• Member Statistics

    • 847,520 Colleagues-to-Date [Sponsored by a generous R&D grant from iMBA, Inc.]
  • David E. Marcinko [Editor-in-Chief]

    As a former Dean and appointed University Professor and Endowed Department Chair, Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA was a NYSE broker and investment banker for a decade who was respected for his unique perspectives, balanced contrarian thinking and measured judgment to influence key decision makers in strategic education, health economics, finance, investing and public policy management.

    Dr. Marcinko is originally from Loyola University MD, Temple University in Philadelphia and the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in PA; as well as Oglethorpe University and Emory University in Georgia, the Atlanta Hospital & Medical Center; Kellogg-Keller Graduate School of Business and Management in Chicago, and the Aachen City University Hospital, Koln-Germany. He became one of the most innovative global thought leaders in medical business entrepreneurship today by leveraging and adding value with strategies to grow revenues and EBITDA while reducing non-essential expenditures and improving dated operational in-efficiencies.

    Professor David Marcinko was a board certified surgical fellow, hospital medical staff President, public and population health advocate, and Chief Executive & Education Officer with more than 425 published papers; 5,150 op-ed pieces and over 135+ domestic / international presentations to his credit; including the top ten [10] biggest drug, DME and pharmaceutical companies and financial services firms in the nation. He is also a best-selling Amazon author with 30 published academic text books in four languages [National Institute of Health, Library of Congress and Library of Medicine].

    Dr. David E. Marcinko is past Editor-in-Chief of the prestigious “Journal of Health Care Finance”, and a former Certified Financial Planner® who was named “Health Economist of the Year” in 2010. He is a Federal and State court approved expert witness featured in hundreds of peer reviewed medical, business, economics trade journals and publications [AMA, ADA, APMA, AAOS, Physicians Practice, Investment Advisor, Physician’s Money Digest and MD News] etc.

    Later, Dr. Marcinko was a vital and recruited BOD  member of several innovative companies like Physicians Nexus, First Global Financial Advisors and the Physician Services Group Inc; as well as mentor and coach for Deloitte-Touche and other start-up firms in Silicon Valley, CA.

    As a state licensed life, P&C and health insurance agent; and dual SEC registered investment advisor and representative, Marcinko was Founding Dean of the fiduciary and niche focused CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER® chartered professional designation education program; as well as Chief Editor of the three print format HEALTH DICTIONARY SERIES® and online Wiki Project.

    Dr. David E. Marcinko’s professional memberships included: ASHE, AHIMA, ACHE, ACME, ACPE, MGMA, FMMA, FPA and HIMSS. He was a MSFT Beta tester, Google Scholar, “H” Index favorite and one of LinkedIn’s “Top Cited Voices”.

    Marcinko is “ex-officio” and R&D Scholar-on-Sabbatical for iMBA, Inc. who was recently appointed to the MedBlob® [military encrypted medical data warehouse and health information exchange] Advisory Board.

    entrepreneur

    Frontal_lobe_animation

  • ME-P Information & Content Channels

  • ME-P Archives Silo [2006 – 2021]

  • Ann Miller RN MHA [Managing Editor]

    ME-P SYNDICATIONS:
    WSJ.com,
    CNN.com,
    Forbes.com,
    WashingtonPost.com,
    BusinessWeek.com,
    USNews.com, Reuters.com,
    TimeWarnerCable.com,
    e-How.com,
    News Alloy.com,
    and Congress.org

    Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners(TM)

    Product Details

    Product Details

    Product Details

  • CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER® program

    New "Self-Directed" Study Option SinceJanuary 1, 2020
  • Most Recent ME-Ps

  • PodiatryPrep.org


    BOARD CERTIFICATION EXAM STUDY GUIDES
    Lower Extremity Trauma
    [Click on Image to Enlarge]

  • ME-P Free Advertising Consultation

    The “Medical Executive-Post” is about connecting doctors, health care executives and modern consulting advisors. It’s about free-enterprise, business, practice, policy, personal financial planning and wealth building capitalism. We have an attitude that’s independent, outspoken, intelligent and so Next-Gen; often edgy, usually controversial. And, our consultants “got fly”, just like U. Read it! Write it! Post it! “Medical Executive-Post”. Call or email us for your FREE advertising and sales consultation TODAY [770.448.0769]

    Product Details

    Product Details

  • Medical & Surgical e-Consent Forms

    ePodiatryConsentForms.com
  • iMBA R&D Services

    Commission a Subject Matter Expert Report [$2500-$9999]January 1, 2020
    Medical Clinic Valuations * Endowment Fund Management * Health Capital Formation * Investment Policy Statement Analysis * Provider Contracting & Negotiations * Marketplace Competition * Revenue Cycle Enhancements; and more! HEALTHCARE FINANCIAL INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX
  • iMBA Inc., OFFICES

    Suite #5901 Wilbanks Drive, Norcross, Georgia, 30092 USA [1.770.448.0769]. Our location is real and we are now virtually enabled to assist new long distance clients and out-of-town colleagues.

  • ME-P Publishing

  • SEEKING INDUSTRY INFO PARTNERS?

    If you want the opportunity to work with leading health care industry insiders, innovators and watchers, the “ME-P” may be right for you? We are unbiased and operate at the nexus of theoretical and applied R&D. Collaborate with us and you’ll put your brand in front of a smart & tightly focused demographic; one at the forefront of our emerging healthcare free marketplace of informed and professional “movers and shakers.” Our Ad Rate Card is available upon request [770-448-0769].

  • Reader Comments, Quips, Opinions, News & Updates

  • Start-Up Advice for Businesses, DRs and Entrepreneurs

    ImageProxy “Providing Management, Financial and Business Solutions for Modernity”
  • Up-Trending ME-Ps

  • Capitalism and Free Enterprise Advocacy

    Whether you’re a mature CXO, physician or start-up entrepreneur in need of management, financial, HR or business planning information on free markets and competition, the "Medical Executive-Post” is the online place to meet for Capitalism 2.0 collaboration. Support our online development, and advance our onground research initiatives in free market economics, as we seek to showcase the brightest Next-Gen minds. THE ME-P DISCLAIMER: Posts, comments and opinions do not necessarily represent iMBA, Inc., but become our property after submission. Copyright © 2006 to-date. iMBA, Inc allows colleges, universities, medical and financial professionals and related clinics, hospitals and non-profit healthcare organizations to distribute our proprietary essays, photos, videos, audios and other documents; etc. However, please review copyright and usage information for each individual asset before submission to us, and/or placement on your publication or web site. Attestation references, citations and/or back-links are required. All other assets are property of the individual copyright holder.
  • OIG Fraud Warnings

    Beware of health insurance marketplace scams OIG's Most Wanted Fugitives at oig.hhs.gov

Are Financial Asset Classes like a Box of Valentine Chocolates in 2020?

Join Our Mailing List

On Valentine’s Day Diversification

By Rick Kahler MS CFP® ChFC CCIM  www.KahlerFinancial.com

Rick Kahler CFPWith displays of Valentine candy in every store, February is the perfect time to talk about chocolate. A creative financial planner might even steal Forrest Gump’s analogy and say, “Diversification is like a box of chocolates.”

Except that it isn’t.

True, a box of chocolates might have a lot of variety. Cream centers. Caramels. Nougats. Nuts. Dark chocolate. Milk chocolate. Truffles. Yet it’s all still chocolate.

Retirement Savings

Buying that box would be like investing your retirement savings in a variety of US stocks. Even if you had a dozen different companies, they would all be the same basic category of investment, or asset class.

For example, suppose you gave your true love a slightly more diversified Valentine gift made up of chocolates, Girl Scout cookies, baklava, and apple pie. That would compare to investing in different types of stocks like US, international, or emerging markets. But, everything would still be dessert.

Wiser Physician-Investors

You would be a wiser doctor-investor if you took your true love out for dinner and had a meat course, a salad, vegetables, bread, dessert, and wine. Now you’d start to see real diversification.

In addition to US, international, and emerging market stocks (all dessert), you might have some other asset classes like US and international bonds (meat), real estate (bread), cash (salad), commodities (veggies), and absolute return strategies (wine).

***

box

***

Long Term Growth Generator

This kind of asset class diversification is the best investment strategy for long-term growth. My preference is eight or nine different classes. For many clients, I recommend a mix of US and international stocks and bonds, real estate investment trusts, a commodities index fund, market neutral funds like merger arbitrage and managed futures, junk bonds, and Treasury Inflation Protected Securities (TIPS).

Market Fluctuations

Fluctuations in the market will tend to affect the various securities within a given asset class in the same way. Most US stocks, for example, would generally move up or down at the same times. So, owning shares of several different stocks wouldn’t protect you against changes in the market. When a portfolio is well-diversified, the volatility is reduced even during times when the markets are moving strongly up or down.

When I talk about investing in a variety of asset classes, I don’t mean owning stocks, real estate, gold, or other assets directly. For individual investors, mutual funds are a much better choice. Occasionally, someone will ask me, “But why should I have everything in mutual funds? That isn’t diversified, is it?”

Mutual Funds

Mutual funds are not an asset class. A mutual fund isn’t like a type of food; it’s like the plate you put the food on. A single plate might hold one food item or servings from several different food groups. More specifically, mutual funds are pools of money invested by managers. One fund might invest in real estate investment trusts (REITS). Another might have international stocks chosen for their high returns. Still others invest in a diversified mix of asset classes. The mutual fund is just the container that holds the investments.

heart[Courtesy GE Healthcare]

Annuities

Annuities and IRAs aren’t asset classes, either, but are also examples of different types of containers that hold investments. If you use your IRA to purchase an annuity, all you’re doing is stacking one plate on top of another. It doesn’t give you another asset class, it just costs you more for the second plate.

Assessment

Having a box of chocolates for dinner might seem more appealing in the short term than eating a balanced meal. Investing in the “get-rich-now” flavor of the month might seem tempting, too. Yet in the long run, asset class diversification is the best way to make sure you have a healthy investment diet.

***

February 14th, 2020

***

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

***

  Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners(TM)* 8

More on “Passive Investing” for Physicians

Join Our Mailing List 

Basic Financial Concepts

tim

By Timothy J. McIntosh; CFPMBA MPH CMP [hon]

By Jeffery S. Coons; PhD CFA

By Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA CMP™

Passive investing is a monetary plan in which an investor invests in accordance with a pre-determined strategy that doesn’t necessitate any forecasting of the economy or an individual company’s prospects.

Premise

The primary premise is to minimize investing fees and to avoid the unpleasant consequences of failing to correctly predict the future. The most accepted method to invest passively is to mimic the performance of a particular index. Investors typically do this today by purchasing one or more ‘index funds’. By tracking an index, an investor will achieve solid diversification with low expenses.  Thus, a physician-investor could potentially earn a higher rate of return than an investor paying higher management fees.

Passive management is most widespread in the stock markets.  But; with the explosion of exchange traded funds on the major exchanges, index investing has become more popular in other categories of investing. There are now literally hundreds of different index funds.

***

Bull Markets

[Domestic Bull Markets – Historical USA]

***

Passive management is based upon the Efficient Market Hypothesis theory.  The Efficient Market Hypothesis (EMH) states that securities are fairly priced based on information regarding their underlying cash flows and that investors should not anticipate to consistently out-perform the market over the long-term.

The Efficient Market Hypothesis evolved in the 1960s from the Ph.D. dissertation of Eugene Fama.  Fama persuasively made the case that in an active market that includes many well-informed and intelligent investors, securities will be appropriately priced and reflect all available information. If a market is efficient [even emerging and/or world markets], no information or analysis can be expected to result in outperformance of an appropriate benchmark.

***

World Markets

[USA versus World Index]

***

Channel Surfing the ME-P

Have you visited our other topic channels? Established to facilitate idea exchange and link our community together, the value of these topics is dependent upon your input. Please take a minute to visit. And, to prevent that annoying spam, we ask that you register. It is fast, free and secure.

More:

The Author

Timothy J. McIntosh is Chief Investment Officer and founder of SIPCO.  As chairman of the firm’s investment committee, he oversees all aspects of major client accounts and serves as lead portfolio manager for the firm’s equity and bond portfolios. Mr. McIntosh was a Professor of Finance at Eckerd College from 1998 to 2008. He is the author of The Bear Market Survival Guide and the The Sector Strategist.  He is featured in publications like the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, USA Today, Investment Advisor, Fortune, MD News, Tampa Doctor’s Life, and The St. Petersburg Times.  He has been recognized as a Five Star Wealth Manager in Texas Monthly magazine; and continuously named as Medical Economics’ “Best Financial Advisors for Physicians since 2004.  And, he is a contributor to SeekingAlpha.com., a premier website of investment opinion. Mr. McIntosh earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Economics from Florida State University; Master of Business Administration (M.B.A) degree from the University of Sarasota; Master of Public Health Degree (M.P.H) from the University of South Florida and is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® practitioner. His previous experience includes employment with Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Florida, Enterprise Leasing Company, and the United States Army Military Intelligence.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners(TM)

Is Passive Investing Right for You?

Join Our Mailing List

On the “Buy low and Sell high” Strategy 

By Rick Kahler CFP® http://www.KahlerFinancial.com

Rick Kahler CFP“Buy low and sell high.” That was my simple approach when I was a smart young investment advisor. I poured over a company’s balance sheet, earnings statements, and forecasted returns. Then I bought those companies that were bargains and waited for my gains to roll in. More times than not, they did—eventually.

The problem came with the “not” and “eventually.” A majority of my picks did go up in value, but the minority that were “nots” still lost enough to have a negative impact on my bottom line. Even more frustrating, some of my “nots” turned into gains “eventually” after I sold them.

My investment returns were similar to findings from Dalbar, Inc., a financial services research firm. Dalbar’s studies have shown that average active investors barely beat inflation over the long term. They significantly underperform investors who put their money in an index fund of stocks and leave it alone.

So much for my early investment brilliance! Over the past 40 years, I’ve learned that with every passing year I know less than I thought I did the year before. I’ve proven to myself I have no idea where any market is going tomorrow, next month, next year, or in the next 10 years.

This awareness has led me to become increasingly passive in my investments. In passive investing, rather than trying to time the buying and selling of winners and losers, you instead buy a representative sample of the entire market. This is possible in any market: bonds, stocks, real estate investment trusts, or commodities. You simply buy mutual funds and exchange-traded funds (ETF’s) called index funds.

Benefits

The two biggest benefits of passive investing are cost and diversification.

Costs

Index funds have incredibly low costs, with annual fees as low as 0.1%. Contrast that with the average equity fund that costs 1.5%, fifteen times more. According to research, 97% of active mutual fund managers don’t beat the index over 20 years. Even the 3% who do must beat the index by more than the 1.5% fee they charge, in order for their investors to come out ahead.

Diversification

The smaller number of stocks owned – the more my fortunes are tied to those few companies. It’s the old adage, “don’t put all your eggs in one basket.” By owning index funds, I own hundreds or thousands of securities. While I will never hit a home run, I also will never strike out. My returns will be “average.” Investing may be one of the few professions where being average puts you in the 97th percentile of all investment managers.

The NaySayers

Not all of my peers agree with this philosophy. Many very smart investment advisors jumped off the passive investing bandwagon after 2008 and returned to tactical asset allocation, which is another name for timing the markets.

###

cropped-the-medical-executive-post3.jpg

###

Harold’ Strategy

A noted investment advisor, Harold Evensky MBA CFP® of Evensky & Katz, addressed this issue at a conference last year. After the 2008 crisis, his firm hired researchers to evaluate whether they could find any tactical strategies that would have avoided the crisis. They found some that, in hindsight, would have worked. Yet he didn’t feel those strategies could be comfortably applied looking forward. Instead, the firm decided to add a 20% allocation to non-correlated alternative investments, something I’ve done since the late 90’s. In other words, they increased their clients’ diversification.

Assessment

The bottom line is that passive investing actually gives you more control. It allows you to focus on reducing costs and taxes, the aspects of investing you can control. It frees you from trying to beat the market and worrying over what you can’t control.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Health Dictionary Series: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/product/9780826105752

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Hospitals: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439879900

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Product DetailsProduct DetailsProduct Details

Product Details  Product Details

A Brief Interview on Investing with Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP™

On Opportunities for Risk Tolerant and Investment Minded Physicians

Sponsored by: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

By Hope R. Hetico RN MHA [Managing Editor]

This is my second interview with ME-P Founder and Publisher-in-Chief, David Edward Marcinko. Our first formal interview was during the Thanksgiving weekend of 2007. I caught up with him recently on client engagements, in Chicago, Illinois.

And, while he may not always be right; he is never equivocal with his opinions, and is always passionate about them.

HETICO: Well, David, what have you been up to since our last interview?

MARCINKO: The usual; writing, editing, teaching, speaking, consulting engagements and servicing private clients. All noted on this blog forum, of course.

HETICO: So, refresh our readers, and tell us a little bit about yourself

MARCINKO: A doctor, surgeon, and bone and joint lower extremity specialist by training, I took down my medical shingle in 2000 and sold my ASC to become a full-time health 2.0 consultant that never looked back. I’ve also got an MBA degree in marketing and micro-economics, and was a registered BD representative, RIA rep, insurance agent, Series #7, #63 and #65 licensee and, certified financial planner for almost 15 years before eschewing them all. I then started the www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com online educational and certification program for physician focused financial advisors and fiduciary medical management consultants. My CV, fingerprints and DNA, are all over this e-publication.

HETICO: So, back on point. What is your investment style and where do you see market opportunities today?

MARCINKO: I am a non-conformist and contrarian by nature; when others zig; I zag. I use ETFs and index funds, and as a strategic investor have a personal ten-year time line, at least. I like cash-on-hand, too.

HETICO: I know you like international investing; when did this proclivity start.

MARCINKO: I did very well investing in long term Federal and state municipal bonds back in the early 1980’s. This was against the investment advice of everyone I spoke to at the time; except my mother – a banker. Interest rates were sky-high, so listening to her was a no-brainer. I then saw an international opportunity right after the Asian contagion crisis back in 1997-98. I lost a bit with Japan, but more than made up most everywhere else. I’m still underweighted in the US, and must admit, I missed the bottom-feeder boat domestically back during the flash-crash of 2008.

HETICO: How have your international products changed over time?

MARCINKO: I used ADRs and index funds, at first, mostly Vanguard. But, I moved to ETFs as they emerged. I stay away from individual foreign or international stocks

HETICO: What kind of foreign assets do you prefer?

MARCINKO: Equities strictly; no foreign bonds or currencies.

HETICO: What about gold?

MARCINKO: Nope, missed the run-up, but I hate commodities based solely on the supple-demand curve.

HETICO: What parts of the world do you see as hot investing opportunities, right now?

MARCINKO: The Middle-East, and Singapore which provide higher dividend returns than most US equities. I’m patiently waiting for Europe to implode.

HETICO: What kind of research do you do?

MARCINKO: I read everything written and online, but try to follow the massive macro-economic trends and demographics. For example, now is not the time to invest in US bonds as IRs are near historical lows, and cannot go much further, I think.

HETICO: Any other domestic opportunities?

MARCINKO: Not that I can see. Horde cash! Maybe domestic equity based REITs with the real estate lows.

HETICO: How often do you adjust your portfolio?

MARCINKO: Every 3-5 years I might buy if the opportunity [screams] presents itself. Generally, we never sell.

HETICO: Do you believe in asset allocation and balanced investment portfolios?

MARCINKO: No. It is the surest way I know to mediocre returns.

HETICO: Do you believe in dollar cost averaging?

MARCINKO: No, it is a theoretical artifice – merely a mechanism to “keep you in the game” so that mutual fund companies, SBs and BDs, RIAs, IAs and FAs can earn commissions, trails, 12b-1 fees and/or AUM percentage revenues, etc. It gets and keeps [your] money rolling into their coffers. And,  it smooths out their cash flow. Remember, DCA is a no brainer – and it is fit for those with no brains.

HETICO: What is your forecast for 2012?

MARCINKO: I’m with Bill Gross, who runs the world’s biggest bond fund at PIMCO, and thinks the global economy and financial markets are at risk in 2012.

HETICO: If you and Bill are correct, what will you do?

MARCINKO: Yawn!

HETICO: Who is your favorite health economist?

MARCINKO: Noble prize winner Ken Arrow PhD, of course. He is the god-father of the industry.

HETICO: Where do you see yourself in 5 or 10 years; or thereafter?

MARCINKO: Well, in five years my daughter will be out of college. In ten years, I see myself doing the same things I do now. And, I just love my engaged clients at: www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com Then, perhaps some private philanthropy work.

HETICO: Who is your financial investing hero?

MARCINKO: My colleague and former hedge fund manager Mike Burry, MD.

Link: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2010/03/24/video-on-hedge-fund-manager-michael-burry-md/

Assessment

Thank you; David!

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Is Dr. Marcinko correct; what do you think about his style and candor? Please review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Health Dictionary Series: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/product/9780826105752

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest ME-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Sponsors Welcomed: And, credible sponsors and like-minded advertisers are always welcomed.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2007/11/11/advertise


Product Details

Tax Strategies for Retiring Medical Professionals

Some Valuable Tips for 2011

By Sean G. Todd, Esq., M. Tax, CFP©, CPA 

www.EMCAdvisors.com

We need to start this ME-P with the famous quote made by Benjamin Franklin almost 300 years ago and yet still rings true: 

Nothing in life is certain except death and taxes.”

I believe physicians and all individuals better be formulating a tax-efficient investment and distribution strategy. Here is why: as a physician retiree or planning-to-be retired, with an effective tax strategy, you will keep more of your hard-earned assets for yourself and your heirs. Here are a few items for consideration which just might help with your money management during your later years.

The General “Rules”

1.  Utilize Tax Efficient Investments

Municipal bonds or “munis” have long been appreciated by retirees seeking a haven from taxes and stock market volatility. In general, the interest paid on municipal bonds is exempt from federal taxes and sometimes state and local taxes as well. The higher your tax bracket, the more you may benefit from investing in munis. This is not the “silver bullet” to retirement income planning. Yet, we see unknowing investors being exposed to a significant downside risk which could result in significant losses of their assets.

2.  Utilize Tax Efficient Mutual Funds/Index Funds

A more acceptable point is that all mutual funds are not created equal. A prudent move might be to reallocate part of your portfolio to start investing in tax-managed mutual funds. Managers of these funds pursue tax efficiency by employing a number of strategies. For instance, they might limit the number of times they trade investments within a fund or sell securities at a loss to offset portfolio gains. Equity index funds may be even more tax-efficient than actively managed stock funds – having the ability to identify which index fund(s) are being more tax efficient is where we come in.

It’s also important to review which types of securities are held in taxable versus tax-deferred accounts. Why? Because in 2003, Congress reduced the maximum federal tax rate on some dividend-producing investments and long-term capital gains to 15%. In light of these changes, many financial experts recommend keeping real estate investment trusts (REITs), high-yield bonds, and high-turnover stock mutual funds in tax-deferred accounts. Low-turnover stock funds, municipal bonds, and growth or value stocks may be more appropriate for taxable accounts.

A Comparison Chart

Just for ease of comparison on a pure return basis, I thought the following chart would make a great reference.  Would a tax-free bond be a better investment for you than a taxable bond? Compare the yields to see. For instance, if you were in the 25% federal tax bracket, a taxable bond would need to earn a yield of 6.67% to equal a 5% tax-exempt municipal bond yield.

Federal Tax Rate 15% 25% 28% 33% 35%
Tax-Exempt Rate Taxable-Equivalent Yield
4% 4.71% 5.33% 5.56% 5.97% 6.15%
5% 5.88% 6.67% 6.94% 7.46% 7.69%
6% 7.06% 8% 8.33% 8.96% 9.23%
7% 8.24% 9.33% 9.72% 10.45% 10.77%
8% 9.41% 10.67% 11.11% 11.94% 12.31%

*The yields shown above are for illustrative purposes only and are not intended to reflect the actual yields of any investment. 

3.  A question we get frequently: Which Security to Tap First?

A successful retirement plan is largely based on a sustainable income stream. This type of financial planning requires a specific set of skills. To facilitate a consistent income stream, another major decision is when to liquidate various types of assets.  The advantage of holding on to tax-deferred investments is that they compound on a before-tax basis and therefore have a greater earning potential than their taxable counterparts.

Consideration must also be given to making qualified withdrawals from tax-deferred investments which are taxed at ordinary federal income tax rates up to 35%, while distribution, in the form of capital gains or dividends, from investment in taxable accounts are taxed at a maximum 15% [Capital gains on investments held for less than one year are taxed at regular income tax rates].

This reason makes it beneficial to hold securities in taxable accounts long enough to qualify for the 15% rate.  When the focus is on estate planning, long term capital gains are more attractive because the beneficiary will receive a step-up in basis on appreciated assets inherited at death.
Another consideration when developing the sustainable retirement income plan is the timeframe for tapping into tax-deferred accounts.  Keep in mind, the deadline for taking required annual minimum distributions (RMDs) and have you taken into account the possible impact of the proposed tax law changes on your retirement income distribution plan?

4.  The Ins and Outs of RMDs

The IRS mandates that you begin taking an annual RMD from traditional IRAs and employer-sponsored retirement plans after you reach age 70 1/2. The premise behind the RMD rule is simple — the longer you are expected to live, the less the IRS requires you to withdraw (and pay taxes on) each year. RMDs are now based on a uniform table, which takes into consideration the participant’s and beneficiary’s lifetimes, based on the participant’s age. Failure to take the RMD can result in a tax penalty equal to 50% of the required amount.

Inside Tip: Why you should not wait until you retire to develop a sustainable retirement income plan: If you’ll be pushed into a higher tax bracket at age 70 1/2 due to the RMD rule, it may pay to begin taking withdrawals during your sixties. Unlike traditional IRAs, Roth IRAs do not require you to begin taking distributions by age 70 1/2. In fact, you’re never required to take distributions from your Roth IRA, and qualified withdrawals are tax free. For this reason, you may wish to liquidate investments in a Roth IRA after you’ve exhausted other sources of income. Be aware, however, that your beneficiaries will be required to take RMDs after your death. 

Estate Planning and Gifting

Attaining proper investment counsel and advice has to answer the question—-“What happens when I die?”  Many strategies can be implemented by clients to address the various ways to make the tax payments on your assets easier for your heirs to handle. Who is the proper beneficiary of your money accounts?  If you do not name a beneficiary, your assets could end up in probate, and your beneficiaries could be taking distributions faster than they expected.

In most cases spousal beneficiaries are ideal, because they have several options that aren’t available to other beneficiaries, including the marital deduction for the federal estate tax, and the ability to transfer plan assets — in most cases — into a rollover IRA.

Also consider transferring assets into an irrevocable trust if you’re close to the threshold for owing estate taxes based on the sunset provisions.  Best estate tax avoidance plan today – die in 2010 as there is no limit on the amount you can pass to the next generation estate tax free.  Assets in this type of arrangement are passed on free of estate taxes, saving heirs tens of thousands of dollars.

Inside Tip: If you plan on moving assets from tax-deferred accounts do so before you reach age 70 1/2, when RMDs must begin.

Finally, if you have a taxable estate, you can give up to $13,000 per individual ($26,000 per married couple) each year to anyone tax free.  If you need my contact information, please let me know.  Also, consider making gifts to children over age 14 as dividends may be taxed — or gains tapped — at much lower tax rates than those that apply to adults.

Inside Tip: You may want to consider a transfer of appreciated securities to custodial accounts (UTMAs and UGMAs) to help save for a grandchild’s higher education expenses.

Market Focus

As individuals, especially doctors living in mini-mansions, come to grips with not being able to sell their homes for a value they once thought possible, we are apt to suggest that we might see increased activity in the home improvements sector as individuals just decide to make the upgrade to their existing home while they wait this whole real estate mess out. 

How can all this help you financially?  You are seeing exactly why you cannot base your investment decisions on the latest headline or try to time the market  Single and doubles in the investment world will score more runs than trying to to hit a home run (timing the market). What is your singles and doubles strategy? 

Summary

  • Formulating a tax-efficient investment and distribution strategy may allow you to keep more assets for you and your heirs.
  • Consider tax-efficient investments, such as municipal bonds and index funds, to help reduce exposure to taxes.  It’s what you keep that counts.
  • Tax-deferred investments compound on a before-tax basis and therefore have greater earning potential than their taxable counterparts. However, qualified withdrawals from tax-deferred investments are taxed at income tax rates up to 35%, whereas distributions from taxable investments held for more than 12 months are taxed at a maximum 15%.
  • You must begin taking an annual amount of money (known as a required minimum distribution) from some tax-deferred accounts after you reach age 70 1/2.
  • Review how your assets fit into a comprehensive estate plan to make the most of your money while you’re alive and to maximize the amount you’ll pass along to your heirs.
  • Before selling appreciated investment assets, be sure that you have owned them for at least one year. That way, you’ll qualify for lower capital gains taxes.
  • If you’re considering placing assets in a trust or custodial account, think carefully about which assets would be most appropriate to transfer.
  • Schedule a meeting with a financial professional to review your tax management strategies.
  • Remember to begin taking required minimum distributions from traditional IRAs and employer-sponsored retirement accounts after you reach age 70 1/2 in order to avoid costly penalties.

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Get our Widget: Get this widget!

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Health Dictionary Series: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/product/9780826105752

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest ME-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Sponsors Welcomed: And, credible sponsors and like-minded advertisers are always welcomed.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2007/11/11/advertise

Product DetailsProduct DetailsProduct Details       

Product Details  Product Details

Whither Physician Self-Portfolio Management?

Do it Yourself Considerations

By Clifton N. McIntire, Jr.; CIMA, CFP®

By Lisa Ellen McIntire; CIMA, CFP®fp-book

In order to self create and monitor an investment portfolio for personal, office, or medical foundation use, the physician investor should ask him/herself three questions:

1. How much do I have invested?

2. How much did I make on my investments?

3. How much risk did I take to get that rate of return?

How Am I Doing?

Most doctors and health care professionals know how much money they have invested. If they don’t, they can add a few statements together to obtain a total. Few actually know the rate of return achieved during last year’s debacle, or so far this year in 2009. Everyone can get this number by simply subtracting the ending balance from the beginning balance and dividing the difference. But, few take the time to do it. Why? A typical response to the question is, “We were doing fine” -or- “We did terrible last year.”

But, ask how much risk is in the portfolio and help is needed. Nobel laureate Harry Markowitz, PhD said, “If you take more risk, you deserve more return.” Using standard deviation, he referred to the “variability of returns” –  in other words, how much the portfolio goes up and down, its volatility.

Your Own Portfolio

How, and even whether or not to create and manage your own portfolio, is what this brief post is about.

First, you must determine what to do with your investments. How much risk can be taken and what is the time frame? You must understand the concept of risk vs. reward and write an investment policy statement.

Next, the assets that will be used for investment must be selected. This involves asset allocation and mixing different styles of investment management to achieve the desired results, and is the point where you go it alone, or professional investment managers are selected.

Be sure to review expenses, like wrap accounts, service fees, AUMs, commissions and compare mutual funds with private money management.

Monitor

Once the initial portfolio is in place, the performance must be monitored to assure compliance with the investment policy.  Here’s where you consider 401k or 403(b) plans, pension plans, retirement accounts, as well as how to change doctor trustees or managers when necessary.

Assessment

Finally, consider the role of professional consultants. Now after all of this, if you still want to do it yourself rather than be a doctor, the entire process will be professionally illustrated. An actual physicians’ financial plan with investing portfolio was reviewed previously, along with the steps taken to improve returns and reduce risk.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2009/09/03/evaluating-a-sample-physician-financial-plan-iii/

Join Our Mailing List

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com 

Get our Widget: Get this widget!

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Tax Efficient Investing

Friends and ME-P Readers,

By Sean G. Todd; Esq, M.Tax, CPA, CFP®

Summer is here for sure in Atlanta—90 degrees plus day after day. I’ve been enjoying the fresh sweet corn, a BLT and a large glass of sweet tea at dinner—now that is a fine meal. Why do I share this with you — because at mid-year, I think from time to time we have to step back from all that we are involved in, concerned with, and what we think is important to actually appreciate all that we have and not overlook the small things. Which brings me to the topic of this Medical Executive-Post and not overlooking the small things—like taxes. As a physician-investor, you have to keep an eye on the impact taxes have on your investment portfolio because it is what you keep after taxes that counts.

Of the Markets

During my last post—I indicated that I was not sure if the recent reprieve in the markets was sustainable. And, we did experience a mild reversal recently. But, did you know that doing nothing is actually doing something? I’m pretty certain that the past investment strategies are not going to work going forward and I share these with ME-P readers as to why I believe this is true; and how best to position your portfolio going forward. Other professionals agree—the rules have changed — have you changed anything? Let’s move on to the real reason you continue to read our posts: To be able to make the right long-term decision during these difficult times. In this post we need to focus on the importance of tax-efficient investing.  We are confident that you and your friends and colleagues whom you choose to share this ME-P will benefit from the information discussed, as well.

Why Tax Efficient Investing is Important

Physicians and all investors have experienced some turbulent times over the last 12 months and it appears more rough waters lie ahead. As a physician-investor, you are unable to control the markets but there are certainly things you can control and should. One of these is taxes. Given the level of government spending, additional tax revenues will be needed which equates to higher taxes. You cannot plan your taxes on April 15th but you have to implement a tax strategy plan during the year so you can capture the benefit on April 15th. With increased taxes on the horizon, tax-efficient investment is going to be more important than ever. Brokers or the 1-800 do-it-yourself brokerage firms are not licensed to give you tax advice, but CPAs and EAs, are. The old saying goes, “It’s not what you make, but what you keep after taxes that counts”. This statement will become even more important going forward.

Returns Lost to Taxes

Have you thought of the impact on your portfolio that taxes have on your investment returns? Good financial advisors should as these are still some of the most important decisions you face as an investor.

Take for example a physician-investor in the top tax bracket earned an average return of 15% on actively managed mutual funds in a taxable account from 1981 to 2001. After taxes, average return dwindled to roughly 12% – which means our investor lost an average of 2.4% in return to taxes (the numbers reflect a compound rate of return). Investment return lost to taxes don’t just affect mutual fund investors — you have to look at your entire holdings in your taxable accounts and how you manage your investments, because, investors in individual stocks and bonds are vulnerable too. Like I indicated, you do have a lot of control over your taxes and should actively control them given the significant impact on your total investment return. Something for consideration: Diversification and asset allocation are great tools for helping to reduce portfolio volatility, but we’re still going to be subject to the short-term whims of the market, no matter how diligent we might be in setting up our portfolios and selecting our individual investments. One of the areas that we have the greatest degree of control is the area of tax-efficient implementations. Doesn’t it make sense that where we can exercise the most control, we do so?

Tax-Efficient Investing is More Important than Ever

Work with me here. If we assume that over the next 20 years annual compound returns for the broad stock market average between 8% and 10%, and bonds average about half that, then average portfolio returns would be less than what we enjoyed over the last 20 years. What this actually means is that any return lost to taxes will be a much bigger deal. In other words, losing 2.4% per year to taxes may not have seemed like much if you were making 15-20% annual returns. But if you only expect to make 9% on your investments, keeping as much of that return as possible, can be vital to achieving your long-term goals. The real impact– 2.4% tax impact will cause you to lose 26% of your 9% gain. Thinking you got a 9% gain but your real after-tax gain is only 6.6%. This is a big annual difference and a significant compound difference.

The second reason tax efficiency is more important than ever is because of the changes to the tax rules in 2003. A notable provision: the 15% tax rate on qualified dividend income. Often a missed opportunity! Previously it might have made sense to hold dividend-paying stocks in a tax-deferred account such as an IRA instead of a taxable account. Either way, dividends were taxed at your ordinary income tax rate between 28% and 39.6% prior to 2001. The thought was the IRA offered tax-deferred potential growth.

Currently, qualified dividends in a taxable account are taxed at a maximum rate of 15%. Those save dividends would be taxed at the ordinary rate—currently as high as 35% when withdrawn from your tax-deferred account. As a result, the value of putting dividend-paying stocks in taxable accounts has grown significantly.

What Investments Go Where?

I need to speak in general terms here, investment that tend to lose less of their return to income taxes are good selections to go into taxable accounts. With that said the opposite should be true: Investments that lose more of their return to taxes could go into tax-deferred accounts. Here’s where tax-smart investors might want to place their investments.

Taxable Accounts Tax-Deferred accounts – Traditional IRAs, 401(k)s and deferred annuities
Ideally place…
Individual Stocks you plan to hold more than one year Individual stocks you plan to hold one year or less
Tax-managed stock funds, index funds, low turnover stock funds Actively managed funds that generate significant short-term capital gains
Stocks or mutual funds that pay qualified dividends Taxable bond funds, zero-coupon bonds, inflation protected bonds or high yield bond funds
Municipal bonds, I bonds Reits

DISCLOSURE: This assumes you hold investments in both types of accounts. A different set of rules would apply if you held all your investments in a taxable account or a tax-deferred account.

In general, holding tax-efficient investment in taxable account and less tax-efficient investment in tax-advantaged account should add value over time. It appears that the above serves as a simple set of guidelines to go by but there are additional considerations before making the above allocation.

Additional Considerations

Reallocation of your Portfolio

To maintain your strategic asset allocation will cause additional tax drag on return, to the extent you rebalance in taxable accounts. You may want to focus on your rebalancing efforts on your tax-advantaged accounts, including your taxable accounts only when necessary. Keep in mind, adding new money to underweighted asset classes in also a tax-efficient way to help keep your portfolio allocation in balance.

Active Trading

Active trading by individuals or by mutual funds, when successful tends to be less tax efficient and better suited for tax-advantaged accounts. A caveat: Realized losses in your tax-advantaged accounts cannot be recognized to offset realized gains on your tax return.

Liquidity Preference

If an investor wanted liquidity, then they might be holding bonds in their taxable accounts, even if it makes more sense to form a tax perspective to hold them in tax advantaged accounts. In other situations, it may be impractical to implement all of your portfolio’s fixed income allocation using taxable bonds in tax-advantaged accounts. If so, compare the after-tax return on taxable bonds to the tax-exempt return on municipal bonds to see which makes the most sense on an after-tax basis.

Estate Planning Issues

One cannot overlook the estate planning issues in deciding which account will hold a given type of investment. Also, what is the philanthropic intent of the doctor or investor? Stocks held in taxable accounts receive a step-up in cost basis at death (something heirs greatly appreciate) which is not the same for tax-advantaged accounts. Additionally, highly appreciated stocks held in taxable accounts more than a year might be well-suited for charitable giving.

Roth IRA

This type of account might just be an exception to all of the above. The rules are different when investors involve a Roth IRA. Since qualified distributions are tax free, assets you believe will have the greatest potential for higher return are best placed inside a Roth IRA, when possible.

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Tell us what you think. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

Get our Widget: Get this widget!

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest ME-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Sponsors Welcomed

And, credible sponsors and like-minded advertisers are always welcomed.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2007/11/11/advertise

Product Details  Product Details

ETF Portfolio Diversification and Cost Reductions

A Multi-Dimensional Investment Product

By JD Steinhilber

 Certified Medical Planner  

Most physicians and their financial advisors and/or Certified Medical Planners™ [CMP™] believe that effective diversification is most readily achieved by combining poorly correlated asset classes within an investment portfolio.

And, when combined with low costs, a winning combination may be achieved for most any physician-investor’s wealth achievement and management goals.

Diversification Impact

One of the most basic examples of proper diversification is two poorly correlated assets like stocks and bonds. Over time, the returns of these two asset classes have a very low level of correlation. Over shorter time periods, the degree of correlation between stocks and bonds can vary widely.

From January 1999 to November 2002, for example, stocks and bonds had a negative, or inverse, correlation. Real Estate Investment Trusts [REITS] and international stocks are examples of other asset classes that tend to be poorly correlated with US stocks. And, volatility is expected to increase beyond 2008.

Because exchange-traded funds replicate the performance of entire asset classes, which themselves are diversified among numerous securities, it is possible to construct well-diversified, high-performing portfolios with only 5-10 ETFs. Accordingly, ETFs provide a highly efficient means of diversification.

Reduction of “Style Drift

Mutual funds also facilitate diversification, but actively managed mutual funds are susceptible to “style drift” and their portfolio holdings at any particular time are unknown. This presents a challenge to diversification efforts.

In contrast, ETFs offer asset class purity, meaning their holdings are totally transparent, disclosed daily and not subject to style drift. Actively managed mutual funds are also more expensive and less tax-efficient than ETFs.

Cost Impact

Exchange-traded funds have some of the lowest expense ratios of any registered investment product. In fact, ETFs have a cost advantage, on average, in excess of 100 basis points relative to actively managed mutual funds. This can have a significant impact on a portfolio’s performance over time.

For example, assume that investor A and investor B each invest $10,000 and earn the same gross annualized return over a 20 year time frame. After expenses, assume that investor A earns a net return of 10% and investor B earns a net return of 9%. After 20 years, investor A would have $67,275, while investor B would have $56,044, representing a difference of $11,231.

Trading Cautions

It is important to point out that physician-investors have to pay commissions when they buy or sell ETFs.As a result, the cost advantages of ETFs relative to mutual funds diminish the more actively an ETF portfolio is traded. ETFs are therefore not appropriate vehicles for active traders; they are more suitable for investors.

Of course, physicians and all investors tend to be more conscious of investment costs when portfolio returns are low or negative.Given that costs are among the few controllable variables in a portfolio’s returns, investors and advisors should always be evaluating portfolio costs relative to the benefits received.

Assessment: 

Exchange-traded funds may provide an opportunity to enhance net returns by reducing investment expenses and increasing returns through improved diversification.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

DICTIONARIES: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko
PHYSICIANS: www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com
PRACTICES: www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com
HOSPITALS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781466558731
CLINICS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439879900
BLOG: www.MedicalExecutivePost.com
FINANCE: Financial Planning for Physicians and Advisors
INSURANCE: Risk Management and Insurance Strategies for Physicians and Advisors

 

Product Details  Product Details

%d bloggers like this: