PODCAST: Cash Flow, Revenue Management and Leadership in Healthcare Business; etc.

THE ENTREPRENEURIAL M.D.

In this episode we are joined by Dr. Brent Jackson, Chief Medical Officer for Mercy General in Sacramento, CA to discuss the physician life-cycle, burnout, and transitioning into leadership within healthcare.

Play EpisodeDownload (40.4 MB)

Summary: Dr Brent Jackson discusses the flow of revenue throughout the medical industry.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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DICTIONARY: Health Insurance and Managed Care

Designated a Doody’s CORE TITLE

To keep up with the ever-changing field of health care, we must learn new and re-learn old terminology in order to correctly apply it to practice. By bringing together the most up-to-date abbreviations, acronyms, definitions, and terms in the health care industry, the Dictionary offers a wealth of essential information that will help you understand the ever-changing policies and practices in health insurance and managed care today. For Further Information.

Review

The Dictionary of Health Insurance and Managed Care lifts the fog of confusion surrounding the most contentious topic in the health care industrial complex today. My suggestion therefore is to ‘read it, refer to it, recommend it, and reap’.”
Michael J. Stahl,PhD, Physician Executive MBA Program, William B. Stokely Distinguished Professor of Business, The University of Tennessee, College of Business Administration

***

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

Thank You

***

YOUR THOUGHTS are appreciated.

COMPREHENSIVE FINANCIAL PLANNING STRATEGIES

For Doctors and Advisors

BOOK REVIEWS WITH FOREWORD

Reviews

Written by doctors and healthcare professionals, this textbook should be mandatory reading for all medical school students―highly recommended for both young and veteran physicians―and an eliminating factor for any financial advisor who has not read it. The book uses jargon like ‘innovative,’ ‘transformational,’ and ‘disruptive’―all rightly so! It is the type of definitive financial lifestyle planning book we often seek, but seldom find.
LeRoy Howard MA CMPTM,Candidate and Financial Advisor, Fayetteville, North Carolina

I taught diagnostic radiology for over a decade. The physician-focused niche information, balanced perspectives, and insider industry transparency in this book may help save your financial life.
Dr. William P. Scherer MS, Barry University, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

This book was crafted in response to the frustration felt by doctors who dealt with top financial, brokerage, and accounting firms. These non-fiduciary behemoths often prescribed costly wholesale solutions that were applicable to all, but customized for few, despite ever-changing needs. It is a must-read to learn why brokerage sales pitches or Internet resources will never replace the knowledge and deep advice of a physician-focused financial advisor, medical consultant, or collegial Certified Medical Planner™ financial professional.
―Parin Khotari MBA,Whitman School of Management, Syracuse University, New York

In today’s healthcare environment, in order for providers to survive, they need to understand their current and future market trends, finances, operations, and impact of federal and state regulations. As a healthcare consulting professional for over 30 years supporting both the private and public sector, I recommend that providers understand and utilize the wealth of knowledge that is being conveyed in these chapters. Without this guidance providers will have a hard time navigating the supporting system which may impact their future revenue stream. I strongly endorse the contents of this book.

―Carol S. Miller BSN MBA PMP,President, Miller Consulting Group, ACT IAC Executive Committee Vice-Chair at-Large, HIMSS NCA Board Member

This is an excellent book on financial planning for physicians and health professionals. It is all inclusive yet very easy to read with much valuable information. And, I have been expanding my business knowledge with all of Dr. Marcinko’s prior books. I highly recommend this one, too. It is a fine educational tool for all doctors.

―Dr. David B. Lumsden MD MS MA,Orthopedic Surgeon, Baltimore, Maryland

There is no other comprehensive book like it to help doctors, nurses, and other medical providers accumulate and preserve the wealth that their years of education and hard work have earned them.
―Dr. Jason Dyken MD MBA,Dyken Wealth Strategies, Gulf Shores, Alabama

I plan to give a copy of this book written
by doctors and for doctors’ to all my prospects, physician, and nurse clients. It may be the definitive text on this important topic.
―Alexander Naruska CPA,Orlando, Florida

Health professionals are small business owners who need to apply their self-discipline tactics in establishing and operating successful practices. Talented trainees are leaving the medical profession because they fail to balance the cost of attendance against a realistic business and financial plan. Principles like budgeting, saving, and living below one’s means, in order to make future investments for future growth, asset protection, and retirement possible are often lacking. This textbook guides the medical professional in his/her financial planning life journey from start to finish. It ranks a place in all medical school libraries and on each of our bookshelves.
―Dr. Thomas M. DeLauro DPM,Professor and Chairman – Division of Medical Sciences, New York College of Podiatric Medicine

Physicians are notoriously excellent at diagnosing and treating medical conditions. However, they are also notoriously deficient in managing the business aspects of their medical practices. Most will earn $20-30 million in their medical lifetime, but few know how to create wealth for themselves and their families. This book will help fill the void in physicians’ financial education. I have two recommendations: 1) every physician, young and old, should read this book; and 2) read it a second time!
―Dr. Neil Baum MD,Clinical Associate Professor of Urology, Tulane Medical School, New Orleans, Louisiana

I worked with a Certified Medical Planner™ on several occasions in the past, and will do so again in the future. This book codified the vast body of knowledge that helped in all facets of my financial life and professional medical practice.
Dr. James E. Williams DABPS, Foot and Ankle Surgeon, Conyers, Georgia

***

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

***

YOUR THOUGHTS ARE APPRECIATED.

SECOND OPINIONS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

Thank You

My Academic “Chair” and “Teaching Philosophy”

Colleges and Universities

TO H.R. RECRUITERS, UNIVERSITY HIRING MANAGERS & SEARCH COMMITTEES

Sooth My Academic Teaching and Classroom Withdrawal Pangs!


cropped-dem

I’m screening for my next university Dean, Chair or teaching Professorship opportunity.

Currently, an endowed Resident-Scholar completing a text book production assignment complete with aligned case models, tests, quizzes, rubrics, curriculum teaching portfolio, and accreditation review.

Two-decades of domestic and international teaching experience and credentials in health economics, finance, investing, business, policy, risk management, IT and administration. Hundreds of peer-reviewed and trade publications [TNTC] with 30 major textbooks redacted in more than a thousand university libraries [NIH, Library of Congress and National Institute Health, etc]. Public and population health global speaker and thought leader. Wall Street experience as start-up founder, entrepreneur and CXO.

Ideal mentor for under graduate thru post-doctoral and fellowship students [PhD, DBA, MD/DO, MHA and MBA, etc].

Compensation important, but fit is paramount as servant-leader.
[+] RANKED: Google Scholar and “H” Index
CV available upon request.

***

DEM avatar

Dr. Marcinko Teaching Philosophy

CHAIR: Chair 3.0 Philosophy Dr. Marcinko

THANK YOU
770-448-0769
MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com
***

RISK MANAGEMENT, Liability Insurance and Asset Protection Strategies

FOR PHYSICIANS AND THEIR FINANCIAL ADVISORS

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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REVIEWS:

“Physicians who don’t understand modern risk management, insurance, business, and asset protection principles are sitting ducks waiting to be taken advantage of by unscrupulous insurance agents and financial advisors; and even their own prospective employers or partners. This comprehensive volume from Dr. David Marcinko and his co-authors will go a long way toward educating physicians on these critical subjects that were never taught in medical school or residency training.”
Dr. James M. Dahle, MD, FACEP, Editor of The White Coat Investor, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA


“With time at a premium, and so much vital information packed into one well organized resource, this comprehensive textbook should be on the desk of everyone serving in the healthcare ecosystem. The time you spend reading this frank and compelling book will be richly rewarded.”
—Dr. J. Wesley Boyd, MD, PhD, MA, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Risk-Management-Liability-Insurance-and-Asset-Protection-Strategies-for/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781498725989

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***

PODCAST: Traditional Medicare Part A for Hospital Coverage and Part B for Physician and Outpatient Services

UNDERSTAND AND KNOW THE DIFFERENCE

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Your thoughts are appreciated.

THANK YOU

***

PODCAST: Laboratory Test Costs in EHRs and Physician Behavior


Johns Hopkins Hospital Listed the Cost of 61 Lab Tests on Doctors’ Computer Screens … While They Were Ordering Labs.



By Dr. Eric Bricker MD

Results:

–Just Seeing the Cost of the Lab Test DECREASED the Number of Labs Ordered Per Patient by 9%.

–Doctors Also SUBSTITUTED a Lower Cost Lab Test for a Higher Cost Lab Test 10,000 Times.

The Doctors Were NOT Clinically Directed to Change Their Behavior.

The Doctors’ Pay Was NOT Affected by Their Lab Ordering Either Way.

This Study Illustrates How Giving Doctors Cost Information in a Setting of Clinical and Financial Independence AUTOMATICALLY Decreases Healthcare Waste.

Doctors Can Be Much Better Stewards of Healthcare Dollars … and the Technological Innovation Needed is Minimal.

Disclosure: Dr. Bricker is the Chief Medical Officer of Virtual Care Company First Stop Health.

YOUR COMMENTS ARE APPRECIATED.

Thank You

***

REAL ESTATE for Physician Investors

SOME GUIDELINES FOR COLLEAGUES

Touring with Marcinko | The Leading Business Education ...

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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According to Rick Kahler MS CFP® ChFC CCIM [www.KahlerFinancial.com] real estate is one of the largest asset classes in the world. The family home is the largest asset many middle-class Americans own. And, real estate makes up a significant portion of the net worth of many wealth accumulators. Directly owning real estate is not an investment for the faint of heart, the armchair investor, or the uneducated. Most wealth accumulators would do well to leave direct ownership of real estate to the pros and invest in real estate investment trusts (REITs) instead [personal communication].

Still, as we have seen, the lure of investing in a tangible asset like real estate is enticing for high risk tolerant physician-investors who need a sense of control and interaction with their investments. If you are among them, here are a few guidelines that may keep you on a profitable path.

1. Don’t attempt to purchase investment real estate without the help of a commercial real estate specialist who is a fiduciary bound to look out for your best interest. Engage a Certified Commercial Investment Member (CCIM) with years of training and experience in analyzing and acquiring investment real estate. To find a CCIM near you, go to http://www.ccim.com.

2. You will sign a disclosure agreement that will tell you who the Realtor represents. Be sure the Realtor you engage represents you and not the seller, both parties, or neither party.

3. Never trust the income and expense data provided by the seller’s Realtor. While a seller represented by a CCIM will have a greater chance of supplying you with accurate data, most will significantly understate expenses and overstate the capitalization rate. Selling Realtors often understate the average annual cost of repairs and maintenance. I estimate this annual expense at 10%.

4. Another often understated expense is management. Many owners manage their own properties, so the selling broker doesn’t include an estimate for management expenses. They should. Real estate doesn’t manage itself, ever. You will either need to hire professional management or do your own management (always a scary proposition). Even if you do it yourself, you have an opportunity cost of your time, so you must include a management fee in the expenses. Most small residential apartments and single-family homes will pay 10% of their rents to a manager.

5. You must verify all the costs presented to you by the seller’s Realtor. Demand copies of at least the last three and preferably five years of tax returns. Research items like utility bills, property taxes, legal fees, insurance costs and repairs, maintenance costs, replacement reserves, tax preparation and all management fees. As a rule of thumb, expenses will average 40% of rental income on average-aged properties where the tenants pay all utilities except water. Newer properties may have expenses as low as 35%, while older properties can be as high as 50%.

6. By subtracting the vacancy rate and stabilized expenses from the rent, you will find the net operating income. This is the income you will put in your pocket—assuming the property is paid for. By dividing the net operating income by the purchase price, you will find the return you will receive on your investment, called the capitalization or “cap” rate. In Rapid City SD, for example, the cap rate tends to be 4% for single-family homes, 5% to 8% for duplexes to eight-plexes, and 8% to 12% for larger residential and commercial properties.

Citation: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

ASSESSMENT: Yes, physician-investors and all of us can build wealth with real estate. You just need to educate yourself, work hard, start conservatively, think long-term, and be prepared for lean years. This is not a quick or easy path to riches.

Your comments are appreciated.

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

THANK YOU

***

PODCAST: Nursing Home Care

Residents disproportionately affected by COVID-19

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New Covid-19 death data reveals 'hidden' crisis in care ...

BY JAMES BLUMENSTOCK MA

Residents of nursing homes have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19. The nature of this coronavirus—which is particularly harmful to older adults and people with multiple chronic conditions—has left residents vulnerable.

Additionally, the pandemic has exacerbated existing challenges in our fragmented long-term care system, which is financed, regulated, and administered by states, the federal government, and private care facilities.

During this webinar, panelists discussed policy options to support high quality care for nursing home residents during the COVID-19 pandemic.

NOTE: This webinar is a project of the Alliance for Health Policy and NIHCM Foundation, in collaboration with The Commonwealth Fund.

PODCAST: https://nihcm.org/publications/nursing-home-care

Your thoughts are appreciated

THANK YOU

***

AGI: What it is – How it Works?

ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME

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BY Dr. DAVID EDWARD MARCINKO MBA CMP®

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

The U.S. individual tax return is based around the concepts of Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) and Taxable Income (TI).  AGI is the amount that shows up at the bottom of page one of Form 1040, individual income tax return.  It is the sum of all of the taxpayer’s income less certain allowed adjustments (like alimony, one-half of self-employment taxes, a percentage of self-employed health insurance, retirement plan contributions and IRAs, moving expenses, early withdrawal penalties and interest on student loans).  This amount is important because it is used to calculate various limitations within the area of itemized deductions (e.g., medical deductions: 10 percent of AGI; miscellaneous itemized deductions: 2 percent of AGI). 

When a healthcare professional taxpayer hears the phrase “an above the line deduction”, the line being referenced is the AGI line on the tax return.  Generally, it is better for a deduction to be an above the line deduction, because that number helps a taxpayer in two ways.  First, it reduces AGI, and second, since it reduces AGI, it is also reducing the amounts of limitations placed on other deductions as noted above.

Obviously, if there is an above the line there is also a “below the line” deduction.  These below the line deductions are itemized deductions (or the standard deduction if itemizing is not used) plus any personal exemptions allowed. AGI less these deductions provides the taxable income on which income tax is actually calculated. All of that being said, it is better for a deduction to be an above the line deduction. Although this is a bit dry, it helps to understand the concepts in order to know where items provide the most benefit to the medical professional taxpayer.

                            PERSONAL TAXATION CALCULATIONS

Gross Income (all income, from whatever source derived, including illegal activities, cash, indirect for the benefit of, debt forgiveness, barter, dividends, interest, rents, royalties, annuities, trusts, and alimony payments-no more)

    Less non-taxable exclusions (municipal bonds, scholarships, inheritance, insurance

                                            proceeds, social security and unemployment income [full or

                                            partial exclusion], etc.).

Total Income

    Less Deductions for AGI (alimony, IRA contributions, capital gains, 1/2 SE tax,

                                               moving, personal, business and investment expenses, and

                                               penalties, etc.). 

Adjusted Gross Income (bottom Form 1040)

    Less Itemized Deductions from AGI, (medical, charitable giving, casualty,

involuntary conversions, theft, job and miscellaneous expenses, etc.), or

    Less Standard Deduction (based on filing status)

    Less Personal Exemptions (per dependents, subject to phase outs)

Taxable Income

   Calculate Regular Tax

      Plus Additional Taxes (AMT, etc.)

      Minus Credits (child care, foreign tax credit, earned income housing, etc.)

      Plus Other Taxes

Total Tax Due

YOUR THOUGHTS ARE APPRECIATED.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Thank You

***

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On Purchasing Individual BONDS!

A Seldom Discussed Investing Topics for Doctors and All Investors Until Now?

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

MARKET ALERT: Investors fled into the bond market Monday, pulling the yield on the closely watched 10-year Treasury to its lowest since February, with investors dashing out of equities on fears that rising COVID-19 infections will threaten recovery in the world’s largest economy.

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Now – Trading individual bonds is not like trading stocks. Stocks can be bought at uniform prices and are traded through exchanges. Most bonds trade over the counter, and individual brokers price them.  But, price transparency has gotten better in the last decade. 

For example, in 1999, the bond markets gained clearness from the House of Representatives’ Bond Price Competition Improvement Act of 1999. Responding to this pioneering law, the site http://www.investinginbonds.com was established. This site provides current prices on bonds that have traded more than four times the previous day. With the advent of Investinginbonds.com and real-time reporting of many trades, investors are much better off today.  Many well regarded brokers including Schwab, Ameritrade, and Fidelity Investments now have dedicated websites devoted to bond trading and pricing. 

Fidelity Investments chose to disclose its fee structure for all bonds, making it clear what it will cost you per trade. Fidelity charges $1 per bond trade. Some on-line brokers charge a flat fee as well, ranging from $10.95 at Zions Direct to $45 at TD Ameritrade. Depending on the number of bonds trading, one may be more complimentary than another. The trading fee disclosures, however, do not divulge the spreads between the buy and sell price embedded in the transaction that some dealer is making in the channel. Keep in mind that only by comparison shopping can assist you in finding the best transaction price, after all fees are taken into account. Other sites may not charge any fee, but rather embed the profit in the spread.

Despite the difficulty in pricing and transparency, investing in individual bonds offers several rewards over purchasing bond mutual funds.

First, bond mutual funds never mature.

Second, you know exactly what you will be receiving in interest each year.  You will also know the exact maturity date. 

Furthermore, your individual investment is protected against interest rate risk, at least over the full term to maturity.  Both individual bonds and bond funds share interest-rate risk (the risk of locking up an investment at a given rate, only to see rates rise). This pushes bond prices down.  At least with an individual bond, you can re-invest it at the higher, market rate once the bond matures.

But, the lack of a fixed maturity date on a bond mutual fund causes an open ended problem; there is no promise of the original investment back.  Short of default, an individual bond will return all principal and pay all interest assuming you hold it to maturity.  Bond funds are not likely to default as most funds maintain positions in hundreds of individual bonds.  The force of interest rate risk to individual bond or bond mutual fund prices depends on the maturity of a bond investment: the longer the maturity of a bond or bond fund (average), the more the price will drop due to rising rates. This is known as duration.

Duration is a statistical term that measures the price sensitivity to yield, is the primary measurement of a bond or bond fund’s sensitivity to interest rate changes.  Duration indicates approximately how much the price of a bond or bond fund will adjust in the reverse direction given a rise in interest rates. For instance, an individual bond with an average duration of five years will fall in value approximately 5% if rates rise by 1% and the opposite is accurate as well.

Although stated in years, duration is not simply a gauge of time. Instead, duration signals how much the price of your bond investment is likely to oscillate when there is an up or down movement in interest rates. The higher the duration number, the more susceptible your bond investment will be to changes in interest rates.  If you have money in a bond or bond fund that holds primarily long-term bonds, expect the value of that fund to decline, perhaps significantly, when interest rates rise. The higher a bond’s duration, the greater its sensitivity to interest rates alterations. This means fluctuations in price, whether positive or negative, will be more prominent.

For example, a bond fund with 10-year duration will diminish in value by 10 percent if interest rates increase by one percent. On the other hand, the bond fund will rise in value by 10 percent if interest rates descend by one percent. The important concept to remember is once you recognize a bond’s or bond fund’s duration, you can forecast how it will react to a change in interest rates.

UPDATE:

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note, which serves as a benchmark for interest rates across the US economy, fell for an eighth straight day last week to below 1.3%—the lowest level since February. And, the 10-year yield fell to 1.181% with an intra-day low of 1.176% yesterday, which was the lowest since February 11.

Since bond prices and yields move in opposite directions, falling yields signal higher demand for Treasuries.

Why it matters: At the most basic level, the 10-year yield is a key indicator of investors’ confidence in future US economic growth. As the Delta variant spreads and threatens to slow the economic recovery, the fall in yields means investors are souring on a mega growth spurt and snapping up safer assets rather than riskier stocks.

What does this mean for inflation? Because investors sell bonds when they think inflation is coming, the runup in bond prices means the worst of Wall Street’s inflation concerns may be over. “It feels like we have moved from thinking inflation will be transitory, to fearing growth will be transitory,” Art Hogan, chief marketing strategist at National Securities, said.

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER Textbook: https://www.amazon.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-Advisors/dp/1482240289/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418580820&sr=8-1&keywords=david+marcinko

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***

STOCKS: A Very Skewed Market “Boom”

PRICES CHANGES FOR THE LAST SEVEN YEARS

***

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Your thoughts are appreciated.

SECOND OPINIONS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

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***

Transformational Health 2.0 Business Skills for Doctors

THE BUSINESS OF MEDICAL PRACTICE

Textbook Review

***

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The BUSINESS [Economic] CYCLE: What is it Really?

Of BUll and Bear Markets, too!

See the source image

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

The business cycle is also known as the economic cycle and reflects the expansion or contraction in economic activity. Understanding the business cycle and the indicators used to determine its phases may influence investment or economic business decisions and financial or medical planning expectations. Although often depicted as the regular rising and falling of an episodic curve, the business cycle is very irregular in terms of amplitude and duration.

Moreover, many elements move together during the cycle and individual elements seldom carry enough momentum to cause the cycle to move. However, elements may have a domino effect on one another, and this is ultimately drives the cycle.  We can also have a large positive cycle, coincident with a smaller but still negative cycle, as seen in the current healthcare climate of today.

  1. First Phase: Trough to Recovery (production driven)

Scenario: A depressed GNP leads to declining industrial production and capacity utilization. Decreased workloads result in improved labor productivity and reduced labor (unit) costs until actual producer (wholesale) prices decline.

  1. Second Phase: Recovery to Expansion (consumer driven)

Scenario: CPI declines (due to reduced wholesale prices) and consumer real income rises, improving consumer sentiment and actual demand for consumer goods.

  1. Third Phase: Expansion to Peak (production driven)

Scenario: GNP rises leading to increased industrial production and capacity utilization. But, labor productivity declines and unit labor costs and producer (wholesale) prices rise.

  1. Fourth Phase: Peak to Contraction (consumer driven)

Scenario: CPI rises making consumer real income and sentiment erode until consumer demand, and ultimately purchases, shrink dramatically.  Recessions may occur and economists have an alphabet used to describe them.

For example, with a V, the drop and recovery is quick. For U, the economy moves up more sluggishly from the bottom. A W is what you would expect: repeated recoveries and declines. An L shaper recession describes a prolonged dry economic spell or even depression.


NOTE: Historically, contractions have had a shorter duration than expansions.

Bull and Bear Markets for Medical Professionals

A bull market is generally one of rising stock prices, while a bear market is the opposite. There are usually two bulls for every one bear market over the long term.

More specifically, a bear market is defined as a drop of twenty percent or more in a market index from its high, and can vary in duration and severity.  While a bull market has no such threshold requirement to exist, other than they exist between these two periods of sharp decline.

Whither the Bear?

As a doctor, your action plan in a bear market depends on many variables, with perhaps your age being the most important:

In your 30s:

  • Pay off debts, school or practice loans.
  • Invest in safe money market mutual funds, cash or CDs.
  • Start retirement plan or 401-K account.

In your 40s:

  • Increase your pension plan or 401-K contributions.
  • Stay weighted more toward equity investments.
  • Review your goals, risk tolerance and portfolio.

In your 50s:

  • Position assets for ready cash instruments.
  • Diversify into stock, bonds and cash.

Retirement:

  • Maintain 3 years of ready cash living expenses.
  • Reduce, but still maintain your exposure to equities.

ASSESSMENT: So, where are we right now in the economic business cycle? Your thoughts are appreciated.

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.amazon.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-Advisors/dp/1482240289/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418580820&sr=8-1&keywords=david+marcinko

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***

ENTREPRENEURSHIP Rising Again!

Try (or learn about) Entrepreneurship

BY DR. DAVID EDWARD MARCINKO MBA CMP®

One of the greatest things about the virtual economy is the expanded opportunity for people to branch out on their own and create something using their own expertise. Related to this is the growing societal desire to have more free time and a more balanced, efficient life overall. 

In fact, years ago when I was in business school, I learned that during a recession when jobs were sparse – folks would either go back to school to re-engineer and re-educate OR start their own business.

Today – If the pandemic taught us anything, it’s that we need to be able to pivot when circumstances call for it. In the years ahead, there will be a premium on flexibility, portability, and improvisation; knowing how to earn income outside the traditional employer-employee relationship will continue to be an especially valuable skill. 

entrepreneur

ASSESSMENT: So, if you are a physician, nurse, medical professional or financial advisor in the healthcare space, think about what you’re naturally good at (or at least interested in), and determine if there’s an opportunity to monetize it in some way on your own. Your career might thank you for it!

Your thoughts and comments are appreciated.

http://www.CERTIFIEDMEDICALPLANNER.org

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CONTACT: Ann Miller RN MHA

MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

Ph: 770-448-0769

Second Opinions: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

THANK YOU

***

Are Today’s Doctors Desperate?

Emotions Rise with Healthcare Reform

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™

[Publisher-in-Chief]

NOTE:  I penned this essay more than a decade ago.dem2

Managed care is a prospective payment method where medical care is delivered regardless of the quantity or frequency of service, for a fixed payment, in the aggregate. It is not traditional fee-for-service medicine or the individual personal care of the past, but is essentially utilitarian in nature and collective in intent. Will new-age healthcare reform be even more draconian?

Unhappy Physicians

There are many reasons why doctors are professionally and financially unhappy, some might even say desperate, because of managed care; not to mention the specter of healthcare reform from the Obama administration. For example:

  • A staggering medical student loan debt burden of $100,000-250,000 is not unusual for new practitioners. The federal Health Education Assistance Loan (HEAL) program reported that for the Year 2000, it squeezed significant repayment settlements from its Top 5 list of deadbeat doctor debtors. This included a $303,000 settlement from a New York dentist, $186,000 from a Florida osteopath, $158,000 from a New Jersey podiatrist, $128,000 from a Virginia podiatrist, and $120,000 from a Virginia dentist. The agency also excluded 303 practitioners from Medicare, Medicaid, and other federal healthcare programs and had their cases referred for nonpayment of debt.
  • Because of the flagging economy, medical school applications nationwide have risen. “Previously, there were a lot of different opportunities out there for young bright people”; according to Rachel Pentin-Maki; RN, MHA”; not so today. In fact, Physicians Practice Digest recently stated, “Medicine is fast becoming a job in which you work like a slave, eke out a middle class existence, and have patients, malpractice insurers, and payers questioning your motives.” Remarkably, the Cornell University School of Continuing Education has designed a program to give prospective medical school students a real-world peek, both good and bad.

The Ripple Effects of Managed Care and Reform

“Many people who are currently making a great effort and investment to become doctors may be heading for a role and a way of life that are fundamentally different from what they expect and desire,” according to Stephen Scheidt, MD, director of the $1,000 Cornell fee program; why?

  • Fewer fee-for-service patients and more discounted patients.
  • More paperwork and scrutiny of decisions with lost independence and morale.
  • Reputation equivalency (i.e., all doctors in the plan must be good), or commoditization (i.e., a doctor is a doctor is a doctor).
  • The provider is at risk for (a) utilization and acuity, (b) actuarial accuracy, (c) cost of delivering medical care, and (d) adverse patient selection.
  • Practice costs are increasing beyond the core rate of inflation.
  • Medicare reimbursements are continually cut.

Mad Obama

Early Opinions

Richard Corlin MD, opined back in 2002 that “these are circumstances that cannot continue because we are going to see medical groups disappearing.” Furthermore, he stated, “This is an emergency that lawmakers have to address.” Such cuts also stand to hurt physicians with private payers since commercial insurers often tie their reimbursement schedules to Medicare’s resources. “That’s the ripple effect here,” says Anders Gilberg, the Washington lobbyist for the Medical Group Management Associations (MGMA).

Assessment

And so, some desperate doctors are pursing these sources of relief, among many others:

  • A growing number of doctors are abandoning traditional medicine to start “boutique” practices that are restricted to patients who pay an annual retainer of $1,500 and up for preferred services and special attention. Franchises for the model are also available.
  • Regardless of location, the profession of medicine is no longer ego-enhancing or satisfying; some MDs retire early or leave the profession all together. Few recommend it, as a career anymore.

Assessment

To compound the situation, it is well known that doctors are notoriously poor investors and do not attend to their own personal financial well being, as they expertly minister to their patients’ physical illnesses.

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Tell us what you think? Are you a desperate doctor? Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

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References:

  1. www.managedcaremagazine.com/archives/9809/9809/.qna_dickey.shtml
  2. www.hrsa.dhhs.gov/news-pa/heal.htm
  3. www.bhpr.hrsa.gov/dsa/sfag/health-professions/bk1prt4.htm
  4. Pamela L. Moore, “Can We All Just Get Along: Bridging the Generation Gap, Physicians Practice Digest (May/June 2001).

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CASH FLOW ANALYSIS: Real Life ACO Accounting Example

ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATION EXAMPLE

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BY DR. DAVID EDWARD MARCINKO MBA CMP®

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What is an ACO?

ACOs are groups of doctors, hospitals, and other health care providers, who come together voluntarily to give coordinated high-quality care to their Medicare patients. The goal of coordinated care is to ensure that patients get the right care at the right time, while avoiding unnecessary duplication of services and preventing medical errors.

When an ACO succeeds both in delivering high-quality care and spending health care dollars more wisely, the ACO will share in the savings it achieves for the Medicare program.

Citation: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Case Model

Now, suppose that in a new Accountable Care Organization [ACO] contract, a certain medical practice was awarded a new global payment or capitation styled contract that increased revenues by $100,000 for the next fiscal year. The practice had a gross margin of 35% that was not expected to change because of the new business. However, $10,000 was added to medical overhead expenses for another assistant and all Account’s Receivable (AR) are paid at the end of the year, upon completion of the contract.

Cost of Medical Services Provided (COMSP):

The Costs of Medical Services Provided (COMSP) for the ACO business contract represents the amount of money needed to service the patients provided by the contract.  Since gross margin is 35% of revenues, the COMSP is 65% or $65,000.  Adding the extra overhead results in $75,000 of new spending money (cash flow) needed to treat the patients. Therefore, divide the $75,000 total by the number of days the contract extends (one year) and realize the new contract requires about $ 205.50 per day of free cash flows.

Assumptions

Financial cash flow forecasting from operating activities allows a reasonable projection of future cash needs and enables the doctor to err on the side of fiscal prudence. It is an inexact science, by definition, and entails the following assumptions:

  • All income tax, salaries and Accounts Payable (AP) are paid at once.
  • Durable medical equipment inventory and pre-paid advertising remain constant.
  • Gains/losses on sale of equipment and depreciation expenses remain stable.
  • Gross margins remain constant.
  • The office is efficient so major new marginal costs will not be incurred.

Physician Reactions:

Since many physicians are still not entirely comfortable with global reimbursement, fixed payments, capitation or ACO reimbursement contracts; practices may be loath to turn away short-term business in the ACA era.  Physician-executives must then determine other methods to generate the additional cash, which include the following general suggestions:

1. Extend Account’s Payable

Discuss your cash flow difficulties with vendors and emphasize their short-term nature. A doctor and her practice still has considerable cache’ value, especially in local communities, and many vendors are willing to work them to retain their business

2. Reduce Accounts Receivable

According to most cost surveys, about 30% of multi-specialty group’s accounts receivable (ARs) are unpaid at 120 days. In addition, multi-specialty groups are able to collect on only about 69% of charges. The rest was written off as bad debt expenses or as a result of discounted payments from Medicare and other managed care companies. In a study by Wisconsin based Zimmerman and Associates, the percentages of ARs unpaid at more than 90 days is now at an all time high of more than 40%. Therefore, multi-specialty groups should aim to keep the percentage of ARs unpaid for more than 120 days, down to less than 20% of the total practice. The safest place to be for a single specialty physician is probably in the 30-35% range as anything over that is just not affordable.

The slowest paid specialties (ARs greater than 120 days) are: multi-specialty group practices; family practices; cardiology groups; anesthesiology groups; and gastroenterologists, respectively. So work hard to get your money, faster. Factoring, or selling the ARs to a third party for an immediate discounted amount is not usually recommended.

3. Borrow with Short-Term Bridge Loans

Obtain a line of credit from your local bank, credit union or other private sources, if possible in an economically constrained environment. Beware the time value of money, personal loan guarantees, and onerous usury rates. Also, beware that lenders can reduce or eliminate credit lines to a medical practice, often at the most inopportune time.

4. Cut Expenses

While this is often possible, it has to be done without demoralizing the practice’s staff.

5.  Reduce Supply Inventories

If prudently possible; remember things like minimal shipping fees, loss of revenue if you run short, etc.

6. Taxes

Do not stop paying withholding taxes in favor of cash flow because it is illegal.

Hyper-Growth Model:

Now, let us again suppose that the practice has attracted nine more similar medical contracts. If we multiple the above example tenfold, the serious nature of potential cash flow problem becomes apparent. In other words, the practice has increased revenues to one million dollars, with the same 35% margin, 65% COMSP and $100,000 increase in operating overhead expenses.  Using identical mathematical calculations, we determine that $750,000 / 365days equals $2,055.00 per day of needed new free cash flows!  Hence, indiscriminate growth without careful contract evaluation and cash flow analysis is a prescription for potential financial disaster.

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Medical FINANCIAL PLANNING “Holistic” STRATEGIES

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Personal BUDGET Rules for Doctors

Personal Physician Budgeting Rules

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BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

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Budgeting is probably one of the greatest tools in building wealth. However, it is also one of the greatest weaknesses among physicians who tend to live a certain lifestyle. This includes living in an exclusive neighborhood, driving an expensive car, wearing imported suits and a fine watch, all of which do not lend themselves to expense budgeting. Only one in ten medical professionals has a personal budget. Fear, or a lack of knowledge, is a major cause of procrastination.

The following guidelines will assist in this microeconomic endeavor:

  1. Set reasonable goals and estimate annual income. Do not keep large amounts of cash at     home, or in the office. Deposit it in a money market account for safety and interest.
  1. Do not pay bills early, do not have more taxes withheld from your salary than you owe, and develop spending estimates and budget fixed expenses first. Fixed expenses are usually contractual, and may include housing, utilities, food, telephone, social security, medical, debt repayment, homeowner’ or renter’s insurance, auto, life and disability insurance, and maintenance, etc.
  1. Make variable expenses a priority. Variable expenses are not usually contractual, and may include clothing, education, recreational, travel, vacation, gas, entertainment, gifts, furnishings, savings, investments, etc.
  1. Trim variable expenses by 10-15 percent, and fixed expenses, when possible. Ultimately, all fixed expenses get paid and become variable in the long run.
  1. Use carve-out or set-asides for big ticket items and differentiate “wants from needs.”
  1. Know the difference between saving and investing. Savers tend to be risk adverse and     investors understand risk and takes steps to mitigate it.
  1. Determine shortfalls or excesses with the budget period.
  1. Track actual expenses.
  1. Calculate both income and expenses as a percentage of the total, and determine if there    is a better way to allocate resources. Then, review the budget on a monthly basis to determine if there is a variance. Determine if the variance was avoidable, unavoidable, or a result of inaccurate assumptions, and take needed corrective action.

***

How to budget for medical expenses

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Verify Your Budget and Follow a Financial Plan

The process of establishing a budget relies heavily on guesswork, and the use of software or “apps”, that seamlessly track expenditures and help your budget and your financial plan become more of reality. Most doctors underestimate their true expenses, so lumping and best guesses on expense usually prove very inaccurate. Personal financial software and mobile phone applications make the verification of budgets easier. Once your personal accounts are setup, free apps like MINT.com will let give you a detailed report on where your money is going and the adjustments you must make. Few professions make larger contributions to the Internal Revenue Service than physicians and the medical profession. It is very important to categorize different budget categories not only to be proactive about your expenses, but also to accurately reflect the effect your different expenditures have on your real savings capability. All expense dollars are not equal.

For example, a mortgage payment, which is mostly interest expense in the early years, is likewise mostly tax deductible. Spending money on your family vacation is typically not tax deductible. Itemized deductions, which are deductions that a US taxpayer can claim on their tax return in order to reduce their Adjustable Gross Income (AGI), may include such costs as property taxes, vehicle registration fees, income taxes, mortgage expense, investment interest, charitable contributions, medical expenses (to the extent the expenses exceed 10% of the taxpayers AGI) and more.

Employing a qualified certified medical planneR® that utilizes a cash-flow based financial planning software program may help the physician identify their actual after-tax projected cash flow and more accurately plan their future.

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

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40 Years – MICROSOFT Corp.

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About the Institute of Medical Business Advisors, Inc

The Institute of Medical Business Advisors, Inc provides a team of experienced, senior level consultants led by iMBA Chief Executive Officer Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP™ MBBS [Hon] and President Hope Rachel Hetico RN MHA CMP™ to provide going contact with our clients throughout all phases of each project, with most of the communications between iMBA and the key client participants flowing through this Senior Team.  iMBA Inc., and its skilled staff of certified professionals have many years of significant experience, enjoy a national reputation in the healthcare consulting field, and are supported by an unsurpassed research and support staff of CPAs, MBAs, MPHs, PhDs, CMPs™, CFPs® and JDs to maintain a thorough and extensive knowledge of the healthcare environment. The iMBA team approach emphasizes providing superior service in a timely, cost-effective manner to our clients by working together to focus on identifying and presenting solutions for our clients’ unique, individual needs.

The iMBA Inc project team’s exclusive focus on the healthcare industry provides a unique advantage for our clients.  Over the years, our industry specialization has allowed iMBA to maintain instantaneous access to a comprehensive collection of healthcare industry-focused data comprised of both historically-significant resources as well as the most recent information available.  iMBA Inc’s specific, in-depth knowledge and understanding of the “value drivers” in various healthcare markets, in addition to the transaction marketplace for healthcare entities, will provide you with a level of confidence unsurpassed in the public health, health economics, management, administration, and financial planning and consulting fields.  iMBA Inc’s information resources and network of healthcare industry textbook resources enhanced by our professional consultants and research staff, ensure that the iMBA project team will maintain the highest level of knowledge regarding the current and future trends of the specific specialty market related to the project, as well as the healthcare industry overall, which serves as the “foundation” for each of our client engagements.

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MEDICAL ERRORS: Incidence and Prevelance

Robert James Cimasi

Todd A. Zigrang

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“Knowing is not enough; we must apply. Willing is not enough; we must do. Goethe [1]

As developments in research and technology have advanced medical practice, the improved ability to diagnose and treat patients has led to an increased volume of medical assessments and procedures performed. However, these increases in the volume of procedures performed by physicians have led to an increase in both the risk of harm to patients and the exposure to liability for physicians.[2] Today, most healthcare services are delivered not by individual Marcus Welby type of physicians,[3] but through a group practice, healthcare organization, or hospital system. While there are numerous advantages to physicians providing care as employees of a healthcare enterprise, some of the unintended consequences exhibited under physician employment arrangements (e.g., diminishing physician autonomy, patient quotas, and limited time to spend with patients) have led to an increase in the potential for patient harm and subsequent physician liability.[4]  Additionally, as the overlap between the scope of practice for physicians and non-physicians continues to increase, the complexities of malpractice liability, which may jeopardize the licenses of both the supervising physician and the non-physician professional, may similarly increase.[5] The result of these increased risks, medical errors, disgruntled patients, and changing scopes of practice has produced an environment that is ripe for malpractice litigation.[6] 

Numerous studies and examinations of the reality of medical errors demonstrate the varied nature and causes contributing to these errors, and the need for the medical malpractice system.  The 2000 Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) landmark report, entitled, “To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System,” conservatively estimated that in 1997, “at least 44,000 and perhaps as many as 98,000 Americans die in hospitals each year as a result of medical errors.”[7] Moreover, the IOM report noted that out of 30,000 discharges at 51 randomly selected New York hospitals in 1984, adverse events occurred in 3.7% of all hospitalizations or (1,110 hospitalizations), with 58% of adverse events (approximately 644 hospitalizations) caused by preventable medical errors, and 27.6% of adverse events (approximately 306 hospitalizations) caused by negligence.[8]  In addition to medical errors, more than one million serious medication errors occur every year in U.S.[9] As observed in The Leapfrog Group’s study, one adverse drug effect (ADE) adds, on average, $2,000 to the cost of a hospitalization, which totals over $7.5 billion per year nationwide.[10]

Other studies have updated the figures relied upon in the IOM report. In 2010, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) estimated that approximately 13.5% of hospitalized Medicare beneficiaries experienced adverse events during their hospitalizations, 44% of which were deemed preventable by independent physician reviewers.[11] Within this estimate, the OIG subdivided the adverse events into four clinical categories:

  • Events related to medication – 31%;
  • Events related to ongoing patient care – 28%;
  • Events related to surgery or other procedures – 26%; and,
  • Events related to infection – 15%.[12]

A 2013 study published in Journal of Patient Safety combined the OIG’s estimate with the estimates of three other studies[13] relating to the prevalence of medical errors to conclude that over “210,000 preventable adverse events per year…contribute to the death of hospitalized patients,” with numerous additional errors shortening patients’ lifespans and causing other harms.[14]

The debate surrounding medical errors focuses not only on the number of adverse events in hospitals and deaths due to these adverse events, but also the causes of these adverse events.  Although the 2000 IOM report is widely cited for its estimate of deaths due to medical errors,[15] the report also provided one of the first arguments that many medical errors “could likely have been avoided had better systems of care been in place,” framing the medical error debate not solely on “incompetent or impaired providers” but also on the process of care delivery.[16] These process improvements can center on infrastructure as well as policies and procedures regarding the provision of medical care. The same IOM committee that published the 2000 report released a second report in 2001 entitled, “Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century,” which advocated for widespread change in overall structures and processes in the healthcare environment as a means to preventing medical errors and improving quality, and listed six “aims” for high quality care: safety; effectiveness; efficiency; equity; timeliness; and, patient-centeredness.[17]  However, a 2013 IOM report entitled, “Best Care at Lower Cost: The Path to Continuously Learning Health Care in America,” noted that, 12 years later, these six aims still had not been achieved, and attributed the “fragmented, uncoordinated, and diffusely organized” infrastructure of the U.S. healthcare delivery system to the lack of systemic processes in place.[18] Specifically addressing outpatient enterprise structures, a 2011 study on adverse drug events (ADEs) in ambulatory care settings noted the potential for infrastructure improvements to support the reduction of medical errors, stating that “as health information technology becomes more widespread in ambulatory health care delivery… automated surveillance for (adverse drug events) will become more feasible.”[19]

The OIG has provided similar guidance to healthcare providers regarding the relationship between structure and quality. In its revised guidance to nursing homes, the OIG recommended that nursing facilities can “promote compliance by having in place proper medication management processes,” such as utilizing a consultant pharmacist and continually training staff in proper medication management.[20]  Nevertheless, criticism still exists regarding the processes utilized by healthcare providers to reduce medical errors. In its 2010 report on adverse events suffered by Medicare beneficiaries, the OIG recommended that the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) “influence hospitals to reduce adverse events through enforcement of the conditions of participation” in Medicare, which includes sanctioning physicians through the peer review process.[21] Other studies have advanced the OIG’s claim a step further, arguing that “the hospital peer-review system has widespread failures that permit negligent care by physicians.”[22]

In an attempt “to improve patient safety by encouraging voluntary and confidential reporting of events that adversely affect patients,”[23] The Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act (PSQIA) of 2005, effective January 19, 2009, established a voluntary reporting system for medical errors.[24] Under PSQIA, to address provider fear that “patient safety event reports could be used against them in medical malpractice cases or in disciplinary proceedings,”[25] confidentiality provisions regarding the protection of “patient safety work product” were established.[26]Patient safety work product” includes any information that is collected while reporting and analyzing a patient safety event,[27] i.e., “a process or act of omission or commissions that resulted in hazardous health care conditions and/or unintended harm to the patient.[28] Under PSQIA, Patient Safety Organizations (PSOs) are charged with collecting and analyzing data under the supervision of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).[29]

Despite the numerous attempts and strategies to curtail the prevalence of medical errors, no definitive answer exists as to whether medical errors are properly attributable to process or physician errors on a large scale. If it were determined that most medical errors are mistakes from breakdowns in processes of care rather than the negligence of physicians, improving and implementing new and effective process controls may best reduce medical errors – and the resulting incidence of medical malpractice cases.[30] However, to date, the healthcare industry and the U.S. tort system are far from reaching this conclusion, leaving the tort system – as well as malpractice insurers and their physician insureds – to continue to grapple with this uncertainty.

https://media3.s-nbcnews.com/j/newscms/2016_18/1524261/errors_fd53fca207ac4622017a0b55e1dcb951.nbcnews-ux-2880-1000.png

[1]       “Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century,” Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, 2001, front matter.

[2]       “Overview of Medical Errors and Adverse Events,” By Maité Garrouste-Orgeas, et al., Annals of Intensive Care, Vol. 2, No. 2 (2012), p. 6.

[3]       “Healthcare Valuation: The Financial Appraisal of Enterprises, Assets, and Services,” Vol. 1, By Robert James Cimasi, MHA, ASA, FRICS, CVA, CM&AA, Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2014, p. xiii.

[4]       “Health Law: Cases, Materials, and Problems, 7th Edition,” By Barry R. Furrow, Thomas L. Greaney, Sandra H. Johnson, Timothy Stoltzfus Jost, and Robert L. Schwartz, St. Paul, MN: West Publishing Company, 2013, p. 507.

[5]       “Licensure of Health Care Professionals,” In “Health Care Law: A Practical Guide, Second Edition” By Scott Becker, Matthew Bender Co., 1998, § 16.02[4], p. 16-23.

[6]       “Health Law: Cases, Materials, and Problems, 7th Edition,” By Barry R. Furrow, Thomas L. Greaney, Sandra H. Johnson, Timothy Stoltzfus Jost, and Robert L. Schwartz, St. Paul, MN: West Publishing Company, 2013, p. 506-507.

[7]       “To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System,” Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, 2000, p. 26. The IOM study extrapolated data from the 1984 New York study, as well as a 1992 study from Colorado and Utah to the number of hospitalizations in 1997 to estimate the number of deaths due to medical errors in 1997. The report authors note that these extrapolations may be low because the studies:

  1. Considered only those patients whose injuries resulted in a specified level of harm;”
  2. Imposed a high threshold to determine whether an adverse event was preventable or negligent;” and,
  3. Included only errors that are documented in patient records.”

“To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System,” Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, 2000, p. 31.

[8]       “To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System,” Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, 2000, p. 30.

[9]     “Fact Sheet: Computerized Physician Order Entry,” The Leapfrog Group, March 3, 2009; “To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System,” By Institute of Medicine, 2000, p.1.

[10]     “Leapfrog Hospital Survey Results,” The Leapfrog Group, 2008, p. 3.

[11]     “Adverse Events in Hospitals: National Incidence among Medicare Beneficiaries,” Office of Inspector General, November 2010, p. 15, 22.

[12]     “Adverse Events in Hospitals: National Incidence among Medicare Beneficiaries,” Office of Inspector General, November 2010, p. 15.

[13]     “‘Global Trigger Tool’ Shows That Adverse Events in Hospitals May be Ten Times Greater Than Previously Measured,” By David C. Classen et al., Health Affairs, Vol. 30, No. 4 (2011); “Adverse Events in Hospitals: Case Study of Incidence Among Medicare Beneficiaries in Two Selected Counties,” Office of Inspector General, December 2008, http://oig.hhs.gov/oei/reports/OEI-06-08-00220.pdf (Accessed 2/17/15); “Temporal Trends in Rates of Patient Harm Resulting from Medical Care” By Christopher P. Landrigan, MD, MPH, et al., New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 363, No. 22 (November 24, 2010).

[14]     “A New, Evidence-Based Estimate of Patient Harms Associated with Hospital Care” By John T. James, PhD, Journal of Patient Safety, Vol. 9. No. 3 (September 2013), p. 125.

[15]     “How Many Die From Medical Mistakes in U.S. Hospitals?” By Marshall Allen, National Public Radio, September 20, 2013, http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2013/09/20/224507654/howmanydiefrommedicalmistakesinushospitals (Accessed 12/3/14).

[16]     “To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System,” Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, 2000, p. 30.

[17]     “Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century,” Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, 2001, p. ix, 25.

[18]     “Best Care at Lower Cost: The Path to Continuously Learning Health Care in America,” Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, 2009, p. 134.

[19]     “Adverse Drug Events in U.S. Adult Ambulatory Medical Care,” By Urmimala Sarkar et al., Health Services Research, Vol. 46, No. 5 (October 2011), p. 1527.

[20]     “OIG Supplemental Compliance Program Guidance for Nursing Facilities,” Federal Register Vol. 73, No. 190 (September 30, 2008), p. 56837.

[21]     “Adverse Events in Hospitals: National Incidence among Medicare Beneficiaries,” Office of Inspector General, November 2010, p. 32.

[22]     “A New, Evidence-Based Estimate of Patient Harms Associated with Hospital Care”, By John T. James, PhD, Journal of Patient Safety, Vol. 9. No. 3 (September 2013), p. 127.

[23]     “Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005,” Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, http://archive.ahrq.gov/news/newsroom/press-releases/2008/psoact.html (Accessed 3/5/15).

[24]     “Health Information Privacy: Understanding Patient Safety Confidentiality,” U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/psa/understanding/index.html (Accessed 3/5/15); “Patient Safety and Quality Improvement; Final Rule,” Federal Register, Vol. 73, No. 226 (November 21, 2008), p. 70732.

[25]     “Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005,” Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, http://archive.ahrq.gov/news/newsroom/press-releases/2008/psoact.html (Accessed 3/5/15).

[26]     “Patient Safety and Quality Improvement: Final Rule” Federal Register, Vol. 73, No. 226 (November 21, 2008), p. 70734.

[27]     “Patient Safety and Quality Improvement: Final Rule” Federal Register, Vol. 73, No. 226 (November 21, 2008), p. 70739.

[28]     “Patient Safety and Quality Improvement: Final Rule” Federal Register, Vol. 73, No. 226 (November 21, 2008), referring to footnote 7 in “Patient Safety and Quality Improvement: Proposed Rule” Federal Register, Vol. 73, No. 29 (February 12, 2008), p. 8113.

[29]     “Understanding Patient Safety Confidentiality” U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/psa/understanding/index.html (Accessed 3/5/15).

[30]     “To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System,” Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, 2000, p. 30.

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HOSPITALS and Health Care Organizations

Management Strategies, Operational Techniques, Tools, Templates and Case Studies

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Drawing on the expertise of decision-making professionals, leaders, and managers in health care organizations, Hospitals & Health Care Organizations: Management Strategies, Operational Techniques, Tools, Templates, and Case Studies addresses decreasing revenues, increasing costs, and growing consumer expectations in today’s increasingly competitive health care market.

Offering practical experience and applied operating vision, the authors integrate Lean managerial applications, and regulatory perspectives with real-world case studies, models, reports, charts, tables, diagrams, and sample contracts. The result is an integration of post PP-ACA market competition insight with Lean management and operational strategies vital to all health care administrators, comptrollers, and physician executives. The text is divided into three sections:

  1. Managerial Fundamentals
  2. Policy and Procedures
  3. Strategies and Execution

Using an engaging style, the book is filled with authoritative guidance, practical health care–centered discussions, templates, checklists, and clinical examples to provide you with the tools to build a clinically efficient system. Its wide-ranging coverage includes hard-to-find topics such as hospital inventory management, capital formation, and revenue cycle enhancement. Health care leadership, governance, and compliance practices like OSHA, HIPAA, Sarbanes–Oxley, and emerging ACO model policies are included. Health 2.0 information technologies, EMRs, CPOEs, and social media collaboration are also covered, as are 5S, Six Sigma, and other logistical enhancing flow-through principles. The result is a must-have, “how-to” book for all industry participants.

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ME-P Speaking Invitations

Dr. David E. Marcinko is at your Service

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Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP® enjoys personal coaching and public speaking and gives as many talks each year as possible, at a variety of medical society and financial services conferences around the country and world.

These have included lectures and visiting professorships at major academic centers, keynote lectures for hospitals, economic seminars and health systems, keynote lectures at city and statewide financial coalitions, and annual keynote lectures for a variety of internal yearly meetings.

His talks tend to be engaging, iconoclastic, and humorous. His most popular presentations include a diverse variety of topics and typically include those in all iMBA, Inc’s textbooks, handbooks, white-papers and most topics covered on this blog.

CONTACT: Ann Miller RN MHA

MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

Ph: 770-448-0769

Abbreviated Topic List: https://healthcarefinancials.files.wordpress.com/2009/02/imba-inc-firm-services.pdf

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SAMPLE: New Physician Letter of Employment Contract

ABOUT | DAVID EDWARD MARCINKO

BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

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SAMPLE NEW PHYSICIAN LETTER OF EMPLOYMENT INTENT

Dear Dr. [Name of Physician]

On behalf of [Name of medical practice or clinic] (hereinafter called the “practice”), this letter sets out a proposed agreement for your initial employment in Dr. [Name of physician]’s medical practice. After both you and Dr. [Name of physician] have agreed upon all issues related to your employment, a formal physician employment agreement will be prepared for your review and signature.

1.   Term: You will be an employee of the practice for an initial [Duration]-month period starting [Month, Date, Year]. Should you and the practice want to proceed past this initial employment period, an offer of co-ownership may be made to you as described in item nine below.

      Your employment with the practice will essentially be “at will,” since you or the practice may voluntarily terminate it at any time upon 30 days’ written notice to the other. However, the following are conditions under which the practice may terminate your em­ployment immediately: (a) upon your death or disability for three (3) consecutive months; (b) upon the suspension, revocation, or cancellation of your right to practice medicine in the State of [State]; (c) if you should lose privileges at any hospital at which the practice regularly maintains admission privileges; (d) should you fail or refuse to follow reasonable policies and directives es­tablished by the practice; (e) should you commit an act amounting to gross negligence or willful misconduct to the detriment of the practice or its patients; (f) if you are convicted of a crime involving moral turpitude, including fraud, theft, or embezzlement; and (g) if you breach any of the terms of your employment contract.

2.   Compensation: Your salary for the initial 12-month period will be $[dollar value] and $[dollar value] in the second 12-month period, each year payable in monthly installments. You will also be enti­tled to an incentive bonus calculated as follows: [Percentage] % of your collected production when such collections exceeds $[dollar value] in the first year and $[dollar value] in the second year. The bonus each year will be calculated and paid on a semiannual basis. You will also be entitled to receive a one-time signing bonus of $[dollar value] if you sign your employment contract before [Month, Date, Year].

      A portion of your compensation may be paid for by proceeds received from [Name of hospital] under the terms and conditions of a hospital recruitment agreement. The parties to this agreement will be the hospital and the practice only. However, forgiveness of any advances made by the hospital will be directly contingent upon the length of time you remain with the practice. Therefore, should your employment terminate for any reason, the practice will re­quire you to repay to it any amounts the practice repays the hospi­tal, in no matter what form, per the terms and conditions in the hospital recruitment agreement. [Note: Use this if the practice signs a hospital recruitment agreement with the hospital.]

3.   Benefits: In addition to your base compensation and incentive bo­nus, the practice will pay for the following: (a) health insurance, (b) malpractice insurance, (c) continuing medical education (CME) costs, (d) medical license fee, (e) board certification exam fee, (f) reasonable cellular phone costs, and (g) a pager. You will also be entitled to a moving cost allowance for relocating to [Location.] You will be entitled to two weeks of paid vacation, 10 working days as paid sick leave, and four days paid time off for CME or the board certification exam.

4.   Disability Leave: In case of absence because of your illness or injury, your base salary will continue for a period not exceeding 30 days per calendar year, plus any unused vacation time and sick leave. You will be entitled to any incentive bonus payments that may be due to you as collections are received on your prior production. Absence in excess of 30 days would be without pay. Unused sick leave cannot be carried over to succeeding years, nor will it be paid for at any time.

5.   Exclusive Employment: As an employee, you will be involved full-time in the practice and you may not take any outside employ­ment during the term of your employment agreement without the practice’s written approval. However, you will be entitled to keep compensation from honorariums, royalties, and copyrights if ap­proved by the practice in writing. If the practice does not give approval, then the income from such activities shall remain the property of the practice.

6.   Termination Compensation:  Should your employment terminate for any reason, you will be entitled to accrued but unpaid base compensation, earned but unpaid incentive bonus, and unused va­cation leave.

7.   Non-Solicitation: During the course of your employment, the prac­tice will introduce and make available to you its contacts and refer­ring physician relationships, ongoing patient flow, general hospital sources, business and professional relationships, and the like. Since you have not been in private practice in the area previously, you acknowledge that you currently have no established patients following you. If there should be a termination, the practice will not restrict your ability to practice medicine in the area; however, it will require you to enter into a nonsolicitation agreement in which you agree not to solicit the employees of the practice nor its patients to follow you into your new medical practice. [Note: Insert Covenant Not to Compete here, if applicable.]

8.   Employee-Only Status: During the term of your employment, you will not be required to contribute any money toward the practice’s equipment or operations, but likewise your work will give you no financial interest in the assets of the practice. However, the prac­tice intends to offer you the opportunity to buy into the ownership of the practice as set forth in item 9 below.

9.   Ownership Opportunity: At the end of your employment period, the practice will evaluate your relationship and may offer you the opportunity to become a co-owner in the practice (or enter into an office-sharing relationship). This offer is not mandatory and is at the total discretion of the practice. Should an offer not be tendered for some reason, the practice will wait until the end of your next 12-month employment period to decide whether to tender an offer of co-ownership.        If an offer of co-ownership is made, Dr. [Name of physician] will discuss with you the following: (a) what percentage of the practice you will be allowed to acquire, (b) how best to value such interest, and (c) how you will pay for the acquisition of such interest. The practice hopes to achieve mutually agreeable solutions to these ownership issues.

We hope this offer meets with your approval. If so, please contact Dr. [Name of physician] as soon as possible. This letter is not intended to be a legally binding agreement; it is, rather, a tool to be used to prepare your formal physician employment agreement. If you should have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact myself or Dr. [Name of physician] at your convenience.

Sincerely,

Atlantic Physicians Group

MEDICAL GROUP PRACTICE, LLC

Lantana FLA

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

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OVERHEARD IN THE FINANCIAL ADVISOR’S LOUNGE

On Asset Protection FOR PHYSICIANS

From my perspective, asset protection is a team sport, and lawyers rely on financial advisers all the time to spot issues for clients. We do not all share the opinion that non-lawyers are incapable of giving good advice.

J. Chris Miller JD

Alpharetta, GA

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PODCAST: Soap-Box Opera of Healthcare Reform?

By Carolyn McClanahan MD CFP

Your thoughts are appreciated.

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Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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HEDGE FUNDS: History in Brief

ABOUT | DAVID EDWARD MARCINKO

BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

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The investment profession has come a long way since the door-to-door stock salesmen of the 1920s sold a willing public on worthless stock certificates. The stock market crash of 1929 and ensuing Great Depression of the 1930s forever changed the way investment operations are run. A bewildering array of laws and regulations sprung up, all geared to protecting the individual investor from fraud. These laws also set out specific guidelines on what types of investment can be marketed to the general public – and allowed for the creation of a set of investment products specifically not marketed to the general public. These early-mid 20th century lawmakers specifically exempted from the definition of “general public,” for all practical purposes, those investors that meet certain minimum net worth guidelines.

The lawmakers decided that wealth brings the sophistication required to evaluate, either independently or together with wise counsel, investment options that fall outside the mainstream. Not surprisingly, an investment industry catering to such wealthy individuals, such as doctors and healthcare professionals, and qualifying institutions has sprung up.

EARLY DAYS

The original hedge fund was an investment partnership started by A.W. Jones in 1949. A financial writer prior to starting his investment management career, Mr. Jones is widely credited as being the prototypical hedge fund manager. His style of investment in fact gave the hedge fund its name – although Mr. Jones himself called his fund a “hedged fund.” Mr. Jones attempted to “hedge,” or protect, his investment partnership against market swings by selling short overvalued securities while at the same time buying undervalued securities. Leverage was an integral part of the strategy. Other managers followed in Mr. Jones’ footsteps, and the hedge fund industry was born.

In those early days, the hedge fund industry was defined by the types of investment operations undertaken – selling short securities, making liberal use of leverage, engaging in arbitrage and otherwise attempting to limit one’s exposure to market swings. Today, the hedge fund industry is defined more by the structure of the investment fund and the type of manager compensation employed.

The changing definition is largely a sign of the times. In 1949, the United States was in a unique state. With the memory of Great Depression still massively influencing common wisdom on stocks, the post-war euphoria sparked an interest in the securities markets not seen in several decades. Perhaps it is not so surprising that at such a time a particularly reflective financial writer such as A.W. Jones would start an investment operation featuring most prominently the protection against market swings rather than participation in them. 

Citation: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Apart from a few significant hiccups – 1972-73, 1987 and 2006-07 being most prominent – the U.S. stock markets have been on quite a roll for quite a long time now. So today, hedge funds come in all flavors – many not hedged at all. Instead, the concept of a private investment fund structured as a partnership, with performance incentive compensation for the manager, has come to dominate the mindscape when hedge funds are discussed. Hence, we now have a term in “hedge fund” that is not always accurate in its description of the underlying activity. In fact, several recent events have contributed to an even more distorted general understanding of hedge funds.

During 1998, the high profile Long Term Capital Management crisis and the spectacular currency losses experienced by the George Soros organization both contributed to a drastic reversal of fortune in the court of public opinion for hedge funds. Most hedge fund managers, who spend much of their time attempting to limit risk in one way or another, were appalled at the manner with which the press used the highest profile cases to vilify the industry as dangerous risk-takers. At one point during late 1998, hedge funds were even blamed in the lay press for the currency collapses of several developing nations; whether this was even possible got short thrift in the press.

Needless to say, more than a few managers have decided they did not much appreciate being painted with the same “hedge fund” brush. Alternative investment fund, private investment fund, and several other terms have been promoted but inadequately adopted. As the memory of 1998 and 2007 fades, “hedge fund” may once again become a term embraced by all private investment managers.

See the source image

ASSESSMENT: Physicians, and all investors, should be aware, however, that several different terms defining the same basic structure might be used. Investors should therefore become familiar with the structure of such funds, independent of the label. The Securities Exchange Commission calls such funds “privately offered investment companies” and the Internal Revenue Service calls them “securities partnerships.”

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WHITHER THE CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER™ MARKS?

Wither the CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER™ Professional Certification?

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DEAR INVESTMENT ADVISORS, CPAs, FINANCIAL PLANNERS, FINANCIAL ADVISORS & INSURANCE AGENTS

We believe that:

If you do not have a market niche; you are not deeply informed
If you are not deeply informed; you can’t different yourself
If you can’t differentiate yourself; you can’t differentiate price
If you can’t differentiate price; you have no market power
If you have no market power; you have no unique knowledge
If you have no unique knowledge; you have fewer profits

If you have fewer profits; you are not likely a CMP™

CMP

PROGRAM CURRICULUM: Enter the CMPs

POPULAR BOOKS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/04/29/why-are-certified-medical-planner-textbooks-so-darn-popular/

Dean Gene Schmuckler PhD MBA MEd CTS
http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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Dictionary of Health Economics and Finance

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State of the Medical Professional Liability Market?

A Hardening Market Arrives Just in Time TO GREET the GLOBAL Pandemic

The year 2019 marked a turning point for the medical professional liability (MPL) insurance industry. Reserve releases declined to less than 5% of premium. Insurers projected a combined ratio over 120% on 2019 earned business. Frequency increased for many writers and the trend in indemnity severity was above inflation. In response, insurers began to take rate action, manifesting in growth in direct written premium that exceeded inflation for the first time since 2005.

Despite significant underwriting losses, the MPL industry returned double its net income for the year as dividends to policyholders. Policyholder dividends show little sign of declining as the MPL industry remains well-capitalized and able to fund policyholder dividends with investment income.

And so, to learn more about the current state of the MPL market, read this article by Susan Forray and Chad Karls.

.PDF FORMAT: https://www.milliman.com/-/media/milliman/pdfs/articles/industry-update-2q-2020.ashx

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts and comments are appreciated.

THANK YOU

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors : Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™ book cover

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What is a Federally Qualified Health Center?

ABOUT F.Q.H.C.s

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

I worked at several FQHCs as a medical student and intern, back in the day, both in urban and suburban settings. But, I never was sure what this entity was, exactly. Probably because I was from an under served area, myself.

DEFINITION:

A Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) is a reimbursement designation from the Bureau of Primary Health Care and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services of the United States Department of Health and Human Services. This designation is significant for several health programs funded under the Health Center Consolidation Act (Section 330 of the Public Health Service Act).

It is a community-based organization that provides comprehensive primary care and preventive care, including health, oral, and mental health/substance abuse services to persons of all ages, regardless of their ability to pay or health insurance status.

Thus, they are a critical component of the health care safety net. FQHCs are called Community/Migrant Health Centers (C/MHC), Community Health Centers (CHC), and 330 Funded Clinics. FQHCs are automatically designated as health professional shortage facilities.

CMS: https://www.cms.gov/Center/Provider-Type/Federally-Qualified-Health-Centers-FQHC-Center

FQHC.org: https://www.fqhc.org/what-is-an-fqhc/

Your thoughts are appreciated.

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NHICs = Prepaid Preventative and Maintenance Health Care Networks

Emerging New MEDICAL BUSINESS Models 2.0

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

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Many folks feels that private preventative medical contracts may be one possible solution for those Americans going without healthcare; especially the young and healthy. Generally, and generically, they have a moniker like the “No Health Insurance Club”; or similar

Why?

Some pundits are leaning toward universal healthcare, or Medicare-4-All, which seems too socialized for others. Yet, private insurers continue to increase premiums, which prices healthcare out of reach for the average American. Employers can no longer float the cost of insurance so they pass it on to their employees. Patients aren’t the only ones being affected by the current state of healthcare. More and more doctors are going out of business and hospitals are cutting back due to escalating costs and payment defaults.

So, current remedies to this dilemma include major medical insurance policies for catastrophic events with high-deductibles to keep monthly premiums down, Medicaid, mini retail-clinics at grocery stores/pharmacies, and emergency room visits for common illnesses; as well as the PP-ACA.

Medical Maintenance

But, preventative healthcare and medical maintenance is not typically addressed. More than 90 percent of health related issues can be taken care of with preventative care and maintenance but only a small percentage of Americans currently enjoy the benefit of preventative healthcare. Healthcare economists are rethinking healthcare by offering an affordable alternative to traditional insurance options. NHICs, connect patients with participating board certified physicians that will treat and care for preventative healthcare needs for a one-time prepaid annual membership fee.

In this NHIC model:

  • Patients make a one-time annual payment that is typically less than a one-month premium with traditional insurance.
  • Patients receive up to 12 office visits per year that also include immunizations, $10 or less in-office prescriptions, and additional services including blood tests.
  • No deductible, no co-pays, no premiums.
  • No surprise bills to patients.
  • Viable alternative to COBRA for employees disengaged from work.
  • Low cost option for the self-employed.
Yakima DentiFlex Membership Club | Your Dentist in Yakima, WA

The Doctors

What’s in it for the doctors? How about no insurance clerks, no need to snail mail medical insurance claims or use expensive electronic claims submission clearinghouse services, no bad debts or bad expense write-offs, no ARs; and fast cash.

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are comments are appreciated.

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PHYSICIAN BRANDING: Post Corona Virus Pandemic

SELF-BRANDING IN THE MODERN ERA

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP©

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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In 1987 the magazine Fast Company published an article authored by Tom Peters entitled “The Brand Called You.” Although some individuals may shy away from the concept of self-branding in actuality, many of the online social network sites such as Facebook become media by which we in fact brand ourselves.

In his article, Peter’s stated. “Regardless of position, regardless of the business we happen to be in, all of us need to understand the importance of branding. We are CEOs of their own companies: Me Inc. to be in business today, our most important job is to be head marketer for the brand called you.”

As a medical practitioner how do you differentiate yourself from others in your specialty and why should a new patient choose your practice above those of the others in the field?

Branding is about finding your big idea and building your identity and game plan around it. The bottom line: if you can’t explain who you are, and the value you bring to your practice in a short sentence or two, you have work to do.

According to Catherine Kaputa, a personal coach she suggests that there are the objective things: your credentials, the schools you went to, your years of experience, and your skill set, which represent what she refers to as hard power. Then there’s soft power: your image and reputation, your visibility in the community, your network of contacts, supporters and mentors. In today’s competitive marketplace, soft power plays a vital role in attracting people to you and your practice.

Standing Out

Peters suggests that everyone has a chance to stand out. Everyone has a chance to learn, improve, and build up their skills. Everyone has a chance to be a brand worthy of remark. Corporations spend millions of dollars creating and maintaining their distinct brand.

The Olympic Rings are representative of a brand which the International Olympic Committee guards zealously. Professional services firms such as McKinsey, foster self-branding among their employees. Major corporations have as employees those individuals who are smart, motivated and talented. Self-branding allows the employees to differentiate themselves from their peers. For one to engage in self-branding is first necessary to ask the question,

What is it that my practice does that makes it different?”

You can begin by identifying the qualities or characteristics that make you distinctive from your competitors-or your colleagues.

What have you done lately-this week-to make yourself stand out? What would your colleagues say is your greatest and clearest strength?

What would they say is your most noteworthy personal trait? As a practitioner does your customer get dependable, reliable service that meets his or her strategic needs?

In addition, ask yourself: “what do I do that adds remarkable, measurable, distinguished distinctive value.”

Branding For A Medical Practice & It's Importance ...

Business Cards

While we are on the topic of mass media look at your business card and check to see if it has a distinctive logo on it. Keep in mind that packaging counts.

Getting and using power, intelligently, responsibly, and powerfully are essential skills for growing your brand. One of the things that attract us to certain brands is the power they project. Power, is largely a matter of perception. If you want people to see you as a powerful brand, act like a credible leader.

Another technique advocated by Peters is developing loyalty among your patients. In addition, you yourself need to be loyal to your colleagues, your staff, patients and to yourself.

Another way in which you can begin to promote yourself is, with a personal visibility campaign; getting yourself on a panel discussion with signing up to make a presentation at a workshop. If you are a medical writer, try writing about the corona pandemic, or contributing a column on a regular basis to your local newspaper. Community newspapers and professional newsletters are always seeking articles to fill the space. Not only does it give you the opportunity to express yourself it also is an excellent means to expose your practice and your capabilities to a mass audience.

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are comments are appreciated.

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Invite Professor Marcinko to Your Next Seminar or Event

See You Soon

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Colleagues know that I enjoy personal coaching and public speaking and give as many talks each year as possible, at a variety of medical society and financial services conferences around the country and world. All in a Corona safe environment.

Avatar of Dr. Marcinko Speaking as MSL

These include lectures and visiting professorships at major academic centers, keynote lectures for hospitals, economic seminars and health systems, end-note lectures at city and statewide financial coalitions, and annual lectures for a variety of internal yearly meetings.

LIVE or PODCAST enabled, as well.

Topics Link: imba-inc-firm-services

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My Fond Farewell to Tuskegee University

And so, we appreciate your consideration.

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CONTACT: ANN MILLER RN MHA CMP®

[ME-P Executive-Director]

PH: 770-448-0769

EM: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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Some Memorial Day Weekend Thoughts 2021

“Decoration Day”

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA

”Memorial Day (Decoration Day) is a federal holiday in the United States for honoring and mourning the military personnel who died while serving in the United States Armed Forces.

The holiday is now observed on the last Monday of May, having been observed on May 30th from 1868 to 1970.

Here are some related thoughts:

SOME “MEMORIAL DAY” THOUGHTS FOR 2021

***

The Business of Medical Practice [3rd. edition]

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MEDICAL ETHICS: Managing Risk is a Component of Caring

Demanding High Moral Standards of Self … and Economic HEALTHCARE Organizations

Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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It has been argued that physicians have abdicated the “moral high ground” in health care by their interest in seeking protection for their high incomes, their highly publicized self-referral arrangements, and their historical opposition toward reform efforts that jeopardized their clinical autonomy. 

Experts Speak

In his book Medicine at the Crossroads, colleague and Emory University professor Melvin Konnor, MD noted that “throughout its history, organized medicine has represented, first and foremost, the pecuniary interests of doctors.” He lays significant blame for the present problems in health care at the doorstep of both insurers and doctors, stating that “the system’s ills are pervasive and all its participants are responsible.” 

In order to reclaim their once esteemed moral position, physicians must actively reaffirm their commitment to the highest standards of the medical profession and call on other participants in the health care delivery system also to elevate their values and standards to the highest level.

Evolution

In the evolutionary shifts in models for care, physicians have been asked to embrace business values of efficiency and cost effectiveness, sometimes at the expense of their professional judgment and personal values.  While some of these changes have been inevitable as our society sought to rein in out-of-control costs, it is not unreasonable for physicians to call on payers, regulators and other parties to the health care delivery system to raise their ethical bar. 

Harvard University physician-ethicist Linda Emmanuel noted that “health professionals are now accountable to business values (such as efficiency and cost effectiveness), so business persons should be accountable to professional values including kindness and compassion.” 

Within the framework of ethical principles, John La Puma, M.D., wrote in Managed Care Ethics, that “business’s ethical obligations are integrity and honesty.  Medicine’s are those plus altruism, beneficence, non-maleficence, respect, and fairness.”

Incumbent in these activities is the expectation that the forces that control our health care delivery system, the payers, the regulators, and the providers will reach out to the larger community, working to eliminate the inequities that have left so many Americans with limited access to even basic health care. 

Charles Dougherty clarified this obligation in Back to Reform, when he noted that “behind the daunting social reality stands a simple moral value that motivates the entire enterprise”. 

ASSESSMENT

Health care is indeed grounded in caring. And, managing risk is a component of caring. It arises from a sympathetic response to the suffering of others.

YOUR THOUGHTS ARE APPRECIATED

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Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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FORM ADV is a Must Read for Selecting a Financial “Advisor”

Form ADV – The Essential Document

Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA - WEGO Health Awards Nominee

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP©

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

CMP logo

Under law, financial advisors and planners must provide you with a form ADV Part II or a brochure that covers the same information.  Even if a brochure is provided, ask for the ADV.  While it is acceptable, even desirable, for the brochure to be easier to read than the ADV, the ADV is what is filed with the appropriate state or SEC.  If the brochure reads more like a slick sales brochure or the information in the brochure glosses over the items on the ADV to a high degree, one should consider eliminating the advisor from consideration.

FIDUCIARY: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2020/06/15/the-new-fiduciary-rule/

Registering with a state or SEC gives an advisor a fiduciary duty to the client.  This is a high standard under the law. 

There are several types of advisors who are exempt from registering and filing an ADV. 

First, there are registered representatives (brokers).  Brokers have a fiduciary responsibility to their firms regardless of whether they are statutory employees or independent contractors. Not the client.

Second are attorneys and accountants whose advice is “incidental” to their legal or accounting practices. But, why would one hire someone whose advice is “incidental” to his primary profession?  A top-notch advisor is a full-time professional and should be registered.  One should insist that their advisor be registered.

CFP: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2016/11/18/why-we-cannot-assume-cfp-equals-fiduciary/

The ADV will describe the advisor’s background and employment history, including any prior disciplinary issues.  It will describe the ownership of the firm and outline how the firm and advisor are compensated.  Any referral arrangements will be described.  If an advisor has an interest in any of the investments to be recommended, it must be listed as well as the fee schedule.  There is also a description of the types of investments recommended and the types of research information that is used.

ASSESSMENT: A review of the ADV should result in an alignment of what the advisor said during the interview and what is filed with the regulators.  If there is a clear discrepancy, choose another advisor.  If it is unclear, discuss the issue with the advisor.

Your thoughts and comments are appreciated.

Form ADV | Moneygrow.com | Registered Investment Advisor ...

SEC Headquarters
100 F Street, NE
Washington, DC 20549
(202) 942-8088

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Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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Financial Management Strategies for Hospitals and Healthcare Organizations

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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TEXTBOOK ORDER: https://www.amazon.com/Financial-Management-Strategies-Healthcare-Organizations/dp/1466558733/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1380743521&sr=8-3&keywords=david+marcinko

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Hospitals and Healthcare Organizations

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.amazon.com/Hospitals-Healthcare-Organizations-Management-Operational/dp/1439879907/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1334193619&sr=1-4

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Why We Podcast Less and Read & Write More on the ME-P?

Why we remember more by reading – especially print – than from audio or video

By Naomi S. Baron

PREMISE: Recently, several readers of this Medical Executive-Post have asked why we have not embraced vlogging, podcasting and / or videos even more on our growing platform?

Professor Naomi S. Baron [unrelated] explains most eloquently.

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EDITOR’S NOTE: Dr. Naomi S. Baron does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond academic appointment. She is a Professor of Linguistics Emerita, at American University.

Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

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LINK: https://theconversation.com/why-we-remember-more-by-reading-especially-print-than-from-audio-or-video-159522?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Your thoughts are appreciated.

THANK YOU

***

The “Zero-Based Budget” for Physicians?

Zero-Based Budget

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By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP©

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org


A zero-based budget means you start with the absolute essential expenses, and then add expenses from there until you run out of money. This is an extremely effective, yet rigorous exercise for most medical professionals and can be used personally or at the office.

Guess what your first personal financial item should be?

That’s right, retirement plan contributions. Then your mortgage and other debt payments, and other required fixed expenses. From the office perspective, the first budget item should be salary expenses, both your own and your staff.

Operating assets and other big ticket items come next, followed by the more significant items on your net income statement.

Some doctors even review their P&L statements quarterly, line by line, in an effort to reduce expenses. Then add discretionary personal or business expenses that you have some control over.

P&L: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2008/03/18/net-income-pl-statement/

Do you run out of money before you reach the end of the month, quarter, or year? 

Then you better cut back on entertainment at home or that fancy new, but unproven piece of office or medical equipment.  This sounds Draconian until you remind yourself that your choice is either a) entertainment now but no money later, or b) living a simpler lifestyle now as you invest so you’re able to enjoy yourself at retirement.

Risks: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2017/10/18/on-retirement-planning-risks/

Zero-Based Budgeting: The Ultimate Guide - MintLife Blog

Why?

When you were a young doctor, it may have been a difficult trade-off. But at mid-life, you’re staring ultimate retirement in the face.

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

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The CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER® Online Designation Program is Now Automated

[By Staff Reporters]

The concept of a self-taught and student motivated, but automated outcomes driven classroom may seem like a nightmare scenario for those who are not comfortable with computers.

Now everyone can breathe a sigh of relief, because the Institute of Medical Business Advisors just launched an “automated” final examination review protocol that requires no programming skill whatsoever.

Enter the CMPs

cmp

In fact, everything is designed to be very simple and easy to use. Once a student’s examination “blue-book” is received, computerized “robotic reviewers” correct student assignments and quarterly test answers. This automated examination model lets the robots correct tests and exams, while the students concentrate on guided self-learning.

SplitShire-

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Assessment

According to Eugene Schmuckler PhD MBA MEd, Dean of the CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER® professional designation and certification program,

“This option allows the modern adult-learner save both time and money as s/he progresses toward the ultimate goal of board certification as a CMP® mark holder.”

The trend is growing and iMBA, Inc., is leading the way.

imba inc

THANK YOU

TEXTBOOK LINK: https://www.amazon.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-Advisors/dp/1482240289/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418580820&sr=8-1&keywords=david+marcinko

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FRAUD SCHEMES of [Fewer] Medical Providers

[TOP TEN IN HEALTH CARE]

Sponsor: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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https://healthcarefinancials.files.wordpress.com/2018/06/david-edward-marcinko.png

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

  1. Billing for services not rendered.
  2. Billing for a non-covered service as a covered service.
  3. Misrepresenting dates of service.
  4. Misrepresenting locations of service.
  5. Misrepresenting provider of service.
  6. Waiving of deductibles and/or co-payments.
  7. Incorrect reporting of diagnoses or procedures (includes unbundling).
  8. Overutilization of services.
  9. Corruption (kickbacks and bribery).
  10. False or unnecessary issuance of prescription drugs.

[Source]: Charles Piper; CFE CRT January/February 2013 ACFE

Related: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2020/10/01/healthcare-fraud-and-abuse-costs-and-cases-rose-in-2019/

More: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2017/05/03/combating-healthcare-fraud/

Update: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/04/24/fraudsters-phishing-for-physician-signatures/

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors : Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™ book cover

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OVER HEARD IN THE FINANCIAL ADVISOR’S LOUNGE

center

“TAKE THE FIDUCIARY PLEDGE”

FINANCIAL ADVISORS LOUNGE AT iMBA, Inc.

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SPONSORED: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

DEFINITION: A fiduciary is a person who holds a legal or ethical relationship of trust with one or more other parties (person or group of persons).

Typically, a fiduciary prudently takes care of money or other assets for another person. One party, for example, a corporate trust company or the trust department of a bank, acts in a fiduciary capacity to another party, who, for example, has entrusted funds to the fiduciary for safekeeping or investment. Likewise, financial advisers, financial planners, and asset managers, including managers of pension plans, endowments, and other tax-exempt assets, are considered fiduciaries under applicable statutes and laws.

In a fiduciary relationship, one person, in a position of vulnerability, justifiably vests confidence, good faith, reliance, and trust in another whose aid, advice, or protection is sought in some matter. In such a relation good conscience requires the fiduciary to act at all times for the sole benefit and interest of the one who trusts.

CITATION: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

See the source image

[Fiduciary Pledge]*

I, the undersigned, ___________________________ (“financial advisor”), pledge to always put the best interests of _______________________________ (“client”) first, no matter what.

As such, I will disclose in writing the following material facts and any conflicts of interest (actual and/or perceived) that may arise in our business relationship:

  • All commission, fees, loads, and expenses, in advance, client will pay as a result of my advice and recommendations;
  • All commission and commissions I receive as a result of my advice and recommendations;
  • The maximum fee discount allowed by my firm and the largest fee discount I give to other customers;
  • The fee discount client is receiving;
  • Any recruitment bonuses and other recruitment compensation I have or will receive from my firm;
  • Fees I paid to others for the referral of client to me;
  • Fees I have or will receive for referring client to any third-parties; and
  • Any other financial conflicts of interest that could reasonably compromise the impartiality of my advice and recommendations.

Jeff Kuest MBA CFA CFP®

[CounterPoint Capital Advisors]

*© 2011-2015. All rights reserved. Courtesy permission with personal communication from Jeff Kuest, MBA, CFA, CFP®

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

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So – What is Financial ALPHA, in Detail?

The measure of a stock’s expected return

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

May 12, 2021

Markets DOW 33,587.66 ▼ -681.50 NASDAQ 13,031.68 ▼ -357.75 S&P 500 4,062.90 ▼ -89.20 Crude Oil 65.85 ▲ +0.57

Alpha:  The measure of the amount of a stock’s expected return that is not related to the stock’s sensitivity to market volatility. It measures the residual non-market influences that contribute to a securities risk unique to each security.

Alpha uses beta as a measure of risk, a benchmark and a risk free rate of return (usually T-bills) to compare actual performance with expected performance.

CITATION: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Product Details

For example, a fund with a beta of .80 in a market that rises 10% is expected to rise 8%. If the risk-free return is 3%, the alpha would be –.6%, calculated as follows:

(Fund return – Risk-free return) – (Beta x Excess return) = Alpha   

(8% – 3%) – [.8 × (10% – 3%)]           = – .6%           

A positive alpha indicates out performance while a negative alpha means under-performance.

ENDOWMENT ALPHA: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2010/07/28/managing-for-endowment-portfolio-alpha/

QUEST FOR ALPHA: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2011/10/31/%e2%80%9cthe-quest-for-alpha%e2%80%9d/

ALPHA versus BETA Podcast: https://youtu.be/dP_23vKJ3HQ

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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