Determining Your [PHYSICIAN] Retirement Vision?

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Determining Your Retirement Vision

Dr David E Marcinko MBABy Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

There’s an aspect to retirement that many physicians do not plan for … the transition from work and practice to retirement. Your work has been an important part of your life.  That’s why the emotional adjustments of retirement may be some of the most difficult ones.

Examples:

For example, what would you like to do in retirement? Your retirement vision will be unique to you. You are retiring to something not from something that you envisioned. When you have more time, you would like to do more travelling, play golf or visit more often, family and friends. Would you relocate closer to your kids? Learn a new art or take a new class? Fund your grandchildren’s education? Do you have philanthropic goals? Perhaps you would like to help your church, school or favorite charity? If your net worth is above certain limits, it would be wise to take a serious look at these goals. With proper planning, there might be some tax benefits too. Then you have to figure how much each goal is going to cost you.

Lists

If have a list of retirement goals, you need to prioritize which goal is most important. You can rate them on a scale of 1 to 10; 10 being the most important. Then, you can differentiate between wants and needs. Needs are things that are absolutely necessary for you to retire; while wants are things that still allow retirement but would just be nice to have.

Recent studies indicate there are three phases in retirement, each with a different spending pattern [Richard Greenberg CFP®, Gardena CA, personal communication].

The three phases are:

  1. The Early Retirement Years. There is a pent-up demand to take advantage of all the free time retirement affords. You can travel to exotic places, buy an RV and explore forty-nine states, go on month-long sailing vacations. It’s possible during these years that after-tax expenses increase during these initial years, especially if the mortgage hasn’t been paid off yet. Usually the early years last about ten years until most retirees are in their 70’s.
  2. Middle Years. People decide to slow down on the exploration. This is when people start simplifying their life. They may sell their house and downsize to a condo or townhouse. They may relocate to an area they discovered during their travels, or to an area close to family and friends, to an area with a warm climate or to an area with low or no state taxes. People also do their most important estate planning during these years. They are concerned about leaving a legacy, taking care of their children and grandchildren and fulfilling charitable intent. This a time when people spend more time in the local area. They may start taking extension or college classes. They spend more time volunteering at various non-profits and helping out older and less healthy retirees. People often spend less during these years. This period starts when a retiree is in his or her mid to late 70’s and can last up to 20 years, usually to mid to late-80’s.
  3. Late Years. This is when you may need assistance in our daily activities. You may receive care at home, in a nursing home or an assisted care facility. Most of the care options are very expensive. It’s possible that these years might be more expensive than your pre-retirement expenses. This is especially true if both spouses need some sort of assisted care. This period usually starts when the retiree is their 80’s; however they can sometimes start in the middle to the late 70’s.

[A] Planning issues – early career

Most retirement lifestyle issues do not have to be addressed at this point. Keeping a healthy, balanced lifestyle will help to ensure a more productive retirement.  This is the time to focus on the financial aspects of retirement planning.

[B] Planning issues – mid career

If early retirement is a major objective, start thinking about activities that will fill up your time during retirement. Maintaining your health is more critical, since your health habits at this time will often dictate how healthy you will be in retirement. 

[C] Planning issues – late career

Three to five years before you retire, start making the transition from work to retirement.

  1. Try out different hobbies;
  2. Find activities that will give you a purpose in retirement;
  3. Establish friendships outside of the office or hospital;
  4. Discuss retirement plans with your spouse.
  5. If you plan to relocate to a new place, it is important to rent a place in that area and stay for few months and see if you like it. Making a drastic change like relocating and then finding you don’t like the new town or state might be very costly mistake. The key is to gradually make the transition. 

Conclusion

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OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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A.I. Examiners and the CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER® Professional Designation Program

Artificial Intelligence and “Robo-Examiners” Let Adult-Learners and Students Take Control of their Career Education and On-Line Matriculation

Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®
[Academic Dean and CEO: Institute of Medical Business Advisors, Inc]

Enter the CMPs

[Course Curriculum]

The concept of a self-taught and student motivated, but automated outcomes driven classroom may seem like a nightmare scenario for those who are not comfortable with computers. Now everyone can breathe a sigh of relief, because the Institute of Medical Business Advisors just launched an “automated” final examination review protocol that requires no programming skill whatsoever.

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In fact, everything is designed to be very simple and easy to use. Once a student’s examination “blue-book” is received, computerized “robotic reviewers” correct student assignments and quarterly test answers. This automated examination model lets the robots correct tests and exams, while the students concentrate on guided self-learning.

Get a robo advisor on board to help with your investment ...

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Assessment

According to Eugene Schmuckler PhD MBA MEd, Academic Provost of the CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER® professional designation and certification program,

“This option allows the modern adult-learner save both time and money as s/he progresses toward the ultimate goal of board certification as a CMP® mark holder.”

The trend is growing and iMBA, Inc., is leading the way.

COURSE TEXTBOOKS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/04/29/why-are-certified-medical-planner-textbooks-so-darn-popular/

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EM: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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The BUSINESS of Medical Practice

“NO MARGIN – NO MISSION”

Within Reason

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BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

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PROFESSIONAL DESIGNATION: Certified Medical Planner™

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Can Doctors Afford to Retire Early – TODAY?

By Staff Reporters

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You’ve got a sense of your ideal retirement age. And you’ve probably made certain plans based on that timeline. But what if you’re forced to retire sooner than you expect? Aging baby-boomers, corporate medicine, the medical practice great resignation and/or the pandemic, etc?

RESIGNATION: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/12/12/healthcare-industry-hit-with-the-great-resignation-retirement/

Early retirement is nothing new, but it’s clear how much the COVID-19 pandemic has affected an aging workforce. Whether due to downsizing, objections to vaccine mandates, concerns about exposure risks, other health issues, or the desire for more leisure time, the retired general population grew by 3.5 million over the past two years—compared to an annual average of 1 million between 2008 and 2019—according to the Pew Research Center.1 At the same time, a survey conducted by the National Institute on Retirement Security revealed that more than half of Americans are concerned that the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted their ability to achieve a secure retirement.2

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There’s no need to panic, but those numbers make one thing clear, says Rob Williams, managing director of financial planning, retirement income, and wealth management for the Schwab Center for Financial Research. Flexible and personalized financial planning that addresses how you’d cope if you had to retire early can help you make the best use of all your resources. 

So – Here are six steps to follow. We’ll use as an example a person who’s seeing if they could retire five years early, but the steps remain the same regardless of your individual time frame.

Step 1: Think strategically about pension and Social Security benefits

For most retirees, Social Security and (to a lesser degree) pensions are the two primary sources of regular income in retirement. You usually can collect these payments early—at age 62 for Social Security and sometimes as early as age 55 with a pension. However, taking benefits early will mean that you get smaller monthly benefits for the rest of your life. That can matter to your bottom line, even if you expect Social Security to be merely the icing on your retirement cake.

On the Social Security website, you can find a projection of what your benefits would be if you were pushed to claim them several years early. But if you’re part of a two-income couple, you may want to make an appointment at a Social Security office or with a financial professional to weigh the potential options.

For example, when you die, your spouse is eligible to receive your monthly benefit if it’s higher than his or her own. But if you claim your benefits early, thus receiving a reduced amount, you’re likewise limiting your spouse’s potential survivor benefit.

If you have a pension, your employer’s pension administrator can help estimate your monthly pension payments at various ages. Once you have these estimates, you’ll have a good idea of how much monthly income you can count on at any given point in time.

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Step 2: Pressure-test your 401(k)

In addition to weighing different strategies to maximize your Social Security and/or pension, evaluate how much income you could potentially derive from your personal retirement savings—and there’s a silver lining here if you’re forced to retire early. 

Rule of 55

Let’s say you leave your job at any time during or after the calendar year you turn 55 (or age 50 if you’re a public safety employee with a government defined-benefit plan). Under a little-known separation-of-service provision, often referred to as the “rule of 55,” you may be able take distributions (though some plans may allow only one lump-sum withdrawal) from your 401(k), 403(b), or other qualified retirement plan free of the usual 10% early-withdrawal penalties. However, be aware that you’ll still owe ordinary income taxes on the amount distributed. 

This exception applies only to the plan (including any consolidated accounts) that you were contributing to when you separated from service. It does not extend to IRAs. 

4% rule

There’s also a simple rule of thumb suggesting that if you spend 4% or less of your savings in your first year of retirement and then adjust for inflation each year following, your savings are likely to last for at least 30 years—given that you make no other changes to your withdrawals, such as a lump sum withdrawal for a one-time expense or a slight reduction in withdrawals during a down market. 

To see how much monthly income you could count on if you retired as expected in five years, multiply your current savings by 4% and divide by 12. For example, $1 million x .04 = $40,000. Divide that by 12 to get $3,333 per month in year one of retirement. (Again, you could increase that amount with inflation each year thereafter.) Then do the same calculation based on your current savings to see how much you’d have to live on if you retired today. Keep in mind that your money will have to last five years longer in this instance.

Knowing the monthly amount your current savings can generate will give you a clearer sense of whether you’ll have a shortfall—and how large or small it might be. Use our retirement savings calculator to test different saving amounts and time frames.

Step 3: Don’t forget about health insurance, doctor!

Nobody wants to spend down a big chunk of their retirement savings on unanticipated healthcare costs in the years between early retirement and Medicare eligibility at age 65. If you lose your employer-sponsored health insurance, you’ll want to find some coverage until you can apply for Medicare. 

Your options may include continuing employer-sponsored coverage through COBRA, insurance enrollment through the Health Insurance Marketplace at HealthCare.gov, or joining your spouse’s health insurance plan. You may also find discounted coverage through organizations you belong to—for example, the AARP. 

Step 4: Create a post-retirement budget

To make sure your retirement savings will cover your expenses, add up the monthly income you could get from pensions, Social Security, and your savings. Then, compare the total to your anticipated monthly expenses (including income taxes) if you were to retire five years early and are eligible, and choose to file, for Social Security and pension benefits earlier. 

Take into account various life events and expenditures you may encounter. You may not pay off your mortgage by the date you’d planned. Your spouse might still be working (which can add income but also prolong certain expenses). Or your children might not be out of college yet. 

You’re probably fine if you anticipate that your monthly expenses will be lower than your income. But if you think your expenses would be higher than your early-retirement income, some suggest that you take one or more of these measures:

  • Retire later; practice longer.
  • Save more now to fill some of the potential gap.
  • Trim your budget so there’s less of a gap down the road.
  • Consider options for medical consulting or part-time work—and begin to explore some of those opportunities now.

To the last point, finding a physician job later in life can be challenging, but certain employment agencies specialize in this area. If you can find work you like that covers a portion of your expenses, you’ll have the option of delaying Social Security and your company pension to get higher payments later—and you can avoid dipping into your retirement savings prematurely. 

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Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER: https://www.routledge.com/Risk-Management-Liability-Insurance-and-Asset-Protection-Strategies-for/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781498725989

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Step 5: Protect your portfolio

When you retire early, you have to walk a fine line with your portfolio’s asset allocation—investing aggressively enough that your money has the potential to grow over a long retirement, but also conservatively enough to minimize the chance of big losses, particularly at the outset.

“Risk management is especially important during the first few years of retirement or if you retire early,” Rob notes, because it can be difficult to bounce back from a loss when you’re drawing down income from your portfolio and reducing the overall number of shares you own.  

To strike a balance between growth and security, start by making sure you have enough money stashed in relatively liquid, relatively stable investments—such as money market accounts, CDs, or high-quality short-term bonds—to cover at least a year or two of living expenses. Divide the rest of your portfolio among stocks, bonds, and other fixed-income investments. And don’t hesitate to seek professional help to arrive at the right mix. 

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Many people are unaccustomed to thinking about their expenses because they simply spend what they make when working, Rob says. But one of the most valuable decisions you can make about your life in retirement is to reevaluate where your money is going now.

This serves two aims. First, it’s a reality check on the spending plan you’ve envisioned for retirement, which may be idealized (e.g., “I’ll do all the home maintenance and repairs!”). Second, it enables you to adjust your spending habits ahead of schedule—whichever schedule you end up following. This gives you more control and potentially more income. 

Step 6: Reevaluate your current spending

For example, if you’re not averse to downsizing, moving to a less expensive home could reduce your monthly mortgage, property tax, and insurance payments while freeing up equity that could also be invested to provide additional monthly income.

“When you are saving for retirement, time is on your side”. You lose that advantage when you’re forced to retire early, but having a backup plan that anticipates the possibility of an early retirement can make the unknowns you face a lot less daunting.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/082610254

References:

1Richard Fry, “Amid the Pandemic, A Rising Share Of Older U.S. Adults Are Now Retired”, Pew Research Center, 11/04/2021, https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/11/04/amid-the-pandemic-a-rising-share-of-older-u-s-adults-are-now-retired/.

2Tyler Bond, Don Doonan and Kelly Kenneally, “Retirement Insecurity 2021: Americans’ Views of Retirement”, Nirsonline.Org, 02/2021, https://www.nirsonline.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/FINAL-Retirement-Insecurity-2021-.pdf.

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Financial Ratio Liquidity Analysis for Medical Accounts Receivable

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Understanding Vital Balance Sheet and Income Statement Components

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™

By Dr. Gary L. Bode; MSA, CPA, CMP™ [Hon]

Dr. Gary L. Bode CPA MSAFinancial ratios are derived from components of the balance sheet and income statement. These short and long-term financial ratio values are “benchmarked” to values obtained in medical practice management surveys that become industry standards. Often they become de facto economic indicators of entity viability, and should be monitored by all financial executives regularly.

Defining Terms

One of the most useful liquidity ratiosrelated to ARs is the current ratio. It is mathematically defined as: current assets/current liabilities. The current ratio is important since it measures short-term solvency, or the daily bill-paying ability of a medical practice, clinic  or hospital; etc.  Current assets include cash on hand (COH), and cash in checking accounts, money market accounts, money market deposit accounts, US Treasury bills, inventory, pre-paid expenses, and the percentage of ARs that can be reasonably expected to be collected. Current liabilitiesare notes payable within one year. This ratio should be at least 1, or preferably in the range of about 1.2 to 1.8 for medical practices.

Other Ratios

The quick ratiois similar to the current ratio. However, unlike the current ratio, the quick ratio does not include money tied up in inventory, since rapid conversion to cash might not be possible in an economic emergency. A reasonable quick ratio would be 1.0 – 1.3 for a hospital, since this ratio is a more stringent indicator of liquidity than the current ratio.

Assessment

A point of emphasis in the case of both the current ratio and the quick ratio is that higher is not necessarily better. Higher ratios denote a greater capacity to pay bills as they come due, but they also indicate that the entity has more cash tied up in assets that have a relatively low rate of earnings. Hence, there is an optimum range for both ratios: they should be neither too low nor too high.

Conclusion

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FINANCE: Financial Planning for Physicians and Advisors
INSURANCE: Risk Management and Insurance Strategies for Physicians and Advisors

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Professor VERSUS Entrepreneur

Teaching / Educating

Bill Hennessey, M.D.

Bill Hennessey, M.D.

CEO at Pratter, Inc.

As a teacher educating is your job. It’s what you enjoy. There’s a fairly lax time schedule and resources are already built in the equation. Little accountability because the ultimate burden and measure of success is placed on the student to pass a test. If they don’t do well, it’s the student not directly the teacher who pays the price.

Now, I work with first year students who don’t know what a red blood cell looks like (biconcave disc, you thought I forgot, didn’t you) all the way to a chief resident who can probably do some surgeries better than me. It’s my job to take that first year student and turn them into a chief resident.

As an entrepreneur with limited resources, time, and energy, you don’t have the luxury to continuously teach, develop, and convince. You need people who simply get it especially in strategic positions. You don’t have the luxury of time or resources. You also are directly accountable if they don’t understand because you have a burn rate that probably just got worse. So how much “oxygen” do you allocate when trying to build your team?

Different story for Apple, Boeing and others that can create academies and educational tracks to teach and develop internally.

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

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The FIDUCIARY OATH for “Financial Advisors”

“Will you sign a fiduciary oath?”

PHYSICIAN COLLEAGUES AND MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS ASK

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

CMP

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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“SIGN IT -OR- FORGET IT”

Asking a “Financial Advisor” if they’re a fiduciary isn’t always enough to hire them. People can “ice skate” around that terminology and give fuzzy or unclear answers to that question. Instead, you may consider asking them to sign a fiduciary oath.

“If someone is fee-only, not “fee-based”, they shouldn’t have a problem signing a document stating how they get compensated.” “If someone is, for example, a broker dealer, insurance agent or investment advisor who works on commissions, they probably wouldn’t be allowed to sign it.” Just say NOT to contract arbitration clauses, too! As well as “Dual Registration”. Remember Bernie Lawrence Madoff.

THE FIDUCIARY OATH

This one-page document outlines five fiduciary principles a financial adviser must follow to put the client’s interests ahead of their own. They include acting with prudence, not misleading the client, avoiding conflicts of interest, and disclosing and managing unavoidable conflicts.

The oath, meant to be printed out and signed by an adviser, has been around for several years. But recent events, such as the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals striking down the DOL rule, have increased the urgency to get it into circulation.

“With the 5th Circuit ruling, it is just so important to have this oath out there because it states fiduciary principles,” said Ms. P. Houlihan, president of Houlihan Financial Resource Group. “The oath is the answer, given that the DOL rule is gone.”

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;,nbv

 fiduciaryoath_individual

Conclusion

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Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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3 FINANCIAL SLANG “T” Terms

DEFINITIONS Physician-Investors Need to Know

By. Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

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Trading AheadUnethical and illegal trading by specialists or market makers.
A specialist may buy a stock for themselves from Dr. John Q. Public even though a better price is available from another seller. The specialist can view bid and ask prices and then manually mis-match them, or see ahead to a less favorable price. It happens in this editor’s experience, by observing how long it takes for a stop order to execute after the stop price was reached.
This practice is a form of shimming.
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Trading ImbalanceA situation where a large block of stock is put up for sale, but not enough buyers are available for purchase, and a market maker is unable to buy the imbalance. Lightly traded and tightly held stocks are considered temporarily illiquid during such imbalances.
On occasion, a trading halt is put into place until enough buyers are available to purchase the deficit. On rare occasion, a handful of buyers can buy the stock at a huge discount if the stock was not halted during the imbalance.
On the New York Stock Exchange, large stocks usually have a “delayed open” for such imbalances, as a trading specialist will fill the order by lining up buyers for the block, and then open trading for the stock for the day.
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Triple Witching HourThe final hour of trading on a Friday when stock index futures, stock index options, and stock options all expire. This happens on the third Friday in March, June, September, and December. See Quadruple Witching Hour.
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CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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Business Plan for Creatives … and Doctors!

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A Detailed Plan for Medical Professionals

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP

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MBA Business Plan CAPSTONE Outline

PODCAST Transcript: Podcast

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, urls and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

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FINANCIAL PLANNING: Strategies for Doctors and their Advisors

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BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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REVIEWS:

Written by doctors and healthcare professionals, this textbook should be mandatory reading for all medical school students—highly recommended for both young and veteran physicians—and an eliminating factor for any financial advisor who has not read it. The book uses jargon like ‘innovative,’ ‘transformational,’ and ‘disruptive’—all rightly so! It is the type of definitive financial lifestyle planning book we often seek, but seldom find.
LeRoy Howard MA CMPTM,Candidate and Financial Advisor, Fayetteville, North Carolina

I taught diagnostic radiology for over a decade. The physician-focused niche information, balanced perspectives, and insider industry transparency in this book may help save your financial life.
Dr. William P. Scherer MS, Barry University, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

This book was crafted in response to the frustration felt by doctors who dealt with top financial, brokerage, and accounting firms. These non-fiduciary behemoths often prescribed costly wholesale solutions that were applicable to all, but customized for few, despite ever-changing needs. It is a must-read to learn why brokerage sales pitches or Internet resources will never replace the knowledge and deep advice of a physician-focused financial advisor, medical consultant, or collegial Certified Medical Planner™ financial professional.
—Parin Khotari MBA,Whitman School of Management, Syracuse University, New York

In today’s healthcare environment, in order for providers to survive, they need to understand their current and future market trends, finances, operations, and impact of federal and state regulations. As a healthcare consulting professional for over 30 years supporting both the private and public sector, I recommend that providers understand and utilize the wealth of knowledge that is being conveyed in these chapters. Without this guidance providers will have a hard time navigating the supporting system which may impact their future revenue stream. I strongly endorse the contents of this book.
—Carol S. Miller BSN MBA PMP,President, Miller Consulting Group, ACT IAC Executive Committee Vice-Chair at-Large, HIMSS NCA Board Member

This is an excellent book on financial planning for physicians and health professionals. It is all inclusive yet very easy to read with much valuable information. And, I have been expanding my business knowledge with all of Dr. Marcinko’s prior books. I highly recommend this one, too. It is a fine educational tool for all doctors.
—Dr. David B. Lumsden MD MS MA,Orthopedic Surgeon, Baltimore, Maryland

There is no other comprehensive book like it to help doctors, nurses, and other medical providers accumulate and preserve the wealth that their years of education and hard work have earned them.
—Dr. Jason Dyken MD MBA,Dyken Wealth Strategies, Gulf Shores, Alabama

I plan to give a copy of this book written
by doctors and for doctors’ to all my prospects, physician, and nurse clients. It may be the definitive text on this important topic.
—Alexander Naruska CPA,Orlando, Florida

Health professionals are small business owners who need to apply their self-discipline tactics in establishing and operating successful practices. Talented trainees are leaving the medical profession because they fail to balance the cost of attendance against a realistic business and financial plan. Principles like budgeting, saving, and living below one’s means, in order to make future investments for future growth, asset protection, and retirement possible are often lacking. This textbook guides the medical professional in his/her financial planning life journey from start to finish. It ranks a place in all medical school libraries and on each of our bookshelves.
—Dr. Thomas M. DeLauro DPM,Professor and Chairman – Division of Medical Sciences, New York College of Podiatric Medicine

Physicians are notoriously excellent at diagnosing and treating medical conditions. However, they are also notoriously deficient in managing the business aspects of their medical practices. Most will earn $20-30 million in their medical lifetime, but few know how to create wealth for themselves and their families. This book will help fill the void in physicians’ financial education. I have two recommendations: 1) every physician, young and old, should read this book; and 2) read it a second time!
—Dr. Neil Baum MD,Clinical Associate Professor of Urology, Tulane Medical School, New Orleans, Louisiana

I worked with a Certified Medical Planner™ on several occasions in the past, and will do so again in the future. This book codified the vast body of knowledge that helped in all facets of my financial life and professional medical practice.
Dr. James E. Williams DABPS, Foot and Ankle Surgeon, Conyers, Georgia

This is a constantly changing field for rules, regulations, taxes, insurance, compliance, and investments. This book assists readers, and their financial advisors, in keeping up with what’s going on in the healthcare field that all doctors need to know.
Patricia Raskob CFP® EA ATA, Raskob Kambourian Financial Advisors, Tucson, Arizona

I particularly enjoyed reading the specific examples in this book which pointed out the perils of risk … something with which I am too familiar and have learned (the hard way) to avoid like the Black Death. It is a pleasure to come across this kind of wisdom, in print, that other colleagues may learn before it’s too late— many, many years down the road.
Dr. Robert S. Park MD, Robert Park and Associates Insurance, Seattle, Washington

Although this book targets physicians, I was pleased to see that it also addressed the financial planning and employment benefit needs of nurses; physical, respiratory, and occupational therapists; CRNAs, hospitalists, and other members of the health care team….highly readable, practical, and understandable.
Nurse Cecelia T. Perez RN, Hospital Operating Room Manager, Ellicott City, Maryland

Personal financial success in the PP-ACA era will be more difficult to achieve than ever before. It requires the next generation of doctors to rethink frugality, delay gratification, and redefine the very definition of success and work–life balance. And, they will surely need the subject matter medical specificity and new-wave professional guidance offered in this book. This book is a ‘must-read’ for all health care professionals, and their financial advisors, who wish to take an active role in creating a new subset of informed and pioneering professionals known as Certified Medical Planners™.
—Dr. Mark D. Dollard FACFAS, Private Practice, Tyson Corner, Virginia

As healthcare professionals, it is our Hippocratic duty to avoid preventable harm by paying attention. On the other hand, some of us are guilty of being reckless with our own financial health—delaying serious consideration of investments, taxation, retirement income, estate planning, and inheritances until the worry keeps one awake at night. So, if you have avoided planning for the future for far too long, perhaps it is time to take that first step toward preparedness. This in-depth textbook is an excellent starting point—not only because of its readability, but because of his team’s expertise and thoroughness in addressing the intricacies of modern investments—and from the point of view of not only gifted financial experts, but as healthcare providers, as well … a rare combination.
Dr. Darrell K. Pruitt DDS, Private Practice Dentist, Fort Worth, Texas

This text should be on the bookshelf of all contemporary physicians. The book is physician-focused with unique topics applicable to all medical professionals. But, it also offers helpful insights into the new tax and estate laws, fiduciary accountability for advisors and insurance agents, with investing, asset protection and risk management, and retirement planning strategies with updates for the brave new world of global payments of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Starting out by encouraging readers to examine their personal ‘money blueprint’ beliefs and habits, the book is divided into four sections offering holistic life cycle financial information and economic education directed to new, mid-career, and mature physicians.

This structure permits one to dip into the book based on personal need to find relief, rather than to overwhelm. Given the complexity of modern domestic healthcare, and the daunting challenges faced by physicians who try to stay abreast of clinical medicine and the ever-evolving laws of personal finance, this textbook could not have come at a better time.
—Dr. Philippa Kennealy MD MPH, The Entrepreneurial MD, Los Angeles, California

Physicians have economic concerns unmatched by any other profession, arriving ten years late to the start of their earning years. This textbook goes to the core of how to level the playing field quickly, and efficaciously, by a new breed of dedicated Certified Medical Planners™. With physician-focused financial advice, each chapter is a building block to your financial fortress.
Thomas McKeon, MBA, Pharmaceutical Representative, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

An excellent resource … this textbook is written in a manner that provides physician practice owners with a comprehensive guide to financial planning and related topics for their professional practice in a way that is easily comprehended. The style in which it breaks down the intricacies of the current physician practice landscape makes it a ‘must-read’ for those physicians (and their advisors) practicing in the volatile era of healthcare reform.
—Robert James Cimasi, MHA ASA FRICS MCBA CVA CM&AA CMP™, CEO-Health Capital Consultants, LLC, St. Louis, Missouri

Rarely can one find a full compendium of information within a single source or text, but this book communicates the new financial realities we are forced to confront; it is full of opportunities for minimizing tax liability and maximizing income potential. We’re recommending it to all our medical practice management clients across the entire healthcare spectrum.
Alan Guinn, The Guinn Consultancy Group, Inc., Cookeville, Tennessee

Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP™ and his team take a seemingly endless stream of disparate concepts and integrate them into a simple, straightforward, and understandable path to success. And, he codifies them all into a step-by-step algorithm to more efficient investing, risk management, taxation, and enhanced retirement planning for doctors and nurses. His text is a vital read—and must execute—book for all healthcare professionals and physician-focused financial advisors.
Dr. O. Kent Mercado, JD, Private Practitioner and Attorney, Naperville, Illinois

Kudos. The editors and contributing authors have compiled the most comprehensive reference book for the medical community that has ever been attempted. As you review the chapters of interest and hone in on the most important concerns you may have, realize that the best minds have been harvested for you to plan well… Live well.
Martha J. Schilling; AAMS® CRPC® ETSC CSA, Shilling Group Advisors, LLC, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

I recommend this book to any physician or medical professional that desires an honest no-sales approach to understanding the financial planning and investing world. It is worthwhile to any financial advisor interested in this space, as well.
David K. Luke, MIM MS-PFP CMP™, Net Worth Advisory Group, Sandy, Utah

Although not a substitute for a formal business education, this book will help physicians navigate effectively through the hurdles of day-to-day financial decisions with the help of an accountant, financial and legal advisor. I highly recommend it and commend Dr. Marcinko and the Institute of Medical Business Advisors, Inc. on a job well done.
Ken Yeung MBA CMP™, Tseung Kwan O Hospital, Hong Kong

I’ve seen many ghost-written handbooks, paperbacks, and vanity-published manuals on this topic throughout my career in mental healthcare. Most were poorly written, opinionated, and cheaply produced self-aggrandizing marketing drivel for those agents selling commission-based financial products and expensive advisory services. So, I was pleasantly surprised with this comprehensive peer-reviewed academic textbook, complete with citations, case examples, and real-life integrated strategies by and for medical professionals. Although a bit late for my career, I recommend it highly to all my younger colleagues … It’s credibility and specificity stand alone.
Dr. Clarice Montgomery PhD MA,Retired Clinical Psychologist

In an industry known for one-size-fits-all templates and massively customized books, products, advice, and services, the extreme healthcare specificity of this text is both refreshing and comprehensive.
Dr. James Joseph Bartley, Columbus, Georgia

My brother was my office administrator and accountant. We both feel this is the most comprehensive textbook available on financial planning for healthcare providers.
Dr. Anthony Robert Naruska DC,Winter Park, Florida

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Happy NATIONAL DOCTOR’s Day 2022

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To all our valued physicians readers and subscribers

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You have always been the shield defending and healing patients in our communities. Now more than ever, you have become a guiding light through uncertainty as we navigate toward a brighter future.

This is our chance to thank you for your hard work and incredible impact!

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REAL ESTATE Investing for Physicians

SOME GUIDELINES FOR COLLEAGUES

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By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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According to Rick Kahler MS CFP® ChFC CCIM [www.KahlerFinancial.com] real estate is one of the largest asset classes in the world. The family home is the largest asset many middle-class Americans own. And, real estate makes up a significant portion of the net worth of many wealth accumulators. Directly owning real estate is not an investment for the faint of heart, the armchair investor, or the uneducated. Most wealth accumulators would do well to leave direct ownership of real estate to the pros and invest in real estate investment trusts (REITs) instead [personal communication].

Still, as we have seen, the lure of investing in a tangible asset like real estate is enticing for high risk tolerant physician-investors who need a sense of control and interaction with their investments. If you are among them, here are a few guidelines that may keep you on a profitable path.

1. Don’t attempt to purchase investment real estate without the help of a commercial real estate specialist who is a fiduciary bound to look out for your best interest. Engage a Certified Commercial Investment Member (CCIM) with years of training and experience in analyzing and acquiring investment real estate. To find a CCIM near you, go to http://www.ccim.com.

2. You will sign a disclosure agreement that will tell you who the Realtor represents. Be sure the Realtor you engage represents you and not the seller, both parties, or neither party.

3. Never trust the income and expense data provided by the seller’s Realtor. While a seller represented by a CCIM will have a greater chance of supplying you with accurate data, most will significantly understate expenses and overstate the capitalization rate. Selling Realtors often understate the average annual cost of repairs and maintenance. I estimate this annual expense at 10%.

4. Another often understated expense is management. Many owners manage their own properties, so the selling broker doesn’t include an estimate for management expenses. They should. Real estate doesn’t manage itself, ever. You will either need to hire professional management or do your own management (always a scary proposition). Even if you do it yourself, you have an opportunity cost of your time, so you must include a management fee in the expenses. Most small residential apartments and single-family homes will pay 10% of their rents to a manager.

5. You must verify all the costs presented to you by the seller’s Realtor. Demand copies of at least the last three and preferably five years of tax returns. Research items like utility bills, property taxes, legal fees, insurance costs and repairs, maintenance costs, replacement reserves, tax preparation and all management fees. As a rule of thumb, expenses will average 40% of rental income on average-aged properties where the tenants pay all utilities except water. Newer properties may have expenses as low as 35%, while older properties can be as high as 50%.

6. By subtracting the vacancy rate and stabilized expenses from the rent, you will find the net operating income. This is the income you will put in your pocket—assuming the property is paid for. By dividing the net operating income by the purchase price, you will find the return you will receive on your investment, called the capitalization or “cap” rate. In Rapid City SD, for example, the cap rate tends to be 4% for single-family homes, 5% to 8% for duplexes to eight-plexes, and 8% to 12% for larger residential and commercial properties.

Citation: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

ASSESSMENT: Yes, physician-investors and all of us can build wealth with real estate. You just need to educate yourself, work hard, start conservatively, think long-term, and be prepared for lean years. This is not a quick or easy path to riches.

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What is “Shelf Registration” for Securities?

What is “Shelf Registration” for Securities?

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP™

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

A relatively new method of registration under the Act of ’33 is known as shelf registration.

Under this rule, an issuer may register any amount of securities that, at the time the registration statement becomes effective, is reasonably expected to be offered and sold within two years of the initial effective date of the registration.

Once registered, the securities may be sold continuously or periodically within 2 years without any waiting period for a registration to clear issuers generally like shelf registration because of the flexibility it gives them to take advantage of changing market conditions.

https://www.crcpress.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

In addition, the legal, accounting, and printing costs involved in issuance are reduced, since a single registration statement suffices for multiple offerings within the 2 year period. In effect, what the issuer does is register securities that will meet its financing needs for the next 2 years.

It issues what it needs at the current time, and puts the balance on the “shelf” to be taken off the shelf as needed.

Conclusion:

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What is the SELLING AWAY of Securities?

Information All Physician Investors Should Know

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

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According to Wikipedia, selling away in the U.S. securities brokerage industry is the inappropriate practice of an investment professional who sells, or solicits the sale of, securities not held or offered by the brokerage firm with which he is associated.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

An example of the term expressed in a sentence is, “The broker was selling investments away from the firm.” Brokers marketing securities must have obtained the appropriate securities licenses for various types of investments. Brokers in the U.S. may be “associated” with one or more Brokerage firms and must obtain licenses by passing standardized Financial Industry Regulatory Authority exams such as the Series 6 or Series 7 exam.

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In the past I’ve held these as well as a Series 63 and 65 license [SEC].

CFI: https://corporatefinanceinstitute.com/resources/knowledge/trading-investing/selling-away/

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What are OTC “PINK” Sheets?

LOW PRICED “PENNY STOCKS?

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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Pink sheets are an over-the-counter (OTC) market that connects broker-dealers electronically. There is no trading floor and the quotations are also all done electronically. Since there is no central trading floor or stock exchange like the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), the pink sheet-listed companies do not have the same criteria to fulfill as the companies listed on national stock exchanges. Many stocks listed on the pink sheets are low-priced penny stocks that trade for under $5 a share.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Pink sheets got their name because the original pink sheets listing the stocks were actually printed and distributed on pink pieces of paper. Trading over-the-counter (OTC) refers to the process of how securities listed on the pink sheets are traded through a broker-dealer network.

MORE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OTC_Markets_Group

Pink Sheets | Explanation | Examples with Advantages and Disadvantages

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MEDICAL ETHICS: Managing Risk is a Component of Real Health Caring

Demanding High Moral Standards of Self … and Economic HEALTHCARE Organizations

Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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It has been argued that physicians have abdicated the “moral high ground” in health care by their interest in seeking protection for their high incomes, their highly publicized self-referral arrangements, and their historical opposition toward reform efforts that jeopardized their clinical autonomy. 

Experts Speak

In his book Medicine at the Crossroads, colleague and Emory University professor Melvin Konnor, MD noted that “throughout its history, organized medicine has represented, first and foremost, the pecuniary interests of doctors.” He lays significant blame for the present problems in health care at the doorstep of both insurers and doctors, stating that “the system’s ills are pervasive and all its participants are responsible.” 

In order to reclaim their once esteemed moral position, physicians must actively reaffirm their commitment to the highest standards of the medical profession and call on other participants in the health care delivery system also to elevate their values and standards to the highest level.

Evolution

In the evolutionary shifts in models for care, physicians have been asked to embrace business values of efficiency and cost effectiveness, sometimes at the expense of their professional judgment and personal values.  While some of these changes have been inevitable as our society sought to rein in out-of-control costs, it is not unreasonable for physicians to call on payers, regulators and other parties to the health care delivery system to raise their ethical bar. 

Harvard University physician-ethicist Linda Emmanuel noted that “health professionals are now accountable to business values (such as efficiency and cost effectiveness), so business persons should be accountable to professional values including kindness and compassion.” 

Within the framework of ethical principles, John La Puma, M.D., wrote in Managed Care Ethics, that “business’s ethical obligations are integrity and honesty.  Medicine’s are those plus altruism, beneficence, non-maleficence, respect, and fairness.”

Incumbent in these activities is the expectation that the forces that control our health care delivery system, the payers, the regulators, and the providers will reach out to the larger community, working to eliminate the inequities that have left so many Americans with limited access to even basic health care. 

Charles Dougherty clarified this obligation in Back to Reform, when he noted that “behind the daunting social reality stands a simple moral value that motivates the entire enterprise”. 

ASSESSMENT

Health care is indeed grounded in caring. And, managing risk is a component of caring. It arises from a sympathetic response to the suffering of others.

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Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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The Long and Short of Portfolio Construction

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Long-Short Portfolio Construction vs. Long-Only

[By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP™]

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

[Publisher-in-Chief]

Long-Short is an active portfolio construction discipline that balances long positions in high expected return securities and short positions in low expected return securities of approximately equal value and market sensitivity. This type of portfolio is “neutralized” or immunized against changes in value of the underlying market and, therefore, has zero systematic (beta) risk. If the selected securities perform as expected, the long-short positions will provide a positive return, whether the market rises or falls.

Misconceptions

While long-short portfolios are often perceived and portrayed as much costlier and much riskier than long-only, it is inherently neither. Much of the incremental cost and risk is either largely dependent on the amount of leverage employed or controllable via optimization. Those costs and risks that are not controllable—financial intermediation costs of borrowing shares to short, the trading costs incurred to meet long-short balancing, margin requirements, uptick rules, and the risks of unlimited losses on short positions—do not invalidate the viability of long-short strategies.

Long-Short Advantages

Compared with long-only portfolios, long-short portfolios offer enhanced flexibility not only in the control of risk and pursuit of return, but also in asset allocation. Basic market-neutral portfolios achieve a return consisting of three components: (1) interest on funds held as a liquidity buffer, (2) interest on the short sale proceeds maintained with the broker, and (3) the return spread between the aggregate long and aggregate short positions in the portfolios.

Disadvantages

Share borrow-ability and uptick rules make short-selling more difficult and costly than going long. Also, it may be legally or contractually restricted for some investors, such as mutual funds. Inefficiencies may be concentrated in overpriced stocks and, accordingly, short sales of the most overpriced stocks may offer higher positive returns than long purchases of underpriced stocks.

Assessment

Long-only portfolios are confined to altering the weighting of securities within an index in order to realize an excess return. Long-short portfolios are not constrained by index weights and, because they can short securities, they can “underweight” a security by as much as investment insights and risk considerations dictate. Long-short portfolios can be enhanced by “equitizing” them using stock index futures.

Note: “The Long and Short on Long-Short” by Bruce I. Jacobs and Kenneth N. Levy, The Journal of Investing, Spring 1997, pp. 73–86, Institutional Investor, Inc.

Conclusion

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What is a Stock Market Index IMPLIED OPEN?

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FINANCIAL TERMS AND DEFINITIONS FOR PHYSICIANS AND ALL INVESTORS

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By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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The stock markets have been near all time highs, lately. Physician colleagues and clients are so excited that they are even checking the overnight status of favorite stocks and/or the domestic/overseas markets.

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Some colleagues are even becoming a bit OCD by checking the implied open of various markets the night before. But, what exactly is the Implied Open? How is it calculated?

DEFINITION: The Implied Open attempts to predict the prices at which various stock indexes will open, at 9:30am New York time. It is frequently shown on various cable television channels prior to the start of the next business day.

Product Details

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

EXAMPLE: Considering the DJIA as an example, the basis of calculating implied open is the price of a “DJX index option futures contract”. This is not the price of the DJIA itself but rather the current ticker price of an option issued by the Chicago Board Options Exchange.

CBOE: The Chicago Board Options Exchange, located at 400 South LaSalle Street in Chicago, is the largest U.S. options exchange with annual trading volume that hovered around 1.27 billion contracts at the end of 2014. CBOE offers options on over 2,200 companies, 22 stock indices, and 140 exchange-traded funds.

CALCULATION: https://www.quora.com/How-do-you-calculate-the-implied-open-from-futures

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NOTE: We would like to remind you that new amendments adopted by the U.S. Securities Exchange Commission (SEC) have gone into effect as of September 28, 2021. These amendments restrict the ability of market makers to publish OTC quotations for those companies that have not made required current financial and company information available to regulators and investors.

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Physician Medical Risk Management and Insurance Planning Practices of Leading CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNERS®

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      Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™  Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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“BY DOCTORS – FOR DOCTORS – PEER REVIEWED – FIDUCIARY FOCUSED”

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SAMPLE: 21. Practice Risks

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MENTAL ACCOUNTING: What is it?

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

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DEFINITION: Mental accounting attempts to describe the process whereby people code, categorize and evaluate economic outcomes. The concept was first named by Richard Thaler. Mental accounting deals with the budgeting and categorization of expenditures. People budget money into mental accounts for expenses or expense categories

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Mental Accounting is the act of bucketizing investments and then reviewing the performance of the individual buckets separately (e.g. investing at low savings rate while paying high credit card interest rates).

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Mental Accounting • Money is

Examples of mental accounting are: (1) matching costs to benefits (wanting to pay for vacation before taking it and getting paid for work after it was done, even though from perspective of time value of money the opposite should be preferred0, (2) aversion to debt (don’t like long-term debt for short-term benefit), (3) sunk-cost effect (illogically considering non-recoverable costs when making forward-going decisions).

In investing, treating buckets separately and ignoring interaction (correlations) induces people not to sell losers (even though they get tax benefits), prevent them from investing in the stock market because it is too risky in isolation (however much less so when looked at as part of the complete portfolio including other asset classes and labor income and occupied real estate), thus they “do not maximize the return for a given level of risk taken).

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Welcome ARPA-H [health]

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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Recent advances in biomedical and health sciences—from immunotherapy to treat cancer, to the highly effective COVID-19 vaccines—demonstrate the strengths and successes of the U.S. biomedical enterprise. Such advances present an opportunity to revolutionize how to prevent, treat, and even cure a range of diseases including cancer, infectious diseases, Alzheimer’s disease, and many others that together affect a significant number of Americans.

NIH: https://www.nih.gov/arpa-h

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To improve the U.S. government’s capabilities to speed research that can improve the health of all Americans, President Biden is proposing the establishment of the Advanced Research Projects Agency for Health (ARPA-H). Included in the President’s FY2022 budget as a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) with a requested funding level of $6.5B available for three years, ARPA-H will be tasked with building high-risk, high-reward capabilities (or platforms) to drive biomedical breakthroughs—ranging from molecular to societal—that would provide transformative solutions for all patients.

MORE: https://thehealthcareblog.com/blog/2022/03/22/arpha-h-needs-to-think-bigger/

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PSYCHOLOGICAL “TRAPS” of Investing

MIND TRAPS PHYSICIAN INVESTORS MUST REDUCE AND AVOID AT ALL COSTS

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By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

As human beings, our brains are booby-trapped with psychological barriers that stand between making smart financial decisions and making dumb ones. The good news is that once you realize your own mental weaknesses, it’s not impossible to overcome them.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

In fact, Mandi Woodruff, a financial reporter whose work has appeared in Yahoo! Finance, Daily Finance, The Wall Street Journal, The Fiscal Times and the Financial Times among others; related the following mind-traps in a September 2013 essay for the finance vertical Business Insider; as these impediments are now entering the lay-public zeitgeist.

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8 Psychological Traps All Stock Investors Should Avoid - YouTube

 Anchoring happens when we place too much emphasis on the first piece of information we receive regarding a given subject. For instance, when shopping for a wedding ring a salesman might tell us to spend three months’ salary. After hearing this, we may feel like we are doing something wrong if we stray from this advice, even though the guideline provided may cause us to spend more than we can afford.

 Myopia makes it hard for us to imagine what our lives might be like in the future. For example, because we are young, healthy, and in our prime earning years now, it may be hard for us to picture what life will be like when our health depletes and we know longer have the earnings necessary to support our standard of living. This short-sightedness makes it hard to save adequately when we are young, when saving does the most good.

 Gambler’s fallacy occurs when we subconsciously believe we can use past events to predict the future. It is common for the hottest sector during one calendar year to attract the most investors the following year. Of course, just because an investment did well last year doesn’t mean it will continue to do well this year. In fact, it is more likely to lag the market.

 Avoidance is simply procrastination. Even though you may only have the opportunity to adjust your health care plan through your employer once per year, researching alternative health plans is too much work and too boring for us to get around to it. Consequently, we stick with a plan that may not be best for us.

 Loss aversion affected many investors during the stock market crash of 2008. During the crash, many people decided they couldn’t afford to lose more and sold their investments. Of course, this caused the investors to sell at market troughs and miss the quick, dramatic recovery.

 Overconfident investing happens when we believe we can out-smart other investors via market timing or through quick, frequent trading. Data convincingly shows that people who trade most often underperform the market by a significant margin over time.

 Mental accounting takes place when we assign different values to money depending on where we get it from. For instance, even though we may have an aggressive saving goal for the year, it is likely easier for us to save money that we worked for than money that was given to us as a gift.

MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/09/04/more-on-money-psychology/

RELATED: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2014/12/15/on-internet-investing-psychology/

 Herd mentality makes it very hard for humans to not take action when everyone around us does. For example, we may hear stories of people making significant profits buying, fixing up, and flipping homes and have the desire to get in on the action, even though we have no experience in real estate.

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Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors : Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™ book cover

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The Millennial Spend on COVID-19 Tests?

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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Millennials Spent the most on COVID-19 tests ($142)

A recent ValuePenguin survey found out-of-pocket costs for COVID-19 tests on average varied by age groups as follows:

 •  Gen Zers (ages 18-25): $125
 •  Millennials (ages 26-41): $142
 •  Gen Xers (ages 42-56): $101
 •  Baby boomers (ages 57-76): $59

Source: ValuePenguin, “COVID-19 Testing Survey: Americans Talk Out-of-Pocket Charges, Bill Negotiations, Barriers,” February 14, 2022

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/082610254

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The Three [3] Types of Banks

Join Our Mailing List Understanding Differences

[By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP™]

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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dem-thinkingThere are several different kinds of banks.

A general understanding of these types is suggested for any medical professional prior to launching a self-directed [ME, Inc], or even a guided investment strategy or wealth building portfolio effort with a financial advisor [FA], stock broker or wealth manager, etc.

This banking information is usually not included in any text on financial planning, or related, until now.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/082610254

Definition of Retail Bank

A retail bank is a typical small mass-market financial institution in which individual customers use local branches; usually of larger commercial banks. Services offered include savings and checking accounts, mortgages, personal loans, debit/credit cards and certificates of deposit (CDs).

Definition of Commercial Bank

A financial institution that provides services, such as accepting deposits, giving business loans and auto loans, mortgage lending, and basic investment products like savings accounts and certificates of deposit. The traditional commercial bank is a brick and mortar institution with tellers, safe deposit boxes, vaults and ATMs.

However, some commercial banks do not have any physical branches and require consumers to complete all transactions by phone or Internet. In exchange, they generally pay higher interest rates on investments and deposits, and charge lower fees.

Definition of Investment Bank

Investment banking activities are different than those of retail and commercial banking and include underwriting securities, acting as an intermediary between an issuer of securities and the investing public, facilitating mergers and other corporate reorganizations, and also acting as a broker for institutional clients.

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Bankers

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Assessment

This brief review provides a retrospective on implications for modernity.

More:

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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“IDES OF MARCH” and U.S. Debt Limits 2022

BEWARE THE “IDES OF MARCH”

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Courtesy:www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Debts and Settlement is Due

The Ides of March was a day in the Roman calendar that corresponds to 15 March. It was marked by several religious observances and was notable for the Romans as a deadline for settling debts.

In 44 BC, it became notorious as the date of the assassination of Julius Caesar which made the Ides of March a turning point in Roman history.

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MORE: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ides_of_March

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Assessment: Your thoughts and comments are appreciated.

2022 UPDATE: https://home.treasury.gov/policy-issues/financial-markets-financial-institutions-and-fiscal-service/debt-limit

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“Robo-Examiners” Let CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER™ Candidates Take Control

“Robo-Examiners” Let Adult-Learners Take Control

Dr. David Marcinko MBA
[Founding CEO and President]

Enter the CMPs

cmp

The concept of a self-taught and student motivated, but automated outcomes driven classroom may seem like a nightmare scenario for those who are not comfortable with computers. Now everyone can breathe a sigh of relief, because the Institute of Medical Business Advisors just launched an “automated” final examination review protocol that requires no programming skill whatsoever.

In fact, everything is designed to be very simple and easy to use. Once a student’s examination “blue-book” is received, computerized “robotic reviewers” correct student assignments and quarterly test answers. This automated examination model lets the robots correct tests and exams, while the students concentrate on guided self-learning.

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http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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Assessment

According to Eugene Schmuckler PhD MBA MEd, Dean of the CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER® professional designation and certification program,

“This option allows the modern adult-learner save both time and money as s/he progresses toward the ultimate goal of board certification as a CMP® mark holder.”

The trend is growing and iMBA, Inc., is leading the way.

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Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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AMA: Prior Authorization and Patient Harm?

By Staff Reporters

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Prior Authorization and Patient Harm

 •  34% of physicians report that PA has led to a serious adverse event for a patient in their care.
 •  24% of physicians report that PA has led to a patient’s hospitalization.
 •  18% of physicians report that PA has led to a life-threatening event or required intervention to prevent  permanent impairment or damage.
 •  8% of physicians report that PA has led to a patient’s disability/permanent bodily damage, congenital anomaly/birth defect or death.

Source: AMA, “2021 AMA prior authorization (PA) physician survey,” February 2022

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BALANCE BILLING: The Emerging “No Surprise” Act

Balance Medical Billing

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

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The No Surprises Act is looking to make the practice of out of network balance billing a thing of the past.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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No Surprises Act: New Law to Protect Against Surprise ...

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Beginning in 2022, there will be few situations in which a patient can receive a bill for out-of-network care they believed would be covered by their insurance company. This new rule should especially benefit patients in emergency situations who don’t have the time or luxury to dig up the details on every provider they encounter.

CONGRESS: https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/house-bill/3630/

The No Surprises Act also requires insurance companies to provide patients with at least 90 days of coverage if an in-network provider moves out of network. That way, patients aren’t forced to switch providers immediately if such a move happens while they’re in the middle of a treatment plan.

DOCTORS: https://www.elixirehr.com/what-the-no-surprises-act-means-for-healthcare-providers/

Now, the No Surprises Act does have its limitations. Patients can still get a bill for out-of-network care if they visit an urgent care clinic for non-emergency purposes. Also, if consumers are informed that the care they’re about to receive is out of network and they give written consent to move forward, then they may get billed for that care even once the new rule takes effect.

CMS: https://www.cms.gov/nosurprises

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VALUATION: Approaches for Common Stocks

A BRIEF REVIEW FOR PHYSICIAN INVESTORS

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP™

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

QUESTION: We are in near bear market correction territory – especially for tech stocks – so what are the 2 major types of valuation approaches for common stock?

UPDATE: https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/markets/stock-market-news-live-updates-sandp-500-dow-fall-amid-mixed-bank-earnings-retail-sales-miss/ar-AASL74g?li=BBnb7Kz

TECH: https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/markets/nasdaq-near-a-10percent-correction-isnt-the-sell-signal-you-probably-think-it-is/ar-AASL22m?li=BBnbfcL

ANSWER: There are basically two different approaches for common stock valuation; top-down and bottom-up.  Under either of the two fundamental approaches, a physician investor will have to work with individual company data.  In reality, each of these approaches is used by investors and security analysts when doing fundamental analysis.  

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/082610254

With the bottom-up approach, investors focus directly on a company’s prospects. Analysis of such information as the company’s products, its competitive position, and its financial status leads to an estimate of the company’s earnings potential, and, ultimately, its value in the market.  Considerable time and effort are required to produce the type of detailed financial analysis needed to understand a firm’s standing. The emphasis in this approach is on finding companies with good long-term growth prospects, and making accurate earnings estimates. 

The top-down approach is the opposite of the bottom-up approach. Investors begin with the economy and the overall market, considering such important factors as interest rates and inflation. They next consider likely industry prospects, or sectors of the economy that are likely to do particularly well (or particularly poorly). Finally, having decided that factors are favorable for investing, and having determined which parts of the overall economy are likely to perform well, individual companies are analyzed.

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Activity Based Medical Cost Accounting and Management

NON-TRADITIONAL ACCOUNTING METHODS KNOWN IN THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY BUT NOT USED IN HOSPITALS OR HEALTH CARE ORGANIZATIONS

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA CMP® CPHQ

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Sooner or later – as a practicing physician – you will want to ascertain and then demonstrate the cost effectiveness of your medical care. By using the process of Activity Based Cost (ABC) Management, you will be able to do so.  

ALAS: But, if you’re using a traditional accounting system – like most all hospitals today that use the fictional “average wholesale cost” method – you won’t know a thing about your medical practice or clinic activity costs. Hence, again like most all hospitals, fees become simply vacuous.

Managerial Accounting Assignment Help in Australia

Here’s how: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2007/12/15/activity-based-cost-medical-management/

HOW TO READ A SCIENTIFIC PAPER: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/04/09/how-to-read-and-understand-a-scientific-paper/

DETAILED WHITE PAPERIN-PROGRESS [thru editing but before peer-reviewed publication]: https://healthcarefinancials.files.wordpress.com/2007/12/abcm.pdf

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.amazon.com/Business-Medical-Practice-Transformational-Doctors/dp/0826105750/ref=sr_1_9?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1287563112&sr=1-9

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PODCASTS: AMA to Teach Medical Students Health Economics?

AMA TO TEACH MEDICAL STUDENTS ABOUT HEALTH ECONOMICS?

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Courtesy: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

DICTIONARY: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2009/06/08/dictionary-of-health-economics-and-finance/

Did you know that the American Medical Association is calling on medical schools and residency programs to include specific information about healthcare economics and financing in their curricula.

But, is health economics heterodoxic, or not? And; what about demand-derived economics in medicine?

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economic freedom

LINKS

ESSAY: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2019/08/31/is-health-economics-heterodoxic-or-not/

ESSAY: https://www.modernhealthcare.com/education/ama-adopts-new-policy-training-physicians-healthcare-economics

MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2019/11/10/ricardian-derived-demand-economics-in-medicine/

MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2014/08/27/financial-and-health-economics-benchmarking/

MORE: https://healthcarefinancials.files.wordpress.com/2019/01/big-data.pdf

PODCAST: https://vimeo.com/ihe

Your thoughts are appreciated.

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CURRENCY: Devaluation versus Depreciation

KNOW THE FINANCIAL DIFFERENCE

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BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CPM®

INVITE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

Competitive World 27

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Devaluation is the deliberate downward adjustment of the value of a country’s money related to another currency, group of currencies or currency standard. It is often confused with depreciation and is the opposite of revaluation which refers to the readjustment of a currency exchange rate.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Definition

The government of a country may decide to devalue its currency and like depreciation it is not the result of non-governmental activities.

One reason a country made devalue its currency is to combat a trade imbalance. Devaluation reduces the cost of a country’s export rendering them more competitive in the Global market which is which in turn increases the cost of imports.

If imports are more expensive domestic consumers are less likely to purchase them further strengthening domestic businesses because exports increase and imports decrease there is typically a better balance of payments because the trade deficit shrinks. In short a country that devalue its currency can produce is difficult because there is a greater demand for cheaper exports.

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Advantages and disadvantages of devaluation - Economics Help

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In accountancy, depreciation refers to two aspects of the same concept: first, the actual decrease of fair value of an asset, such as the decrease in value of factory equipment each year as it is used and wear, and second, the allocation in accounting statements of the original cost of the assets to periods in which the assets are used (depreciation with the matching principle).

Depreciation is thus the decrease in the value of assets and the method used to reallocate, or “write down” the cost of a tangible asset (such as equipment) over its useful life span. Businesses depreciate long-term assets for both accounting and tax purposes. The decrease in value of the asset affects the balance sheet of a business or entity, and the method of depreciating the asset, accounting-wise, affects the net income, and thus the income statement that they report.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Generally, the cost is allocated as depreciation expense among the periods in which the asset is expected to be used.

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ORDER TEXT: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

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The CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER® Program Curriculum

BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

CMP

THE NEXT GENERATION OF FIDUCIARY FOCUSED FINANCIAL PLANNING AND MEDICAL MANAGEMENT ADVICE FOR DOCTORS

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VISIT: http://www.CERTIFIEDMEDICALPLANNER.org

CURRICULUM: Enter the CMPs

BE AWARE ALL ADVISORS … NEXT GEN FINANCIAL ADVICE IS HERE?

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Are you a financial planner, insurance agent or investment advisor seeking to assist your physician clients with medical practice enhancement solutions, along with healthcare targeted financial planning services, but don’t know where to turn for help?

OR, maybe you’ve already had a bad experience with a young physician or astute healthcare professional client that was actually more informed than you in these areas?

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

OR, a doctor/nurse client who demanded a true fiduciary advisor [not fee-based advice, with no dual licenses and no arbitration clauses] documented in writing].

Read this decade old Federal Government report to learn what can happen when your advisor is not an informed Certified Medical Planner© designated medical management practitioner.

Then, become a Certified Medical Planner© and thrive by helping others …. first!

GOV: https://oig.hhs.gov/fraud/docs/alertsandbulletins/consultants.pdf

True yesterday … more true today.

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Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™
Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™
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CONTACT: Ann Miller RN MHA CMP®

Phone: 770-448-0769

EMAIL: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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FINANCIAL HEALTH INSURANCE CO-PAY CARDS & DRUG COUPONS?

The “Real Deal”

A co-payment is a fixed amount ($20, for example) you pay for a covered health care service after you’ve paid your deductible.

Let’s say your health insurance plan’s allowable cost for a doctor’s office visit is $100. Your copayment for a doctor visit is $20.

  • If you’ve paid your deductible: You pay $20, usually at the time of the visit.
  • If you haven’t met your deductible: You pay $100, the full allowable amount for the visit.
  • Partial deductible payments incur hybrid fees.

Copayments (sometimes called “copays”) can vary for different services within the same plan, like drugs, lab tests, and visits to specialists. Generally plans with lower monthly premiums have higher copayments. Plans with higher monthly premiums usually have lower copayments.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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Invite Dr. Marcinko | The Leading Business Education Network for Doctors,  Financial Advisors and Health Industry Consultants

BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

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Co-Pay Cards May Be Creating More Controversy Instead of Solutions

Instead of reducing the actual price of their excessively priced medications, many companies have opted to provide co-pay cards / coupons as an affordable solution. However, co-pay cards may only lower the cost for some consumers and patients.

Novartis: https://www.copay.novartispharma.com/nvscopay/#

Pfizer: https://www.pfizerpro.com/co-pay-cards-patient-savings-offers

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See the source image

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But – The insurer is still left to pay the high price, which will eventually be passed back on to the patient / consumers in the form of higher health insurance deductibles. So – It doesn’t really seem like much of a solution when we all end up paying for these co-pay cards / coupons; does it?

Find out more here. (Source: Rebecca Mayer Knutsen, MM&M, 8/26/16)

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MEDICAL OFFICE CREDIT CARDS:

We stopped taking credit cards altogether. The only credit cards we take are for call-in payments of balances. We have placed ATM machines in our lobbies and we educate patients in advance of their visits that we only take cash or check. Our cash income has increased, our credit card fees have decreased, and we make $1.50 from each transaction through our ATM. Our patients have taken to the idea so much that they use the ATM for personal cash for other transactions because our fee is the lowest of any ATM. It has been a win-win-win.  

Dr. Farshid Nejad, Beverly Hills, CA [PM Magazine]

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For anyone contemplating taking credit cards for payments or copayments in your office, please be aware that some of the credit card companies require you to sign a contract. Don’t do that! If you do and you either have a problem with the company or find out that they are overcharging you, they will hold you responsible for the contract and may take you to court. There are enough credit card companies out that that do not require contracts and are highly competitive. 

-Dr. Elliot Udell, DPM, Hicksville, NY [PM Magazine]

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BUSINESS PLAN CONSTRUCTION: For Health Industry Modernity

FOR MEDICAL AND HEALTHCARE ENTREPRENEURS AND INNOVATORS

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA MEd CMP®

I was asked by business schools and medical colleagues – and their bankers, CPAs and advisors – to speak about this topic several times last year before the pandemic.

Now, with the specter of M-4-A etc; it certainly is a vital concern to all young entrepreneurs, doctors & medical professionals whether live, audio recorded or in podcast form. And so, here is a written transcript of a recent presentation for your review.

Now, with the specter of tele-health, tele-medicine, M-4-A etc; it certainly is a vital concern to all young doctors & medical professionals whether live, audio recorded or in podcast form. And so, here is a written transcript of a recent presentation for your review.

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New Product Business Plan Sample [2021 Updated] | OGScapital

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READ: https://healthcarefinancials.files.wordpress.com/2017/08/mba-business-plan-capstone-outline.pdf

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More on Medical Practice Business Costs for Entrepreneurial Physicians

Unknown and Under-Appreciated by Many

By Rick Kahler CFP®

I recently talked with an administrator of a private medical practice about some of the financial challenges she faces in dealing with the medical system, insurers, and patients.

Some of the insights she gave me into the realities that private physicians face in providing medical care were rather disturbing.

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Here are a few of them.

Let’s start with the insurers who account for the bulk of their revenue. Many payments for procedures from insurance companies (including Medicare) are below the cost of providing the service. This forces physicians to make up the difference on other procedures or find other sources of income to sustain the profitability of the practice.

Conversely, in markets that have just one hospital, the insurance companies have no leverage. If the insurers won’t pay what the hospitals demand, the hospitals can threaten to drop out of the network, leaving the insurers with nowhere to send their insureds in those markets. The insurers end up agreeing to pay the hospitals more.

Charges for services provided in-house at the hospital can end up being substantially higher than those same services done by outside providers.

Example:

She gave me an example of a lab test that cost $1,500 to $2,000 at the hospital lab but $35 to $80 at an independent lab. Patients do have the option to direct the hospital to use an independent lab. But, how many people know that and will have the presence of mind to make the request? While it makes financial sense to price-shop if you have a high deductible HSA plan, there isn’t much incentive if your plan has low deductibles.

Collections

Another challenge is collecting from patients. She says a surprising percentage of Americans maintain checking accounts with no money or keep checks from accounts which have long been closed. While writing bad checks is a crime, those who game the system know they can probably get by with writing a low-dollar check because the cost of pursuing justice is much more than the check is worth.

Most companies would never do business with such a person again. Healthcare professionals tend to have a bias toward giving everyone services, so these same people do return requesting care. She said she and her physician employer have had huge internal arguments about this. Her position is that these people take advantage of the physician in a premeditated fashion and don’t deserve to be extended services. The physician argues that everyone, even deadbeats, deserves healthcare. Since the practice doesn’t provide life-and-death services, she was able to get the physician to agree that if someone has an outstanding bill they need to settle it upfront, in cash, before any new services are provided.

Then there are those who use credit cards and then fraudulently dispute the charges. Some providers let this go because of the difficulty of proving that the charge is legitimate. It requires photographs of customers during the transaction, copies of driver’s licenses, customers’ signatures on the paperwork, and notarized statements from the provider verifying that this was the person who received services and presented the credit card.

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http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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SSNs

A final interesting point concerned patients’ Social Security numbers. She said the only time these are ever needed is when an outstanding bill is sent for collection. Otherwise, they are never accessed or used.

Assessment

Finally, she was quick to add that only a small fraction of their patients premeditate stealing from them. She also stressed that not all insurance companies or hospitals behave unethically, and some do wonderful, humane acts of kindness. Nevertheless, the lack of integrity that does occur on both sides is infuriating and adds to the cost of health services.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, urls and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements.

Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

Subscribe: MEDICAL EXECUTIVE POST for curated news, essays, opinions and analysis from the public health, economics, finance, marketing, I.T, business and policy management ecosystem.

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The Medical Practice Business Plan EXECUTIVE SUMMARY?

WHAT IT IS – HOW IT WORKS

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

THE BUSINESS PLAN STANDARD FORMAT

Physician Executive Summary

The Physician Executive Summary is always included at the beginning of a formal business plan and represents a brief synopsis of the medical prarctice entire plan.  Its appearance, grammar and style should be sharp and crisp as it represents an enticement for the reader to maintain interest and contribute intelligent or economic input into the new venture.

It should contain information about the practice, advertising and marketing opportunities, physician management, proposed financing with four Pro Forma financial statements, business operations and exit strategy.  This last point, while unpleasant is often overlooked by naive practitioners.  Business experts however, look favorably upon an escape plan and view it as the mark of mature professional that realizes the possibility of success as well as failure. 

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Ultimately, the plan must explain to potential investors how you will make the practice   profitable and produce the required Return on Investment (ROI) for them.  It must describe medical services, patient acceptance and benefits, provider qualifications and accomplishments, the amount of capital required, market size, potential practice growth rate, and market niche. 

Additional information may include office location, proximity to labor, transportation, license requirements, business entity status, proprietary technology and potential working agreements with various insurance, managed care, ACA and HMO plans.  If all of the above seems bewildering to the uninitiated, you are correct. 

Remember however, that if you do not have, or can’t borrow the funds to begin a private practice, you will just have to become an employed practitioner until you can.  It is therefore imperative to start off on the right foot, with a sound business plan, as you begin your medical career.

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FRANCHISE Healthcare Opportunities?

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dave-2

BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Healthcare Business and Medical Franchises

The International Franchise Association (IFA) estimates that that about $1 trillion in sales, or 40% of all retail sales, were made through franchised establishment last year.  On the positive side, franchises offer a branded practice concept with management training and access to proprietary methods, marketing and advertising campaigns and a host of support.

Moreover, there are franchises available for virtually every healthcare product or service, including: diet, weight loss and fitness; vein care and laser surgery; vitamins, nutriceuticals and pharmaceuticals; plastic and cosmetic surgery; dermatology, tanning and skin care; home healthcare and extended, etc. Some well know established healthcare and medical franchises are:  Doctors Express, Being There Senior Care, Home Care Assistance, Personal Training Institute, Inches-A-Weigh, Remedy Intelligent Staffing, Visiting Angels, Unlimited MedSearch, prnYourHealth and Any Lab Test Now, etc.

On the downside, franchises incur high start-up costs, rules and obligations, payment of franchise percentages and many contractual obligations. Questions to consider when contemplating this business entity include:

  • Franchise stability, track record, licensing and costs.
  • Training, support and proximity of other franchises.
  • Independence, ownership laws, contracts and dispute resolutions,
  • Screening methods, market size and potential market share.
  • Replacement cost and transferability?

For more information on Uniform Franchise Offerings Circulars (UFOCs) contact www.FranChoice.com or:

Frandata

1130 Connecticut Avenue, NW

Washington DC 20036

202.659.8640

http://www.frandata.com

International Franchise Association

1350 New York Avenue, NW

Washington, DC 20005

202.628.800

http://www.franchise.org


Also visit:
www.aafd.org; www.franNet.com

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PODCAST: The FOUR PERCENT Spending Rule with Challenge?

Still Valid or Not?

PLUS the “RULES of 72, 78 and 115″ Explained”

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What Is The 4% Rule? How Much Money Do I Need To Retire? - YouTube

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The 4% Rule is a practical rule of thumb that may be used by retirees to decide how much they should withdraw from their retirement funds each year; according to Investopedia.

READ: https://www.investopedia.com/terms/f/four-percent-rule.asp#:~:text=The%20Four%20Percent%20Rule%20is%20a%20rule%20of,account%20balance%20that%20keeps%20income%20flowing%20through%20retirement.

The purpose of adopting the rule is to keep a steady income stream while maintaining an adequate overall account balance for future years. The withdrawals will consist primarily of interest and dividends on savings.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/082610254

READ: https://www.financial-planning.com/news/kitces-smart-fix-for-the-4-rule#:~:text=The%20purpose%20of%20the%204%25%20rule%20is%20to,when%20it%20provides%20superior%20outcomes%20in%20all%20situations.

CHALLENGE: But, experts like Mike Kitces are divided on whether the 4% withdrawal rate is the best option. Many, including the creator of the rule, say that 5% is a better rule for all but the worst-case scenario.

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RULES of 72, 78 and 115: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2020/11/22/the-rules-of-72-78-and-115/

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PODCAST: https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=4+percent+rule&&view=detail&mid=5B0C2D1CABA12C7CF6075B0C2D1CABA12C7CF607&&FORM=VRDGAR&ru=%2Fvideos%2Fsearch%3Fq%3D4%2Bpercent%2Brule%26FORM%3DHDRSC3

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UPDATE: Stock Markets, the Economy and Pandemic

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  • Stock Markets: US stocks staged a big afternoon comeback for the second day in a row … but still not big enough to close in the green. American Express was the top performer in both the S&P and the Dow after the company reported its highest billings volume ever in Q4. And, enthusiasm over meme stocks more broadly appears to be dwindling along with cryptos. And, while NASDAQ took a hit, Microsoft reported quarterly sales of more than $50 billion for the first time ever.
  • Economy: The weight of the financial world is on Jerome Powell’s shoulders today. The Federal Reserve chair will provide an update on the central bank’s views on sky-high inflation and its plan for interest rate hikes this year (though none are expected until March).
  • Pandemic: Pfizer and BioNTech started clinical trials for an Omicron-specific vaccine yesterday. The results will help the pharma partners decide whether to replace their current jab formula with one that targets the most dominant Covid variant. The new vaccine is being tested both as a three-shot series for un-vaccinated participants and as a booster for the already vaccinated.
  • CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/082610254

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IRS Tax Reduction Issues for Self-Employed Physician Executives

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By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

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INTRODUCTION

Whether you do contract work or have your own small business, tax deductions for the self-employed physician consultant and/or medical executive or nurse consultant, etc., can add up to substantial tax savings.

Welcome Tax Season: https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/taxes/tax-season-2022-irs-now-accepting-tax-returns-what-to-know-before-filing-taxes-about-your-refund/ar-AAT53rR?li=BBnb7Kz


With self-employment comes freedom, responsibility, and a lot of expense. While most self-employed people celebrate the first two, they cringe at the latter, especially at tax time. They might not be aware of some of the tax write-offs to which they are entitled.

When it comes time to file your returns, don’t hesitate to claim the benefits you get for being the boss. As a self-employed success story, you’ve earned them.

FORM 1099 NEC: Form 1099 NEC is one of several IRS tax forms used in the United States to prepare and file an information return to report various types of income other than wages, salaries, and tips. The term information return is used in contrast to the term tax return although the latter term is sometimes used colloquially to describe both kinds of returns.

READ: https://turbotax.intuit.com/tax-tips/self-employment-taxes/how-to-file-taxes-with-irs-form-1099-misc/L3UAsiVBq?tblci=GiC9aWPDzN9yXLpSuE8LDo3YRMDPuoFwO9ycCY6qixKJ8CC8ykEo94-H7prplp7cAQ

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/082610254

“Many times an overlooked deduction is educational expenses. If one is taking courses or buying research material to be more effective in their work, this can be deductible.”

Individual Retirement Plans (IRAs)

One of the best tax write-offs for the self-employed physician consultant is a retirement plan. A person with no employees can set up an individual 401 (k). “You can contribute $19,500 in 2021 as a 401(k) deferral, plus 25 percent of net income.”

If you have employees, consider a SIMPLE (Savings Incentive Match Plan for Employees) IRA—an IRA-based plan that gives small employers a simplified method to make contributions to their employees’ retirement. As of 2021, an employee may defer up to $13,500 and employees over 50 may contribute an additional $3,000.

“A third retirement plan is Simplified Employee Pension IRA (SEP IRA).” The employer may contribute the lesser of 25 percent of income or $58,000 in 2021. If the employer has eligible employees, an equal percentage of their income must be contributed.

Recall that retirement plans are “absolutely the No. 1 tax deduction. The government is helping fund retirement.”

Business use of home or dwelling

Now, most self-employed taxpayers’ businesses start as home-based businesses. These people need to know portions of business costs are deductible and so “It is very important that you keep track of expenses relating to your housing costs.”

If your gross income from your business exceeds your total expenses, then you can deduct all of your expenses related to the business use of your home. If your gross income is less than your total expenses, your deduction will be limited to the difference between your gross income and the sum of all business expenses you would pay if the business was not in your home. Those expenses could include telephone lines, the Internet, and other costs to do business.

You must also have a home office that is truly used for work and the Internal Revenue Service may require you to document this.

***

Deducting automobile expenses

If you travel for business, even short distances within your own city, you may deduct the dollar value of business miles traveled on your tax return. The taxpayer may file the actual expense s/he incurred, or use the standard mileage rate prescribed by the IRS, which is 56 cents as of 2021. The IRS allowable mileage rates should be checked every year as they can change.

“If you decide to use actual car expenses, be sure to include payments, depreciation, registration, insurance, garage rent, licenses, repairs and maintenance, and parking and toll fees.” AND, “If you decide to use the standard mileage rate, it would be in your best interest to keep a log—daily, weekly or monthly—of miles driven to distinguish personal use from business use.”

Depreciation of property and equipment

Some self-employed people may purchase property and equipment for a business. If they expect that property to last longer than one year, it should be depreciated on the tax return.

Claims regarding property, according to the IRS, must meet the following criteria: You must own the property and it must be used or held to generate income. The property should have an estimated useful life, meaning you should be able to guess how long you can generate income with it. It may not have a useful life of one year or less, and may not be purchased and disposed of in the same year.

Certain repairs on property used for business may also be deducted.

Educational expenses

Any educational expense is potentially tax-deductible.

“Many times an overlooked deduction is educational expenses. “If one is taking courses or buying research material to be more effective in their work, this can be deductible.”

Think about any books, web courses, local college courses, or other classes or materials that you have purchased to improve your job or business. It’s easy to forget a work-related webinar or business e-book that was purchased online, so remember to save e-receipts.

Also recall that subscriptions to trade or professional publications and donations to business organizations, both of which are frequently necessary for the continuation and growth of your business.

Other areas to explore

Other deductions that can be easily missed are advertising and promotional expenses, banking fees, and air, bus, or train fare. Restaurant meals and other entertainment costs may be written off as long as they are necessary business expenses.

And, consider health insurance premiums, which in most cases represent a credit rather than a tax deduction. “A credit goes directly against one’s taxes, rather than a reduction of income.”

Regardless of which expenses you discover that you may write off, the most important thing is to keep accurate records throughout the year. Save receipts, including e-mail receipts, and file or log them so you have easy access to them at tax time. Not only does keeping receipts, mileage logs, and other expense records make filing taxes easier, but it also facilitates a system that allows you to track changes from year to year.

***

Long-term tax-saving strategies

Don’t just look at last-minute write-offs when considering self-employment tax deductions. Think about laying down some long-term strategies for money savings from year to year—particularly if you are a high earner.

“Accountants typically tell you what you have to pay but they don’t always tell you strategies to reduce your payments.”

To reduce your gross taxable income, consider setting up a defined-benefit pension plan. This plan is based on your age and income: The older you are and the higher your earnings, the more you are allowed to contribute. An alternative plan is an age-weighted profit-sharing plan, which is similar and can benefit those who have several employees.

Another strategy for high-earning business owners who own their own building through a limited liability company or similar business structure is to pay themselves rent. This rent is used to pay down the mortgage, but it is also considered a business expense for tax purposes.

Self-employed professionals required to have liability insurance should consider setting up their own insurance company. A captive insurance company is one that insures the risks of the business—or businesses, in the case of a cooperative. Its premiums can be tax-deductible.

But, if money accumulates and claims are minimal, the money taken out is taxable under capital gains. This is not a retirement strategy, but that it can save you money by allowing you to “pay yourself” instead of an insurance company and still deduct the premiums.

Assessment

With any of these more complicated, long-term strategies, consult with a business attorney, CPA/EA or financial planner to ensure you have the best plan possible for your business.

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CAPITAL GAINS UPDATE: https://wordpress.com/post/medicalexecutivepost.com/251470

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Understanding Medical Cost Accounting

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A Subset of Managerial Accounting

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

By ME-P Staff Reporters

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Managerial and medical cost accounting is not governed by generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) as promoted by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) for CPAs. Rather, a healthcare organization costing expert may be a Certified Cost Accountant (CCA) or Certified Managerial Accountant (CMA) designated by the Cost Accounting Standards Board (CASB), an independent board within the Office of Management and Budget’s (OMB) Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP).

The Cost Accounting Standards Board

CASB consists of five members, including the OFPP Administrator who serves as chairman and four members with experience in government contract cost accounting (two from the federal government, one from industry, and one from the accounting profession). The Board has the exclusive authority to make, promulgate, and amend cost accounting standards and interpretations designed to achieve uniformity and consistency in the cost accounting practices governing the measurement, assignment, and allocation of costs to contracts with the United States.

Codified at 48 CFR

CASB’s regulations are codified at 48 CFR, Chapter 99.  The standards are mandatory for use by all executive agencies and by contractors and subcontractors in estimating, accumulating, and reporting costs in connection with pricing and administration of, and settlement of disputes concerning, all negotiated prime contract and subcontract procurement with the United States in excess of $500,000. The rules and regulations of the CASB appear in the federal acquisition regulations.

North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes are used to categorize data for the federal government.  In acquisition they are particularly critical for size standards.  The NAICS codes are revised every five years by the Census Bureau.  As of October 1, 2007, the federal acquisition community began using the 2007 version of the NAICS codes at www.census.gov/epcd/www/naics.html

Cost Accounting Standards

Healthcare organizations and consultants are obligated to comply with the following cost accounting standards (CAS) promulgated by federal agencies:

  • CAS 501 requires consistency in estimating, accumulating, and reporting costs.
  • CAS 502 requires consistency in allocating costs incurred for the same purpose.
  • CAS 505 requires proper treatment of unallowable costs.
  • CAS 506 requires consistency in the periods used for cost accounting.

The requirements of these standards are different from those of traditional financial accounting, which are concerned with providing static historical information to creditors, shareholders, and those outside the public or private healthcare organization.

AssessmentTwo Doctors

Functionally, most healthcare organizations also contain cost centers, which have no revenue budgets or mission to earn revenues for the organization.  Examples include human resources, administration, housekeeping, nursing, and the like.  These are known as responsibility centers with budgeting constraints but no earnings.  Furthermore, shadow cost centers include certain non-cash or cash expenses, such as amortization, depreciation and utilities, and rent. These non-centralized shadow centers are cost allocated for budgeting purposes and must be treated as costs http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

MORE:  CASE MODEL EOQ 1

Conclusion

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What Physician Investors STILL NEED TO KNOW about Monte Carlo Simulation in 2022

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Probability Forecasting and Investing

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP™

[Editor-in-Chief] www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

dr-david-marcinko1Recently, I had a physician-client ask me about Monte Carlo simulation. You know the routine: what it is and how it works, etc.

From Monaco

Named after Monte Carlo, Monaco, which is famous for its games of chance, MCS is a technique that randomly changes a variable over numerous iterations in order to simulate an outcome and develop a probability forecast of successfully achieving an outcome.

In endowment management, MCS is used to demonstrate the probability of “success” as defined by achieving the endowment’s asset growth and payout goals.  In other words, MCS can provide the endowment manager with a comfort level that a given payout policy and asset allocation success will not deplete the real value of the endowment.

Quantitative Tools Problematic

The problem with many quantitative tools is the divorce of judgment from their use. Although useful, MCS has limitations that should not supplant the endowment manager’s, FA or physician-investor’s, experience.

MCS generates an efficient frontier by relying upon several inputs: expected return, expected volatility, and correlation coefficients. These variables are commonly input using historical measures as proxies for estimated future performance. This poses a variety of problems.

  • First, the MCS will generally assume that returns are normally distributed and that this distribution is stationary.  As such, asset classes with high historical returns are assumed to have high future returns.
  • Second, MCS is not generally time sensitive. In other words, the MCS optimizer may ignore current environmental conditions that would cause a secular shift in a given asset class returns.
  • Third, MCS may use a mean variance optimizer [MVO] that may be subject to selection bias for certain asset classes. For example, private equity firms that fail will no longer report results and will be eliminated from the index used to provide the optimizer’s historical data.

Healthcare Investment Risks

A Tabular Data Example

This table compares the returns, standard deviations for large and small cap stocks for the 20-year periods ended in 1979 and 2010.

Twenty Year Risk & Return Small Cap vs. Large Cap (Ibbotson Data)

[IA Micro-Cap Value 14.66 17.44 24.69 0.44]

1979

2010

Risk

Return

Correlation

Risk

Return

Correlation

Small   Cap Stocks 30.8% 17.4% 78.0% 18.1% 26.85% 59.0%
Large   Cap Stocks 16.5% 8.1% 13.1% 15.06%

[Reproduced from “Asset Allocation Math, Methods and Mistakes.” Wealthcare Capital Management White Paper, David B. Loeper, CIMA, CIMC (June 2, 2001)]

The Problems

Professor David Nawrocki identified a number of problems with typical MCS in that their mean variance optimizers assume “normal distributions and correlation coefficients of zero, neither of which are typical in the world of financial markets.”

Dr. Nawrocki subsequently described a number of other issues with MCS including nonstationary distributions and nonlinear correlations.

Finally, Dr. Nawrocki quoted financial advisor, Harold Evensky MS CFP™ who eloquently notes that “[t]he problem is the confusion of risk with uncertainty.” Risk assumes knowledge of the distribution of future outcomes (i.e., the input to the Monte Carlo simulation). Uncertainty or ambiguity describes a world (our world) in which the shape and location of the distribution is open to question.

Assessment

Contrary to academic orthodoxy, the distribution of U.S. stock market returns is “far from normal.”[1] Other critics have noted that many MCS simulators do not run enough iterations to provide a meaningful probability analysis.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

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[1]   Nawrocki, D., Ph.D. “The Problems with Monte Carlo Simulation.” FPA Journal (November 2001).

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What is a REIT, Really?

REITs – The Margarine of Real Estate Investing

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By Dr. Dennis Bethel MD

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

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Just like real estate, butter has been around for thousands of years.  Sometime in the 1800’s someone decided that there was a need for something that looked like butter, tasted similar to butter, but wasn’t butter.  Along came margarine.  Real estate investment trusts (REITs) are the margarine of the real estate investing world.

NAREIT, the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts, answers the question

What is a REIT?” in the following way:

“A REIT, or Real Estate Investment Trust, is a type of real estate company modeled after mutual funds.  REITs were created by Congress in 1960 to give all Americans – not just the affluent – the opportunity to invest in income producing real estate in a manner similar to how many Americans invest in stocks and bonds through mutual funds.  Income-producing real estate refers to land and the improvements on it – such as apartments, offices or hotels.  REITs may invest in the properties themselves, generating income through the collection of rent or they may invest in mortgages or mortgage securities tied to the properties, helping to finance the properties and generating interest income.”

While REITs typically own real estate, investors in REITs do not.  REITs are paper assets that represent interest in a company that owns and operates income producing properties.  In essence they are real estate flavored stock.  As such, REITs are generally highly correlated with the stock market.

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TERMINOLOGY

When discussing REITs, you encounter the following terminology – public, private, traded, and non-traded.  Public REITs can be designated as non-traded or traded depending on whether or not they are traded on a stock exchange.

Since traded REITs are traded on the stock exchange, they enjoy a high degree of liquidity just like any other stock.  Unfortunately, traded REITs tend to follow the economic cycles and can closely correlate with the stock market.  This can lead to a higher degree of volatility than what is usually seen with physical real estate.  Additionally, they do not afford the investor the tax-advantages that come with investments in physical real estate.

MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2017/11/15/on-non-traded-real-estate-investment-trusts-reits/

Private REITs and non-traded public REITs are not traded on an exchange.  These are usually offered to accredited investors through broker-dealer networks.  These REITs are illiquid and generally have high fees.  They have been plagued with transparency issues as well as conflicts of interest.  Valuation of this stock is difficult and can be misleading to the investor.  Due diligence is very important as the quality of non-traded REITs can vary widely.

MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2014/06/13/why-i-hate-non-publicly-traded-reits/

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts and comments are appreciated.

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