BUSINESS PLAN CONSTRUCTION: For Health Industry Modernity

FOR MEDICAL AND HEALTHCARE ENTREPRENEURS AND INNOVATORS

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA MEd CMP®

I was asked by business schools and medical colleagues – and their bankers, CPAs and advisors – to speak about this topic several times last year before the pandemic.

Now, with the specter of M-4-A etc; it certainly is a vital concern to all young entrepreneurs, doctors & medical professionals whether live, audio recorded or in podcast form. And so, here is a written transcript of a recent presentation for your review.

Now, with the specter of tele-health, tele-medicine, M-4-A etc; it certainly is a vital concern to all young doctors & medical professionals whether live, audio recorded or in podcast form. And so, here is a written transcript of a recent presentation for your review.

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New Product Business Plan Sample [2021 Updated] | OGScapital

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READ: https://healthcarefinancials.files.wordpress.com/2017/08/mba-business-plan-capstone-outline.pdf

YOUR THOUGHTS ARE APPRECIATED.

SECOND OPINIONS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

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Thank You

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CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER™ Designation: A.I. Allows Adult Learners Take Control

“Robo-Examiners” Let CMP™ Candidates Take Control

Dr. David Marcinko MBA CMP™
[Founding CEO and President]

Enter the CMPs

cmp

The concept of a self-taught and student motivated, but automated outcomes driven classroom may seem like a nightmare scenario for those who are not comfortable with computers. Now everyone can breathe a sigh of relief, because the Institute of Medical Business Advisors just launched an “automated” final examination review protocol that requires no programming skill whatsoever.

In fact, everything is designed to be very simple and easy to use. Once a student’s examination “blue-book” is received, computerized “robotic reviewers” correct student assignments and quarterly test answers. This automated examination model lets the robots correct tests and exams, while the students concentrate on guided self-learning.

READ: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2020/07/09/robo-examiners-let-cmp-candidates-take-control/

MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2020/06/16/discover-the-best-medical-risk-management-and-insurance-planning-practices-of-leading-cmps/

Your thoughts and comments are appreciated.

THANK YOU

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“Churning”, “Front Running” and “Pumping & Dumping”

BE ALERT AND BE AWARE

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Front Running (Definition, Examples) | How Traders Use it?

Churning: The practice of a provider seeing a patient more often than is medically necessary, primarily to increase revenue through an increased number of visits. A practice, in violation of SEC rules, where a salesperson affects a series of transactions in a customer’s account which are excessive in size and/or frequency in relation to the size and investment objectives of the account. An insurance agent who is churning an account is normally seeking to maximize the income (in commissions, sales credits or mark-ups) derived from the account.  

FRONT-RUNNING: Form of market manipulation where a broker/dealer delays processing of a large customer trade in an underlying security until the firm can execute an options trade in that security in anticipation of the client’ s trade impact on the underlying security.

Pump and dump: A a form of securities fraud that involves artificially inflating the price of an owned stock through false and misleading positive statements, in order to sell the cheaply purchased stock at a higher price. Once the operators of the scheme “dump” their overvalued shares, the price falls and investors lose their money.

Citation: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Your comments are appreciated.

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AGI: What it is – How it Works?

ADJUSTED GROSS INCOME

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BY Dr. DAVID EDWARD MARCINKO MBA CMP®

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

The U.S. individual tax return is based around the concepts of Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) and Taxable Income (TI).  AGI is the amount that shows up at the bottom of page one of Form 1040, individual income tax return.  It is the sum of all of the taxpayer’s income less certain allowed adjustments (like alimony, one-half of self-employment taxes, a percentage of self-employed health insurance, retirement plan contributions and IRAs, moving expenses, early withdrawal penalties and interest on student loans).  This amount is important because it is used to calculate various limitations within the area of itemized deductions (e.g., medical deductions: 10 percent of AGI; miscellaneous itemized deductions: 2 percent of AGI). 

When a healthcare professional taxpayer hears the phrase “an above the line deduction”, the line being referenced is the AGI line on the tax return.  Generally, it is better for a deduction to be an above the line deduction, because that number helps a taxpayer in two ways.  First, it reduces AGI, and second, since it reduces AGI, it is also reducing the amounts of limitations placed on other deductions as noted above.

Obviously, if there is an above the line there is also a “below the line” deduction.  These below the line deductions are itemized deductions (or the standard deduction if itemizing is not used) plus any personal exemptions allowed. AGI less these deductions provides the taxable income on which income tax is actually calculated. All of that being said, it is better for a deduction to be an above the line deduction. Although this is a bit dry, it helps to understand the concepts in order to know where items provide the most benefit to the medical professional taxpayer.

                            PERSONAL TAXATION CALCULATIONS

Gross Income (all income, from whatever source derived, including illegal activities, cash, indirect for the benefit of, debt forgiveness, barter, dividends, interest, rents, royalties, annuities, trusts, and alimony payments-no more)

    Less non-taxable exclusions (municipal bonds, scholarships, inheritance, insurance

                                            proceeds, social security and unemployment income [full or

                                            partial exclusion], etc.).

Total Income

    Less Deductions for AGI (alimony, IRA contributions, capital gains, 1/2 SE tax,

                                               moving, personal, business and investment expenses, and

                                               penalties, etc.). 

Adjusted Gross Income (bottom Form 1040)

    Less Itemized Deductions from AGI, (medical, charitable giving, casualty,

involuntary conversions, theft, job and miscellaneous expenses, etc.), or

    Less Standard Deduction (based on filing status)

    Less Personal Exemptions (per dependents, subject to phase outs)

Taxable Income

   Calculate Regular Tax

      Plus Additional Taxes (AMT, etc.)

      Minus Credits (child care, foreign tax credit, earned income housing, etc.)

      Plus Other Taxes

Total Tax Due

YOUR THOUGHTS ARE APPRECIATED.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Thank You

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On Purchasing Individual BONDS!

A Seldom Discussed Investing Topics for Doctors and All Investors Until Now?

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

MARKET ALERT: Investors fled into the bond market Monday, pulling the yield on the closely watched 10-year Treasury to its lowest since February, with investors dashing out of equities on fears that rising COVID-19 infections will threaten recovery in the world’s largest economy.

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Now – Trading individual bonds is not like trading stocks. Stocks can be bought at uniform prices and are traded through exchanges. Most bonds trade over the counter, and individual brokers price them.  But, price transparency has gotten better in the last decade. 

For example, in 1999, the bond markets gained clearness from the House of Representatives’ Bond Price Competition Improvement Act of 1999. Responding to this pioneering law, the site http://www.investinginbonds.com was established. This site provides current prices on bonds that have traded more than four times the previous day. With the advent of Investinginbonds.com and real-time reporting of many trades, investors are much better off today.  Many well regarded brokers including Schwab, Ameritrade, and Fidelity Investments now have dedicated websites devoted to bond trading and pricing. 

Fidelity Investments chose to disclose its fee structure for all bonds, making it clear what it will cost you per trade. Fidelity charges $1 per bond trade. Some on-line brokers charge a flat fee as well, ranging from $10.95 at Zions Direct to $45 at TD Ameritrade. Depending on the number of bonds trading, one may be more complimentary than another. The trading fee disclosures, however, do not divulge the spreads between the buy and sell price embedded in the transaction that some dealer is making in the channel. Keep in mind that only by comparison shopping can assist you in finding the best transaction price, after all fees are taken into account. Other sites may not charge any fee, but rather embed the profit in the spread.

Despite the difficulty in pricing and transparency, investing in individual bonds offers several rewards over purchasing bond mutual funds.

First, bond mutual funds never mature.

Second, you know exactly what you will be receiving in interest each year.  You will also know the exact maturity date. 

Furthermore, your individual investment is protected against interest rate risk, at least over the full term to maturity.  Both individual bonds and bond funds share interest-rate risk (the risk of locking up an investment at a given rate, only to see rates rise). This pushes bond prices down.  At least with an individual bond, you can re-invest it at the higher, market rate once the bond matures.

But, the lack of a fixed maturity date on a bond mutual fund causes an open ended problem; there is no promise of the original investment back.  Short of default, an individual bond will return all principal and pay all interest assuming you hold it to maturity.  Bond funds are not likely to default as most funds maintain positions in hundreds of individual bonds.  The force of interest rate risk to individual bond or bond mutual fund prices depends on the maturity of a bond investment: the longer the maturity of a bond or bond fund (average), the more the price will drop due to rising rates. This is known as duration.

Duration is a statistical term that measures the price sensitivity to yield, is the primary measurement of a bond or bond fund’s sensitivity to interest rate changes.  Duration indicates approximately how much the price of a bond or bond fund will adjust in the reverse direction given a rise in interest rates. For instance, an individual bond with an average duration of five years will fall in value approximately 5% if rates rise by 1% and the opposite is accurate as well.

Although stated in years, duration is not simply a gauge of time. Instead, duration signals how much the price of your bond investment is likely to oscillate when there is an up or down movement in interest rates. The higher the duration number, the more susceptible your bond investment will be to changes in interest rates.  If you have money in a bond or bond fund that holds primarily long-term bonds, expect the value of that fund to decline, perhaps significantly, when interest rates rise. The higher a bond’s duration, the greater its sensitivity to interest rates alterations. This means fluctuations in price, whether positive or negative, will be more prominent.

For example, a bond fund with 10-year duration will diminish in value by 10 percent if interest rates increase by one percent. On the other hand, the bond fund will rise in value by 10 percent if interest rates descend by one percent. The important concept to remember is once you recognize a bond’s or bond fund’s duration, you can forecast how it will react to a change in interest rates.

UPDATE:

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note, which serves as a benchmark for interest rates across the US economy, fell for an eighth straight day last week to below 1.3%—the lowest level since February. And, the 10-year yield fell to 1.181% with an intra-day low of 1.176% yesterday, which was the lowest since February 11.

Since bond prices and yields move in opposite directions, falling yields signal higher demand for Treasuries.

Why it matters: At the most basic level, the 10-year yield is a key indicator of investors’ confidence in future US economic growth. As the Delta variant spreads and threatens to slow the economic recovery, the fall in yields means investors are souring on a mega growth spurt and snapping up safer assets rather than riskier stocks.

What does this mean for inflation? Because investors sell bonds when they think inflation is coming, the runup in bond prices means the worst of Wall Street’s inflation concerns may be over. “It feels like we have moved from thinking inflation will be transitory, to fearing growth will be transitory,” Art Hogan, chief marketing strategist at National Securities, said.

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER Textbook: https://www.amazon.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-Advisors/dp/1482240289/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418580820&sr=8-1&keywords=david+marcinko

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FINANCIAL PLANNING AND INVESTING FOR PHYSICIANS: Purchase Textbook Today & Relax Tomorrow

“MANIC MONDAY” 2021

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

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THANK YOU

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FINANCIAL PLANNING: Strategies for Physicians and their Advisors

A Textbook Review

SECOND OPINIONS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

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RISK FACTORS COMMON TO PHYSICIANS

SOME COMMON RISK FACTORS FOR MEDICAL COLLEAGUES TO APPRECIATE

BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

AN INCOMPLETE LIST = T.N.T.C.

  • Do you and or any family members drive a vehicle?
  • Do you have employees?
  • Do you have a professional malpractice exposure?
  • Do you have legal responsibility to protect medical, EMRs or personal and patient financial data?
  • Are you married and do you have assets not protected by a prenuptial agreement?
  • Do you have a current tax obligation?
  • Do you own a business?
  • Are you a board member, officer, or director of a corporation, foundation, religious or educational organization?
  • Do you engage in activities like hunting, flying, boating, etc?
  • Do you have business or domestic partners whose actions create joint and several liabilities for you?
  • Do you have personal guarantees on real estate or for business loans; or family members?
  • Do you have tail liability for professional services performed in the past?
  • Have you made specific legal or financial representations that others have relied upon in a business context?
  • What kind and what dollar amount of insurance and legal planning have you implemented against these exposures?

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FOREWORD BY J. WESLEY BOYD MD PhD MA

[Professor of Psychiatry Harvard and Yale University]

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ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts and comments are appreciated.

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Risk-Management-Liability-Insurance-and-Asset-Protection-Strategies-for/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781498725989

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Medical FINANCIAL PLANNING “Holistic” STRATEGIES

BY AND FOR PHYSICIANS AND THEIR ADVISORS

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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The BUSINESS of Medical Practice

“NO MARGIN – NO MISSION”

Within Reason

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BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

Your thoughts are appreciated.

THANK YOU

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What is a MEME Stock?

MEME ME!

BY PROFESSOR DR. DAVID EDWARD MARCINKO MBA Certified Medical Planner®
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A “MEME” stock isn’t as easily defined as a growth or value stock, so to give it a definitive categorization would be inappropriate. Nor would actually categorizing it alongside growth and value stocks. They won’t be found in textbooks anytime soon, but to overlook their impact could potentially be an expensive oversight.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Stonks Meme, Explained: What Can It Teach You About Actual ...

READ: https://blog.mywallst.com/what-is-a-meme-stock/#:~:text=A%20meme%20stock%20isn%E2%80%99t%20as%20easily%20defined%20as,their%20impact%20could%20potentially%20be%20an%20expensive%20oversight.

DIY Textbooks: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/04/29/why-are-certified-medical-planner-textbooks-so-darn-popular/

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

CONTACT: Ann Miller RN MH

[Executive Director]

MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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HEDGE FUNDS: History in Brief

ABOUT | DAVID EDWARD MARCINKO

BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

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The investment profession has come a long way since the door-to-door stock salesmen of the 1920s sold a willing public on worthless stock certificates. The stock market crash of 1929 and ensuing Great Depression of the 1930s forever changed the way investment operations are run. A bewildering array of laws and regulations sprung up, all geared to protecting the individual investor from fraud. These laws also set out specific guidelines on what types of investment can be marketed to the general public – and allowed for the creation of a set of investment products specifically not marketed to the general public. These early-mid 20th century lawmakers specifically exempted from the definition of “general public,” for all practical purposes, those investors that meet certain minimum net worth guidelines.

The lawmakers decided that wealth brings the sophistication required to evaluate, either independently or together with wise counsel, investment options that fall outside the mainstream. Not surprisingly, an investment industry catering to such wealthy individuals, such as doctors and healthcare professionals, and qualifying institutions has sprung up.

EARLY DAYS

The original hedge fund was an investment partnership started by A.W. Jones in 1949. A financial writer prior to starting his investment management career, Mr. Jones is widely credited as being the prototypical hedge fund manager. His style of investment in fact gave the hedge fund its name – although Mr. Jones himself called his fund a “hedged fund.” Mr. Jones attempted to “hedge,” or protect, his investment partnership against market swings by selling short overvalued securities while at the same time buying undervalued securities. Leverage was an integral part of the strategy. Other managers followed in Mr. Jones’ footsteps, and the hedge fund industry was born.

In those early days, the hedge fund industry was defined by the types of investment operations undertaken – selling short securities, making liberal use of leverage, engaging in arbitrage and otherwise attempting to limit one’s exposure to market swings. Today, the hedge fund industry is defined more by the structure of the investment fund and the type of manager compensation employed.

The changing definition is largely a sign of the times. In 1949, the United States was in a unique state. With the memory of Great Depression still massively influencing common wisdom on stocks, the post-war euphoria sparked an interest in the securities markets not seen in several decades. Perhaps it is not so surprising that at such a time a particularly reflective financial writer such as A.W. Jones would start an investment operation featuring most prominently the protection against market swings rather than participation in them. 

Citation: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Apart from a few significant hiccups – 1972-73, 1987 and 2006-07 being most prominent – the U.S. stock markets have been on quite a roll for quite a long time now. So today, hedge funds come in all flavors – many not hedged at all. Instead, the concept of a private investment fund structured as a partnership, with performance incentive compensation for the manager, has come to dominate the mindscape when hedge funds are discussed. Hence, we now have a term in “hedge fund” that is not always accurate in its description of the underlying activity. In fact, several recent events have contributed to an even more distorted general understanding of hedge funds.

During 1998, the high profile Long Term Capital Management crisis and the spectacular currency losses experienced by the George Soros organization both contributed to a drastic reversal of fortune in the court of public opinion for hedge funds. Most hedge fund managers, who spend much of their time attempting to limit risk in one way or another, were appalled at the manner with which the press used the highest profile cases to vilify the industry as dangerous risk-takers. At one point during late 1998, hedge funds were even blamed in the lay press for the currency collapses of several developing nations; whether this was even possible got short thrift in the press.

Needless to say, more than a few managers have decided they did not much appreciate being painted with the same “hedge fund” brush. Alternative investment fund, private investment fund, and several other terms have been promoted but inadequately adopted. As the memory of 1998 and 2007 fades, “hedge fund” may once again become a term embraced by all private investment managers.

See the source image

ASSESSMENT: Physicians, and all investors, should be aware, however, that several different terms defining the same basic structure might be used. Investors should therefore become familiar with the structure of such funds, independent of the label. The Securities Exchange Commission calls such funds “privately offered investment companies” and the Internal Revenue Service calls them “securities partnerships.”

Your thoughts are appreciated.

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

THANK YOU

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PODCAST: What is the “Diluted” Stock Effect?

WHAT IT IS – HOW IT WORKS

BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

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The lowering of the book or market value of the shares of a company’s stock as a result of more shares outstanding. A company’s initial registration may include more shares than are initially issued when the company goes public for the first time.

Later, an issue of more stock by a company (called a “primary offering,” distinguished from the “initial public offering”) dilutes the existing shares outstanding. 

Also, earnings-per-share calculations are said to be “fully diluted” when all common stock equivalents (convertible securities, rights, and warrants) are included. “Fully diluted” numbers are used in analysis when there is a likelihood of conversion or exercise of rights and warrants.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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How does dilution affect my shares? | Startupxplore Blog

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PODCAST: https://duckduckgo.com/?q=Dilutive%22+Stock&t=newext&atb=v275-2&iax=videos&ia=videos&iai=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DtjQzJ7GY0GY

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

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WHITHER THE CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER™ MARKS?

Wither the CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER™ Professional Certification?

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DEAR INVESTMENT ADVISORS, CPAs, FINANCIAL PLANNERS, FINANCIAL ADVISORS & INSURANCE AGENTS

We believe that:

If you do not have a market niche; you are not deeply informed
If you are not deeply informed; you can’t different yourself
If you can’t differentiate yourself; you can’t differentiate price
If you can’t differentiate price; you have no market power
If you have no market power; you have no unique knowledge
If you have no unique knowledge; you have fewer profits

If you have fewer profits; you are not likely a CMP™

CMP

PROGRAM CURRICULUM: Enter the CMPs

POPULAR BOOKS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/04/29/why-are-certified-medical-planner-textbooks-so-darn-popular/

Dean Gene Schmuckler PhD MBA MEd CTS
http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

THANK YOU

***

What is a REIT, Really?

REITs – The Margarine of Real Estate Investing

See the source image

By Dr. Dennis Bethel MD

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Just like real estate, butter has been around for thousands of years.  Sometime in the 1800’s someone decided that there was a need for something that looked like butter, tasted similar to butter, but wasn’t butter.  Along came margarine.  Real estate investment trusts (REITs) are the margarine of the real estate investing world.

NAREIT, the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts, answers the question

What is a REIT?” in the following way:

“A REIT, or Real Estate Investment Trust, is a type of real estate company modeled after mutual funds.  REITs were created by Congress in 1960 to give all Americans – not just the affluent – the opportunity to invest in income producing real estate in a manner similar to how many Americans invest in stocks and bonds through mutual funds.  Income-producing real estate refers to land and the improvements on it – such as apartments, offices or hotels.  REITs may invest in the properties themselves, generating income through the collection of rent or they may invest in mortgages or mortgage securities tied to the properties, helping to finance the properties and generating interest income.”

While REITs typically own real estate, investors in REITs do not.  REITs are paper assets that represent interest in a company that owns and operates income producing properties.  In essence they are real estate flavored stock.  As such, REITs are generally highly correlated with the stock market.

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https://www.sgobserver.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/Screen-Shot-2018-08-26-at-8.41.54-pm.png

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TERMINOLOGY

When discussing REITs, you encounter the following terminology – public, private, traded, and non-traded.  Public REITs can be designated as non-traded or traded depending on whether or not they are traded on a stock exchange.

Since traded REITs are traded on the stock exchange, they enjoy a high degree of liquidity just like any other stock.  Unfortunately, traded REITs tend to follow the economic cycles and can closely correlate with the stock market.  This can lead to a higher degree of volatility than what is usually seen with physical real estate.  Additionally, they do not afford the investor the tax-advantages that come with investments in physical real estate.

MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2017/11/15/on-non-traded-real-estate-investment-trusts-reits/

Private REITs and non-traded public REITs are not traded on an exchange.  These are usually offered to accredited investors through broker-dealer networks.  These REITs are illiquid and generally have high fees.  They have been plagued with transparency issues as well as conflicts of interest.  Valuation of this stock is difficult and can be misleading to the investor.  Due diligence is very important as the quality of non-traded REITs can vary widely.

MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2014/06/13/why-i-hate-non-publicly-traded-reits/

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts and comments are appreciated.

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors : Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™ book cover

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Risk-Management-Liability-Insurance-and-Asset-Protection-Strategies-for/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781498725989

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

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The CORPORATE PRACTICE of Medicine?

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

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CORPORATE PRACTICE OF MEDICINE (CPM) LAWS

OK – I admit that I am not an attorney. But, approximately half of states in the U.S. have made it unlawful for practicing physicians to be employees of corporations. This ban on the corporate practice of medicine (CPM) is intended to keep medical professionals independent and free from financial pressures and influence.

Most states have made exceptions allowing physicians to become employees of not-for-profit organizations and sometimes hospitals. States such as California, Iowa, and Texas, have declined to allow hospitals to employ physicians, although even those states have special exceptions. Iowa hospitals may employ pathologists and radiologists, and Texas public hospitals and California teaching hospitals may employ physicians. Ohio has no ban on the corporate practice of medicine.

ASSESSMENT: Anyone can own a physician practice in Ohio.

QUERY: So, who does the aggrieved patient sue?

YOUR THOUGHTS ARE APPRECIATED

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Risk-Management-Liability-Insurance-and-Asset-Protection-Strategies-for/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781498725989

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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***

The Business of Medical Practice [3rd. edition]

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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Health Dictionary Series of Administrative Terms

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To keep up with the ever-changing healthcare industrial complex, we must learn new definitions and re-learn old terminology in order to correctly apply it to practice. By aggregating the most up-to-date abbreviations, acronyms, definitions and terms, the Health Dictionary Series offers a wealth of information to help understand the ever-changing terms-of-art in healthcare today.

Each 10,000 item handbook is essential for doctors, nurses, benefits managers, financial advisors/planners, and insurance agents, CPAs, and administrators; as well as graduate and under graduate students and professors. Our goal to for each dictionary to be designated as a Doody’s Core Title.

Dictionary of Health Insurance and Managed Care

With more than 10,000 definitions, 4,000 abbreviations and acronyms, and a 3,000 item oeuvre of resources, readings, and nomenclature derivatives, this dictionary covers the Medicare, managed care and Medicaid, private insurance, Veteran’s Administration and PP-ACA language of the entire health and long-term care insurance sector.

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Dictionary of Health Economics and Finance

Health economics and finance is an integral component of the health care industrial complex. Its language is a diverse and broad-based concept covering many other industries: accounting, mathematics, the actuarial sciences, stochastics and statistics, salary reimbursements, physician payments, compensation and forecasting are all commingled arenas.

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Dictionary of Health Information Technology Security

There is a myth that all healthcare stakeholders understand the meaning of information technology jargon. In truth, the vernacular of contemporary systems is unique, and often misused or misunderstood. Moreover, emerging Heath Information Technology (HIT) thru the HITECG initiatives; in the guise of terms, definitions, acronyms, abbreviations and standards; often puts the non-expert in a position of maximum uncertainty and minimum productivity.

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FOREWORDS

[Mike Stahl PhD MBA] *** [Foreword Dr.Mata MD CIS] *** [Dr. Getzen PhD] 

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MEDICAL ETHICS: Managing Risk is a Component of Caring

Demanding High Moral Standards of Self … and Economic HEALTHCARE Organizations

Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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It has been argued that physicians have abdicated the “moral high ground” in health care by their interest in seeking protection for their high incomes, their highly publicized self-referral arrangements, and their historical opposition toward reform efforts that jeopardized their clinical autonomy. 

Experts Speak

In his book Medicine at the Crossroads, colleague and Emory University professor Melvin Konnor, MD noted that “throughout its history, organized medicine has represented, first and foremost, the pecuniary interests of doctors.” He lays significant blame for the present problems in health care at the doorstep of both insurers and doctors, stating that “the system’s ills are pervasive and all its participants are responsible.” 

In order to reclaim their once esteemed moral position, physicians must actively reaffirm their commitment to the highest standards of the medical profession and call on other participants in the health care delivery system also to elevate their values and standards to the highest level.

Evolution

In the evolutionary shifts in models for care, physicians have been asked to embrace business values of efficiency and cost effectiveness, sometimes at the expense of their professional judgment and personal values.  While some of these changes have been inevitable as our society sought to rein in out-of-control costs, it is not unreasonable for physicians to call on payers, regulators and other parties to the health care delivery system to raise their ethical bar. 

Harvard University physician-ethicist Linda Emmanuel noted that “health professionals are now accountable to business values (such as efficiency and cost effectiveness), so business persons should be accountable to professional values including kindness and compassion.” 

Within the framework of ethical principles, John La Puma, M.D., wrote in Managed Care Ethics, that “business’s ethical obligations are integrity and honesty.  Medicine’s are those plus altruism, beneficence, non-maleficence, respect, and fairness.”

Incumbent in these activities is the expectation that the forces that control our health care delivery system, the payers, the regulators, and the providers will reach out to the larger community, working to eliminate the inequities that have left so many Americans with limited access to even basic health care. 

Charles Dougherty clarified this obligation in Back to Reform, when he noted that “behind the daunting social reality stands a simple moral value that motivates the entire enterprise”. 

ASSESSMENT

Health care is indeed grounded in caring. And, managing risk is a component of caring. It arises from a sympathetic response to the suffering of others.

YOUR THOUGHTS ARE APPRECIATED

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Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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THE ANATOMIC BASIS OF HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR?

BRAIN ANATOMY

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP©

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I am not a neurologist, psychologist, or psychiatrist. But, it is well known that emotional and behavioral change involves the human nervous system. And, there are two parts of the nervous system that are especially significant for holistic financial advisor; the first is the limbic system and the second is the autonomic nervous system. 

According to Dr. C. George Boerre of Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania, this is known as the emotional nervous system.

1. The Limbic System

The limbic system is a set of structures that lies on both sides of the thalamus, just under the cerebrum.  It includes the hypothalamus, the hippocampus, the amygdala, and nearby areas.  It is primarily responsible for emotions, memories and recollection. 

Hypothalamus

The small hypothalamus is located just below the thalamus on both sides of the third ventricle (areas within the cerebrum filled with cerebrospinal fluid that connect to spinal fluid). It sits inside both tracts of the optic nerve, and just above the pituitary gland.

The hypothalamus is mainly concerned with homeostasis or the process of returning to some “set point.”  It works like a thermostat:  When the room gets too cold, the thermostat conveys that information to the furnace and turns it on.  As the room warms up and the temperature rises, it sends turns off the furnace.  The hypothalamus is responsible for regulating hunger, thirst, response to pain, levels of pleasure, sexual satisfaction, anger and aggressive behavior, and more.  It also regulates the functioning of the autonomic nervous system, which means it regulates functions like pulse, blood pressure, breathing, and arousal in response to emotional circumstances. In a recent discovery, the protein leptin is released by fat cells with over-eating.  The hypothalamus senses leptin levels in the bloodstream and responds by decreasing appetite.  So, it seems that some people might have a gene mutation which produces leptin, and can’t tell the hypothalamus that it is satiated.   The hypothalamus sends instructions to the rest of the body in two ways.  The first is to the autonomic nervous system.  This allows the hypothalamus to have ultimate control of things like blood pressure, heart rate, breathing, digestion, sweating, and all the sympathetic and parasympathetic functions.

The second way the hypothalamus controls things is via the pituitary gland.  It is neurally and chemically connected to the pituitary, which in turn pumps hormones called releasing factors into the bloodstream.  The pituitary is the so-called “master gland” as these hormones are vitally important in regulating growth and metabolism.

Hippocampus

The hippocampus consists of two “horns” that curve back from the amygdala.  It is important in converting things “in your mind” at the moment (short-term memory) into things that are remembered for the long run (long-term memory).  If the hippocampus is damaged, a patient cannot build new memories and lives in a strange world where everything they experience just fades away; even while older memories from the time before the damage are untouched!  Most patients who suffer from this kind of brain damage are eventually institutionalized.

Amygdala

The amygdalas are two almond-shaped masses of neurons on either side of the thalamus at the lower end of the hippocampus.  When it is stimulated electrically, animals respond with aggression.  And, if the amygdala is removed, animals get very tame and no longer respond to anger that would have caused rage before.  The animals also become indifferent to stimuli that would have otherwise have caused fear and sexual responses.

Related Anatomic Areas

Besides the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and amygdala, there are other areas in the structures near to the limbic system that are intimately connected to it:

  • The cingulate gyrus is the part of the cerebrum that lies closest to the limbic system, just above the corpus collosum.  It provides a pathway from the thalamus to the hippocampus, is responsible for focusing attention on emotionally significant events, and for associating memories to smells and to pain.
  • The ventral tegmental area of the brain stem (just below the thalamus) consists of dopamine pathways responsible for pleasure.  People with damage here tend to have difficulty getting pleasure in life, and often turn to alcohol, drugs, sweets, and gambling.
  • The basal ganglia (including the caudate nucleus, the putamen, the globus pallidus, and the substantia nigra) lie over to the sides of the limbic system, and are connected with the cortex above them.  They are responsible for repetitive behaviors, reward experiences, and focusing attention. 
  • The prefrontal cortex, which is the part of the frontal lobe which lies in front of the motor area, is also closely linked to the limbic system.  Besides apparently being involved in thinking about the future, making plans, and taking action, it also appears to be involved in the same dopamine pathways as the ventral tegmental area, and plays a part in pleasure and addiction.

https://wallpapercave.com/wp/wp3011600.jpg

2. The Autonomic Nervous System

The second part of the nervous system to have a particularly powerful part to play in our emotional life is the autonomic nervous system. 

The autonomic nervous system is composed of two parts, which function primarily in opposition to each other.  The first is the sympathetic nervous system, which starts in the spinal cord and travels to a variety of areas of the body.  Its function appears to be preparing the body for the kinds of vigorous activities associated with “fight or flight,” that is, with running from danger or with preparing for violence.  Activation of the sympathetic nervous system has the following effects:

  • dilates the pupils and opens the eyelids,
  • stimulates the sweat glands and dilates the blood vessels in large muscles,
  • constricts the blood vessels in the rest of the body,
  • increases the heart rate and opens up the bronchial tubes of the lungs, and
  • inhibits the secretions in the digestive system.

One of its most important effects is causing the adrenal glands (which sit on top of the kidneys) to release epinephrine (adrenalin) into the blood stream.  Epinephrine is a powerful hormone that causes various parts of the body to respond in much the same way as the sympathetic nervous system.  Being in the blood stream, it takes a bit longer to stop its effects, and may take some time to calm down again

The sympathetic nervous system also takes in information, mostly concerning pain from internal organs.  Because the nerves that carry information about organ pain often travel along the same paths that carry information about pain from more surface areas of the body, the information sometimes get confused.  This is called referred pain, and the best known example is the pain in the left shoulder and arm when having a heart attack.

The other part of the autonomic nervous system is called the parasympathetic nervoussystem.  It has its roots in the brainstem and in the spinal cord of the lower back.  Its function is to bring the body back from the emergency status that the sympathetic nervous system puts it into.

Some of the details of parasympathetic arousal include some of the following:.

  • pupil constriction and activation of the salivary glands,
  • stimulating the secretions of the stomach and activity of the intestines,
  • stimulating secretions in the lungs and constricting the bronchial tubes, and;
  • decreases heart rate.

The parasympathetic nervous system also has some sensory abilities:  It receives information about blood pressure, levels of carbon dioxide in the blood, etc.

There is actually another part of the autonomic nervous system that is not mentioned too often: the enteric nervous system.  It is a complex of nerves that regulate the activity of the stomach. 

For example, if you get sick to your stomach with a new financial advisory client – or feel nervous butterflies with your first patient encounter as a doctor- you can blame the enteric nervous system.

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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Non-Traditional Physician Compensation Models

Creative Compensation Models

"Advisors Only" | The Leading Business Education Network ...

BY DR. DAVID EDWARD MARCINKO MBA CMP®

A Review of Some Newer Compensation Models

http://www.CERTIFIEDMEDICALPLANNER.org

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Today, whether independent or employed, physicians can pursue several creative compensation models, other than fee-for service reimbursement based on Current Procedural Terminology [CPT®] codes, not popular a few decade ago:

  • Pay-for-Performance Initiatives [P4P]: According to Mark Fendrick, MD and Michael E. Chernew, PhD, instead of the one size fits all approach of traditional health insurance, a “clinically-sensitive” cost-sharing system that supports co-payments related to evidence-based value for targeted patients is emerging. In 2014, for example, there were a number of changes to Medicare’s pay-for-performance programs [personal communication]. These value-based payment modifiers will show up in physicians’ paychecks in few years, and will be expanded to practices with 10 or more eligible professionals. The program, mandated by the Affordable Care Act, assesses a provider’s quality of care and costs, and increases Medicare payments for good performers and decreases them for bad ones. And, doctor performance will be reflected in adjustments to 2016 payments. As much as 2% of Medicare payments will be at risk in 2021 based on physician performance in 2019. It was only 1% for 2015, which was based on doctors’ 2013 performance.
  • Physician Quality Reporting Initiative Model.  The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services [CMS] paid out more than $40 million in monetary incentives to medical providers who reported data on quality of care delivered between July 2020 and December 2020; as part of its PQRI. Under the PQRI, healthcare providers who participated received bonuses of 1.5 percent of their total CMS payments during the reporting period.
  • Direct Reimbursement Payment Model:  A Health Reimbursement Arrangement (HRA) is a tool which is used to provide direct reimbursement by an employer for qualified medical expenses.  The HRA is an employer-established benefit plan, and contributions to the plan may only be made by the employer.  The HRA can be used in conjunction with any insurance plan, including a high-deductible plan. Qualified reimbursements made under the HRA are tax-deductible for the employer, and the payments are not counted as income for the employee.  Any balance in an HRA can generally be carried over to the next year.  This plan allows for flexibility and tailored to meet the particular needs of both employers and employees in a tax-advantaged manner.  From the physician’s perspective, increasing use of HRAs poses new challenges.  Payment for services in the medical office may be required of the patient/employee before reimbursement from the employer occurs.  These extra steps can easily result in delayed payment or non-payment to medical providers who are not prepared to work with this model of reimbursement.  The provisions for this model are outlined in IRS publication 969, http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p969.pdf.
  • Concierge Practice Model:  The concept of concierge medicine (CM), also known as retainer medicine, first emerged in Seattle, Washington in the 1990’s. With CM, the physician charges an annual retainer fee to patients.  The fee usually ranges from $1,000 to $20,000 per year, and the number of patients in a practice is usually limited to a few hundred.  In return, patients receive increased levels of access and personalized care. This often includes same day appointments, extended visit times, house calls, and 24/7 access to the physician by pager and cell phone. An annual executive physical is often included, as well as an increased emphasis on preventive care.  Many physicians choosing this type of practice model do so for lifestyle and control reasons, although the average income for a successful CM primary care physician is higher than that of a typical primary care physician. .
  • Global Healthcare Model: American businesses are extending their cost-cutting initiatives to include offshore employee medical benefits, and facilities like the Bumrungrad Hospital in Bangkok, Thailand (cosmetic surgery), the Apollo Hospital in New Delhi, India (cardiac and orthopedic surgery) are premier examples for surgical care. Both are internationally recognized institutions that resemble five-star hotels equipped with the latest medical technology. Countries such as Finland, England and Canada are also catering to the English-speaking crowd, while dentistry is especially popular in Mexico and Costa Rica. Although this is still considered “medical tourism,” Mercer Health and Benefits was recently retained by three Fortune 500 companies interested in contracting with offshore hospitals and The Joint Commission [TJC] has accredited 88 foreign hospitals through a joint international commission. To be sure, when India can discount costs up to 80%, the effects on domestic hospital reimbursement and physician compensation may be assumed to increase downward compensation pressures.
  • Locum Tenens Practitioner Model: Locum Tenens (LT) as an alternative to full-time employment is enjoying a comeback for most specialties. Some younger physicians enjoy the travel, while mature physicians like to practice at their leisure. Employment factors to consider include: firm reputation, malpractice insurance, credentialing, travel and relocation expenses (which are negotiable). However, a LT firm typically will not cover taxes [NALTO.org and http://www.studentdoc.com/locum-tenens.html%5D

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

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OVER HEARD IN THE FINANCIAL ADVISOR’S LOUNGE

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“TAKE THE FIDUCIARY PLEDGE”

FINANCIAL ADVISORS LOUNGE AT iMBA, Inc.

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DEFINITION: A fiduciary is a person who holds a legal or ethical relationship of trust with one or more other parties (person or group of persons).

Typically, a fiduciary prudently takes care of money or other assets for another person. One party, for example, a corporate trust company or the trust department of a bank, acts in a fiduciary capacity to another party, who, for example, has entrusted funds to the fiduciary for safekeeping or investment. Likewise, financial advisers, financial planners, and asset managers, including managers of pension plans, endowments, and other tax-exempt assets, are considered fiduciaries under applicable statutes and laws.

In a fiduciary relationship, one person, in a position of vulnerability, justifiably vests confidence, good faith, reliance, and trust in another whose aid, advice, or protection is sought in some matter. In such a relation good conscience requires the fiduciary to act at all times for the sole benefit and interest of the one who trusts.

CITATION: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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[Fiduciary Pledge]*

I, the undersigned, ___________________________ (“financial advisor”), pledge to always put the best interests of _______________________________ (“client”) first, no matter what.

As such, I will disclose in writing the following material facts and any conflicts of interest (actual and/or perceived) that may arise in our business relationship:

  • All commission, fees, loads, and expenses, in advance, client will pay as a result of my advice and recommendations;
  • All commission and commissions I receive as a result of my advice and recommendations;
  • The maximum fee discount allowed by my firm and the largest fee discount I give to other customers;
  • The fee discount client is receiving;
  • Any recruitment bonuses and other recruitment compensation I have or will receive from my firm;
  • Fees I paid to others for the referral of client to me;
  • Fees I have or will receive for referring client to any third-parties; and
  • Any other financial conflicts of interest that could reasonably compromise the impartiality of my advice and recommendations.

Jeff Kuest MBA CFA CFP®

[CounterPoint Capital Advisors]

*© 2011-2015. All rights reserved. Courtesy permission with personal communication from Jeff Kuest, MBA, CFA, CFP®

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

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Join the ME-P and Become a CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER™

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Or, as a financial advisor to doctors, are you looking to develop deeper relationships of knowledge and trust with your physician clients?

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[PHYSICIAN FOCUSED FINANCIAL PLANNING AND RISK MANAGEMENT COMPANION TEXTBOOK SET]

  Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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Why are CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER® Textbooks SO DARN Popular?

[By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®]

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OK – I was a Certified Financial Planner® before my academic team launched the Certified Medical Planner™ online and on-ground chartered education and board certification designation program a few years ago. I am now CFP reformed and in remission.

MORE: Enter CPMs

Enter the Certified Medical PlannerChartered Designation

Today, we are of course, gratified that Certified Medical Planner™ mark notoriety is growing organically in the healthcare, as well as financial services, industry.

Even uber-blogger Mike Kitces MSFS, MTAX, CFP, CLU, ChFC, RHU, REBC, CASL has taken note of us in his musings on the Nerd’s Eye View website. And, the reality is that there are a growing number of CFP educational programs at the post-CFP niche market level.

But, none for healthcare industrial complex: for doctors … by doctors!

Popularity of our Text Books

However, it is our modern, innovative and proprietary Certified Medical Planner™ textbooks and dictionaries that have exploded in the academic marketplace.

In fact, they are now redacted in thousands of medical, graduate, law and B-schools and libraries, as well as colleges and universities throughout the nation. This includes the Library of Congress, National Institute of Health and  the Library of Congress.

What Gives?

We have been told that this textbook popularity and publishing success is because of their balanced and peer-reviewed nature; something not very widespread in the financial services industry that is prone to gross and overstated advertising, salesmanship and marketing hyperbole. And, for this we are very gratified.

But, is there another reason our books are so popular?

A bit of networking and research suggests that interested folks may be eschewing the actual course work in favor of just the high quality textbooks! UGH!

Another reason may be that our books and curricula are kept fresh and updated on our corporate website: http://www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com

Assessment

So, what do you think? Matriculation with the professional mark versus self study without the designation mark. Please opine.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements.

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COMPREHENSIVE FINANCIAL PLANNING FOR PHYSICIANS & ADVISORS 2.0

COMPREHENSIVE FINANCIAL PLANNING FOR PHYSICIANS & ADVISORS 2.0
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Understanding the Art of Selling Your Medical Practice

Part Two of Medical Practice Valuation

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko, MBA, CMP

By Prof. Hope Rachel Hetico, RN, MHA, CMP

www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

In Part 1, we discussed how to establish fair market value (FMV) for a medical practice in the article, “Establish Your Practice’s Fair Market Value.” This time, we’ll review important terms and conditions for the sale transaction.

Valuation Types

Unfortunately, as a general rule, medical practice worth is presently deteriorating. A good medical practice is no longer a good business necessarily, and selling doctors can no longer automatically expect to extract a premium sale price. Nevertheless, appraising your medical practice on a periodic basis can play a key role in obtaining maximum value for it.

Competent practice valuation specialists typically charge a retainer to cover out-of-pocket expenses. Fees should not be based on a percentage of practice value, and may take 30-45 days to complete. Flat fees should be the norm because a sliding scale or percentage fee may be biased toward over-valuation in a declining marketplace. Fees range from $7,500-$50,000 for the small to large medical practice or clinic.

Expect to pay a retainer and sign a formal, professional engagement letter. Seek an unbiased and independent viewpoint. Buyer and sellers should each have their own independent appraisal done, using similar statistics, accounting measures, and economic assumptions.

At the Institute of Medical Business Advisors, Inc www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com we use three engagement levels that vary in intensity, purpose, and cost:

1. A comprehensive valuation provides an unambiguous value range. It is supported by most all procedures that valuators deem relevant, with mandatory onsite review. This gold standard is suitable for contentious situations. A written “opinion of value” is applicable for litigation support activities like depositions and trial. It is also useful for external reporting to bankers, investors, the public, Internal Revenue Service (IRS), etc.

2. A limited valuation lacks additional suggested Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP) procedures. It is considered to be an “agreed upon engagement,” when the client is the only user. For example, it may be used when updating a buy/sell agreement, or when putting together a practice buy-in for a valued associate. This limited valuation would not be for external purposes, so no onsite visit is necessary and a formal opinion of value is not rendered.

3. An ad-hoc valuation is a low level engagement that provides a gross non-specific approximation of value based on limited parameters or concerns involved parties. Neither a written report nor an opinion of value is rendered. It is often used periodically as an internal organic growth/decline gauge.

Structure Sales Transactions

When the practice price has been determined and agreed on, the actual sales deal can be structured in a couple of ways:

(1) Stock Purchase v. Asset Purchase

In an asset transaction, the buyer will receive a tax amortization benefit associated with the intangible value of the business. This tax amortization represents a non-cash expense benefiting the buyer. In this case, the present value of those future tax benefits is added to the business enterprise value.

(2) Corporate Transactions

Typical private deals in the past involved some multiple (ratio) of earning before income taxes (EBIT)—usually a combination of cash, restricted stock, notes receivable, and possibly assumption of liabilities. For some physician hospital organizations, and public deals, the receipt of common stock can increase the practice price by as much as 40-50 percent (to accept the corresponding business risk, in lieu of cash).

Complete the Deal

The deal structure will vary depending on whether the likely buyer is a private practitioner, health system or a corporate partner. Some key issues to consider in the “art of the deal” include:

  • Working capital (in or out?): Including working capital in the transaction will increase the sale price.
  • Stock vs. asset transaction: Structuring the deal as an asset purchase will increase practice value due to the tax amortization benefits received by the buyer for intangible assets of the practice.
  • Common stock premium: The total sale price can be significantly higher than a cash equivalent price for accepting the risk and relative illiquidity of common stock as part of the payment.
  • Physician compensation: If your goal is to maximize practice value, take home a lower salary to increase practice sale price. The reverse is also true.

Understand Private Deal Structure

Assuming a practice sale is a private transaction, deal negotiations are based on the following pricing methodologies:

Seller financing: Many transactions involve an earn-out arrangement where the buyer puts money down and pays the balance under a formula based on future revenues, or gives the seller a promissory note under similar terms. Seller financing decreases a buyer’s risks (the longer the terms, the lower the risk). Longer terms demand premiums, while shorter terms demand discounts. Premiums that buyers pay for a typical seller-financed practice are usually more than what you would expect from a simple time value of money calculation, as a result of buyer risk reduction from paying over time, rather than up front with a bank loan or all cash. Remember to obtain a life insurance policy on the buyer.

Down payment: The greater the down payment for acquisition of a medical practice, the greater the risk is to the buyer. Consequently, sellers who will take less money up front can command a higher than average price for their practice, while sellers who want more down usually receive less in the end.

Taxation: Tax consequences can have a major impact on the price of a medical practice. For instance, a seller who obtains the majority of the sales price as capital gains can often afford to sell for a much lower price and still pocket as much or more than if the sales price were paid as ordinary income. Value attributed to the seller’s patient list, medical records, name brand, good will, and files qualifies for capital gains treatment. Value paid for the selling doctor’s continuing assistance after the sale and value attributed to a non-compete agreement are taxed at ordinary income. A buyer willing to allocate more for items with capital gains treatment, or a seller willing to take more in ordinary income, can frequently negotiate a better price. This is the essence of economically prudent practice transition planning.

Sidestep Common Buyer Blunders

Here are 10 blunders to avoid, as a buyer:

1. Believing the selling doctor’s attestations. Always verify data through an independent appraisal.

2. Wanting to change the culture of the practice. Be careful: Patients may not adjust quickly to change.

3. Using all available cash without keeping a reserve for potential contingencies.

4. Creating a conflict with the seller by recognizing a weakness and continually focusing on it for a bargain price.

5. Failing to realize that managed care plan contracts can be lost quickly or may not be always transferable.

6. Suffering from analysis paralysis. Money cannot be made by continually checking out a medical practice, only by actually running one.

7. Not appreciating the uniqueness of each practice, and using inaccurate “rules of thumb” from the golden age of medicine.

8. Not realizing that practice worth and goodwill value have plummeted lately and continue to decline in most parts of the country.

9. Not understanding that practice brokers may play both sides of the buy/sell equation for profit. Brokers usually are not obligated to disclose conflicts of interest, are not fiduciaries, and do not provide testimony as a court-approved expert witness.

10. Not hiring an appraisal professional who will testify in court, if need be, using the IRS-approved USPAP methods of valuation. Always assume that the appraisal will be contested (many times, it is).

After pricing and contracting due diligence has been performed, the next step in the medical practice sale process—as Donald Trump might say—is just good, old-fashioned negotiation.

Electronic Downloads

Part I: Part I

Part II: Part II

Additional Reading:

Cimasi, R.J., A.P. Sharamitaro, T.A. Zigrang, L.A.Haynes. Valuation of Hospitals in a Changing Reimbursement and Regulatory Environment. Edited by David E. Marcinko. Healthcare Organizations: Financial Management Strategies. Specialty Technical Publishers, 2008.

Marcinko, D.E. “Getting it Right: How much is a plastic surgery practice really worth?” Plastic Surgery Practice, August 2006.

Marcinko, D.E., H.R. Hetico. The Business of Medical Practice (3rd ed). Springer Publishing,New York,N.Y., 2011.

Marcinko, D.E. and H.R. Hetico. Risk Management and Insurance Planning for Physicians and Advisors. Jones and Bartlett Publishers, Sudbury, Mass., 2007.

Marcinko, D.E. and H.R. Hetico. Financial Planning for Physicians and Advisors. Jones and Bartlett Publishers, Sudbury, Mass., 2007.

Marcinko, D.E. and H.R. Hetico. Dictionary of Health Insurance and Managed Care. Springer Publishers, New York, N.Y., 2007.

Marcinko, D.E. and H.R. Hetico. Dictionary of Health Economics and Finance. Springer Publishers,New York,N.Y., 2007.

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Meet David K. Luke MIM CMP™ [An ME-P Thought-Leader]

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A Physician Focused Financial Advisior and Certified Medical Planner™

Financial Management Experience

https://www.medicuswealthplanning.com/team/david-k-luke

David K. Luke focuses on helping physicians, medical professionals, and successful retirees with financial planning, investment and risk management.

In the past 24 years of industry experience, David has held licenses including general securities registered representative, registered investment advisor, Branch management supervision, and Life, Accident, and Health Producers.

David, a fee-only advisor, is able to help his clients to achieve peace of mind and greater assurance with their financial goals by giving advice and providing investment management that is in their best interest, untainted by commissions or sales objectives. Likewise, in a true fiduciary capacity, he is able to help investors determine the reliability and suitability of products and services that they have been sold by other advisors.

David began his career managing money in 1986 in the General Motors of Canada Banking and Investments department where he was engaged in cash management, foreign currency hedging, and the debt issuance of a $100 million Eurobond and a $300 million Note Issuance facility. In 1988 as Supervisor of Borrowings for GMAC Canada David was responsible for the daily average issuance of $125 million in short-term Commercial Paper. David worked as a stock broker and portfolio manager for 2 major national brokerage firms (A.G. Edwards and Wachovia Securities) from 1989 to 2008.

Additionally, at Wachovia Securities David was among an elite group of financial advisors approved as a PIM (Private Investment Management) Portfolio Manager. Prior to joining Net Worth Advisory Group in 2010, David managed his own independent firm, Luke Wealth Strategies, working as a registered representative and investment advisor.

Education and Designations

  • President 2009/2010, Financial Planning Association (FPA) – Utah Chapter Affiliate
  • National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (NAPFA)
  • Member, Medical Group Management Association Master of International Management (Finance concentration)
  • American Graduate School of International Management Bachelor of Arts, Brigham Young University
  • Certified Medical Planner™ Professiobnal Designation from iMBA, Inc www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Assessment

David is our newest ME-P “thought-leader”. We look foward to his insider comments and posts. So, please welcome him and give his site a click: http://networthadvice.com/our-team/david-k-luke/

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Why 75 Years of American Finance Should Matter to Physician Investors

A Graphic Presentation [1861-1935] with Commentary from the Publisher

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko FACFAS MBA CPHQ CMP™

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

As our private iMBA Inc clients, ME-P subscribers, textbook and dictionary purchasers, seminar attendees and most ME-P readers know, Ken Arrow is my favorite economist. Why?

About Kenneth J. Arrow, PhD

Well, in 1972, Nobel Laureate Kenneth J. Arrow, PhD shocked Academe’ by identifying health economics as a separate and distinct field. Yet, the seemingly disparate insurance, asset allocation, econometric, statistical and portfolio management principles that he studied have been transparent to most financial professionals and wealth management advisors for years; at least until now.

Nevertheless, to informed cognoscenti, they served as predecessors to the modern healthcare advisory era. In 2004, Arrow was selected as one of eight recipients of the National Medal of Science for his innovative views. And, we envisioned the ME-P at that time to present these increasingly integrated topics to our audience.

Healthcare Economics Today

Today – as 2019 nears – savvy medical professionals, management consultants and financial advisors are realizing that the healthcare industrial complex is in flux; and this dynamic may be reflected in the overall economy.

Like many laymen seeking employment, for example, physicians are frantically searching for new ways to improve office revenues and grow personal assets, because of the economic dislocation that is Managed Care, Medi Care and Obama Care [ACA], the depressed business cycle, etc.

Moreover, the largest transfer of wealth in US history is – or was – taking place as our lay elders and mature doctors sell their practices or inherit parents’ estates. Increasingly, the artificial academic boundary between the traditional domestic economy, financial planning and contemporaneous medical practice management is blurring.

I’m Not a Cassandra

Yet, I am no gloom and doom Cassandra like I have been accused, of late. I am not cut from the same cloth as a Jason Zweig, Jeremy Grantham or Nouriel Roubini PhD, for example.

However, I do subscribe to the philosophy of Hope for the Best – Plan for the Worst.

And so dear colleagues, I ask you, “Are the latest swings in the economic, healthcare and financial headlines making you wonder when it will ever stop?”

The short answer is: “It will never stop” because what’s been happening isn’t any “new normal”; it’s just the old normal playing out before a new audience.

What audience?

The next-generation of investors, FAs, management consultants and the medical professionals of Health 2.0.

How do I know all this?

History tells me so! Just read this work, and opine otherwise, or reach a different conclusion.

Evidence from the American Financial Scene, circa 1861-1935

The work was created by L. Merle Hostetler in 1936, while he was at Cleveland College of Western Reserve University (now known as Case Western Reserve University). I learned of him while in B-School, back in the day.

At some point after it was printed, he added the years 1936-1938. Mr. Hostetler became a Financial Economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland in 1943. In 1953 he was made Director of Research. He resigned from the Bank in 1962 to work for Union Commerce Bank in Cleveland. He died in 1990.

The volume appears to be self published and consists of a chart, approximately 85′ long, fan-folded into 40 pages with additional years attached to the last page. It also includes a “topical index” to the chart and some questions of technical interest which can be answered by the chart.

Link: http://fraser.stlouisfed.org/75years

Assessment

And so, as with Sir John Templeton’s [whose son is an MD] four most dangerous words in investing (It’s different this time), Hostetler effectively illustrates that it wasn’t so different in his era, and maybe—just maybe—it isn’t so different today for all these conjoined fields.

Conclusion      

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. While not exactly a “sacred cow,” there is a current theory that investors will experience higher volatility and lower global returns for the foreseeable future.

In fact, it has gained widespread acceptance, from the above noted Cassandra’s and others, as problems in Europe persist and threats of a double-dip recession loom. But, how true is this notion; really?

Is Hostetler correct, or not; and why?

Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

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Dr. Marcinko Interviewed on the Physician Credit Crunch

Financial Experts Share Tips on Obtaining Loans to Start or Expand a Medical Practice

By Michael Gibbons

Editor: ADVANCE Newsmagazines

Maybe you’re a young dermatologist or plastic surgeon who dreams of starting your own practice. Or maybe you’re an established professional but want to expand your palette of anti-aging services. Either way, you’ve probably made an unpleasant discovery: Banks are leery about lending today. Global recessions with seemingly no end in sight tend to give loan officers sticky fingers.HO-JFMS-CD-ROM

Dermatologists and Plastic Surgeons

We have it on good authority that dermatologists and plastic surgeons as a group are less affected by this problem than physicians in some other branches of medicine. Still, there’s no better time than now to absorb some sound advice on how to approach banks for loans—whether you’re a fresh-faced newcomer to the fresh-face business or a wrinkled veteran at eliminating wrinkles.

Start Small

There’s no soft-soaping it: Starting a healthy aging practice is much harder than expanding an existing practice, even in the flushest of times.

“For young dermatologists starting out, I recommend you start small,” advises Jerome Potozkin, MD, who offers facial rejuvenation, liposuction, body contouring and dermatological care through his practice in Walnut Creek, CA. “You can always expand. Keep your overhead low. Know what your credit score is and do everything you can to improve it. Pay your bills on time.”

Lasers aren’t cheap. Besides the initial acquisition costs, a service contract can cost $7,000 to $12,000 a year, according to Dr. Potozkin. “Don’t feel you have to buy every new laser under the sun,” he says. “In fact, renting rather than purchasing is an option many companies offer. When your volume is low you can rent and schedule laser days—although the pitfall there is you don’t have lasers available whenever patients come in.”

Also, young dermatologists “will probably have an easier time getting a loan if they go to a relatively underserved area, as opposed to an area that has a large number of dermatologists per capita,” says Dr. Potozkin, who began practicing 10 years ago. “There are two schools of thought on this: Go where you want to live to start a practice or go to where there’s a need and be instantly successful. I chose the former. It took me longer to get started but I’m very happy where I am.”

Patience, Prudence and Passiondem2

Be patient, prudent, passionate—and start with a spare office and as little debt as possible, advises Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA, a financial advisor and Certified Medical Planner™. Marcinko, a health economist,  is CEO of the Institute of Medical Business Advisors Inc., a national physician and medical practice consulting firm based in Norcross, GA www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com

“Patients are looking for passion from you, not lavish trappings,” Dr. Marcinko says. “When a banker or a loan officer sees $175,000 or more of debt they are loath to give a loan—and it’s hard to blame them. Purchase a home after you become a private practitioner. You need to be as close to debt-free as you can be.

Exit Strategy

“Another thing bankers want to know is, ‘If we give you a loan and you start a practice and it fails, how will we be paid back?’ They want an exit strategy.”

The good news is dermatology “remains a very lucrative specialty, and in most parts of the country they are in a shortage position, particularly with the aging population,” says Sandra McGraw, JD, MBA, principal and CEO of the Health Care Group, a financial and legal consulting firm based in Plymouth Meeting, PA., that advises the American Academy of Dermatology, among other groups.

“I would start with a realistic business plan for why you think this practice can succeed, in the specific location,” McGraw says. “How many patients do you expect to see? How will they know you are there and available? Remember that banks lend to all kinds of people, so keep your numbers realistic. Overestimating expenses is as bad as underestimating them. Then determine how you want the money—usually a fixed loan for a period of time and then a line of credit as you get your practice going and sometimes need the cash flow.”biz-book

Expanding a Practice

Established dermatologists should have an easier time getting loans to expand their practices. They have, one hopes, a track record of success and assets to put up as collateral.

Mid-career physicians “have cash flow, physician assets and equity to some degree in a house and personal assets,” Dr. Marcinko observes. “Banks can attach loans to personal assets and savings accounts. Ninety-nine percent of times you must sign a personal asset guarantee. Mid-lifers have assets young ones don’t, so mid-lifers aren’t quite the risk. They have businesses that have value and cash flow. Banks like cash flow.”

However, even veterans must do some homework before approaching a bank. “You still want to establish why you want the money and how the expansion will increase your income,” McGraw says.

Another tip: If the bank has loans out with reputable vendors, you might ask the loan officer to recommend them to you as potential contractors. “Sometimes keeping it local and supporting others with loans at the bank can be helpful,” she says.

Assessment

Dr. Marcinko adds, “Bankers today want you to come in with a well-reasoned, well-thought-out and well-written business plan. Give bankers a 30-second elevator speech on why you are different. It’s really important to ask yourself, ‘What can I offer the community as a doctor in my specialty that nobody else can?’ If you bill yourself as the first dermatologist to do laser surgery, that’s a perceived advantage. You purchased the equipment and learned to use it. But anyone can do that. If you can come up with something that nobody else has or can do, that’s how you’re successful in anything.”

Link: Dr. Marcinko Interview

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.files.wordpress.com/2009/08/dr-marcinko-interview.pdf

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Tell us what you think. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

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Top High Yield Dividend Stocks in the Financial Industry

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The Financial Sector Yields

 tim

By TIMOTHY J. McINTOSH; MBA, MPH, CFP®, CMP™ [Hon]

The financial sector is a somewhat broad sector, although many of the industries within the sectors tend to move together.

In the last twelve months, the Financial Select Sector SPDR ETF (NYSE: XLF) increased 32%. This compared to an increase of 25% of the S&P 500 index. On a year to date basis, the sector is flat.

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Continue reading Top High Yield Dividend Stocks in the Financial Industry

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HUMANITARIAN WISDOM IN PATIENT CARE AS A MORAL IMPERATIVE AND …

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…. A MEDICAL RISK MANAGEMENT TOOL in 2018!

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DEM white shirt

[Dr. David Edward Marcinko CMP™ MBA MBBS]

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

***

In SECTION ONE, of our newest textbook, on medical practitioner personal risk management issues, let us all recall the Canadian physician Sir William Osler MD, one of the founders of Johns Hopkins Hospital in my hometown of Baltimore Maryland, and where I played stickball in the parking lot as a kid. He left a sizeable body of wisdom that has guided many physicians in the practice of medicine. So, allow me to share with you some of that accumulated wisdom and the quotes that have served me well over the years.

From Dr. Osler, I learned the art of putting myself in the patient’s shoes. “The motto of each of you as you undertake the examination and treatment of a case should be ‘put yourself in his place.’ Realize, so far as you can, the mental state of the patient, enter into his feelings.” Osler further stresses that we should “scan gently (the patient’s) faults” and offer the “kindly word, the cheerful greeting, the sympathetic look.”1

“In some of us, the ceaseless panorama of suffering tends to dull that fine edge of sympathy with which we started,” writes Osler in his famous essay “Aequanimitas.”2 “Against this benumbing influence, we physicians and nurses, the immediate agents of the Trust, have but one enduring corrective — the practice towards patients of the Golden Rule of Humanity as announced by Confucius: ‘What you do not like when done to yourself, do not do to others.’”

Medicine can be both art and science as many physicians have discovered. As Osler tells us, “Errors in judgment must occur in the practice of an art which consists largely of balancing probabilities.”2 Osler notes that “Medicine is a science of uncertainty and an art of probability” and also weighs in with the idea that “The practice of medicine is an art, based on science.”3,4

Osler emphasized that excellence in medicine is not an inheritance and is more fully realized with the seasoning of experience. “The art of the practice of medicine is to be learned only by experience,” says Osler. “Learn to see, learn to hear, learn to feel, learn to smell, and know that by practice alone can you become expert.”5

Finally, some timeless wisdom on patient care came from Osler in an address to St. Mary’s Hospital Medical School in London in 1907: “Gain the confidence of a patient and inspire him with hope, and the battle is half won.”6

Osler has also imparted plenty of advice on the business of medicine. In “Aequanimitas,” Osler says there are only two types of doctors: “those who practice with their brains, and those who practice with their tongues.”7

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Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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In a valedictory address to medical school graduates at McGill University, Osler suggested treating money as a side consideration in a medical career.8 “You have of course entered the profession of medicine with a view of obtaining a livelihood; but in dealing with your patients let this always be a secondary consideration.”

“You are in this profession as a calling, not as a business: as a calling which exacts from you at every turn self-sacrifice, devotion, love and tenderness to your fellow man,” explains Osler in the address to St. Mary’s Hospital Medical School.6 “Once you get down to a purely business level, your influence is gone and the true light of your life is dimmed. You must work in the missionary spirit, with a breadth of charity that raises you far above the petty jealousies of life.”

It is not easy for doctors to combine a passion for patient care, a knowledge of science and the maintenance of business, according to Osler in the British Medical Journal.9 “In the three great professions, the lawyer has to consider only his head and pocket, the parson the head and heart, while with us the head, heart, and pocket are all engaged.”

While some aspects of practice may fall short or be devoid of appropriate financial remuneration, the giving of one’s time, expertise and experience in improving patient outcomes and the quality of their lives may be the greatest gift. “The ‘good debts’ of practice, as I prefer to call them … amount to a generous sum by the end of each year,” says Osler.9

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http://www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com

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MEDICAL Ethics for Challenging Times

[Finding Your Moorings in an Era of Dramatic Change]

Marcinko Ethics

By Render S. Davis MHA

By David Edward Marcinko

***

And so, as you read and reflect on the chapter of SECTION ONE, always remember the words and wisdom of Dr. William Osler, and keep patient welfare as your first priority.

Dr. David Edward Marcinko; CMP™ MBA MBBS [Hon]

[Chief Executive Officer]

iMBA Inc., Norcross, GA

References

  1. Penfield W. Neurology in Canada and the Osler centennial. Can Med Assoc J. 1949; 61(1): 69-73
  2. Osler W. Aequanimitas. Chapter 9, P. Blakiston’s Son and Co., Philadelphia, 1925, p. 159
  3. Bean WB. William Osler: Aphorisms, CC Thomas, Springfield, IL, p. 129.
  4. Osler W. Aequanimitas. Chapter 3, P. Blakiston’s Son and Co., Philadelphia, 1925, p. 34
  5. Thayer WS. Osler the teacher. In: Osler and Other Papers. Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore, 1931, p. 1.
  6. Osler W. The reserves of life. St. Mary’s Hosp Gaz. 1907;13 (1):95-8.
  7. Osler W. Aequanimitas. Chapter 7, P. Blakiston’s Son and Co., Philadelphia, 1925, p. 124
  8. Osler W. Valedictory address to the graduates in medicine and surgery, McGill University. Can Med Surg J. 1874; 3:433-42.
  9. Osler W. Remarks on organization in the profession. Brit Med J. 1911; 1(2614):237-9.
  10. Jacobs. AM: PMNews, April, 2015.

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Investing and Economics is an Imprecise Science

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BUT … It’s still all about CONSUMERISM!

[By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA MBBS [Hon] CMP]

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

DEM 2013There is a major variable, dominant in any marketplace that pushes an economy in a forward direction. It is called consumerism.

This became apparent while I was waiting in a doctor colleague’s office one recent afternoon.

Scenario:

The front office receptionist, who appeared to be about 21 years old, was breaking for lunch and her replacement, and appeared not much older, came over to assist.

Realizing the propensity for a long wait, one was taken by the size of waiting room and the number of patients coming in and out of the office. [Americans consume healthcare and a lot of it].

There was another notable peculiarity. The sample prescription bags being carried out the door were no match for the bags under everyone’s eyes, including the doctor’s. The office staff was probably working overtime, if not two jobs, and the doctor was working harder and faster in a managed care / ACA system.

***

stock-exchange-

[Consumerism driving the Stock Market]

***

Why?

So they all could afford to buy and voraciously consume for their children and themselves. Americans indeed work longer hours than any other industrialized nation.

Assessment

Additionally, as women female medical professionals entered the workforce in unprecedented numbers, the stock markets reached an all time high in 2015, even as money was spent at a feverish pace as the Federal Reserve pumped out money in inflammatory fashion.

Channel Surfing

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Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

COMPREHENSIVE FINANCIAL PLANNING STRATEGIES for DOCTORS and ADVISORS

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UPCOMING: Our Newest Major Textbook Release

[By Ann Miller RN MHA]

Release: February 19th, 2015 by Productivity Press, Inc

744 Pages | 43 Illustrations

Editor(s): Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP™ and Professor Hope Rachel Hetico RN MHA CMP™

***

 COMPREHENSIVE FINANCIAL PLANNING STRATEGIES for DOCTORS and ADVISORS 

[Best Practices from Leading Consultants and

Certified Medical Planners™]

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

 Features: 

  • Engaging content with case models, templates and examples for all medical professionals and their consulting advisors.
  • Combines holistic financial planning with new topics like hedge funds, investment banking, Wall Street practices and shenanigans; securities markets and margin accounts; alternative asset classes and investment policy creation – all integrated with emerging health industry concerns like the PP-ACA, ACOs, new tax laws and reimbursement models; practice sales, contracting and valuations; social media, hospital employee fringe benefits and PHO stock options.
  • Presents disruptive theories on industry suitability rules, fiduciary accountability and stewardship principles, and how to select the most knowledgeable and cost-efficient advisor for every life-cycle need.

Summary

Drawing on the expertise of multi-degreed doctors, and multi-certified financial advisors, COMPREHENSIVE  FINANCIAL PLANNING STRATEGIES FOR DOCTORS AND ADVISORS[Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™]will shape the industry landscape for the next-generation as the current ecosystem strives to keep pace. Traditional generic products and sales-driven advice will yield to a new breed of deeply informed financial advisor, or Certified Medical Planner™.

The profession is set to be transformed by “cognitive-disruptors” that will significantly impact the $2.8 trillion healthcare marketplace for those financial consultants serving this challenging sector. There will be winners and losers. The text which contains 24 chapters, and champions healthcare providers while informing financial advisors, is divided into four sections compete with glossary of terms, CMP™ curriculum content, and related information sources:

  1. For ALL medical providers and financial industry practitioners
  2. For NEW medical providers and financial industry practitioners
  3. For MID-CAREER medical providers and financial industry practitioners
  4. For MATURE medical providers and financial industry practitioners.

Using an engaging style, the book is filled with authoritative guidance and health care–centered discussions, to provide tools and techniques to create a personalized financial plan using professional advice. Comprehensive coverage includes topics likes behavioral finance, medical risk management, Modern Portfolio Theory (MPF), the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAP-M) and Arbitrage Pricing Theory (APT); as well as insider insights on commercial real estate; High Frequency Trading platforms and robo-advisors; the Patriot and Sarbanes–Oxley Acts; hospital endowment fund management, ethical wills, divorce and other special situations.

The result is a codified “must-have” book, for all health industry participants, and those seeking advice from the growing cadre of financial consultants and Certified Medical Planners™ who seek to “do well – by doing good”, dispensing granular physician-centric financial advice: Omnia pro medicus-clientis.

Financial Planning 2015

 RAISING THE BAR

CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER

“The informed voice of a new generation of fiduciary advisors for healthcare”

[Omnia pro medicus-clientis]  

More:

BOOK: Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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What is a Physician-Focused Financial Advisor?

Certified Medical Planner

Enter the Certified Medical Planner™ Designation [A Working White-Paper]

[By Professor Hope R. Hetico RN MHA CMP]

Prof. Hope R. Hetico

Definitions and Terms

The term “physician focused financial advisor” or “physician focused financial planner” ” has been used fast and loose in defining the healthcare financial services business sector.

Many in the industry seem to think it’s interchangeable with more generalist terms like “financial planning” or “financial advice” for doctors.

A Niche Sub-Specialty

The truth is, physician focused financial planning and advice is a niche practice specialty unto itself, and high-net-worth doctors and medical professionals increasingly require specific services with more complex financial and practice management needs than the average Joe (in the sense that their needs are more intricate and sophisticated).

It’s this belief—that physician focused financial planning is a distinct practice specialty with a distinct body of knowledge—that prompted the Institute of Medical Business Advisors, Inc. to precisely define it and codify a body of academic knowledge for its chartered and certified practitioners. To do so, it surveyed more than a thousand doctors, dentists, nurses, therapists and allied healthcare professionals practicing today. They concluded that while the fundamental processes may initially be similar to those of generic financial planning, an advanced and distinct set of tasks, knowledge and skills is required to effectively serve such a lucrative, educated and yet demanding subset of clients.

Survey Results

Today, this “knowledge and task analysis” resulted in 24 knowledge topics [12 financial planning and 12 medical practice management] which iMBA, Inc. used to launch the Certified Medical Planner™ (CMP) education, examination, experience and ethics requirements. Financial Advisors who are committed to advanced competency in physician focused financial planning are able to effectively address the problems of doctors and medical professionals – and therefore have the skills required to serve them.

***

cmp-program1

***

A Knowledge Based Field

Anyone who wishes to work within this niche area must have the necessary deep knowledge, expertise and training to do so. Because of iMBA’s efforts in this specialty field of practice, volunteer physician practitioners in our CMP™ charter certification program established an objective, fair and transparent education and assessment process to qualify their peers who demonstrate advanced competency in advising all medical and healthcare management professionals.

More: Enter the CMPs

Verification Compliance Service

Shannon Cronin [Verifications Specialist] 355 N.E. 5th Avenue Suite #4 Delray Beach, FL 33483 Phone: 561-330-7645 x 308 Fax: 561-330-7044

ncs

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Enter the Financial Advisory Gurus?

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Understanding the Nexus Between Fame and Quality

[By Rick Kahler CFP®]  http://www.KahlerFinancial.com

  • “I see that firm’s ads everywhere.”
  • “His books are best-sellers.”
  • “That advisor does all kinds of free seminars for retirees.”
  • “She’s on TV all the time.”

The Case … For?

When a financial advisor, someone with a radio or television show, or an author of financial books becomes well-known, it’s easy to assume you can trust that person’s advice. This isn’t necessarily the case.

Recently I was selected by an Internet community site called moneytips.com as one of their top 50 “social influencers.” This is a list of professionals in the areas of wealth and personal finance who use social media and other Internet tools effectively.

Among the top three on this list are Dave Ramsey and Suze Orman, whose books and advice include a great deal of solid information to help people get out of debt, manage money well, and provide for the future. Many others in the top 50 are respected financial journalists and advisors.

The Case … Against?

However, the list also includes a few advocates for high-risk investment methods, proponents of dubious get-rich-quick schemes, and purveyors of poorly researched advice. Those who put together the list focused on how well people established a presence on the Internet and used technology to communicate. That’s an assessment completely unrelated to the question of whether the advice or information being communicated was worthwhile.

Financial Planning

Financial planning, just like any other field, has a solid core of practitioners who quietly and ethically serve their clients. It also has its gurus, its outstanding marketers, and its fringe practitioners with extreme ideas. The challenge for consumers is not to assume fame and quality always go together.

Linking Fame and Quality?

Here are a few suggestions for keeping a balanced perspective about famous or familiar financial faces:

1. Knowing about a professional isn’t the same as knowing a professional. Everyone you know may have heard of Noted Local Advisor. That’s not the same as being able to recommend him or her. Get recommendations first-hand, from people who actually are clients of a firm or have used someone’s plan or advice. Ask specific questions about what they’ve done and how it worked for them.

2. Yes, there are shortcuts to building wealth, but they come with very high risks. For most of us, the best ways to build wealth are gradual and even boring: saving part of every paycheck, living on less than we earn, and investing for the long term in a well-diversified portfolio of different asset classes. It’s natural to wish for an easier, faster way, but that desire can make you more vulnerable to high-risk schemes and even scams.

3. Even if a method of building wealth is perfectly legitimate and works for others, it still may not be a good fit for you. If you’re a reclusive introvert, for example, sales is probably not your best path to success.

4. Apply the same common sense and skepticism to financial products or wealth-building methods that you would use anywhere else. For example, you probably don’t assume that a car’s advertised gas mileage is what you’ll actually get under real-world conditions. In the same way, it’s a good idea to assume that your real-world results from a proposed investment or business will be lower than the advertised numbers.

5. Don’t assume every financial guru is a crook. Many reputable professionals can teach you a great deal about money. Your job is to learn the financial basics so you can evaluate them with some educated skepticism.

networking advisors

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Assessment

And always keep in mind that a product or idea is not the same thing as the selling of that product or idea. The true genius of some financial “experts,” after all, is marketing.

Conclusion

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Selecting a Healthcare Focused Financial Advisory Team

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Providing Physician Centric – Not Advisor Centric – Holistic Financial Planning

[By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP™]

[By Professor Hope Rachel Hetico RN MHA CMP™]

David and HopeMost retail financial services products are designed to enhance the well-being of the Financial Advisor and/or vendor at the expense of clients.

The clients get only the leftovers. Of course, no one tells them that secret. They have to figure it out for themselves. As the old line goes, “Where are the customers’ boats?”*

*Rowland, M: Planning Periscope [Where Advisors are the Clients]. Financial Advisors Magazine; page 36, April 2014

Anyone following emerging health care trends and delivery models over the last few years has heard various permutations of the notion “team based medical care”, the “continuum of care” or “patient centered care.” All concerned hope that such high-performing holistic teams, with granular patient input, will improve health delivery and become essential to the advancement of coordinated, successful and cost-effective health care. So too; the informed financial planning team process for physicians and medical professionals!

Introduction

Now, we introduce the related concept of team-based and client-centered, financial planning advice for physicians and medical professionals. But, the concept must be more than a tag line, marketing gimmick or metaphor. And, there are several catches to this new team approach.

The first is doctor involvement to lead the team. Gone are the days of abrogating financial planning to some anointed, “quarter-back”, uber-advisor or planner coordinating inputs, team members, plans, advice and financial products! Today, it is better to Do-It-Yourself [DIY]; or pay the price; literally and figuratively. In other words, a philosophy of ME Inc; not Financial Advisor, Inc

The second is to ensure teams are indeed well educated, high-performing using best practices, that demand the sort of whole-person and psychological attention discussed in the first chapter of this book and extending well beyond financial planning software for the general populace.

The third catch is full integration. In theory, everyone loves team-based medical care.  But, it is seldom used successfully and all must ensure the concept does not re-disintegrate into the disparate parts of traditional care; or the compartmentalized financial planning of the past. This is akin to the individual pieces of a scramble puzzle, which is never fully assembled, as a picture in-toto. Complete – but not completed!

And, we must be absolutely sure of the team leader and of who is accountable; ME Inc or with a tour guide [FA pro re nata]. Most importantly; who has responsibility with the needed authority. Team based financial planning advice must not be a collective risk reduction mechanism for the involved consultants; as is often the case in medicine. And, it must not be an invoice generating machine or revenue enhancing mechanism like some electronic medical records. There must be fiduciary responsibility, of all team members, collectively and individually; and at all times.

Finally, the team must be more than an aspiration or theoretical model; it must be actual, executable and real.

The Real Notion of Teams

In financial planning, there seems to be a fixation … that a team is financial planner [certified; or not] and an attorney; nice-but a couple [and not really a team in the true sense of group development as first proposed by Bruce Tuckman, in 1965.

In his model, Tucker maintained that four phases are all necessary and inevitable in order for the team to grow, to face challenges, to tackle problems, to find solutions, to plan work, and to deliver results [Forming – Storming – Norming – Performing]. Later, headded Adjourning to successfully complete the task and break up the team. Timothy Biggs further added the Re-Norming stageto reflect a period where the team re-assembles, as needed. This put the emphasis back on the ME Inc or physician team leader – as too many ‘diplomats’ in a leadership role may prevent the team from reaching full potential.

Source: http://infed.org/mobi/bruce-w-tuckman-forming-storming-norming-and-performing-in-groups/

This is why “team” must be more than a metaphor. It deserves more than lip service. Delivering client-centered, coordinated financial planning services and products demands true collaboration–a fully integrated team engaged in practices that involve each member at the top, highest and best use of their licensure and education; optimizing their contributions and maximizing their impact on the well being of the client.

CMPs

In this context, board Certified Medical Planners™ may play a lead role going forward; along with other like-minded and educated professionals. Unfortunately, the ranks of CMPs™ while growing; are still painfully small. But, in addition to true expertise, they link physician clients with appropriate providers and resources throughout the holistic professional life/practice planning continuum. They focus on the doctor-client’s totality — emotional, financial, risk and business management and psyche. They advocate for the doctor client to connect him/her to the necessary resources, professional advisors and consultants who need to have their voices heard. Such successful, high-functioning financial planning teams give each member a voice.

The medical professional must be an active participant; not a passive bystander. This is not the norm in financial planning today where doctors are urged to hire a team quarterback. But, the NFL-QB is not a generalist at all; his arm is special and unlike all other teams players. He is unique, skilled and exceptional. A franchise player!

Fortunately, past is not prologue in the era of transparency, information at your fingertips, tablet PCs, Skype® and smart phones. To succeed in the hyper competitive new era of health reform requires education, involvement and active participation. In short, a new model of physician focused advisor. No longer is there a free lunch of passivity for medical professionals; either as doctors or advisory clients themselves. For financial planning in the new era of healthcare reform, successful doctors will assume the mantle of self-quarterback themselves.

ME Inc., or Going it Alone – but with a Team

The physician, nurse, or other medical professional should easily recognize that there are a vast array of opportunities, obstacles, and pitfalls when it comes to managing one’s finances.  Still, with some modicum of effort, the basic aspects of insurance, investments, taxes, accounting, portfolio management, retirement and estate planning, debt reduction, asset protection and practice management can be largely self-taught. Yet, it is realized that nuances and subtleties can make a well-intentioned plan fall short.  The devil truly is in the details.  Moreover, none of these areas can be addressed in isolation. It is common for a solution in one area to cause a new set of problems in another.

Accordingly, most health care practitioners would be well served to hire [independent, hourly compensated and prn] financial help. Unlike some medical problems, financial issues may not cause any “pain” or other obvious symptoms.  Medical professionals tend to have far more complex financial situations than most lay people. Despite the complexities of the new world of health reform, far too many either do nothing; or give up all control totally, to an external advisor. This either/or mistake can be costly in many ways, and should be avoided.

In reality, and at various time in their careers, the medical professional needs a team comprised of at least a financial analyst, lawyer, management consultant, risk manager [actuary, mathematician or insurance counselor] and accountant. At various points in time, each member of the team, or significant others, will properly assume a role of more or less importance, but the doctor must usually remain the “quarterback” or leader; in the absence of a truly informed other, or Certified Medical Planner™.

This is necessary because only the doctor has the personal self-mandate with skin in the game, to take a big picture view.  And, rightly or wrongly, investments dominate the information available regarding personal finance and the attention of most physicians.  One is much more likely to need or want to discuss the financial markets with their financial advisor than private letter rulings by the IRS, or with their estate planning attorney or tax accountant. While hiring for expertise is a good idea, there is sinister way advisors goad doctors into using all their retail services; all of the time. That artifice is – the value of time.

Assessment

True integrated physician focused and financial planning is at its core a service business, not a product or sales endeavor. And, increasingly money is more likely to be at the top of the list for providers as the healthcare environment is contracting. So, eschewing the quarterback model of advice, and choosing to self-educate thru this NEW book and elsewhere, may be one of the best efforts a smart physician can make.

Book Link: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781482240283

Conclusion

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Understanding Some Common Portfolio Payout Methods

   Certified Medical Planner

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP™

Recognizing the risk that market volatility represents to long-term portfolio health, investment accounts and endowment funds utilize a variety of methods to calculate periodic payouts.

  • Investment Yield: An investment portfolio using this method spends only its dividends and interest and re-invests any unrealized and realized gains. There would appear to be two primary disadvantages of this method. First, the payout amount will be extremely volatile as yields on equity and fixed income investments fluctuate. Second, the endowment manager could be encouraged to adopt a short-term focus on yield to the detriment of purchasing power preservation.
  • Percentage of the Prior Year’s Ending Market Value: An endowment using this method would withdraw some fixed percentage of the prior year’s market value. As with the Investment Yield method, disbursements from the endowment can be somewhat volatile under this method.
  • Moving Average: This approach, which is most common among educational institutions, generally involves taking a percentage of a moving average of the endowment market value. The percentage commonly approximates 5% over a 3-year period.
  • Inflation Adjusted: This portfolio method simply adds some factor to the applicable rate of inflation for the institution or investor.
  • Banded Inflation or Corridor: This account method is similar to the Inflation Adjusted method except that it establishes a corridor or band of minimum and maximum increases in an attempt to limit the volatility of the disbursement amounts.

payout

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Conclusion

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Is the CFP-BOD, and the CFP® mark, in Jeopardy? [VOTE]

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Early CFP® Board Leader Says Future of Certification in Jeopardy

[By Staff Reporters]

The CFP® Board’s strategy of punishing some certificate holders over compensation disclosure issues in what critics charge is an arbitrary manner threatens the future of the CFP® designation, according to one of the early leaders of the board who also chaired its disciplinary commission.

Please vote

And so, we ask this question.

Assessment 

Link: http://www.financial-planning.com/news/early-cfp-board-leader-says-future-of-certification-in-jeopardy-2686698-1.html?ET=financialplanning:e14975:86235a:&st=email&utm_source=editorial&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=FP_Weekend__092713

Read More:

Read even more:

2016 Update:

 

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CLINICS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439879900
BLOG: www.MedicalExecutivePost.com
FINANCE: Financial Planning for Physicians and Advisors
INSURANCE: Risk Management and Insurance Strategies for Physicians and Advisors

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Seeking Securities Analysts, Stock-Brokers and Investment Bankers for New “Financial Planning Textbook for Doctors”

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Planning our newest major textbook

By Ann Miller RN MHA [ph-770-448-0769]

[Executive-Director]

Dear Stock Brokers, IBs and Securities Analysts,

Greetings from the Institute of Medical Business Advisors, in Atlanta, Georgia.

Historical Review

As you may know, we released: Financial Planning Handbook for Physicians and Advisors, some time ago. It has enjoyed much success and acclaim in the medical and financial service sectors.

Recently, we have been asked to produce the next edition of this book for our target market of physicians, nurses, medical professionals, healthcare administrators – and those in the financial services sector who target this large and fertile, but rapidly changing niche market.

Why Now?

Urgency for the update has been prompted by ARRA, HI-TECH, the flash-crash of 2008 and the day-crash of 2011; by social, macro-economic and demographic changes; by political fiat and especially the PP-ACA.

Our medical colleagues are frustrated, afraid and fearful for their financial futures. They WANT informed advice.

Thus, true integrated financial planning information that targets this market – very expertly and specifically – is greatly needed.

The Invitation 

And so, we ask if you are interested in contributing an updated vision of an existing book chapter.

  • INVESTMENT BANKING-SECURITIES-MARKETS-MARGIN
  • HOSPITAL EMPLOYEE BENEFITS AND STOCK OPTIONS
  • INVESTMENT POLICY STATEMENT CONSTRUCTION

Not to worry – The original MS-WORD® chapter files are archived and available for use. We will forward it to you, upon assignment acceptance.

And, we are again fortunate that our Editor-in-Chief will be Dr. David Edward Marcinko FACFAS MBA CMP™ along with Professor Hope Rachel Hetico RN MHA CMP™ serving as Managing Editor.

They opined at a recent interview for the ME-P.

David and Hope” … We have entered into an emerging era in the financial planning ecosystem. It is a new era where one size does not fit all; and off-the-shelf financial products and mass sales customization is no long adequate for physicians and medical professionals; or their related generic financial planners or wire-house advisors.

It is a period of rapid change, shifting reimbursement paradigms and salary reductions that focus the healthcare industrial complex on pay-for-performance [P4], compensation for value and quality care; rather than procedures performed and quantity of care.

All must learn to do more with less professionally; and plan their personal financial lives more efficiently than ever before. Mistakes will be more difficult to overcome and the wiggle room that high income earning physicians, nurses and medical professionals used to enjoy is being narrowed by demographic, economic, social, technological and political fiat.

This emerging financial planning analog follows the health industry’s fiscal metamorphosis …”

Style Instructions 

The look and feel, format and style, and font and size of the book will remain the same. We use endnotes, not foot notes; and include mini-case reports or illustrative case models. It will be a major text; not a handbook.

Timeline for submission is about 3 months. Additional time is available, if needed, for a comprehensive update. But, we are trying to avoid running too far along into 2014 in order to avoid income tax season and the related time constraints on all concerned.

Writers Search

A Pleasure – Not Burden 

This should be a pleasurable project for you; and not anxiety provoking.

So, if you are a medically focused and experienced financial advisor with an: MBA, CFP®, PhD, MD, DDS, MSA/MS, CPA, RN, CMP®, DO, JD and/or CFA degree or designation, etc; please let me know if you are interested in updating and revising our chapters. OR, authoring a new to the world chapter.

Your Payback 

In return for your conscientious industry, you will receive a complimentary edition of the entire textbook; be listed on this ME-P as thought-leader with related book advertising content attributed to you; and given e-exposure to our almost 600,000 readers and ME-P subscribers …. Such the deal!

And, you will be added to our roster of experts for potential referrals, interviews, pod-casts and other marketing efforts

Assessment

Regardless of your decision, we remain apostles promoting your core vision of physician focused financial planning whenever possible.

Or, you may suggest another possible author- writer-expert contributor; if you wish.

Just let me know; ASAP [MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com]

Thank you.
ANN
ANN MILLER RN MHA
[Executive-Director]
INSTITUTE OF MEDICAL BUSINESS ADVISORS, INC.
Suite #5901 Wilbanks Drive
Norcross, Georgia, 30092-1141 USA
[Ph] 770.448.0769

DICTIONARIES: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko
PRACTICES: www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com
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CLINICS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439879900
ADVISORS: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org
BLOG: www.MedicalExecutivePost.com 

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NOTICE: This invitation is not for all readers of the ME-P. It is a privilege invitation intended for those who possess the needed credentials, as decided by us, with an inclination to serve.  We reserve the right to accept or reject contributors, and content, at our own non-disclosed discretion.

##

How the Medical Executive-Post Survived to our 8th Anniversary?

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And … Why the American Medical News was Shuttered after 50 Years!

[Some Musing on our Eighth Anniversary]

Ann Miller RN MHA

[Executive-Director]

Happy BirthdayAccording to well known healthcare industry journalist Kevin B. O’Reilly, a dramatic drop in medical-publishing revenues caused the recent closure of the American Medical News, effective with a final edition of the newspaper published just last month.

Published for more than five decades, AMNews was hit hard by industrywide trends. The newspaper’s revenue fell by two-thirds during the last decade, as reported by Thomas J. Easley, senior vice-president and publisher of periodic publications for the American Medical Association [AMA].

Unsustainable financial losses forced the move despite the newspaper’s editorial quality, the AMA’s senior management reportedly said. But, the Association’s other news operations will be enhanced.

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amn

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What the Death of American Medical News Says About the Future of American Medicine

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How we survive!

We’ve been online for eight years now. We have a skeleton staff, a scalable business model, an almost free distribution model, no print analog, and a tiny electronic advertising revenue stream.

Oh, let’s not forget some brilliant essayists, contrarian contributors, insightful commentators and controversial opinions that are often the elephant in the virtual room. 

Our gratitude to you all is without limits.

So, how else do we do it?

Interestingly – Our print books are good, better and best sellers. We’ve been releasing one major, semi-peer reviewed text each year …. and sales are brisk. And, we are now negotiating to begin our next and ninth volume for 2014-15. We maintain our own copy-rights, perform in-house editing, seek out the best contributing authors, and reduce the cost of numerous channels of distribution. How do we do it, year after year? In a word, professional crowdsourcing.

Our consulting business is increasingly robust, too. Cudos to healthcare reform, managed care, and the PP-ACA!

And … another thing

I ask again. How do we do it? How do we stay in business?

Here are some more ways to help-us, do just that:

  1. Subscribe to the ME-P site
  2. Tell a friend or colleague about us
  3. Visit our Blogroll list
  4. Use our classified ads or advertise with us
  5. Purchase a printed handbook, dictionary, software product or textbook
  6. Use our career and educational resources
  7. “Ask a Consultant” for free advice
  8. Request a strategic competitive consultation
  9. Hire us for a medical practice valuation or revenue enhancement review
  10. Request a medical business planning RFP
  11. Purchase a practice management checklist
  12. Seek out our financial planning advice
  13. Ask for second opinion; hire our thought-leaders
  14. Request a healthcare econometrics review
  15. Seek out our practice management or business advice
  16. Become a Certified Medical Planner™ www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org
  17. Request a speaker for a pharmaceutical seminar or health convention
  18. Attend a seminar, sponsor or take a learning-teaching cruise with us
  19. Donate to us …  and repeat
  20. Buy a link … and repeat again
  21. Send a thank you note to our Publisher-in-Chief and Managing Editor
  22. Visit us often to review, read, rant and rave.

Bottom Line Eight Years Out

The ME-P is an austere … Labor of Love.

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QuestionEverythingWallpaper

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Assessment

So, does the demise of the American Medical News really say anything at all about the ME-P; in addition to the future of domestic medicine? How do we avoid the same fate? Please tell us. Question Everything … Trust No One … Paddle your Own Canoe … Keep the Faith!

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Did the AMNews forget the aphorism; No margin – No Mission?

Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

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Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

LEXICONS: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko
PHYSICIANS: www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com
PRACTICES: www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com
HOSPITALS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781466558731
CLINICS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439879900
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PP-ACA Physician Ownership Provisions

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Understanding the “whole hospital exception” to the Stark laws

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Dr. David E. Marcinko MBAThis was a big week for healthcare reform, wasn’t it? Some provisions of the PP-ACA requiring the employer mandates were delayed another year; until January 1, 2015.

But, before passage of the ACA in 2010, the “whole hospital exception” to the Stark law allowed physicians to have an ownership interest in a hospital to which those physicians refer patients, provided the physician is invested in the whole hospital and not a subdivision of the hospital, with no limitations as to the amount or extent of physician ownership, on either an aggregate or individual basis.

Prohibitions

Now, according to colleague Robert James Cimasi MHA, AVA, ASA, MCBA, CMP®, of www.HealthCapital.com, The ACA completely prohibits physician-owned hospitals which were not Medicare-certified by December 31, 2010.

[1] The ACA allows hospitals with a provider agreement prior to December 31, 2010 to continue Medicare participation if they meet the following four criteria: (1) located in a county with a population growth rate of at least150% the state’s population growth over the last 5 years; (2) have Medicaid inpatient admission percentage of at least the average of all hospitals in the county; (3) located in a state with below-national-average bed capacity; and, (4) have bed occupancy rate greater than state average. [2]

Grandfathered

A very limited number of physician-owned hospital existing in 2010 met or were close to meeting all 4 of criteria.[3] The Reconciliation Act provided a limited exception to the ACA growth restrictions for grandfathered physician owned hospitals that treat the highest percentage of Medicaid patients in their county (and are not the sole hospital in a county).[4]

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Financial Management Strategies for Hospitals and Healthcare Organizations: Tools, Techniques, Checklists and…

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Assessment

Based on these provisions, the 2010 healthcare reform legislation will likely have a considerable negative impact on physician-owned hospitals, in terms of impeding development of new hospitals and expansion of existing hospitals.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Health Dictionary Series: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/product/9780826105752

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Hospitals: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439879900

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org


[1]       “Section-by-Section Analysis with Changes Made by Title X and Reconciliation included within Titles I-IX,” Democratic Policy Committee, http://dpc.senate.gov/healthreformbill/healthbill96.pdf (Accessed 5/24/2010).

[2]       “Section-by-Section Analysis with Changes Made by Title X and Reconciliation included within Titles I-IX,” Democratic Policy Committee, http://dpc.senate.gov/healthreformbill/healthbill96.pdf (Accessed 5/24/2010).

[3]       “Healthcare Reform: A Brief Analysis on How it Impacts ASCs and Physician-OwnedHospitals – 10 Observations”, By Scott Becker, Leigh Page, and Rob Kurtz, Becker’s Hospital Review, http://www.beckersorthopedicandspine.com/news-a-analysis/legal-a-regulatory/1193-healthcare-reform-abrief- analysis-on-how-it-impacts-ascs-and-physician-owned-hospitals-10-observations (Accessed 5/20/10).

[4]       “Section-by-Section Analysis with Changes Made by Title X and Reconciliation included within Titles I-IX,” Democratic Policy Committee, http://dpc.senate.gov/healthreformbill/healthbill96.pdf (Accessed 5/24/2010).

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Call for Guest Medical Executive-Posts!

By Ann Miller RN MHA

[Executive-Director]

MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

ME-P

Now that we’ve wrapped up our newest textbook, we thought it would be fun to keep everybody writing to share your best posts and comments with our ever-growing online community.

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We’re open to all kinds of related subjects on the business of medical practice, healthcare economics and finance, HIT and personal financial planning and investing for doctors and all medical professionals.

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So, if you’d like to comment or be a featured guest on our blog, or know of a great post we should feature or re-print, just let us know by emailing me! BROADCAST yourself.

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“Pound Foolish” [Book Review Video on Personal Finance]

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Exposing the Dark Side of the Personal Finance Industry

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko FACFAS, MBA, CMP™

By Professor Hope Rachel Hetico RN, MHA, CPHQ, CMP™

www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

David and HopeHere are the first four video segments of an interview with Helaine Olen, by Harold Pollack, regarding her new book, Pound Foolish.

This essay first appeared on the The Incidental Economist [TIE]; an electronic forum by colleague Austin Frakt PhD:

The VIDEOS:

Part IV: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cSmrH6FUvU&feature=youtu.be

Part III: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTEGaTg9pQE&feature=youtu.be

Part II: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNPX7kft5oM&feature=youtu.be

Part I: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPanXaLvTTI&feature=youtu.be

You can see a more extensive interview with Olen, with arguably better production values, on Frontline’s the retirement gamble last week.

About the Author

HELAINE OLEN is a free­lance journalist whose work has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, Slate, Salon, Forbes, Business­Week, and elsewhere. She wrote and edited the popu­lar Money Makeover series in the Los Angeles Times. She lives in New York City with her family. Follow her on Twitter at @helaineolen.

More:

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Assessment

This book reinforces the R&D efforts of our governing board of physician-directors, accountants, financial advisors, academics and health economists who [years ago] identified the need for integrated personal financial planning and medical practice management as an effective first step in the survival and wealth building life-cycle for physicians, nurses, healthcare executives, administrators and all medical professionals.

Now – more than ever – desperate doctors of all ages are turning to knowledge able financial advisors and medical management consultants for help. Symbiotically too, generalist advisors are finding that the mutual need for extreme niche synergy is obvious.

But, there was no established curriculum or educational program; no corpus of knowledge or codifying terms-of-art; no academic gravitas or fiduciary accountability; and certainly no identifying professional designation that demonstrated integrated subject matter expertise for the increasingly unique healthcare focused financial advisory niche … Until Now!

Enter the Certified Medical Planner™ charter professional designation

 Certified Medical Planner

NOTEWORTHY:

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Health Dictionary Series: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/product/9780826105752

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Hospitals: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439879900

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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Crafting a Business Plan and Starting a Medical Practice “Live” Audio Conference

Medical Office Business PlanCrafting A Business Plan And Starting A Medical Practice
Speaker: Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP
Live Audio Conference
Date:Wednesday, January 30, 2013 Time: 1 pm Eastern | 12 pm Central | 11 am Mountain | 10 am Pacific Length: 60 Minutes
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Do you need money to start or Grow your medical practice?
The “Business Plan” is a key tool for raising start-up capital for a new medical practice, or financing a medical / surgical service line extension for a mature one. It is also used for acquiring loans to finance growth of an existing practice. Although long recognized as a quintessential business tool, its’ formal structure and mental rigor are only now being recognized in the medical community as competition increases in the healthcare industrial complex. There are many reasons to write a medical practice business plan. The process of gathering, compiling and analyzing information is an invaluable experience to the beginning practitioner, or experienced veteran physician. Our expert Dr. David, will discuss all these, step by step in this 1-hour enlightening event. See the steps below:

  • Determine the feasibility of a new practice start-up.
  • Raise money from investment bankers for a new practice.
  • Obtain financing to expand an existing office or turn-around a declining satellite.
  • Develop an operational strategic plan and conduct due diligence.
  • Create a budget, time frame or business direction for a practice.
  • Unmask potential problems, risks or benefits of a medical practice.
  • Focus on market opportunities by determining revenue centers or cost drivers.
  • Persuade third party payers, networks and insurance carriers that your practice has a future and represents a viable synergistic partner for their organization.
  • And more
As a attendee you will get:

  • Power Point slide presentation.
  • Time-line checklist to new medical office launch.
  • Topical comprehensive white paper.
  • Electronic blog forum for further information.
  • And more
Dr. David in this 60-minute conference will present to you:

  • Executive Summary: Where you concisely state the purpose of the loan, the exact amount of money required, an explanation of what the loan will be used for and why it’s needed.
  • Pro-forma Cash Budgets and Financial Statements:You’ll learn to how effectively use your data and underlying assumptions to prepare information that your banker can easily read and buy into.
  • Doctor’s Personal Financial Statements: Learn how to use copies of the last 3 years of personal tax returns for the bank as well as identify the collateral being pledged as security for the loan.
  • Representation: Here is where this presentation is invaluable.
  • And more
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Call 1-866-458-2965 and mention code STCIGH02
Ask a question at the Q&A session following the live event and get advice unique to your situation
About Our Speaker
Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP is founding CEO of the Institute of Medical Business Advisors, Inc www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com and Publisher of the Medical Executive-Post www.MedicalExecutivePost.com iMBA Inc is a leading national scope provider of real time medical practice management reports, books, dictionaries, journals, financial planning and advisory opinions, Fair Market Value appraisals and educational seminars www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org  The firm serves physicians, nurses and medical societies; financial advisors, wealth managers and CPAs; emerging healthcare entities, hospitals, clinics, IPAs and their CXOs; the press, media and all related organizations. Read more
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Hear Dr. Marcinko on Audio-Educator [Do you Need Money to Start or Grow Your Medical Practice?]

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Crafting a Business Plan and Starting a Medical Practice [A “Live” Audio-Conference]

Conference Registration: http://www.audioeducator.com/hospitals-and-health-systems/business-plan-for-medical-practice-013012.html

Wednesday, Jan 30th, 2013 at 1 PM, EST for 60 minutes

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By Staf Reporters www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Dr David E Marcinko MBAThe “Business Plan” is a key tool for raising start-up capital for a new medical practice, or financing a medical / surgical service line extension for a mature one. It is also used for acquiring loans to finance growth of an existing practice.
Although long recognized as a quintessential business tool, its’ formal structure and mental rigor are only now being recognized in the medical community as competition increases in the healthcare industrial complex.

Reasons for the Plan

There are many reasons to write a medical practice business plan. The process of gathering, compiling and analyzing information is an invaluable experience to the beginning practitioner, or experienced veteran physician. Our expert Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMPwill discuss all these, step by step in this 1-hour enlightening event.

See the steps below:

  • Determine the feasibility of a new practice start-up.
  • Raise money from investment bankers for a new practice.
  • Obtain financing to expand an existing office or turn-around a declining satellite.
  • Develop an operational strategic plan and conduct due diligence.
  • Create a budget, time frame or business direction for a practice.
  • Unmask potential problems, risks or benefits of a medical practice.
  • Focus on market opportunities by determining revenue centers or cost drivers.
  • Persuade third party payers, networks and insurance carriers that your practice has a future and represents a viable synergistic partner for their organization.

Medical Office Business Plan

As an attendee you will get:

  • Power Point slide presentation.
  • Time-line checklist to new medical office launch.
  • Topical comprehensive white paper.
  • Electronic blog forum for further information.

Dr. Marcinko in this 60-minute conference will present to you:

  • Executive Summary: Where you concisely state the purpose of the loan, the exact amount of money required, an explanation of what the loan will be used for and why it’s needed.
  • Pro-forma Cash Budgets and Financial Statements: You’ll learn to how effectively use your data and underlying assumptions to prepare information that your banker can easily read and buy into.
  • Doctor’s Personal Financial Statements: Learn how to use copies of the last 3 years of personal tax returns for the bank as well as identify the collateral being pledged as security for the loan.
  • Representation: Here is where this presentation is invaluable.

Ask a question at the Q&A session following the live event and get advice unique to your situation, directly from our expert speaker.

Who should attend? Medical students, interns, residents and fellows, New, mid-career and mature medical practitioners, Office managers, clinic administrators, healthcare CXOs and physician / nurse executives, All doctors who wish to be employers; not employees.

http://businessofmedicalpractice.com/chapter-3-2/

Why use AudioEducator?

  • Save money on travel. Our conferences are available from the comfort and convenience of your own office or meeting room.
  • Meet your specific training needs. Whether you attend a live event, load up one of our encore broadcasts, or purchase a CD or PDF transcript — you’ll get the information you need on your schedule.
  • Keep learning after the event. Every conference purchase includes the speaker’s materials so you can keep learning long after the conference is over.
  • Save time training your whole staff. Gather around a speaker phone or computer and enlighten your entire team for one low price.
  • Do you work with a virtual team or multiple locations? Ask our customer specialists about discounts for your whole staff.

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Fixing the Mental Health Infrastructure of the US

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The Political Topic Du Jour

By David K. Luke MIM CMP™ www.NetWorthAdvice.com

David K. LukeThe sad events of the recent tragedy which occurred in at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut where 20 children and 6 adults were killed painfully reminds us of two problems that are not going away in the United States: continued gun violence and untreated mental illness.

As a Father I could not bear to watch the news coverage. Resolving the problem of high gun violence in this country typically leads to an emotional debate over gun control and gun rights, a debate that in the past has ended with both sides drawing the line and little being accomplished. Politicians that would like to be reelected avoid this emotionally charged hot potato like a leper colony with the hope that the Topic Du Jour will change quickly back to how they can reduce taxes, increase entitlements, or frankly any other issue that will ensure their livelihood for the current elected term. In the meantime, this stalemate is unnecessarily costing the lives of our innocent children and productive citizens that happen to be in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Commonalities

The common thread to almost all of the tragic public gun violence episodes in the past few decades is that the shooter is suffering a serious mental illness. An estimated 26.2 percent of Americans suffer from a diagnosable mental disorder in a given year according to the National Institute of Mental Health (http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/the-numbers-count-mental-disorders-in-america/index.shtml).

Unique among the developed countries is the position of the United States that those with mental illness, like those with any other disease, can receive treatment as long as they pay for it. Those that can’t or choose not to pay for it often end up in dire straits in one of our emergency rooms (the de facto health care solution in the United States for the uninsured) forcing our overworked and understaffed emergency room health professionals to deal with the problem and our hospital systems with spiraling unpaid ER bills. As a country that was founded on the principles of self-reliance and freedom of choice, we recognize the fact that some individuals may prefer not to pay for their health care by electing to not have private health insurance. Lest we become too judgmental of our fellow citizens that do not have health insurance, we should be reminded that our for-profit health insurance industry in the United States that provides the largest portion of payment for healthcare services also precludes individuals that are unhealthy from purchasing coverage. This is done by hiking premiums to unaffordable levels or simply by flat issuing a denial of coverage. So individuals with mental illness, even those diagnosed with mild depression, are often branded by the system that considers mental health issues as preexisting conditions.

Which brings about the question:  How does an individual with a mental health illness in the US normally get medical treatment?

Link: Chapter 07: Workplace Violence

Standard Protocol

Normally, the individual sees their primary care physician, talks about the problem, is diagnosed by the physician and receives treatment, which often includes prescription medications. The individual’s private health insurance plan (or Medicare or Medicaid, depending on the age or financial qualification of the individual), covers all this with typically a small or no copay at the doctor’s office. If a medication is prescribed, the drug (often a generic) is covered typically by a small copay at the pharmacy. Further checkups and treatment are all typically covered by insurance with little money out-of-pocket.

Here are the complications to the “normal” answer regarding an individual with a mental illness in the United States seeking help:

Reasons Mental Illness Goes Untreated That Involve Lack of Access to Medical Care

  1. The individual does not have insurance.  The cost to treat the problem may be considered unaffordable.
  2. The individual has insurance but the mental illness has been ruled a preexisting condition and is not covered under the policy. The cost to treat the problem may be considered unaffordable.
  3. The individual does not see a health service provider on a regular basis and may not realize that they are sick with a mental illness or consider that it is just stress or a temporary mood change.

Reasons Mental Illness Goes Untreated In Spite of Access to Medical Care

  1. The individual considers seeing a physician for such an issue to be a hassle or too time consuming. Some primary care practices in some parts of the country require a long wait to be scheduled and then a long wait in the waiting room to be seen.
  2. The individual would like to receive treatment for their mental illness, but knows that such treatment will be recorded on their medical records and likewise have repercussions that could include such events as losing their job, tarnishing their reputation in their community, family, church, or other organization, or denying them access to a gun license, pilot’s license, medical licenses, etc. Military service people and police officers, for example can be rightfully disqualified from their positions if certain mental illnesses were revealed on a medical record. Also having a mental illness on their medical record could increase their cost to get life insurance or their ability to get new health insurance should they leave their current employer. Likewise many of these individuals may seek help “off the record” or may avoid seeking help all together and simply “man up” as expected.
  3. The individual, for reasons mentioned above and regardless of medical care access, avoids professional medical care and self-diagnoses their mental illness. Likewise, an individual suffering from severe depression may decide that they have only mild depression and based on “Dr. Google” may start a regimen of Vitamin B, a chromium supplement, and some St. John’s Wort. Self-treatment of mental illness issues with easy access to information and prescription drugs through the internet lulls some individuals into a false sense that they are on the road to recovery when their condition can actually worsen.
  4. The individual may know they need help, may have access to qualified medical help, but may be discouraged from seeking help due to a trusted family member or friend that assures them professional medical help is not necessary. I have even witnessed a loving father tell his diagnosed schizophrenic son who had just experienced a manic episode to “shake it off and be happy”. Can you imagine telling your child who suffers from a serious chronic disease such as heart disease, cancer, or diabetes to just “shake it off and be happy”?
  5. The individual perceives that continued medical treatment of their mental illness could threaten their personal freedoms, by resulting in a court ordered commitment to a psychiatric facility for example. Fearing such restrictions, the individual cuts off all medical treatment. In fact recent news is now coming forth that Adam Lanza, the 20-year-old Sandy Hook shooter, had been taken to a psychiatrist by his mother and was in fear of being committed to a facility, which may have been part of the motive for the mass shooting spree, which included the killing of his mother.

[Re-Thinking our Gun Control Dialog]

Gun control dialog

Will the PP-ACA Fix Our Maligned Mental Health Care System?

Mental health services are a part of the services provided under the Affordable Care Act. The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act, which was signed into law in 2008, also helped increase coverage that includes mental health services by requiring employers with more than 50 workers to cover them at the same level as other medical conditions offered by the insurance plan.

In other words, the plan could not provide fewer inpatient hospital days or require higher out-of-pocket costs for mental health conditions. It is still possible however for larger employers to not offer mental health coverage in their insurance plans even after 2014. The ACA will require small group and individual plans however to offer the coverage in 2014 through health exchanges created under the law. An individual that earns less than 138 percent of the federal poverty level may be eligible for Medicaid coverage in 2014, which offers mental health benefits.

It is estimated that as many as 30 million people will gain insurance coverage and likewise mental health care beginning in 2014. Some estimates are lower, with the expectation that many will forgo the mandated insurance coverage and pay the “tax” instead. Even with more Americans having access to mental health care, many will opt to forgo such care as outlined above in “Reasons Mental Illness Goes Untreated In Spite Of Access To Medical Care”.

For those folks we can fault the independent American spirit, good old fashioned stubbornness, the desire to avoid any stigma attached to mental illness, or simply the desire to be unencumbered by a system that threatens to “lock you up and put you away” for your disease. As with the case of Adam Lanza, access to mental health care does not mean the disease is cured or that the patient is an obedient, willing participant.

Assessment

Sadly, preventing another Sandy Hook from occurring is impossible. Whether or not the gun debate this time around will produce any results remains to be seen. Where is the limit of personal freedoms? However, with increased mental health access beginning in 2014 and with increased mental health awareness and acceptance we can hope that such events in the future will be less common.

About the Author:

David K. K. Luke focuses on helping physicians and successful retirees with financial planning, investment and risk management. In the past 24 years of industry experience, David has held licenses including general securities registered representative, registered investment advisor, Branch management supervision, and Life, Accident, and Health Producers.  David, a fee-only advisor, is able to help his clients to achieve peace of mind and greater assurance with their financial goals by giving advice and providing investment management that is in their best interest, untainted by commissions or sales objectives. Likewise, in a true fiduciary capacity, he is able to help investors determine the reliability and suitability of products and services that they have been sold by other advisors. David began his career managing money in 1986 in the General Motors of Canada Banking and Investments department where he was engaged in cash management, foreign currency hedging, and the debt issuance of a $100 million Eurobond and a $300 million Note Issuance facility. In 1988 as Supervisor of Borrowings for GMAC Canada David was responsible for the daily average issuance of $125 million in short-term Commercial Paper. David worked as a stock broker and portfolio manager for 2 major national brokerage firms (A.G. Edwards and Wachovia Securities) from 1989 to 2008. Additionally, at Wachovia Securities David was among an elite group of financial advisors approved as a PIM (Private Investment Management) Portfolio Manager. Prior to joining Net Worth Advisory Group in 2010, David managed his own independent firm, Luke Wealth Strategies, working as a registered representative and investment advisor.

He is also a Certified Medical Planner™ charterholder: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

LEXICONS: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko
PHYSICIANS: www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com
PRACTICES: www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com
HOSPITALS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781466558731
CLINICS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439879900
ADVISORS: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org
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Assessment of Workplace Violence in Healthcare

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ON MEDICAL WORKPLACE VIOLENCE

By Eugene Schmuckler PhD, MBA CTA

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA

Chapter 07: Workplace Violence

NOTE: The ME-P can only speculate how this healthcare workplace violence information from a public safety expert, applies to the recent spate of national violence – regardless of venue – or how any lessons learned are applicable in this case; or not.

1. What Is Workplace Violence?

Workplace violence is more than physical assault — it is any act in which a person is abused, threatened, intimidated, harassed, or assaulted in his or her employment. Swearing, verbal abuse, playing “pranks,” spreading rumors, arguments, property damage, vandalism, sabotage, pushing, theft, physical assaults, psychological trauma, anger-related incidents, rape, arson, and murder are all examples of workplace violence. The Registered Nurses Association of Nova Scotia defines violence as “any behavior that results in injury whether real or perceived by an individual, including, but not limited to, verbal abuse, threats of physical harm, and sexual harassment.” As such, workplace violence includes:

  • threatening behavior — such as shaking fists, destroying property, or throwing objects;
  • verbal or written threats — any expression of intent to inflict harm;
  • harassment — any behavior that demeans, embarrasses, humiliates, annoys, alarms, or verbally abuses a person and that is known or would be expected to be unwelcome. This includes words, gestures, intimidation, bullying, or other inappropriate activities;
  • verbal abuse — swearing, insults, or condescending language;
  • muggings — aggravated assaults, usually conducted by surprise with intent to rob; or
  • physical attacks — hitting, shoving, pushing, or kicking.

Workplace violence can be brought about by a number of different actions in the workplace. It may also be the result of non-work related situations such as domestic violence or “road rage.” Workplace violence can be inflicted by an abusive employee, a manager, supervisor, co-worker, customer, family member, or even a stranger.  The University of Iowa Injury Prevention Research Center classifies most workplace violence into one of four categories.

  • Type I Criminal Intent — Results while a criminal activity (e.g., robbery) is being committed and the perpetrator had no legitimate relationship to the workplace.
  • Type II Customer/Client — The perpetrator is a customer or client at the workplace (e.g., healthcare patient) and becomes violent while being assisted by the worker.
  • Type III Worker on Worker — Employees or past employees of the workplace are the perpetrators.
  • Type IV Personal Relationship — The perpetrator usually has a personal relationship with an employee (e.g., domestic violence in the workplace).

2. Effects of Workplace Violence

The healthcare sector continues to lead all other industry sectors in incidents of non-fatal workplace assaults. In 2000, 48% of all non-fatal injuries from violent acts against workers occurred in the healthcare sector. Nurses, nurses’ aides, and orderlies suffer the highest proportion of these injuries. Non-fatal assaults on healthcare workers include assaults, bruises, lacerations, broken bones, and concussions. These reported incidents include only injuries severe enough to result in lost time from work. Of significance is that the median time away from work as a result of an assault or other violent act is 5 days. Almost 25% of these injuries result in longer than 20 days away from work. Obviously, this is quite costly to the facility as well as to the victim.

A study undertaken in Canada found that 46% of 8,780 staff nurses experienced one or more types of violence in the last five shifts worked. Physical assault was defined as being spit on, bitten, hit, or pushed.

Both Canadian and U.S. researchers have described the prevalence of verbal threats and physical assaults in intensive care, emergency departments, and general wards. A study in Florida reported that 100% of emergency department nurses experience verbal threats and 82% reported being physically assaulted. Similar results were found in a study undertaken in a Canadian hospital. Possible reasons for the high incidence of violence in emergency departments include presence of weapons, frustration with long waits for medical care, dissatisfaction with hospital policies, and the levels of violence in the community served by the emergency department.

Similar findings have been reported in studies of mental health professionals, nursing home and long-term care employees, as well as providers of service in home and community health.

Violence in hospitals usually results from patients, and occasionally family members, who feel frustrated, vulnerable, and out of control. Transporting patients, long waits for service, inadequate security, poor environmental design, and unrestricted movement of the public are associated with increased risk of assault in hospitals and may be significant factors in social services workplaces as well. Finally, lack of staff training and the absence of violence prevention programming are associated with elevated risk of assault in hospitals. Although anyone working in a hospital may become a victim of violence, nurses and aides who have the most direct contact with patients are at higher risk. Other hospital personnel at increased risk of violence include emergency response personnel, hospital safety officers, and all healthcare providers. Personnel working in large medical practices fall into this category as well. Although no area is totally immune from acts of violence it most frequently occurs in psychiatric wards, emergency rooms, waiting rooms, and geriatric settings.

Many medical facilities mistakenly focus on systems, operations, infrastructure, and public relations when planning for crisis management and emergency response: they tend to overlook the people. Obviously, no medical facility can operate without employees who are healthy enough to return to work and to be productive. Individuals who have been exposed to a violent incident need to be assured of their safety.

The costs associated with workplace violence crises are not limited to healthcare dollars, absenteeism rates, legal battles, or increased insurance rates. If mishandled, traumatic events can severely impair trust between patients, employees, their peers, and their managers. Without proper planning, an act of violence can disrupt normal group processes, interfere with the delivery of crucial information, and temporarily impair management effectiveness. It may also lead to other negative outcomes such as low employee morale, increased job stress, increased work turnover, reduced trust of management and co-workers, and a hostile working environment.

Data collected by the U.S. Department of Justice shows workplace violence to be the fastest growing category of murder in the country. Homicide, including domestic homicides, is the leading cause of on-the-job death for women, and is the second leading cause for men. The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) found that an average of 20 workers is murdered each week in the U.S. In addition, an estimated 1 million workers — 28,000 per week — are victims of non-fatal workplace assaults each year. Workplace attacks, threats, or harassment can include the following monetary costs:

  • $13.5 billion in medical costs per year;
  • 500,000 employees missing 1,750,000 days of work per year; with a 41% increase in stress levels with the concomitant related costs!

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About the Author

Dr. Eugene Schmuckler was Coordinator of Behavioral Sciences at a Public Training Center before accepting his current position as Academic Dean for iMBA, Inc. He is an international expert on personal re-engineering and coaching whose publications have been translated into Dutch and Russian. He now focuses on career development, change management, coaching and stress reduction for physicians and financial professionals. Behavioral finance, life planning and economic risk tolerance assessments are additional areas of focus. Formerly, Dr. Schmuckler was a senior adjunct faculty member at the Keller Graduate School of Management, Atlanta. He taught courses in Organizational Behavior and Leadership, Strategic Staffing, Training and Development, and the capstone course in human resources management. He is a member of a number of professional organizations including the American Psychological Association, the Academy of Management, and the Society for Human Resource Management. A native of Brooklyn New York, he received his BS degree in Psychology from Brooklyn College. He earned his MBA and PhD degrees in Industrial and Organizational Psychology from Louisiana State University. Currently, he serves on the executive BOD for:  www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com  and is the Dean of Admissions for www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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