and used cars. (Or, as I explained to my mother-in-law, all the microchips that used to go into cars went into a new COVID vaccine, so now Bill Gates can track our whereabouts.)

Here is another example. The increase in new home construction and spike in remodeling drove demand for lumber while social distancing at sawmills reduced lumber production – lumber prices spiked 300%. Costlier lumber added $36,000 to the construction cost of a house, and the median price of a new house in the US is now about $350,000.

The semiconductor shortage will get resolved by 2022, car production will come back to normal, and supply and demand in the car market will return to the pre-pandemic equilibrium. High prices in commodities are cured by high prices. High lumber prices will incentivize lumber mills to run triple shifts. Increased supply will meet demand, and lumber prices will settle at the pre-pandemic level in a relatively short period of time. That is the beauty of capitalism! 

Most high prices caused by the time-shift in demand and supply fall into the short-term basket, but not all. It takes a considerable amount of time to increase production of industrial commodities that are deep in the ground – oil, for instance. Low oil prices preceding the pandemic were already coiling the spring under oil prices, and COVID coiled it further. It will take a few years and increased production for high oil prices to cure high oil prices. Oil prices may also stay high because of the weaker dollar, but we’ll come back to that.

Federal Reserve officials have told us repeatedly they are not worried about inflation; they believe it is transitory, for the reasons I described above. We are a bit less dismissive of inflation, and the two factors that worry us the most in the longer term are labor costs and interest rates. 

Let’s start with labor costs 

During a garden-variety recession, companies discover that their productive capacity exceeds demand. To reduce current and future output they lay off workers and cut capital spending on equipment and inventory. The social safety net (unemployment benefits) kicks in, but not enough to fully offset the loss of consumer income; thus demand for goods is further reduced, worsening the economic slowdown. Through millions of selfish transactions (microeconomics), the supply of goods and services readjusts to a new (lower) demand level. At some point this readjustment goes too far, demand outstrips supply, and the economy starts growing again.

This pandemic was not a garden-variety recession 

The government manually turned the switch of the economy to the “off” position. Economic output collapsed. The government sent checks to anyone with a checking account, even to those who still had jobs, putting trillions of dollars into consumer pockets. Though output of the economy was reduced, demand was not. It mostly shifted between different sectors within the economy (home improvement was substituted for travel spending). Unlike in a garden-variety recession, despite the decline in economic activity (we produced fewer widgets), our consumption has remained virtually unchanged. Today we have too much money chasing too few goods– that is what inflation is. This will get resolved, too, as our economic activity comes back to normal.

But …

Today, though the CDC says it is safe to be inside or outside without masks, the government is still paying people not to work. Companies have plenty of jobs open, but they cannot fill them. Many people have to make a tough choice between watching TV while receiving a paycheck from big-hearted Uncle Sam and working. Zero judgement here on my part – if I was not in love with what I do and had to choose between stacking boxes in Amazon’s warehouse or watching Amazon Prime while collecting a paycheck from a kind uncle, I’d be watching Sopranos for the third time. 

To entice people to put down the TV remote and get off the couch, employers are raising wages. For instance, Amazon has already increased minimum pay from $15 to $17 per hour. Bank of America announced that they’ll be raising the minimum wage in their branches from $20 to $25 over the next few years. The Biden administration may not need to waste political capital passing a Federal minimum wage increase; the distorted labor market did it for them. 

These higher wages don’t just impact new employees, they help existing employees get a pay boost, too. Labor is by far the biggest expense item in the economy. This expense matters exponentially more from the perspective of the total economy than lumber prices do. We are going to start seeing higher labor costs gradually make their way into higher prices for the goods and services around us, from the cost of tomatoes in the grocery store to the cost of haircuts.

Only investors and economists look at higher wages as a bad thing. These increases will boost the (nominal) earnings of workers; however, higher prices of everything around us will negate (at least) some of the purchasing power. 

Wages, unlike timber prices, rarely decline. It is hard to tell someone “I now value you less.” Employers usually just tell you they need less of your valuable time (they cut your hours) or they don’t need you at all (they lay you off and replace you with a machine or cheap overseas labor). It seems that we are likely going to see a one-time reset to higher wages across lower-paying jobs. However, once the government stops paying people not to work, the labor market should normalize; and inflation caused by labor disbalance should come back to normal, though increased higher wages will stick around.

There is another trend that may prove to be inflationary in the long-term: de-globalization.  Even before the pandemic the US set plans to bring manufacturing of semiconductors, an industry deemed strategic to its national interests, to its shores. Taiwan Semiconductor and Samsung are going to be spending tens of billions of dollars on factories in Arizona.  

The pandemic exposed the weaknesses inherent in just-in-time manufacturing but also in over reliance on the kindness of other countries to manufacture basic necessities such as masks or chemicals that are used to make pharmaceuticals.  Companies will likely carry more inventory going forward, at least for a while.  But more importantly more manufacturing will likely come back to the US. This will bring jobs and a lot of automation, but also higher wages and thus higher costs.  

If globalization was deflationary, de-globalization is inflationary  

We are not drawing straight-line conclusions, just yet. A lot of manufacturing may just move away from China to other low-cost countries that we consider friendlier to the US; India and Mexico come to mind.  

And then we have the elephant in the economy – interest rates, the price of money. It’s the most important variable in determining asset prices in the short term and especially in the long term. The government intervention in the economy came at a significant cost, which we have not felt yet: a much bigger government debt pile. This pile will be there long after we have forgotten how to spell social distancing
 
The US government’s debt increased by $5 trillion to $28 trillion in 2020 – more than a 20% increase in one year! At the same time the laws of economics went into hibernation: The more we borrow the less we pay for our debt, because ultra-low interest rates dropped our interest payments from $570 billion in 2019 to $520 billion in 2020. 

That is what we’ve learned over the last decade and especially in 2020: The more we borrow the lower interest we pay. I should ask for my money back for all the economics classes I took in undergraduate and graduate school.

This broken link between higher borrowing and near-zero interest rates is very dangerous. It tells our government that how much you borrow doesn’t matter; you can spend (after you borrow) as much as your Republican or Democratic heart desires. 

However, by looking superficially at the numbers I cited above we may learn the wrong lesson. If we dig a bit deeper, we learn a very different lesson: Foreigners don’t want our (not so) fine debt. It seems that foreign investors have wised up: They were not the incremental buyer of our new debt – most of the debt the US issued in 2020 was bought by Uncle Fed. Try explaining to your kids that our government issued debt and then bought it itself. Good luck.

Let me make this point clear: Neither the Federal Reserve, nor I, nor a well-spoken guest on your business TV knows where interest rates are going to be (the total global bond market is bigger even than the mighty Fed, and it may not be able to control over interest rates in the long run). But the impact of what higher interest rates will do the economy increases with every trillion we borrow. There is no end in sight for this borrowing and spending spree (by the time you read this, the administration will have announced another trillion in spending). 

Let me provide you some context about our financial situation 


The US gross domestic product (GDP) – the revenue of the economy – is about $22 trillion, and in 2019 our tax receipts were about $3.5 trillion. Historically, the-10 year Treasury has yielded about 2% more than inflation. Consumer prices (inflation) went up 4.2% in April. Today the 10-year Treasury pays 1.6%; thus the World Reserve Currency debt has a negative 2.6% real interest rate (1.6% – 4.2%). 

These negative real (after inflation) interest rates are unlikely to persist while we are issuing trillions of dollars of debt. But let’s assume that half of the increase is temporary and that 2% inflation is here to stay. Let’s imagine the unimaginable. Our interest rate goes up to the historical norm to cover the loss of purchasing power caused by inflation. Thus it goes to 4% (2 percentage points above 2% “normal” inflation). In this scenario our federal interest payments will be over $1.2 trillion (I am using vaguely right math here). A third of our tax revenue will have to go to pay for interest expense. Something has to give. It is not going to be education or defense, which are about $230 billion and $730 billion, respectively. You don’t want to be known as a politician who cut education; this doesn’t play well in the opponent’s TV ads. The world is less safe today than at any time since the end of the Cold War, so our defense spending is not going down (this is why we own a lot of defense stocks). 

The government that borrows in its own currency and owns a printing press will not default on its debt, at least not in the traditional sense. It defaults a little bit every year through inflation by printing more and more money. Unfortunately, the average maturity of our debt is about five years, so it would not take long for higher interest expense to show up in budget deficits. 

Money printing will bring higher inflation and thus even higher interest rates

If things were not confusing enough, higher interest rates are also deflationary 

We’ve observed significant inflation in asset prices over the last decade; however, until this pandemic we had seen nothing yet. Median home prices are up 17% in one year. The wild, speculative animal spirits reached a new high during the pandemic. Flush with cash (thanks to kind Uncle Sam), bored due to social distancing, and borrowing on the margin (margin debt is hitting a 20-year high), consumers rushed into the stock market, turning this respectable institution (okay, wishful thinking on my part) into a giant casino. 

It is becoming more difficult to find undervalued assets. I am a value investor, and believe me, I’ve looked (we are finding some, but the pickings are spare). The stock market is very expensive. Its expensiveness is setting 100-year records. Except, bonds are even more expensive than stocks – they have negative real (after inflation) yields.

But stocks, bonds, and homes were not enough – too slow, too little octane for restless investors and speculators. Enter cryptocurrencies (note: plural). Cryptocurrencies make Pets.com of the 1999 era look like a conservative investment (at least it had a cute sock commercial). There are hundreds if not thousands of crypto “currencies,” with dozens created every week. (I use the word currency loosely here. Just because someone gives bits and bytes a name, and you can buy these bits and bytes, doesn’t automatically make what you’re buying a currency.)

“The definition of a bubble is when people are making money all out of proportion to their intelligence or work ethic.”

By Mike Burry MD
[The Big Short]

I keep reading articles about millennials borrowing money from their relatives and pouring their life savings into cryptocurrencies with weird names, and then suddenly turning into millionaires after a celebrity CEO tweets about the thing he bought. Much ink is spilled to celebrate these gamblers, praising them for their ingenious insight, thus creating ever more FOMO (fear of missing out) and spreading the bad behavior.

Unfortunately, at some point they will be writing about destitute millennials who lost all of their and their friends’ life savings, but this is down the road. Part of me wants to call this a crypto craziness a bubble, but then I think, Why that’s disrespectful to the word bubble, because something has to be worth something to be overpriced. At least tulips were worth something and had a social utility. (I’ll come back to this topic later in the letter).

But ….

When interest rates are zero or negative, stocks of sci-fi-novel companies that are going to colonize and build five-star hotels on Mars are priced as if El Al (the Israeli airline) has regular flights to the Red Planet every day of the week except on Friday (it doesn’t fly on Shabbos). Rising interest rates are good defusers of mass delusions and rich imaginations. 

In the real economy, higher interest rates will reduce the affordability of financed assets. They will increase the cost of capital for businesses, which will be making fewer capital investments. No more 2% car loans or 3% business loans. Most importantly, higher rates will impact the housing market. 

Up to this point, declining interest rates increased the affordability of housing, though in a perverse way: The same house with white picket fences (and a dog) is selling for 17% more in 2021 than a year before, but due to lower interest rates the mortgage payments have remained the same. Consumers are paying more for the same asset, but interest rates have made it affordable.

At higher interest rates housing prices will not be making new highs but revisiting past lows. Declining housing prices reduce consumers’ willingness to improve their depreciating dwellings (fewer trips to Home Depot). Many homeowners will be upside down in their homes, mortgage defaults will go up… well, we’ve seen this movie before in the not-so-distant past. Higher interest rates will expose a lot of weaknesses that have been built up in the economy. We’ll be finding fault lines in unexpected places – low interest has covered up a lot of financial sins.

And then there is the US dollar, the world’s reserve currency. Power corrupts, but the unchallenged and unconstrained the power of being the world’s reserve currency corrupts absolutely. It seems that our multitrillion-dollar budget deficits will not suddenly stop in 2021. With every trillion dollars we borrow, we chip away at our reserve currency status (I’ve written about this topic in great detail, and things have only gotten worse since). And as I mentioned above, we’ve already seen signs that foreigners are not willing to support our debt addiction. 

A question comes to mind.
Am I yelling fire where there is not even any smoke? 

Higher interest rates is anything but a consensus view today. Anyone who called for higher rates during the last 20 years is either in hiding or has lost his voice, or both. However, before you dismiss the possibility of higher rates as an unlikely plot for a sci-fi novel, think about this. 

In the fifty years preceding 2008, housing prices never declined nationwide. This became an unquestioned assumption by the Federal Reserve and all financial players. Trillions of dollars of mortgage securities were priced as if “Housing shall never decline nationwide” was the Eleventh Commandment, delivered at Temple Sinai to Goldman Sachs. Or, if you were not a religious type, it was a mathematical axiom or an immutable law of physics. The Great Financial Crisis showed us that confusing the lack of recent observations of a phenomenon for an axiom may have grave consequences. 

Today everyone (consumers, corporations, and especially governments) behaves as if interest rates can only decline, but what if… I know it’s unimaginable, but what if ballooning government debt leads to higher interest rates? And higher interest rates lead to even more runaway money printing and inflation? 

This will bring a weaker dollar 

A weaker US dollar will only increase inflation, as import prices for goods will go up in dollar terms. This will create an additional tailwind for commodity prices. 

If your head isn’t spinning from reading this, I promise mine is from having written it. 

To sum up: A lot of the inflation caused by supply chain disruption that we see today is temporary. But some of it, particularly in industrial commodities, will linger longer, for at least a few years. Wages will be inflationary in the short-term and will reset prices higher, but once the government stops paying people not to work, wage growth should slow down. Finally, in the long term a true inflationary risk comes from growing government borrowing and budget deficits, which will bring higher interest rates and a weaker dollar with them, which will only make inflation worse and will also deflate away a lot of assets.

THE END

Your thoughts are appreciated.

THANK YOU

***
See the source image

WHITHER THE CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER™ MARKS?

Wither the CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER™ Professional Certification?

CMP logo

DEAR INVESTMENT ADVISORS, CPAs, FINANCIAL PLANNERS, FINANCIAL ADVISORS & INSURANCE AGENTS

We believe that:

If you do not have a market niche; you are not deeply informed
If you are not deeply informed; you can’t different yourself
If you can’t differentiate yourself; you can’t differentiate price
If you can’t differentiate price; you have no market power
If you have no market power; you have no unique knowledge
If you have no unique knowledge; you have fewer profits

If you have fewer profits; you are not likely a CMP™

CMP

PROGRAM CURRICULUM: Enter the CMPs

POPULAR BOOKS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/04/29/why-are-certified-medical-planner-textbooks-so-darn-popular/

Dean Gene Schmuckler PhD MBA MEd CTS
http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

THANK YOU

***

What is a REIT, Really?

REITs – The Margarine of Real Estate Investing

See the source image

By Dr. Dennis Bethel MD

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Just like real estate, butter has been around for thousands of years.  Sometime in the 1800’s someone decided that there was a need for something that looked like butter, tasted similar to butter, but wasn’t butter.  Along came margarine.  Real estate investment trusts (REITs) are the margarine of the real estate investing world.

NAREIT, the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts, answers the question

What is a REIT?” in the following way:

“A REIT, or Real Estate Investment Trust, is a type of real estate company modeled after mutual funds.  REITs were created by Congress in 1960 to give all Americans – not just the affluent – the opportunity to invest in income producing real estate in a manner similar to how many Americans invest in stocks and bonds through mutual funds.  Income-producing real estate refers to land and the improvements on it – such as apartments, offices or hotels.  REITs may invest in the properties themselves, generating income through the collection of rent or they may invest in mortgages or mortgage securities tied to the properties, helping to finance the properties and generating interest income.”

While REITs typically own real estate, investors in REITs do not.  REITs are paper assets that represent interest in a company that owns and operates income producing properties.  In essence they are real estate flavored stock.  As such, REITs are generally highly correlated with the stock market.

***

https://www.sgobserver.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/Screen-Shot-2018-08-26-at-8.41.54-pm.png

***

TERMINOLOGY

When discussing REITs, you encounter the following terminology – public, private, traded, and non-traded.  Public REITs can be designated as non-traded or traded depending on whether or not they are traded on a stock exchange.

Since traded REITs are traded on the stock exchange, they enjoy a high degree of liquidity just like any other stock.  Unfortunately, traded REITs tend to follow the economic cycles and can closely correlate with the stock market.  This can lead to a higher degree of volatility than what is usually seen with physical real estate.  Additionally, they do not afford the investor the tax-advantages that come with investments in physical real estate.

MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2017/11/15/on-non-traded-real-estate-investment-trusts-reits/

Private REITs and non-traded public REITs are not traded on an exchange.  These are usually offered to accredited investors through broker-dealer networks.  These REITs are illiquid and generally have high fees.  They have been plagued with transparency issues as well as conflicts of interest.  Valuation of this stock is difficult and can be misleading to the investor.  Due diligence is very important as the quality of non-traded REITs can vary widely.

MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2014/06/13/why-i-hate-non-publicly-traded-reits/

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts and comments are appreciated.

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors : Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™ book cover

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Risk-Management-Liability-Insurance-and-Asset-Protection-Strategies-for/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781498725989

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

THANK YOU

***

Financing LONG-TERM CARE Needs?

AGING AND RETIREMENT

Long-term care (LTC) may not be the first thing individuals or couples think about as they approach retirement, but the costs for those who needs it can disrupt and derail retirement security. A good plan for long-term care requires many decisions over an extended period of time, and well before retirement.

In this article, Milliman consultant Robert Eaton discusses the major considerations and options for financing LTC needs in retirement.

***

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

THANK YOU

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER: https://www.routledge.com/Risk-Management-Liability-Insurance-and-Asset-Protection-Strategies-for/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781498725989

***

What is Corporate “BOOK VALUE” & “PAR VALUE”?

TWO INVESTING DIFFERENCES = TWO QUICK THOUGHTS

BY DR. DAVID EDWARD MARCINKO MBA CMP®

CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

BOOK-VALUE: Cost of capital assets minus accumulated depreciation for a healthcare [corporation], or other organization.

The net asset value of a [healthcare] companies common stock. This is calculated by dividing the net tangible assets of the company (minus the par value of any preferred stock the company has) by the number of common shares outstanding.

****

PAR VALUE: For common stock, the value on the books of the corporation. It has little to do with market value or even the original price of shares at first issuance.

The difference between par and the price at first issuance is carried on the books of a corporation as “paid-in capital” or “capital surplus.”

***

See the source image

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

THANK YOU

***

Invite Professor Marcinko to Your Next Seminar or Event

See You Soon

CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Colleagues know that I enjoy personal coaching and public speaking and give as many talks each year as possible, at a variety of medical society and financial services conferences around the country and world. All in a Corona safe environment.

Avatar of Dr. Marcinko Speaking as MSL

These include lectures and visiting professorships at major academic centers, keynote lectures for hospitals, economic seminars and health systems, end-note lectures at city and statewide financial coalitions, and annual lectures for a variety of internal yearly meetings.

LIVE or PODCAST enabled, as well.

Topics Link: imba-inc-firm-services

Teleconference: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2020/10/14/me-marcinko-and-my-avatar/

My Fond Farewell to Tuskegee University

And so, we appreciate your consideration.

Invite Dr. Marcinko

CONTACT: ANN MILLER RN MHA CMP®

[ME-P Executive-Director]

PH: 770-448-0769

EM: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

THANK YOU

***

FORM ADV is a Must Read for Selecting a Financial “Advisor”

Form ADV – The Essential Document

Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA - WEGO Health Awards Nominee

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP©

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

CMP logo

Under law, financial advisors and planners must provide you with a form ADV Part II or a brochure that covers the same information.  Even if a brochure is provided, ask for the ADV.  While it is acceptable, even desirable, for the brochure to be easier to read than the ADV, the ADV is what is filed with the appropriate state or SEC.  If the brochure reads more like a slick sales brochure or the information in the brochure glosses over the items on the ADV to a high degree, one should consider eliminating the advisor from consideration.

FIDUCIARY: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2020/06/15/the-new-fiduciary-rule/

Registering with a state or SEC gives an advisor a fiduciary duty to the client.  This is a high standard under the law. 

There are several types of advisors who are exempt from registering and filing an ADV. 

First, there are registered representatives (brokers).  Brokers have a fiduciary responsibility to their firms regardless of whether they are statutory employees or independent contractors. Not the client.

Second are attorneys and accountants whose advice is “incidental” to their legal or accounting practices. But, why would one hire someone whose advice is “incidental” to his primary profession?  A top-notch advisor is a full-time professional and should be registered.  One should insist that their advisor be registered.

CFP: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2016/11/18/why-we-cannot-assume-cfp-equals-fiduciary/

The ADV will describe the advisor’s background and employment history, including any prior disciplinary issues.  It will describe the ownership of the firm and outline how the firm and advisor are compensated.  Any referral arrangements will be described.  If an advisor has an interest in any of the investments to be recommended, it must be listed as well as the fee schedule.  There is also a description of the types of investments recommended and the types of research information that is used.

ASSESSMENT: A review of the ADV should result in an alignment of what the advisor said during the interview and what is filed with the regulators.  If there is a clear discrepancy, choose another advisor.  If it is unclear, discuss the issue with the advisor.

Your thoughts and comments are appreciated.

Form ADV | Moneygrow.com | Registered Investment Advisor ...

SEC Headquarters
100 F Street, NE
Washington, DC 20549
(202) 942-8088

TEXTBOOK ORDER: ORDER Textbook: https://www.amazon.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-Advisors/dp/1482240289/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418580820&sr=8-1&keywords=david+marcinko

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

SECOND OPINIONS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

THANK YOU

***

OVER HEARD IN THE FINANCIAL ADVISOR’S LOUNGE

center

“TAKE THE FIDUCIARY PLEDGE”

FINANCIAL ADVISORS LOUNGE AT iMBA, Inc.

CMP logo

SPONSORED: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

DEFINITION: A fiduciary is a person who holds a legal or ethical relationship of trust with one or more other parties (person or group of persons).

Typically, a fiduciary prudently takes care of money or other assets for another person. One party, for example, a corporate trust company or the trust department of a bank, acts in a fiduciary capacity to another party, who, for example, has entrusted funds to the fiduciary for safekeeping or investment. Likewise, financial advisers, financial planners, and asset managers, including managers of pension plans, endowments, and other tax-exempt assets, are considered fiduciaries under applicable statutes and laws.

In a fiduciary relationship, one person, in a position of vulnerability, justifiably vests confidence, good faith, reliance, and trust in another whose aid, advice, or protection is sought in some matter. In such a relation good conscience requires the fiduciary to act at all times for the sole benefit and interest of the one who trusts.

CITATION: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

See the source image

[Fiduciary Pledge]*

I, the undersigned, ___________________________ (“financial advisor”), pledge to always put the best interests of _______________________________ (“client”) first, no matter what.

As such, I will disclose in writing the following material facts and any conflicts of interest (actual and/or perceived) that may arise in our business relationship:

  • All commission, fees, loads, and expenses, in advance, client will pay as a result of my advice and recommendations;
  • All commission and commissions I receive as a result of my advice and recommendations;
  • The maximum fee discount allowed by my firm and the largest fee discount I give to other customers;
  • The fee discount client is receiving;
  • Any recruitment bonuses and other recruitment compensation I have or will receive from my firm;
  • Fees I paid to others for the referral of client to me;
  • Fees I have or will receive for referring client to any third-parties; and
  • Any other financial conflicts of interest that could reasonably compromise the impartiality of my advice and recommendations.

Jeff Kuest MBA CFA CFP®

[CounterPoint Capital Advisors]

*© 2011-2015. All rights reserved. Courtesy permission with personal communication from Jeff Kuest, MBA, CFA, CFP®

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

THANK YOU

***

Join the ME-P and Become a CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER™

ADVERTISEMENT

Sponsored by: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Join Our Mailing List

As a medical professional, are you looking for ways to make your practice more profitable and boost your efficiency?

Or, as a financial advisor to doctors, are you looking to develop deeper relationships of knowledge and trust with your physician clients?

We can help!

Well, look no more! We can help. Designed with both advisors and physicians’ needs in mind, the ME-P website is filled with practical advice on the most-requested topics. Join us by subscribing so you can read about practice management and physician focused financial planning, and network with your fellow physicians and FAs. You don’t even have to leave the office!

More than 50 topics

  • The ABCs of RVUs
  • Hospital/Practice Integration
  • Employment Contracts
  • eHR Incentives are Here
  • How Health Reform Will Affect You
  • 5010 Transaction Standards
  • Malpractice and liability
  • Fiduciary standards
  • Financial advisors versus planners
  • SEC and FINRA rules and regulations
  • Health economics, finance and insurance
  • Medical business models
  • ACA, and so much more!

Enter the Certified Medical Planners

A Working-White Paper:

Enter the CMPs

Assessment

Get all the benefits of a personal consultant without the hassle and expense of traveling. Subscribe today. Read posts and comment on more than 50 topical channels addressing the hottest topics in medical practice and financial management today.

CMP.Candidate.Welcome

Link: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Product DetailsProduct DetailsProduct Details

Product Details  Product Details

   Product Details 

***

[PHYSICIAN FOCUSED FINANCIAL PLANNING AND RISK MANAGEMENT COMPANION TEXTBOOK SET]

  Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

***

Preferred VERSUS Common Stock?

Is there a Difference?

What is the Difference?

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is dem-at-wharton1.jpg

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

CMP logo

SPONSORED: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

A common stock is the least senior of securities issued by a company. 

A preferred stock, in contrast, is slightly more senior to common stock, since dividends owed to the preferred stockholders should be paid before distributions are made to common stockholders. 

However, distributions to preferred stockholders are limited to the level outlined in the preferred stock agreement (i.e., the stated dividend payments).  Like a fixed income security, preferred stocks have a specific periodic payment that is either a fixed dollar amount or an amount adjusted based upon short-term market interest rates. 

However, unlike fixed income securities, preferred stocks typically do not have a specific maturity date and preferred stock dividend payments are made from the corporation’s after tax income rather than its pre-tax income.  Likewise, dividends paid to preferred stockholders are considered income distributions to the company’s equity owners rather than creditors, so the issuing corporation does not have the same requirement to make dividend distributions to preferred stockholders. 

So, preferred stock is generally referred to as a “hybrid” security, since it has elements similar to both fixed income securities (i.e., a stated periodic payments) and equity securities (i.e., shareholders are considered owners of the issuing company rather than creditors). 

Convertible preferred stocks (and convertible corporate bonds) are also considered hybrid securities since they have both equity and fixed income characteristics.   A convertible security whether a preferred stock or a corporate bond, generally includes a provision that allow the security to be exchanged for a given number of common stock shares in the issuing corporation. The holder of a convertible security essentially owns both the preferred stock (or the corporate bond) and an option to exchange the preferred stock (or corporate bond) for shares of common stock in the company. 

ASSESSMENT: Thus, at times the convertible security may behave more like the issuing company’s common stock than it does the issuing company’s preferred stock (or corporate bonds), depending upon how close the common stock’s market price is to the designated conversion price of the convertible security.

CITATION: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Your thoughts are appreciated.    

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER Textbook: https://www.amazon.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-Advisors/dp/1482240289/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418580820&sr=8-1&keywords=david+marcinko

SECOND OPINIONS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

THANK YOU

***

%d bloggers like this: