The Economy TODAY!

By Staff Reporters

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It’s a big day for anyone trying to read Jerome Powell today because the October consumer price index report gets released this morning.

Economists expect to see the annual inflation rate come in at 7.9%, so anything higher is likely to spark fear that the Fed could get even more aggressive with its rate hikes.

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ORDER: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

PODCAST: The “Economy” – How it Affects Everyone

By Rich Helppie

THE COMMON BRIDGE

The Second of a Two-Part Episode with Beata Kirr

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PODCAST LINK: https://tinyurl.com/zrxdxzya

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UPDATE: Markets and the Economy

By Staff Reporters

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UPDATE: Stock Market and the Economy

By Staff Reporters

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The stock market was very sharply mixed yesterday, and the NASDAQ Composite took the brunt of the damage. Even as the Dow Jones Industrial Average was up triple digits, the NASDAQ fell almost 2% as of 1:45 p.m. ET; and finishing down 210.08 points or (‎-1.33%).

Physicians and other investors looking at the biggest stocks in the NASDAQ would have to go through three dozen stocks on the list before finding a single one that rose more than 1%. Many of the top tech giants were down 1% to 5% or more on the day. Yet there were some winning NASDAQ stocks, and a few in particular might seem surprising to those used to seeing more popular names among top performers.

Bond yields gained thanks to bullish attitudes around economic growth.

Economy: The Great Resignation rolls on as a record 4.5 million Americans quit their jobs in November. That’s equivalent to 3% of the workforce.

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UPDATE: Stock Markets and the Economy

By staff reporters

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Stock Markets with Economic Update

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By staff reporters

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  • Markets: Stocks Gone Wild, the major indexes all bounced back from a bruising Wednesday, led by travel and hospitality stocks. Omicron has the markets looking like a sine wave this week.
  • Other updates: Congress passed a short-term spending bill to avoid a government shutdown this weekend. Plus, it’s jobs report day. Economists expect a meaty gain of 550,000 jobs in November, which would be the biggest number since July.

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The Bear MARKETS and Cyber ECONOMY

By Staff Reporters

  • Markets: Stocks dropped sharply in the post-Thanksgiving trading session on Friday due to concerns over the new Covid variant, Omicron. The Dow fell 2.5% for its worst day of the year, and the S&P also tumbled 2.3%. Oil prices and travel stocks also got rocked given fresh worries over travel demand, while “stay-at-home” names like Peloton and Zoom got a boost.
See the source image
  • Economy: It’s still way too early to know the impact of Omicron on economic growth. As we laid out last week, the Fed is under pressure to accelerate the winding down of its stimulus measures in order to battle inflation, but the new variant could change the calculus. Investors dialed back their expectations of a sooner-than-expected rate increase on Friday.

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Medical News of Arkansas Interviews Dr. Marcinko

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Current Status of Hospitals and the Economy [Op-Ed]

[By Steve Brawner]

atlanta-skylineWhat: An exclusive telephonic and email interview.

Who: Dr. David Edward Marcinko; FACFAS, MBA [Editor, administrator and health economist]

Topic: The recession and economy, hospital operations, and the Obama administration.

Where: The telephone and internet virtual ME-P ether.

Why: To forecast informed opinions and pontifications on the healthcare industrial complex.

Among the dilemmas in healthcare, we seek answers to queries like:

• When will the recession end, and how will it affect hospitals and physicians?
• What operations and organizational policies can hospitals pursue to survive?
• How will the Obama stimulus affect hospitals and healthcare organizations?

Now, in as much as this controversy affects patients, administrators, politicians, Wall Street, nurse-executives and physicians alike, we went right to the source for up-to-date information regarding this current topic.

Assessment

Get ready for this controversial [unedited] interview and Q-A session, with Dr. David Edward Marcinko; Publisher-in-Chief, of this ME-P.

Arkansas Medical News Interviews Dr. Marcinko

Read it Here: interview-dr-marcinko1

Sponsored Link: www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

[HOSPITAL OPERATIONS, ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT COMPANION TEXTBOOK SET]

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The National Health Care-Scare

The Markets and Health Economics

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™

marcinko

As a centrist fiscal conservative – social liberal – I tend to side with libertarian issues and not political parties. Nevertheless, I was dismayed with the recent presidential election and wondered what impact it would have on the stock markets. Mr. Market replied with haste.

The Question 

In the short term, the stock market collapsed back in September when most pundits opined that President-elect Barack Obama would become our new leader. In fact, the DOW has not seen its current lows since 1998, or so.

More specifically, according to one analyst from Wall Street – Paul Shread – “the Dowshould have strong support between here and 7000, which would cover the 1998 and 2002-2003 lows (7200-7400), the 50% decline mark (7100) and the October 1997 low (6971). This would be a very important place for the market to make a stand.” But other chartists see the markets falling even further, with the S&P dropping as low as 400. Why is this?

The Answer is Uncertainty, Doubt and Fear

While the mounting credit default swap and mortgage crisis has had a major role in sinking stocks, some speculators worry that Obama will follow through on promises to raise income taxes on dividends and capital gains; eliminate the estate tax exemption, rescue the auto-industry and  the: airlines, home builders, furniture, footgear and apparels, textiles, glassware, tobacco, beer brewers and perhaps a few others, and generally make it difficult for private employers to resist unionizing drives. In other words – there is a rising level of fear, doubt and uncertainty over the seeming potential of Keynesianism and governmental guarantees and protectionism – rather than the opportunities of capitalism. All disguised in the “cloak of change”.

Enter the Politicians

Some economists – tax and policy experts – fear that if Obama, Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid bailout these manufacturing segments instead of filing for Chapter 11, the country may face a very long recession. Just look to Japan some two decades ago, when the country bailed out its failing banks and corporations instead of letting them fall so that innovative competitors could take their place.

According to Niall Ferguson, a scholar who has studied the relationship between political, banking and financial fortunes –”you can stick money into every orifice of the big banks — their mouth, their nose, their ears, wherever — but if they can’t make loans because they have to reserve against future losses, and if they won’t make loans because there’s a recession, it won’t do any good,” Ferguson says. “If they can’t lend, there’s no money multiplier — they’re stuck, they’re zombies. It’s Japan all over again.” And, some ghoulish traders are indeed hoping for a deep recession. Today, Japan is still in worse shape than we are.

Phoenix Rising

Following such a debacle, the failed companies might then re-organize with some of their current workers under revamped union contracts. Reorganization, new labor contracts and new employee and retiree health benefit plans would make them competitive and profitable after emerging from bankruptcy; much like the proverbial Phoenix.

National Health Insurance, et al

Our physician clients and investors also are also worried that if national health insurance becomes a reality, defense spending is reduced and/or onerous regulations imposed on the surviving banks and Wall Street, the economy will be in for ride rougher than the one we have experienced to-date. No wonder a recent poll suggested that more than half of all doctors did not encourage their offspring to follow their career footsteps.

Other pressing issues for the medical profession, according to the HealthCare Group – Co-Chaired by Angela Braly of Wellpoint Inc., Dr. Denis Cortese of the Mayo Clinic, Jeffrey Kindler from Pfizer Inc., and Dr. Daniel Vasella from Novartis AG – include tort reform,defining and measuring medical value, payment reform, and building the health care workforce of the future with an emphasis on primary care, nursing and other allied health professionals. Moreover, true healthcare reform must involve integrating issues like Single Payer Systems, Consumer Directed Health Plans, Pharmaceutical Price Competition, Advanced Electronic Medical Records, and Quality & Outcomes Disclosure, etc.

The Obama Cabinet

President-elect Obama’s staff and cabinet appointments will also offer important clues for the markets, going forward. In addition to Rahm Emanuel, as the President-elect’s Chief of Staff, hearsay suggests Laura Tyson or Bill Richardson for Secretary of Commerce, Hillary Clinton as Secretary of State and Timothy Geithner as Treasury Secretary. Other considerations include Renee Glover for Secretary of Housing and Urban Development [HUD], Max Cleland as Secretary for Veteran’s Affairs, Janet Napolitano for Homeland Security, Jim Jones as National Security Advisor; and Richard Danzig and/or Chuck Hagel for other Cabinet Posts. Yet, Tom Daschle as Secretary of HHS is not exactly an “agent of change”, as the term is commonly understood.

Assessment

As the world’s markets sink, the pressure on our new administration will be to clarify these issues. Only then, will a stock market bottom be reached, and the dismal economy begins to reverse itself. Hopefully, the health care-scare will then be mitigated.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com 

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