PODCAST: The Real Secret About Why Corporate Mergers Fail

AN AUDIO PRESENTATION

 

By Vitaliy Katsenelson CFA

***

Corporate acquisitions often fail for one simple reason: the buyer pays too much. An old Wall Street adage comes to mind: Price is what you pay, value is what you get.

It all starts with a control premium

When we purchase shares of a stock, we pay a price that is within pennies of the last trade. When a company is acquired, the purchase price is negotiated during long dinners at fine restaurants and comes with a control premium that is higher than the latest stock quotation.

How much above?

***

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

 

A “Six Sigma”© Primer for the Homecare Industry

Join Our Mailing List

By: Christian Hernandez MBA – Apple Health Care Services
Richard Melnyck MBA MS
Mark Friedman PhD Department of Accounting
Howard Gitlow PhD Department of Management Science University Miami
christian hernandez
***
BACKGROUND
***
Homecare has long been one the most cost-effective methods of treating patients. Yet today, homecare providers face significant challenges: reimbursement cuts, mandatory accreditation, and influencing policy changes. So, how can homecare managers efficiently sustain a cutting edge, consistent and quality focused practice amidst this changing landscape?
***
It is time the homecare industry tap into the high-tech tools and proven management theories that together make up “Six sigma” management. This article will provide a solid point of reference for managers interested in adopting “Six Sigma” management. In today’s stiff economic climate, organizations are once again turning to “Six Sigma”strategies as a means to reduce their bottom lines.
***
However, its cost cutting aspect is technically more of a by product than the core of its theory. “Six Sigma” management is practiced in many organizations across all sectors of the global economy. Companies such as drug giant Merck, Cadbury, and Dunkin’ Brands are increasingly turning to Six Sigma to lift their bottom lines.
***
The term “Lean Management” is an old buzz word that still excites managers. Lean Management stems from the term Lean Manufacturing, which was a derivative of Total Quality Management (TQM) —considered one of the earlier versions of “Six Sigma”.
***
Over the years, “Six Sigma” has evolved from a ground-breaking management system to one of the most proven methods for instituting change, reducing errors and eliminating inefficiencies. These management utilities run through the entire spectrum of organizational applications, from confronting the serious issues mentioned above to routine business functions.
***
The resurgence of Japan’s economy in the 70’s and 80’s is largely attributed to TQM. “In the auto industry, manufacturers such as Toyota and Honda became major players. In the consumer goods market, companies such as Toshiba and Sony led the way. These foreign competitors were producing lower-priced products with considerably higher quality.”
***
Note: © Six Sigma is a trademark of the Motorola Corporation
***
Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

DICTIONARIES: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko
PHYSICIANS: www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com
PRACTICES: www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com
HOSPITALS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781466558731
CLINICS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439879900
BLOG: www.MedicalExecutivePost.com
FINANCE: Financial Planning for Physicians and Advisors
INSURANCE: Risk Management and Insurance Strategies for Physicians and Advisors

Product DetailsProduct Details

Product Details

FINANCIAL PLANNING: Strategies for Doctors and their Advisors

***

BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

CMP logo

REVIEWS:

Written by doctors and healthcare professionals, this textbook should be mandatory reading for all medical school students—highly recommended for both young and veteran physicians—and an eliminating factor for any financial advisor who has not read it. The book uses jargon like ‘innovative,’ ‘transformational,’ and ‘disruptive’—all rightly so! It is the type of definitive financial lifestyle planning book we often seek, but seldom find.
LeRoy Howard MA CMPTM,Candidate and Financial Advisor, Fayetteville, North Carolina

I taught diagnostic radiology for over a decade. The physician-focused niche information, balanced perspectives, and insider industry transparency in this book may help save your financial life.
Dr. William P. Scherer MS, Barry University, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

This book was crafted in response to the frustration felt by doctors who dealt with top financial, brokerage, and accounting firms. These non-fiduciary behemoths often prescribed costly wholesale solutions that were applicable to all, but customized for few, despite ever-changing needs. It is a must-read to learn why brokerage sales pitches or Internet resources will never replace the knowledge and deep advice of a physician-focused financial advisor, medical consultant, or collegial Certified Medical Planner™ financial professional.
—Parin Khotari MBA,Whitman School of Management, Syracuse University, New York

In today’s healthcare environment, in order for providers to survive, they need to understand their current and future market trends, finances, operations, and impact of federal and state regulations. As a healthcare consulting professional for over 30 years supporting both the private and public sector, I recommend that providers understand and utilize the wealth of knowledge that is being conveyed in these chapters. Without this guidance providers will have a hard time navigating the supporting system which may impact their future revenue stream. I strongly endorse the contents of this book.
—Carol S. Miller BSN MBA PMP,President, Miller Consulting Group, ACT IAC Executive Committee Vice-Chair at-Large, HIMSS NCA Board Member

This is an excellent book on financial planning for physicians and health professionals. It is all inclusive yet very easy to read with much valuable information. And, I have been expanding my business knowledge with all of Dr. Marcinko’s prior books. I highly recommend this one, too. It is a fine educational tool for all doctors.
—Dr. David B. Lumsden MD MS MA,Orthopedic Surgeon, Baltimore, Maryland

There is no other comprehensive book like it to help doctors, nurses, and other medical providers accumulate and preserve the wealth that their years of education and hard work have earned them.
—Dr. Jason Dyken MD MBA,Dyken Wealth Strategies, Gulf Shores, Alabama

I plan to give a copy of this book written
by doctors and for doctors’ to all my prospects, physician, and nurse clients. It may be the definitive text on this important topic.
—Alexander Naruska CPA,Orlando, Florida

Health professionals are small business owners who need to apply their self-discipline tactics in establishing and operating successful practices. Talented trainees are leaving the medical profession because they fail to balance the cost of attendance against a realistic business and financial plan. Principles like budgeting, saving, and living below one’s means, in order to make future investments for future growth, asset protection, and retirement possible are often lacking. This textbook guides the medical professional in his/her financial planning life journey from start to finish. It ranks a place in all medical school libraries and on each of our bookshelves.
—Dr. Thomas M. DeLauro DPM,Professor and Chairman – Division of Medical Sciences, New York College of Podiatric Medicine

Physicians are notoriously excellent at diagnosing and treating medical conditions. However, they are also notoriously deficient in managing the business aspects of their medical practices. Most will earn $20-30 million in their medical lifetime, but few know how to create wealth for themselves and their families. This book will help fill the void in physicians’ financial education. I have two recommendations: 1) every physician, young and old, should read this book; and 2) read it a second time!
—Dr. Neil Baum MD,Clinical Associate Professor of Urology, Tulane Medical School, New Orleans, Louisiana

I worked with a Certified Medical Planner™ on several occasions in the past, and will do so again in the future. This book codified the vast body of knowledge that helped in all facets of my financial life and professional medical practice.
Dr. James E. Williams DABPS, Foot and Ankle Surgeon, Conyers, Georgia

This is a constantly changing field for rules, regulations, taxes, insurance, compliance, and investments. This book assists readers, and their financial advisors, in keeping up with what’s going on in the healthcare field that all doctors need to know.
Patricia Raskob CFP® EA ATA, Raskob Kambourian Financial Advisors, Tucson, Arizona

I particularly enjoyed reading the specific examples in this book which pointed out the perils of risk … something with which I am too familiar and have learned (the hard way) to avoid like the Black Death. It is a pleasure to come across this kind of wisdom, in print, that other colleagues may learn before it’s too late— many, many years down the road.
Dr. Robert S. Park MD, Robert Park and Associates Insurance, Seattle, Washington

Although this book targets physicians, I was pleased to see that it also addressed the financial planning and employment benefit needs of nurses; physical, respiratory, and occupational therapists; CRNAs, hospitalists, and other members of the health care team….highly readable, practical, and understandable.
Nurse Cecelia T. Perez RN, Hospital Operating Room Manager, Ellicott City, Maryland

Personal financial success in the PP-ACA era will be more difficult to achieve than ever before. It requires the next generation of doctors to rethink frugality, delay gratification, and redefine the very definition of success and work–life balance. And, they will surely need the subject matter medical specificity and new-wave professional guidance offered in this book. This book is a ‘must-read’ for all health care professionals, and their financial advisors, who wish to take an active role in creating a new subset of informed and pioneering professionals known as Certified Medical Planners™.
—Dr. Mark D. Dollard FACFAS, Private Practice, Tyson Corner, Virginia

As healthcare professionals, it is our Hippocratic duty to avoid preventable harm by paying attention. On the other hand, some of us are guilty of being reckless with our own financial health—delaying serious consideration of investments, taxation, retirement income, estate planning, and inheritances until the worry keeps one awake at night. So, if you have avoided planning for the future for far too long, perhaps it is time to take that first step toward preparedness. This in-depth textbook is an excellent starting point—not only because of its readability, but because of his team’s expertise and thoroughness in addressing the intricacies of modern investments—and from the point of view of not only gifted financial experts, but as healthcare providers, as well … a rare combination.
Dr. Darrell K. Pruitt DDS, Private Practice Dentist, Fort Worth, Texas

This text should be on the bookshelf of all contemporary physicians. The book is physician-focused with unique topics applicable to all medical professionals. But, it also offers helpful insights into the new tax and estate laws, fiduciary accountability for advisors and insurance agents, with investing, asset protection and risk management, and retirement planning strategies with updates for the brave new world of global payments of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Starting out by encouraging readers to examine their personal ‘money blueprint’ beliefs and habits, the book is divided into four sections offering holistic life cycle financial information and economic education directed to new, mid-career, and mature physicians.

This structure permits one to dip into the book based on personal need to find relief, rather than to overwhelm. Given the complexity of modern domestic healthcare, and the daunting challenges faced by physicians who try to stay abreast of clinical medicine and the ever-evolving laws of personal finance, this textbook could not have come at a better time.
—Dr. Philippa Kennealy MD MPH, The Entrepreneurial MD, Los Angeles, California

Physicians have economic concerns unmatched by any other profession, arriving ten years late to the start of their earning years. This textbook goes to the core of how to level the playing field quickly, and efficaciously, by a new breed of dedicated Certified Medical Planners™. With physician-focused financial advice, each chapter is a building block to your financial fortress.
Thomas McKeon, MBA, Pharmaceutical Representative, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

An excellent resource … this textbook is written in a manner that provides physician practice owners with a comprehensive guide to financial planning and related topics for their professional practice in a way that is easily comprehended. The style in which it breaks down the intricacies of the current physician practice landscape makes it a ‘must-read’ for those physicians (and their advisors) practicing in the volatile era of healthcare reform.
—Robert James Cimasi, MHA ASA FRICS MCBA CVA CM&AA CMP™, CEO-Health Capital Consultants, LLC, St. Louis, Missouri

Rarely can one find a full compendium of information within a single source or text, but this book communicates the new financial realities we are forced to confront; it is full of opportunities for minimizing tax liability and maximizing income potential. We’re recommending it to all our medical practice management clients across the entire healthcare spectrum.
Alan Guinn, The Guinn Consultancy Group, Inc., Cookeville, Tennessee

Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP™ and his team take a seemingly endless stream of disparate concepts and integrate them into a simple, straightforward, and understandable path to success. And, he codifies them all into a step-by-step algorithm to more efficient investing, risk management, taxation, and enhanced retirement planning for doctors and nurses. His text is a vital read—and must execute—book for all healthcare professionals and physician-focused financial advisors.
Dr. O. Kent Mercado, JD, Private Practitioner and Attorney, Naperville, Illinois

Kudos. The editors and contributing authors have compiled the most comprehensive reference book for the medical community that has ever been attempted. As you review the chapters of interest and hone in on the most important concerns you may have, realize that the best minds have been harvested for you to plan well… Live well.
Martha J. Schilling; AAMS® CRPC® ETSC CSA, Shilling Group Advisors, LLC, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

I recommend this book to any physician or medical professional that desires an honest no-sales approach to understanding the financial planning and investing world. It is worthwhile to any financial advisor interested in this space, as well.
David K. Luke, MIM MS-PFP CMP™, Net Worth Advisory Group, Sandy, Utah

Although not a substitute for a formal business education, this book will help physicians navigate effectively through the hurdles of day-to-day financial decisions with the help of an accountant, financial and legal advisor. I highly recommend it and commend Dr. Marcinko and the Institute of Medical Business Advisors, Inc. on a job well done.
Ken Yeung MBA CMP™, Tseung Kwan O Hospital, Hong Kong

I’ve seen many ghost-written handbooks, paperbacks, and vanity-published manuals on this topic throughout my career in mental healthcare. Most were poorly written, opinionated, and cheaply produced self-aggrandizing marketing drivel for those agents selling commission-based financial products and expensive advisory services. So, I was pleasantly surprised with this comprehensive peer-reviewed academic textbook, complete with citations, case examples, and real-life integrated strategies by and for medical professionals. Although a bit late for my career, I recommend it highly to all my younger colleagues … It’s credibility and specificity stand alone.
Dr. Clarice Montgomery PhD MA,Retired Clinical Psychologist

In an industry known for one-size-fits-all templates and massively customized books, products, advice, and services, the extreme healthcare specificity of this text is both refreshing and comprehensive.
Dr. James Joseph Bartley, Columbus, Georgia

My brother was my office administrator and accountant. We both feel this is the most comprehensive textbook available on financial planning for healthcare providers.
Dr. Anthony Robert Naruska DC,Winter Park, Florida

MORE: tps://www.amazon.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-Advisors/dp/1482240289/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1418580820&sr=8-1&keywords=david+marcinko

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

Thank You

***

How Physician-Executives Get Recruited

Join Our Mailing List

Behind the Scenes of Executive Search Firms

[By Pierce Gray]

[By Ann Miller RN MHA]

Fill the Funnel

The best-kept secret about physician recruiting is to keep the funnel filled with a pool of candidates.  Organizations can’t afford to wait for doctors to beat a path to their door; they have to go after the physicians they want.  That means generating a sizeable list of prospects on the front end to narrow it down to the 100 or so doctors who will be called for an initial conversation.

From there, the team may do some 50 telephone screening interviews to generate five site visits in order to select the one perfectly matched prospect who will sign on the dotted line.

***Physician Executives

***

The Prospect List

Depending upon the opportunity, there are a number of ways to generate a list of prospects:

  • Direct mail using a purchased list of physicians culled from criteria such as medical specialty and current geographical location. The American Board of Medical Specialties, the American Medical Association [AMA], and licensure boards can supply these lists. The organization sends direct mail announcing the opportunity and then has a team member follow-up with outbound calling. If the physician is not interested, the caller should ask if s/he knows someone who is interested.
  • Personal calls following recruitment fairs and specialty meetings.
  • Advertising in medical and specialty journals and on the web, Twitter, etc.
  • Resident campaign using posted flyers and announcements.
  • Physician networking based on group member recommendations.
  • Medical Staff Office contacts at the local hospital.
  • Networking through specialty or group management organizations. Some organizations offer free on-line job postings for members.
  • Affiliations with residency programs.From the initial pool of candidates, the internal recruiter must call prospects and conduct preliminary screenings to verify licensure status and board certification, gather professional and personal details about the candidate, and answer his or her questions about the opportunity. Whenever possible, research should be done to secure the prospect’s home or cell telephone number. Calling prospects in the evening at home gives them more time and privacy to talk freely.
  • This screening step generates a smaller list of credible prospects that meet the search criteria that was generated at the beginning of the recruitment process.

Channel Surfing the ME-P

Have you visited our other topic channels? Established to facilitate idea exchange and link our community together, the value of these topics is dependent upon your input. Please take a minute to visit. And, to prevent that annoying spam, we ask that you register. It is fast, free and secure.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Product DetailsProduct Details

What is a CONTENT DELIVERY NETWORK, Doctor?

CDNs and What They Mean to Physicians

BY J.M.

[Anonymous IT Expert]

DOCTOR – Do you like the internet? Do you use EMRs/EHRs? Do you like fast internet? Of course you do.

But, without a strong infrastructure of content delivery networks (CDNs), website loading times would be too slow to stream tele-health/tele-medicine visits or tela-radiology services; not to mention Netflix, or argue with Reddit strangers or your patients; etc.

CDNs are geographically distributed networks of servers that handle processing and speed up internet delivery. In practice, CDNs make website content like HTML pages, JavaScript files, style-sheets, images, and videos load faster. They also reduce bandwidth costs, handle more traffic, and provide a little security protection. 

  • CDNs don’t actually host web content, but instead keep cached versions of it at the ready in edge servers. 

***

How CDN Works? How to Find the Cheapest CDN Provider?

***

Fastly is one of a number of significant CDN providers that help form the infrastructure of the internet. And while the outage shows the breadth of its reach, it’s far from the biggest player—Akami, Cloudflare, and Amazon CloudFront take up 75% of revenue in CDN space, per Intricately.

But Fastly, one of the world’s largest cloud computing companies itself, just had an outage that shut down its CDN service, affecting major websites including the New York Times, HBO Max, and the British government’s homepage. 

ASSESSMENT: Were you or your clinic or hospital affected? Your thoughts and comments are appreciated.

ORDER DICTIONARY: https://healthcarefinancials.files.wordpress.com/2007/10/foreword-mata.pdf

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

THANK YOU

***

PODCAST: What Hospital CEOs Should Do?

TOP 4 PRESUMPTIONS!

BY ERIC BRICKER, MD

***

***

YOUR COMMENTS APPRECIATED.

HOSPITALS:

https://www.amazon.com/Hospitals-Healthcare-Organizations-Management-Operational/dp/1439879907/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1334193619&sr=1-4

Thank You

HEALTHCARE:

https://www.amazon.com/Financial-Management-Strategies-Healthcare-Organizations/dp/1466558733/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1380743521&sr=8-3&keywords=david+marcinko

***

PODCAST: How Doctors are Really Paid in 2022?

Learn the Incentives in Physician Compensation

BY ERIC BRICKER MD

RAND and Harvard University Researchers Recently Published a Study in the Journal of the American Medical Association Examining How Doctors are Paid by Hospital System-Owned Practices. The Study Found that only 9% of Primary Care Physician Compensation was Based on Value (Quality and Cost-Effectiveness) and only 5.3% of Specialist Compensation was Based on Value.

The Study Concluded: “The results of this cross-sectional study suggest that PCPs and specialists despite receiving value-based reimbursement incentives from payers, the compensation of health system PCPs and specialists was dominated by volume-based incentives designed to maximize health systems revenue.”

***

***

MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2020/09/19/what-doctors-must-do-to-file-an-aetna-claim-to-get-paid/?preview_id=237387&preview_nonce=44f9028974&preview=true

RELATED: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2008/09/12/how-doctors-get-paid/

***

BUSINESS MEDICINE: https://www.amazon.com/Business-Medical-Practice-Transformational-Doctors/dp/0826105750/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1448163039&sr=8-9&keywords=david+marcinko

***

HOSPITALS: https://www.amazon.com/Financial-Management-Strategies-Healthcare-Organizations/dp/1466558733/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1380743521&sr=8-3&keywords=david+marcinko

****

COMMENTS APPRECIATED

Subscribe to the Medical Executive-Post

Thank You

***

Healthcare Leadership VS Management

Join Our Mailing List

Understanding the Difference

[By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA]

DEM blueMany times, individuals will use the terms management and leadership synonymously. In actuality the terms have significantly different meanings.

For example, Warren Bennis describes the difference between managers and leaders as “Managers do things right, Leaders the right thing.”

Managers are those individuals who have as their primary function managing a team of people and their activities. In effect, managers are those who have been given their authority by the nature of their role and ensure that the work gets done by focusing on day to day tasks and their activities.

On other hand, a leader’s approach is generally innate in its approach. Good leadership skills are difficult to learn because they are far more behavioral in nature than those skills needed for management. Leaders are also very focused on change recognizing that continual improvement can be achieved in their people and their activities can be a great step towards continued success.

Training Camps

Perhaps some of the best training grounds for the development of leaders are the military. The Marine Corps slogan is “A Few Good Men” and the military academies at Annapolis (Navy), New London, Connecticut (Coast Guard), Colorado Springs (Air Force), and West Point (Army) all have as their main mission, the development of leaders.

This is done by a number of different techniques. At graduation, the new officers, regardless of the branch of service, have been taught, and more importantly, have internalized the following: communicate the missions, sensitivity matters, real respect is earned, trust and challenge your soldiers. It is due to these lessons that many graduates of the military academies go on to positions of leadership in the private sector as well as in government.  Communicating the mission refers to conveying to those who work with us what are practice is hoping to accomplish and the role of each employee in achieving that goal. Given an understanding and awareness of the mission, when confronted with a barrier, employees are able to face hard problems when there is no well-defined approach by which to deal with them.

***

IRA advice and leadership

***

Sensitivity Does Matter

This is my area to improve; as I can be glib on occasion.

A leader treats each employee with respect and dignity, regardless of race, gender, cultural background or particular role they actually perform in the practice. Consider how many legal suits are filed against any type of organization, whether it is a medical practice or a large manufacturing facility due to perceived disparate treatment towards the employee based on race, religion, gender sexual preference or other non-work related issues.

Real respect is earned – Having initials after one’s name and the wearing of a lab coat does not automatically entitle an individual to respect. Formal authority has been found to be one of the least effective forms of influence. Only by earning the respect of your staff as well as your patients can you be sure that your intent will be carried out when you are not present. Setting the example in performance and conduct, rather than ‘do as I say, not as I do,” level of activity enables one to exert influence far greater than titles.

Trust and challenge your employees – How many times have practices sought to hire the best and brightest only to second guess the employee. Eric Schmidt, the CEO of Google, describes his management philosophy as having “… an employee base in which everybody is doing exactly what they want every day.” Obviously there are certain policies and procedures, but at the same time, the leader enables decision making to the lowest possible level. This also enables employees to question why certain policies and procedures are still being followed when more effective and efficient methods are available.  (How the Army Prepared Me to Work at Google, Doug Raymond, Harvard Business)

The phrase “Physician, heal thyself” (Luke 4:23, King James Version) means that we have to attend to our own faults, in preference to pointing out the faults of others. The phrase alludes to the readiness of physicians to heal sickness in others while sometimes not being able or will to heal themselves.

By the same token, it now is necessary for us to learn how to manage ourselves. It suggests that physicians, while often being able to help the sick, cannot always do so, and when sick themselves are no better placed than anyone else (Gary Martin, phrases.org.uk/meanings/281850.html, 2010).

***

Feet

***

Self-Development

“We will have to learn how to develop ourselves. We will have to place ourselves outside the boundaries where we can make the greatest contribution. And we will have to stay mentally alert and engaged during a 50-year working life, which means knowing how and when to change the work we do” (Managing Oneself, Harvard Business Review – Jan. 2005 – pp 100-109, by Peter Drucker).

Although one’s IQ and certain personality characteristics are more or less innate and appear to remain stable over time there are individual capabilities that enable leadership and can be developed. Enhancement of these capabilities can lead to the individual being able to carry out the leadership tasks of setting direction, gaining commitment, and creating alignment. These capabilities include self-management capabilities, social capabilities and work facilitation capabilities.

***

***

Assessment

Without question, while it is possible to cram for at test and graduate at the top of one’s class, that does not assure   leadership ability. We all know at least one person who scores at the highest levels on cognitive measures but would be incapable of pouring liquid out of a boot if the instructions were written on the heel.

So, here is my philosophy:

  • Leadership: By example and thru transparency with collaboration [Do the right thing]
  • Management: By walking-around thru tangible / intangible metrics [Doing things right].

Channel Surfing the ME-P

Have you visited our other topic channels? Established to facilitate idea exchange and link our community together, the value of these topics is dependent upon your input. Please take a minute to visit. And, to prevent that annoying spam, we ask that you register. It is fast, free and secure.

 ***

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Product DetailsProduct Details

What is the 70-20-10 Leadership Model?

Developing Leadership Ability

[By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA]

We have written about leadership and management before on this ME-P. It is an important and very popular topic; not only in healthcare but in most all industries today.

According to the Center for Creative Leadership there is a model for learning and development that blends experience, relationships and training.

It is referred to as the 70-20-10 model, where approximately:

  • 70% of learning is provided through the use of challenging assignments and on-the-job experiences.
  • 20% of learning is developed through relationships, networks, and feedback.
  • 10% of the learning is delivered via formal training processes.

So, does your medical office, clinic, hospital or healthcare organization put most of its leadership development resources into training?

Is this akin to the medical teaching adage: “See one – Do one – Teach One“?

Assessment

Sometimes it’s easier to purchase external vendor training rather than develop the internal infrastructure to support business succession planning with stretch and / or rotational assignments, coaching, mentoring, and action learning.  The weaker this internal support infrastructure, the more important the formal training will be, but it can’t be a close substitute for the lessons learned on the job and through feedback from peers, bosses and mentors.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements.

Book Marcinko: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

Subscribe: MEDICAL EXECUTIVE POST for curated news, essays, opinions and analysis from the public health, economics, finance, marketing, IT, business and policy management ecosystem.

***

Product DetailsProduct Details

PODCAST: On Replacing Doctors with Computers and Smart Phones

Join Our Mailing List 

Eric Topol on Replacing Clinicians with Algorithms

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP™

[Editor-in-Chief]

BU Dr. MarcinkoRecently, I wrote an ME-P questioning the need for a medical license in order to treat patients.

Boy, did I receive unkind private comments and phone calls on that op-ed piece!

The idea was not my own and, in fact, was proposed more than a decade ago by Shirley Svorny PhD, chairwoman of the economics department at California State University, Northridge. She holds a PhD in economics from UCLA

Her simple rationale was that licensure may be a barrier to competition and hence health care.

Link: Will Future Doctors Need a Medical License?

Enter Dr. Topol

Now, we learn that Eric Topol MD, Director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute and [Editor-in-Chief of Medscape] is questioning whether doctors will be replaced by algorithms. He cites dermatology, optometry and pediatrics as first-mover smart-phone applications.

The idea was really precipitated by Vinod Khosla at the Rock Health Program on Health Innovation, when he said that 80% of doctors are going to be replaced by algorithms [Pareto’s rule].

###

Doctor joining the ME-P

 ###

Video

And so, please enjoy this video presentation of Eric as he describes his healthcare vision of the future.

Link: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/805212?src=wnl_edit_specol&uac=193200AX

Assessment

Of course, this flies in the face of all those projections about hundreds of thousands of doctor shortages over the next 10 years because of the Baby Boomer problem, the aging of the population, as well as the chronic disease burden.

More:

Conclusion

And so, will doctors worker harder, or smarter, in the future? Will the lack of capacity be countered by improvements in efficiency? What will happened to provider reimbursement?

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Product DetailsProduct Details

What Is an IBNR Medical Claim?

Join Our Mailing List

Significance often under Appreciated

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™

[Publisher-in-Chiefdem2]

As some Medical Executive-Post readers and subscribers are aware, hospitals that filed bankruptcy recently include: a two-hospital system in Honolulu; one in Pontiac, MI; Trinity Hospital in Erin, Tennessee; Century City Doctors Hospital in Beverly Hills, and four hospital system Hospital Partners of America, in Charlotte.

One can only wonder about the impact of Incurred But Not Reported claims on their plight?  

IBNR Definition

According to the www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org, an IBNR claim is a concept that signifies healthcare services have been rendered but not invoiced or recorded by the healthcare provider, clinic, hospital, or organization.

Cause and Affect

IBNRs are usually the result of a commercial prospective payment risk contract between managed care organizations and healthcare providers, an IBNR claim refers to the estimated cost of medical services for which a claim has not been filed, or monitored by an IBNR collection systems or control sheet.

IBNR Types

More formally, IBNRs are a financial accounting of all services that have been performed but, as a result of a short period of time or “lag,” have not been invoiced or recorded. The medical services that will not be collected should be accounted for using the following accrued but not recorded (ABNR) entry:

Debit — accrued payments to medical providers or healthcare entity

Credit — IBNR accrual account

Example:

An example of an IBNR is hospital Coronary Artery Bypass Graft [CABG] surgery for a managed care plan member. Out of the capitated or prospective payment funds, the surgeon and/or healthcare organization has to pay for all related physical and respirator therapy, and rehabilitation services, as well as ancillary providers, drugs, and durable medical equipment [DME], as contractually obligated. This may also include complication diagnosis and extensive follow-up treatment.

Accordingly, the health plan will not be completely billed until several weeks, months, or quarters later or even further downstream in the reporting year after the patient is discharged. In order to accurately project the health plan’s financial liability, however, the health plan and hospital must estimate the cost of care based on past expenses.

Accounting Cost Controls

Since the identification and control of costs are paramount in financial healthcare management, an IBNR reserve fund (an interest bearing account) must be set up for claims that reflect services already delivered but, for whatever reason, not yet reimbursed.

From the accounting perspective, IBNR is accrued as an expense and is related as a short-term liability each fiscal month or accounting period.

Otherwise, the organization may not be able to pay the claim, if the associated revenue has already been spent. The proper handling of these “bills in the pipeline” is crucial for proactive providers and health organizations that are exploring arrangements that put them in the role of adjudicating claims or operating in a sub-capitated system.

###

Stetho-Claim

###

Assessment

IBNRs are especially important with newer patients who may be sicker than prior norms.

Recoverables that hospitals post as part of their large reserve charges are also, in many cases, IBNR losses. They may be recorded as IBNR claims on their balance sheets. Once these losses start becoming actual losses, the hospital may look to the insurer to pay a part of the claim. This causes disputes between the payor, provider, and/or healthcare organization.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

DICTIONARIES: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko
PHYSICIANS: www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com
PRACTICES: www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com
HOSPITALS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781466558731
CLINICS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439879900
ADVISORS: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org
PODIATRISTS: www.PodiatryPrep.com
BLOG: www.MedicalExecutivePost.com
FINANCE: Financial Planning for Physicians and Advisors
INSURANCE: Risk Management and Insurance Strategies for Physicians and Advisors

Product DetailsProduct DetailsProduct Details      

Product Details

SCOTUS: Ruled on Opioid Prescriptions

By Jules Murtha

***

***

Here’s What Doctors Need to Know

The Supreme Court of the United States  (SCOTUS) has ruled that doctors must show intent to mis-prescribe opioids in order to face criminal charges.

  • Despite the drop in opioid prescriptions in recent years, opioid overdoses and deaths are on the rise, largely because of street drugs.
  • The CDC’s position is that physicians can better serve patients by focusing on when to initiate and continue opioid treatment, what type and dosage of opioid to use, and how to address risk of drug abuse when prescribing opioids.

Source: Jules Murtha, MD Linx [8/26/22] 

***

COMMENTS APPRECIATED

Thank You

***

DHITS: https://www.amazon.com/Dictionary-Health-Information-Technology-Security/dp/0826149952/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1254413315&sr=1-5

***

PODCAST: Deborah C. Peel MD on Patient Privacy

An Audio-Video Presentation

[Submitted via Darrell Pruitt DDS]

***

***

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements.

Book Marcinko: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

Subscribe: MEDICAL EXECUTIVE POST for curated news, essays, opinions and analysis from the public health, economics, finance, marketing, IT, business and policy management ecosystem.

HOSPITALS:

“Financial Management Strategies for Hospitals” https://tinyurl.com/yagu567d

“Operational Strategies for Clinics and Hospitals” https://tinyurl.com/y9avbrq5

***

Product DetailsProduct Details

PODCAST: Cash Flow, Revenue & Entrepreneurial Leadership in Healthcare Business

THE ENTREPRENEURIAL M.D.

In this episode we are joined by Dr. Brent Jackson, Chief Medical Officer for Mercy General in Sacramento, CA to discuss the physician life-cycle, burnout, and transitioning into leadership within healthcare.

Play EpisodeDownload (40.4 MB)

Summary: Dr Brent Jackson discusses the flow of revenue throughout the medical industry.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

SECOND OPINIONS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

THANK YOU

****

PODCAST: 19 Industries that Blockchain will Disrupt?

Healthcare Included

***

***

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings

Subscribe: MEDICAL EXECUTIVE POST for curated news, essays, opinions and analysis from the public health, economics, finance, marketing, IT, business and policy management ecosystem.

***

HIT: https://www.amazon.com/Dictionary-Health-Information-Technology-Security/dp/0826149952/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1254413315&sr=1-5

***

PODCAST: The Case for Physician Entrepreneurship

By Ismail Sayeed, MD

We are joined by Dr Ismail Sayeed, pediatrician and physician entrepreneur to talk about his cross-border telehealth communications platform Vios, why he transitioned away from clinical practice and how his entrepreneurial journey could not have been possible without that clinical background.

***

Doctor Entrepreneur's Podcast | Libsyn Directory

***

PODCAST: https://share.transistor.fm/s/f5691aea

RELATED: https://getpocket.com/explore/item/all-companies-should-live-by-the-jeff-bezos-70-percent-rule?utm_source=pocket-newtab

YOUR COMMENTS ARE APPRECIATED.

Thank You

BUSINESS MEDICINE: https://www.amazon.com/Business-Medical-Practice-Transformational-Doctors/dp/0826105750/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1448163039&sr=8-9&keywords=david+marcinko

***

To all UNHAPPY Financial Advisors, JDs, CPAs and Physician-Focused Insurance Agents in 2022

Join Our Mailing List

AVOID COLLATERAL ECONOMIC DAMAGE OF HEALTH CARE REFORM – AS A CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER PROFESSIONAL

By Eugene Schnmuckler PhD MBA MEd CTS

[Academic Provost and Dean]

CMP logo

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

ME-P Doctors, Advisors and Consultants

The healthcare industrial complex represents a large and diverse collateral support industry, and the livelihood of synergistic professionals who advise doctors depend on it. So, if you want to be an outstanding financial advisor in the healthcare space, you better read this book and learn something about physician specific financial planning.

Better yet! Combine financial planning and practice management and become a Certified Medical Planner ™. Then, integrate this knowledge, and CMPmark of distinction, into your current financial advisory or healthcare consulting practice.

Or, as some of the following financial services professionals are learning, you might just become more collateral economic damage in the current managed healthcare debacle, if you don’t.

Certified Public Accountants

The nation’s 330,000 or so CPAs know little about the new healthcare dynamics and financial planning. Many often feel as though they are laboring away in obscurity and that their doctor clients do not appreciate what they do or how hard they work.

If you are a CPA, your workweek is ridiculously long, especially January through April; and you often deliver bad news to your doctor clients. You do not earn a generous salary, but you do receive their ire for your efforts. Even ex-SEC chief Arthur Levitt said, “Accounting is clearly a profession in crisis”, after reviewing Arthur Andersen, LLP’s role in Enron Corporation’s collapse, in 2002; not to mention the Global Crossing Ltd, Vivendi Universal, Warnaco, Martha Stewart and WorldCom fiascos.

So, you begin to scratch your head and ponder, quietly at first, and then out loud. Perhaps advising and managing the medical practice of a physician, or providing consulting services to other medical professionals is an opportunity that won’t require a new client base? You can keep your accounting practice during the first four months of the year, and supplement your income with something that may actually earn more than you are making now.

A light then goes off in your head. Epiphany! Enter iMBA’s Certified Medical Planner(CMP) professional certification program, exhorting accountants to “integrate personal financial planning with medical practice management”, through an additional 500 hours of online managerial and planning experience.

However, terms such as capitated medicine; per member-per month fixed fees; payment withholds’; activity based costing with CPT codes; utilization and acuity rates; and more investment and financial nomenclature is likely quite unfamiliar to you.

Furthermore, you may not have the temperament to be responsible for the financial affairs of others. Then you realize that CMPs along with MBAs and CFPs may actually be the new denizens of the healthcare bean counting and practice management scene. Rather than present numbers of the historic past, they make logical and mathematical inferences about the future.

Slowly, you realize that this has occurred because these professionals are proactive, not reactive, as the accounting profession is loosing its premier advisory position within the medical profession. Since doctors are paid a fixed fee amount, regardless of the number of services performed, these futuristic projections are the most important accounting numbers in healthcare today.

In fact, your research suggests that as a result, nearly every major accounting firm has created a financial advisory unit, or acquired one. Moss-Adams acquired Financial Securities in Seattle. Plante and Moran’s advisory unit is one of the largest and most successful in Michigan. And, 1st Global now offers a turnkey program that allows nearly every accounting firm to create its own advisory unit overnight.Even, the AICPA is providing encouragement to CPAs who wish to provide more professional client services by uniting with Fidelity to serve as a professional vendor. And, the PFS designation is about to be abandoned by the AICPA.

Doctor Advisor Teamwork

Tax Attorneys and Lawyers 

As a tax planning, health-law or estate attorney, you already know that almost every legal magazine around has articles or advertisements proposing that you become a financial planning professional or business consultant to your physician clients. Moreover, lawyers of all stripes are being pushed toward interdisciplinary alliances by encroachment on their turf by the Big Four consulting firms. With audits of publicly held companies now a commodity, the giant law firms are getting more of their revenues from consulting fees; and that puts them into direct competition with you and other legal professionals.

Of all careers, you know how absolutely onerous it is to practice medicine today, and are finally thankful that you did not take that career route many years ago. So, like your neighbor the accountant, you begin to explore that potential of developing a service line extension to your legal practice, in order to assist your medical colleagues who have been hit on hard economic times.

In fact, you soon realize that more than 90,000 trust, probate and estate planning attorneys like yourself are interested in pursuing financial planning in the next decade. Sure, you know its difficult to get a CLU or variable annuity license, or become a Certified Financial Planner (CFP), but earning your law degree was no cinch either. And, you reckon, advising physicians has got to be easier than law, or less stressful than the corporate lifestyle of your CMP trained brother-in-law, right?

So, you set out to stretch your legal horizons with an online Certified Medical Plannercertification program and explore the basic legal nuances of those topics not available in law school when you were a student. Things like medical fraud and abuse; managed care compliance audits and Medicare recoupments; PP-ACA, RACS, OSHA, DEA, HIPAA and EPA standards; anti-trust issues; and managed care contract dilemmas or de-selection appeals.

What a brave new world the legal profession has become! Even the American Bar Association’s commission on multi-disciplinary practice has recommended that lawyers be permitted to share fees and become partners with financial planners, money managers and other similar professionals.

As a real life example, the venerated Baltimore brokerage firm of Legg Mason, Inc, has recently teamed up with the Boston law firm of Bingham Danna, LLC, to create one of the first marriages between a law and securities firm. If you want in on the challenge, and bucks, you’d better acquire at least a working knowledge of health care administration, or perhaps help craft some new case law, or assist your doctor-clients in some other fashion; otherwise, you will remain a legal document producer.

Financial Planners and Investment Advisors

As a CFP, CFA, investment advisor or general securities representative, you realize that the financial service sector is going to become the next great growth opportunity of the 21st Century, despite the fact that the stagnant stock market in 2003-2004 set profits for the securities industry back by seven years.

Even H & R Block, and the Charles Schwab Corporation are trying to build medical professional interest in their respective firms and compete with your independent practice. They are fervently wooing away one group or another to interface with their embryonic financial advisory programs. Meanwhile, more than 260,000 of the nation’s brokers are moving into the investment advisory and financial planning business, as transactions have become commoditized.

A recent survey conducted for the Financial Planning Association clearly demonstrated the dominance of registered investment advisors, over stockbrokers, among clients 35-49 years old. With the average Merrill Lynch private client well over 60, it’s easy to spot the future vulnerability of this business model.

When asked to determine the added value of key industry players, baby boomers in a recent Dalbar study ranked financial planners first, followed by stockbrokers, CPAs, mutual fund companies, insurance agents, and commercial bankers, respectively. Even if you are a CFP, and despite the proliferation of investment advisors, evidence suggests that your individual impact is still narrow.

Furthermore, another Prince & Associates study of 778 affluent individuals including physicians, each with more than 5 million dollars to invest, examined the relationship between clients and their providers of five key financial services; retirement planning, estate planning, investment management, executive benefits and health-disability insurance. Prince found that 59 percent of the clients had been serviced in only one area by a particular advisor. Despite the significant assets of each client, the advisers have been unsuccessful at broadening these relationships– a key indicator that many affluent clients do not have a primary financial adviser.

Among the challenges you face to broaden your influence is to offer your clients value added services, perhaps by establishing your expertise in the medical niche and capitalize on being different (your unique knowledge-based value proposition). You must not remain just another of the more than 250,000, or so individuals who claim to be financial planners, with a collective universe of an additional 700,000, who purport to be financial advisors, in some fashion or another. You must begin to develop the strategic competitive advantage of practice management knowledge to synergize with your existing financial services product line.

Like the physicians you advise, you must consider becoming a specialist. In the highly coveted healthcare space, this specialist to high net worth doctors, is known as a Certified Medical Plannerpractitioner.

Integrated practice management and financial planning will also become much more competitive among physicians because they are aware of the above fusion. No one is suggesting therefore, that you abandon your core financial advisory business for medical practice management. It is merely a fact that healthcare has drastically changed during the past decade, and the knowledge you used yesterday will no longer be enough for you to get by on in the future.

Medical practice management is the natural outgrowth of traditional financial planning services, and investment advice in turn, is central to the implementation of a unified medical office and personal financial plan. The most successful financial planners therefore, may be CMPs and CFPs who incorporate medical management services into their practices.

cmp-program1

Insurance Agents and Counselors

As a traditional life insurance agent, it seems that almost all your colleagues are acquiring a general securities license, or CFP designation in addition to the CLU or ChFC after their name. Currently, there are more than 3 million insurance agents, half of which are independent. They are being pressured to move toward financial planning, as distribution of insurance products over the Internet spreads like wildfire.

Meanwhile, the same insurance and investment companies that are knocking on your door are also courting the medical professionals with their practice enhancement programs. Even if you are not interested in going into the financial planning business, you have seen the status of the American College erode of late, even as your own insurance business has declined because of the World Wide Web and various discounted insurance companies.

And, in the eyes of your former golden goose doctor-clients, you may have become a charlatan and everyone is clamoring for a piece of your insurance business and cloaking it in the guise of the contemporary topic of the day; medical practice management and financial planning. Think this is an exaggerated statement? An October 1997 survey conducted by Deloitte & Touche Consulting Group of New York, found insurance agents ranked last in having the trust of a wide selection of the public! Erosion has continued, ever since.

So, how do you regain this lost trust, and what about this new entity known as managed care? How do you learn about it at this stage in your career? What ever happened to the traditional indemnity health insurance, with its deductible and 80/20payment scheme? It was so easy to sell, provided good coverage, and the agent made a nice profit.

As an insurance agent, all you want to know is, can I still sell insurance and make a living? Like the struggling doctors you seek to advise, and the collateral advisors above, you find yourself asking, how do I talk the talk, and walk the walk, in this new era of medical insurance turmoil?

Slowly, as you read, study and learn about the Certified Medical Plannercertification program, you become empowered with the knowledge and ideas for new insurance product derivatives, that actually provide value to your physician clients. You are no longer just an insurance salesman, but a trusted medical risk management advisor.

Congratulations!

You can avoid the managed care economic ripple effect. Act now!

CMP logo

Office: Dean of Admissions

Certified Medical PlannerDesignation Program

Institute of Medical Business Advisors, Inc

Peachtree Plantation – West

Suite # 5901 Wilbanks Drive

Norcross, Georgia 30092-1141

770.448.0769 (voice)

770.361.8831 (fax)

http://www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Financial Planning MDs 2015

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants

Malpractice Allegations Alter Practice Patterns of Emergency Department Doctors

Malpractice Allegations Alter Practice Patterns of Emergency Department Doctors

QUERY: When physicians are accused of malpractice, how does this experience affect their practice of medicine?

w28330.jpg

Researchers Caitlin Carroll, David M. Cutler and Anupam Jena use administrative data on all emergency medicine physicians in Florida to answer this question in How Do Physicians Respond to Malpractice Allegations? Evidence from Florida Emergency Departments (NBER Working Paper 28330).

WHITE PAPER: https://www.nber.org/system/files/working_papers/w28330/w28330.pdf

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts and comments are appreciated.

MORE: https://www.routledge.com/Risk-Management-Liability-Insurance-and-Asset-Protection-Strategies-for/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781498725989

THANK YOU

***

PODCAST: How Extensive is Healthcare Prior Authorization?

A New Study

BY ERIC BRICKER MD

****

***

YOUR COMMENTS ARE APPRECIATED.

Thank You

RELATED: https://www.amazon.com/Business-Medical-Practice-Transformational-Doctors/dp/0826105750/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1448163039&sr=8-9&keywords=david+marcinko

MORE: https://www.amazon.com/Financial-Management-Strategies-Healthcare-Organizations/dp/1466558733/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1380743521&sr=8-3&keywords=david+marcinko

MORE: https://www.amazon.com/Hospitals-Healthcare-Organizations-Management-Operational/dp/1439879907/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1334193619&sr=1-4

***

PODCAST: More on Physician Suicide

Join Our Mailing List

By Pamela Wible MD

HOW YOU CAN STOP THESE SUICIDES:

1) Physician Suicide Etiquette: What to do when your doctor dies suddenly http://www.idealmedicalcare.org/blog/…
2) Physician Suicide 101: Secrets, Lies & Solutions
http://www.idealmedicalcare.org/blog/…
3) Join the ideal medical care movement: http://www.idealmedicalcare.org/sign-…

VIDEO

This summer I did the ice bucket challenge.
But I’m challenged by another disease.
A disease so scary people won’t say it out loud.
A disease so frightening that doctors are afraid to talk about it.
A disease so feared that physicians falsify death certificates,
families deny the cause of death,
and most victims’ names are hidden for eternity.

Every year we lose over 400 doctors to suicide.
That’s like an entire medical school—gone.
I was suicidal. I survived.
But I lost both men I dated in med school to suicide.
And 3 doctors in my town in just over a year to suicide.
Each year over 1 million Americans will lose their doctors to suicide.
These are just the physician suicides I heard about this year.

Fully transcribed here: http://www.idealmedicalcare.org/blog/…

Director of Photography: GeVe.
Voiceover: Pamela Wible, MD.
Cello: Pamela Wible, MD

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

 Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

***

PODCAST: How Financial Advisors Acquire Physician Clients

Join Our Mailing List

It’s About Deep Niche Knowledge [An AV Presentation]

By Vicki Rackner MD

Enter the CMPs vicki

AUDIO-VIDEO PRESENTATION

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W0SGlL0UzXE#t=22

More:

About the Author

Vicki Rackner MD, author, speaker, ME-P thought-leader and President of Targeting Doctors, helps financial advisors accelerate their practice growth by acquiring more physician clients. She calls on her experience as a practicing surgeon, clinical faculty at the University of Washington School of Medicine and nationally-noted expert in physician engagement to offer a bridge between the world of medicine and the world of business.

Conclusion

AT YOUR SERVICE: Invite Dr. Marcinko to Your Next Event, Video Conference or Blog-Cast in 2022

***

ABOUT | DAVID EDWARD MARCINKO

BY ANN MILLER RN CPHQ

Dr. Dave Marcinko at YOUR Service in 2021

THANK YOU

***

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

MORE: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

U.S. Hospitals Feeling the Pain of Physician Burnout

U.S. Hospitals Feeling the Pain of Physician Burnout [REPRINT]

Source: Reuters Health News via MDLinx [11/22/17]

neurotic

Hospitals are just beginning to recognize the toll of burnout on their operations

Experts estimate, for example, that it can cost more than $1 million to recruit and train a replacement for a doctor who leaves because of burnout. But, as no broad calculation of burnout costs exists, Dr. Tait Shanafelt, a former Mayo Clinic researcher who became Stanford Medicine’s first chief physician wellness officer in September said Stanford, Harvard Business School, Mayo Clinic, and the American Medical Association (AMA) are working on that. They have put together a comprehensive estimate of the costs of burnout at the organizational and societal level, which has been submitted to a journal for review.

Shanafelt and other researchers have shown that burnout erodes job performance, increases medical errors, and leads doctors to leave a profession they once loved.

***

 Hospitals can ill afford these added expenses in an era of tight margins, costly nursing shortages, and uncertainty over the fate of the Affordable Care Act, which has put capital projects and payment reform efforts on hold.

Coaching

For a graphic, click here.

http://fingfx.thomsonreuters.com/gfx/rngs/TRAVIS%20HARTMAN/010051RR403/index.html

Sound familiar?

MORE

Graphic-for-2-4-2019-pdf

stress

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, urls and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements.

Book Marcinko: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/
Subscribe: MEDICAL EXECUTIVE POST for curated news, essays, opinions and analysis from the public health, economics, finance, marketing, IT, business and policy management ecosystem.

***

Product DetailsProduct Details

Understanding Medical Cost Accounting

Join Our Mailing List

A Subset of Managerial Accounting

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

By ME-P Staff Reporters

CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Managerial and medical cost accounting is not governed by generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) as promoted by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) for CPAs. Rather, a healthcare organization costing expert may be a Certified Cost Accountant (CCA) or Certified Managerial Accountant (CMA) designated by the Cost Accounting Standards Board (CASB), an independent board within the Office of Management and Budget’s (OMB) Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP).

The Cost Accounting Standards Board

CASB consists of five members, including the OFPP Administrator who serves as chairman and four members with experience in government contract cost accounting (two from the federal government, one from industry, and one from the accounting profession). The Board has the exclusive authority to make, promulgate, and amend cost accounting standards and interpretations designed to achieve uniformity and consistency in the cost accounting practices governing the measurement, assignment, and allocation of costs to contracts with the United States.

Codified at 48 CFR

CASB’s regulations are codified at 48 CFR, Chapter 99.  The standards are mandatory for use by all executive agencies and by contractors and subcontractors in estimating, accumulating, and reporting costs in connection with pricing and administration of, and settlement of disputes concerning, all negotiated prime contract and subcontract procurement with the United States in excess of $500,000. The rules and regulations of the CASB appear in the federal acquisition regulations.

North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes are used to categorize data for the federal government.  In acquisition they are particularly critical for size standards.  The NAICS codes are revised every five years by the Census Bureau.  As of October 1, 2007, the federal acquisition community began using the 2007 version of the NAICS codes at www.census.gov/epcd/www/naics.html

Cost Accounting Standards

Healthcare organizations and consultants are obligated to comply with the following cost accounting standards (CAS) promulgated by federal agencies:

  • CAS 501 requires consistency in estimating, accumulating, and reporting costs.
  • CAS 502 requires consistency in allocating costs incurred for the same purpose.
  • CAS 505 requires proper treatment of unallowable costs.
  • CAS 506 requires consistency in the periods used for cost accounting.

The requirements of these standards are different from those of traditional financial accounting, which are concerned with providing static historical information to creditors, shareholders, and those outside the public or private healthcare organization.

AssessmentTwo Doctors

Functionally, most healthcare organizations also contain cost centers, which have no revenue budgets or mission to earn revenues for the organization.  Examples include human resources, administration, housekeeping, nursing, and the like.  These are known as responsibility centers with budgeting constraints but no earnings.  Furthermore, shadow cost centers include certain non-cash or cash expenses, such as amortization, depreciation and utilities, and rent. These non-centralized shadow centers are cost allocated for budgeting purposes and must be treated as costs http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

MORE:  CASE MODEL EOQ 1

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Product DetailsProduct Details

Product Details

Activity-Based-Medical-Cost Accounting and Management

A Non-Traditional Accounting System

[Dr. David Marcinko MBA and Staff Writers]CPA

Sooner or later you will want to ascertain and then demonstrate the cost effectiveness of your medical care. By using the process of Activity Based Cost (ABC) management, you will be able to do so.  But, if you’re using a traditional accounting system, you won’t know a thing about your activity costs. Here’s how. 

Traditional Cost Accounting Methods 

In a traditional medical practice cost accounting system, costs are assigned to different procedures and services based on volume.  In others words, office costs are spread over the entire office’s product line and you may not know the true profitability of any single medical activity. So, if the office is doing more “procedures” than general medicine, for example, more indirect office overhead costs will be allocated to the procedural portion of the practice. 

ABC management, on the other hand, determines the actual costs of the resources that each service consumes. Because general medicine requires more human resources than “technical procedures,” ABC management will assign more costs to the general medical portion of the practice. 

Accordingly, most physicians, office managers, and their accountants are surprised that a prior notion of office profitability is different than previously thought. ABC management is just more accurate in measuring medical service profitability than traditional accounting methods. 

Medical Activity Cost Drivers 

Examples of medical activities that are office cost drivers include such items as monitoring vital signs, taking radiographic images, removing dressings or casts, performing laboratory tests or veni-punctures, surgical set-ups or operative procedures; etc.  

However, in the office setting, the most economically important activities are listed as specific CPT codes for each medical specialty.  The most important end result of ABC management is the shift of general overhead costs to low volume services from high volume services. These effects are not symmetrical as there is a bigger dollar effect on the per-unit costs of the low volume service.  

ABC Managerial Accounting Improvements 

ABC management improves office managerial cost accounting systems in three ways: 

  1. It increases the number of cost pools used to accumulate general overhead office costs. Rather than accumulate overhead costs in a single office-wide pool, costs are accumulated by activity, service or procedure.
  2. It changes the base used to assign general overhead costs to services or patients. Rather than assigning costs on the basis of a measure of volume (employee or doctor hours), costs are assigned on the basis of medical services or activities that generated those costs.
  3. It changes the nature of many overhead costs in that those formerly considered indirect, are now traced to specific activities or services. The office service mix may then be adjusted accordingly, for additional profit.   

Methodology 

In order to perform an ABC analysis for your medical office, calculate the cost of delivering a single unit of medical or surgical activity using only the work component of the resource based relative value scale (RBRVS).

Do this by adding up your office’s average variable expenses for the prior 1-3 years.  Now, count the number of work resource based relative value units (RBRVUs) delivered for each CPT code for the same time period, using the latest edition of the Federal Register to obtain the latest list of RVUs by CPT code. Then divide total variable expenses by the total number of work RVUs in order to arrive at the marginal cost of a single unit of service for the time period being evaluated.

For example, if your office had variable expenses of $480,000, and produced 80,000 work RVUs last year, it cost $6, on top of the office’s fixed expenses, to deliver one unit of work product. So, if an HMO plan offers to reimburse you at a rate of $11 per member, per month, and you can expect to reasonably deliver on average of one RVU pm/pm, you’ll earn enough on the contract to cover your marginal costs and some of your fixed and direct expenses. 

CASE MODELs: CVPA 4 and CVPA 3

dhimc-bookAssessment

Remember, this method assumes that you have the excess operating capacity and time slots, available and unused, to see the additional patients of the new plan without adding extra overhead expenses to service the contract.

If not, or if you plan for capitation to become a major portion of your practice, you might want the capitated contract(s) to cover all your office expenses, so be sure to include both the fixed and other direct costs to your variable cost calculations. ABC determines the actual costs of resources rendered for each activity and represents a real measure of practice profitability. Office service mix can then be changed to either maximize revenues or better suit your practice personality.

A Caveat

Suppose however, that a medical service is competitively priced but still shows that the CPT code is unprofitable. For example, the costs of special requests can adversely affect office profits. Yet, special patient requests are one of the biggest reasons that a CPT code or procedure isn’t profitable.

In this case, look closely at activity costs and determine which ones are being performed inefficiently. Improving the efficiency of those kinds of medical services, or referring them out or abandoning them all together, will increase office profitability.

MORE: ABCM

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

DICTIONARIES: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko
PHYSICIANS: www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com
PRACTICES: www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com
HOSPITALS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781466558731
CLINICS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439879900
BLOG: www.MedicalExecutivePost.com
FINANCE: Financial Planning for Physicians and Advisors
INSURANCE: Risk Management and Insurance Strategies for Physicians and Advisors

Product DetailsProduct DetailsProduct Details     

Product DetailsProduct Details

***

New Medical Practice Entrepreneurial Business Rules for Young Physicians [circa 2022]

Join Our Mailing List

Go “Out-of-Box” – OR – Go Employee

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP™ www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

There are more than 950,000 physicians in the United States. Yet, the brutal supply and demand, and demographic calculus of the matter is that there are just too many aging patients chasing too few doctors. Compensation and reimbursement is plummeting as Uncle Sam becomes the payer-of-choice for more than 52% of us. More so, going forward with the PP-ACA OR, perhaps not so much after the Trump election.

Furthermore, many large health care corporations, hospitals, and clinical and medical practices have not been market responsive to this change. Some physicians with top-down business models did not recognize the changing health care ecosystem or participatory medicine climate. Change is not inherent in the DNA of traditionalists. These entities and practitioners represented a rigid or “used-to-be” mentality, not a flexible or “want-to-be” mindset.

Yet today’s physicians and emerging Health 2.0 initiatives must possess a market nimbleness that cannot be recreated in a command-controlled or collectivist environment. Going forward, it is not difficult to imagine the following rules for the new virtual medical culture, and young physicians of the modern era.

A. Rule 1

Forget about large office suites, surgery centers, fancy equipment, larger hospitals, and the bricks and mortar that comprised traditional medical practices. One doctor with a great idea, good bedside manners, or competitive advantage can outfox a slew of insurance companies, Certified Public Accountants, or the Associate Management Accountant, while still serving patients and making money. It is now a unit-of-one economy where “ME Inc.,” is the standard. Physicians must maneuver for advantages that boost their standing and credibility among patients, peers, and payers.

Examples include patient satisfaction surveys, outcomes research analysis, evidence-based-medicine, direct reimbursement compensation, physician economic credentialing, and true patient-centric medicine. Physicians should realize the power of networking, vertical integration, and the establishment of virtual offices that come together to treat a patient and then disband when a successful outcome is achieved. Job security is earned with more successful outcomes; not a magnificent office suite or onsite presence.

B. Rule 2

Challenge conventional wisdom, think outside the traditional box, recapture your dreams and ambitions, disregard conventional gurus, and work harder than you have ever worked before. Remember the old saying, “if everyone is thinking alike, then nobody is thinking.” Do traditionalists or collective health care reform advocates react rationally or irrationally?

For example, some health care competition and career thought-leaders, such as Shirley Svorny, PhD, a professor of economics and chair of the Department of Economics at California State University, Northridge, wonder if a medical degree is a barrier—rather than enabler—of affordable health care. An expert on the regulation of health care professionals, including medical professional licensing, she has participated in health policy summits organized by Cato and the Texas Public Policy Foundation. She argues that licensure not only fails to protect consumers from incompetent physicians, but, by raising barriers to entry, makes health care more expensive and less accessible.

Institutional oversight and a sophisticated network of private accrediting and certification organizations, all motivated by the need to protect reputations and avoid legal liability, offer whatever consumer protections exist today.

C. Rule 3

Differentiate yourself among your health care peers. Do or learn something new and unknown by your competitors. Market your accomplishments and let the world know. Be a non-conformist. Conformity is an operational standard and a straitjacket on creativity. Doctors must create and innovate, not blindly follow entrenched medical societies into oblivion.

For example, the establishment of virtual medical schools and hospitals, where students, nurses, and doctors learn and practice their art on cyber entities that look and feel like real patients, can be generated electronically through the wonders of virtual reality units.

D. Rule 4

Realize that the present situation is not necessarily the future. Attempt to see the future and discern your place in it. Master the art of quick change with fast, but informed decision making. Do what you love, disregard what you do not, and let the fates have their way with you.

Assessment

I receive a couple of phone calls each month from young doctors on this topic. I ask them to decide if they are of the philosophical ilk to adhere to the above rules; or become another conformist and go along … to get along? In other words, get fly!

Or, become an employed, or government doctor.  Just remember … the entity that gives you a job, can also take it away.

Sample fly: http://crossoverhealth.com/

MORE: Marriage Business

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

LEXICONS: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko
PHYSICIANS: www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com
PRACTICES: www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com
HOSPITALS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781466558731
CLINICS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439879900
ADVISORS: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org
BLOG: www.MedicalExecutivePost.com

 

Product DetailsProduct DetailsProduct Details

Product Details  Product Details

Product Details

Product Details 

PODCAST: Hospitals Block Guiding Patients

By Eric Bricker MD

***

***
COMMENTS APPRECIATED

Thank You

***

MORE: https://www.amazon.com/Financial-Management-Strategies-Healthcare-Organizations/dp/1466558733/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1380743521&sr=8-3&keywords=david+marcinko

***

“Rules-of-Thumb” and Medical Practice Valuation Benchmarks

Join Our Mailing List

Busting another Myth of Medical Practice Appraisal

[By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™]

[Publisher-in-Chiefdr-david-marcinko]

For doctors, buying or selling a practice may be the biggest financial transaction of their lives. 

Reasons for appraising practice worth include: succession, retirement and estate planning; partnership disputes and divorce; or as an important tool for organic growth and strategic planning.

However, the transaction is fraught with many pitfalls to avoid and no medical specialty seems immune. 

Valuation Difficulties 

For example, we recall the MD who asked her accountant for the “value” of her practice and was correctly given its lower “book value”, rather than its higher “fair-market-value” as a profitable ongoing-concern. The doctor lost tens-of-thousands-of-dollars in a subsequent attorney-driven sales transaction.

Although her CPA produced correct figures for exactly what was requested, the doctor and attorney did not differentiate between the two terms-of-art.  Later legal mediation determined that neither was responsible for the linguistic error, as both parties acted in good-faith.

Of course, it was the doctor who paid dearly for her mistake in communication and business acumen.  

“Rules-of-Thumb” [aka: benchmark formulas or calculations] 

And so, in the stable distant past, physicians occasionally used “rules of thumb” formulas to value their medical practices. 

“Rules” typically were expressed as benchmark calculations, formulas or multipliers (e.g. “one times revenues” or “five times cash flow”).  

Today, because of the economic volatility in the healthcare industrial complex, “rules of thumb” should not be used to value any medical practice (other than as general internal managerial sanity checks).  

Moreover, they are fraught with legal liability should the deal sour, and such benchmarks general hold little to no weight with the IRS. 

Case example [the tale of two identical medical practices] 

Economically, for example, consider two medical offices, each earning $1 million in gross revenues; both worth $1.5 million (according to a “rule of thumb” that a medical practice is worth 1½ times annual revenues).  Yet, in reality Medical Office #1 is worth twice Medical Office #2.   

How is this possible?   

The answer is because Medical Office #1 is a newer practice in a hot neighborhood that did $500,000 last year, $1 million this year; and projects to do even more next year.  Its property, instruments, HIT and medical equipment is new; aggressive young physician-executive management and medical training is excellent.   

Medical Office #2 is an older practice located in a low-income area, revenues were $2 million a few years ago and have fallen to the current level; the practice has a leaky roof, old equipment and lots of deferred maintenance, etc.  HMO patients abound, with declining reimbursement rates and an older practitioner.  

Assessment 

So, although much more complicated than the above simple example, we can now see how “rule-of-thumbs” can mislead more often than inform. 

Yet, we might also ask why they are still used by some misinformed doctors?  

Simplicity and inertia is the answer, according to Hope Rachel Hetico; RN, MHA a valuation professional and Certified Medical Planner™ from the Institute of Medical Business Advisors Inc, in Atlanta GA www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com 

And, the cost of a benchmark “rule-of-thumb” valuation is hard to beat; $0. Keep in mind that in most cases, you will want to ensure the value determination will stand up to IRS scrutiny, so the $0 rule-of-thumb is not really an option  

The Case of Edgar versus Berg 

Legalistically, a landmark legal case in business valuation was the Estate of Edgar A. Berg v. Commissioner (T. C. Memo 1991-279). The Court criticized the CPAs as not being qualified to perform valuations, failing to provide analysis of an appropriate discount rate, and making only general references to justify their “Opinion of Value.”  

In rejecting these experts, the Court accepted the IRS’s expert because he possessed the background, education and training; and developed discounts, and demonstrating how reproducible evidence applied to the assets being examined.  

Assessment 

The Berg decision marked the beginning of the Tax Court leaning toward the side with the most comprehensive appraisal. Previously, it had a tendency to “split the difference.”  

Now, some feel the Berg case launched the business valuation profession.

MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2017/11/03/traditional-reasons-for-a-medical-practice-valuation/

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

HOSPITALS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781466558731
CLINICS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439879900
BLOG: www.MedicalExecutivePost.com

 

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners(TM)

***

Invite Dr. Marcinko

On Wall Street’s Suitability, Prudence and Fiduciary Accountability

Join Our Mailing List 

Financial Advisor’s are Not Doctors!

dr-david-marcinko1

Dr. David E. Marcinko FACFAS MBA CMP™ MBBS

THRIVE-BECOME A CMP™ Physician Focused Fiduciary

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Financial advisors don’t ascribe to the Hippocratic Oath.  People don’t go to work on “Wall Street” for the same reasons other people become firemen and teachers.  There are no essays where they attempt to come up with a new way to say, “I just want to help people.”

Financial Advisor’s are Not Doctors

Some financial advisors and insurance agents like to compare themselves to CPAs, attorneys and physicians who spend years in training and pass difficult tests to get advanced degrees and certifications. We call these steps: barriers-to-entry. Most agents, financial product representatives and advisors, if they took a test at all, take one that requires little training and even less experience. There are few BTEs in the financial services industry.

For example, most insurance agent licensing tests are thirty minutes in length. The Series #7 exam for stock brokers is about 2 hours; and the formerly exalted CFP® test is about only about six [and now recently abbreviated]. All are multiple-choice [guess] and computerized. An aptitude for psychometric savvy is often as important as real knowledge; and the most rigorous of these examinations can best be compared to a college freshman biology or chemistry test in difficulty.

Yet, financial product salesman, advisors and stock-brokers still use lines such as; “You wouldn’t let just anyone operate on you, would you?” or “I’m like your family physician for your finances.  I might send you to a specialist for a few things, but I’m the one coordinating it all.”  These lines are designed to make us feel good about trusting them with our hard-earned dollars and, more importantly, to think of personal finance and investing as something that “only a professional can do.”

Unfortunately, believing those lines can cost you hundreds of thousands of dollars and years of retirement. 

More: Video on Hedge Fund Manager Michael Burry MD

***

231_1

***

Suitability Rule

A National Association of Securities Dealers [NASD] / Financial Industry Regulatory Authority [FINRA] guideline that require stock-brokers, financial product salesman and brokerages to have reasonable grounds for believing a recommendation fits the investment needs of a client. This is a low standard of care for commissioned transactions without relationships; and for those “financial advisors” not interested in engaging clients with advice on a continuous and ongoing basis. It is governed by rules in as much as a Series #7 licensee is a Registered Representative [RR] of a broker-dealer. S/he represents best-interests of the firm; not the client.

And, a year or so ago there we two pieces of legislation for independent broker-dealers-Rule 2111 on suitability guidelines and Rule 408(b)2 on ERISA. These required a change in processes and procedures, as well as mindset change.

Note: ERISA = The Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) codified in part a federal law that established minimum standards for pension plans in private industry and provides for extensive rules on the federal income tax effects of transactions associated with employee benefit plans. ERISA was enacted to protect the interests of employee benefit plan participants and their beneficiaries by:

  • Requiring the disclosure of financial and other information concerning the plan to beneficiaries;
  • Establishing standards of conduct for plan fiduciaries ;
  • Providing for appropriate remedies and access to the federal courts.

ERISA is sometimes used to refer to the full body of laws regulating employee benefit plans, which are found mainly in the Internal Revenue Code and ERISA itself. Responsibility for the interpretation and enforcement of ERISA is divided among the Department Labor, Treasury, IRS and the Pension Benefit Guarantee Corporation.

Yet, there is still room for commissioned based FAs. For example, some smaller physician clients might have limited funds [say under $100,000-$250,000], but still need some counsel, insight or advice.

Or, they may need some investing start up service from time to time; rather than ongoing advice on an annual basis. Thus, for new doctors, a commission based financial advisor may make some sense. 

Prudent Man Rule

This is a federal and state regulation requiring trustees, financial advisors and portfolio managers to make decisions in the manner of a prudent man – that is – with intelligence and discretion. The prudent man rule requires care in the selection of investments but does not limit investment alternatives. This standard of care is a bit higher than mere suitability for one who wants to broaden and deepen client relationships. 

***

student-849825_640

***

Prudent Investor Rule

The Uniform Prudent Investor Act (UPIA), adopted in 1992 by the American Law Institute’s Third Restatement of the Law of Trusts, reflects a modern portfolio theory [MPT] and total investment return approach to the exercise of fiduciary investment discretion. This approach allows fiduciary advisors to utilize modern portfolio theory to guide investment decisions and requires risk versus return analysis. Therefore, a fiduciary’s performance is measured on the performance of the entire portfolio, rather than individual investments 

Fiduciary Rule

The legal duty of a fiduciary is to act in the best interests of the client or beneficiary. A fiduciary is governed by regulations and is expected to judge wisely and objectively. This is true for Investment Advisors [IAs] and RIAs; but not necessarily stock-brokers, commission salesmen, agents or even most financial advisors. Doctors, lawyers, CPAs and the clergy are prototypical fiduciaries. 

***

business-insurance

***

More formally, a financial advisor who is a fiduciary is legally bound and authorized to put the client’s interests above his or her own at all times. The Investment Advisors Act of 1940 and the laws of most states contain anti-fraud provisions that require financial advisors to act as fiduciaries in working with their clients. However, following the 2008 financial crisis, there has been substantial debate regarding the fiduciary standard and to which advisors it should apply. In July of 2010, The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act mandated increased consumer protection measures (including enhanced disclosures) and authorized the SEC to extend the fiduciary duty to include brokers rather than only advisors, as prescribed in the 1940 Act. However, as of 2014, the SEC has yet to extend a meaningful fiduciary duty to all brokers and advisors, regardless of their designation.

The Fiduciary Oath: fiduciaryoath_individual

Assessment 

Ultimately, physician focused and holistic “financial lifestyle planning” is about helping some very smart people change their behavior for the better. But, one can’t help doctors choose which opportunities to take advantage of along the way unless there is a sound base of technical knowledge to apply the best skills, tools, and techniques to achieve goals in the first place.

Most of the harms inflicted on consumers by “financial advisors” or “financial planners” occur not due to malice or greed but ignorance; as a result, better consumer protections require not only a fiduciary standard for advice, but a higher standard for competency.

The CFP® practitioner fiduciary should be the minimum standard for financial planning for retail consumers, but there is room for post CFP® studies, certifications and designations; especially those that support real medical niches and deep healthcare specialization like the Certified Medical Planner™ course of study [Michael E. Kitces; MSFS, MTax, CLU, CFP®, personal communication].

Being a financial planner entails Life-Long-Learning [LLL]. One should not be allowed to hold themselves out as an advisor, consultant, or planner unless they are held to a fiduciary standard, period. Corollary – there’s nothing wrong with a suitability standard, but those in sales should be required to hold themselves out as a salesperson, not an advisor.

The real distinction is between advisors and salespeople. And, fiduciary standards can accommodate both fee and commission compensation mechanisms. However; there must be clear standards and a process to which advisors can be held accountable to affirm that a recommendation met the fiduciary obligation despite the compensation involved.

Ultimately, being a fiduciary is about process, not compensation.

More: Deception in the Financial Service Industry

Full Disclosure:

As a medical practitioner, Dr. Marcinko is a fiduciary at all times. He earned Series #7 (general securities), Series #63 (uniform securities state law), and Series #65 (investment advisory) licenses from the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD-FINRA), and the Securities Exchange Commission [SEC] with a life, health, disability, variable annuity, and property-casualty license from the State of Georgia.

Dr.Marcinko was a licensee of the CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ Board of Standards (Denver) for a decade; now reformed, and holds the Certified Medical Planner™ designation (CMP™). He is CEO of iMBA Inc and the Founding President of: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

More: Enter the CMPs

***

[PHYSICIAN FOCUSED FINANCIAL PLANNING AND RISK MANAGEMENT COMPANION TEXTBOOK SET]

  Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™  Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

[Dr. Cappiello PhD MBA] *** [Foreword Dr. Krieger MD MBA]

[Two Newest Books by Marcinko annd the iMBA, Inc Team]

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

***

Product DetailsProduct Details

Product DetailsProduct DetailsProduct Details

[PRIVATE MEDICAL PRACTICE BUSINESS MANAGEMENT TEXTBOOK – 3rd.  Edition]

Product DetailsProduct Details

  [Foreword Dr. Hashem MD PhD] *** [Foreword Dr. Silva MD MBA]

***

Physician Owned Hospitals Myths DeBunked

BY HEALTH CAPITAL CONSULTANTS, LLC

Literature Review Debunks Claims Against Physician-Owned Hospitals


Approximately 250 hospitals across the U.S. are completely or partially physician owned. These physician-owned hospitals (POHs) can offer a variety of services, from general care to specialty services, such as cardiovascular or orthopedic care, known as “focused factories.”

Over the past several decades, healthcare providers and policymakers have claimed that POHs have a negative impact on the healthcare industry, suggesting that: (1) POHs “cherry-pick” the most profitable patients; (2) the quality of care provided at POHs is substandard; and, (3) conflicts of interest exist due to the financial incentive for physician owners to refer patients to their POHs. (Read more…) 

YOUR COMMENTS ARE APPRECIATED.

Thank You

MORE: https://www.amazon.com/Financial-Management-Strategies-Healthcare-Organizations/dp/1466558733/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1380743521&sr=8-3&keywords=david+marcinko

***

RELATED: https://www.amazon.com/Hospitals-Healthcare-Organizations-Management-Operational/dp/1439879907/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1334193619&sr=1-4

***

HOW: The ME-P Helps Your Financial Advisory Business or Medical Practice Grow?

All about the Medical Executive-Post Business Model

imba inc

***

One of the questions we receive most often from readers of the Medical Executive-Post is how can we “afford” to give away so much content for free. Or stated another way, “how do we get paid for all of this?”

The simple answer is that we know many (or even most) of you will simply take the ideas that we share and implement them yourself. Do-It-YourSelfers can always simply purchase our texts, books and peer reviewed handbooks redacted in more than a thousand, medical, law, business and graduate schools, as well as the Library of Congress, Institute of Health and Library of Congress.

LINK: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/10/22/why-are-certified-medical-planner-textbooks-so-darn-popular/

On the other hand, some of you will realize you need some additional help.

For example:

Maybe as a financial advisor you’re “stuck” in your financial planning business and recognize that some outside assistance is necessary to help you get to the next level of niche specificity thru our Certified Medical Planner™ chartered certification program designation. Helping physicians of all specialty types in a fiduciary focused manner is the proverbial Win-Win for all concerned.

LINK: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

CMP

CMP logo

OR, perhaps you are seeking a glossary of terms and definitions in heath economics, finance, accounting, insurance, managed care, health information technology and security; found in our Health Dictionary Series Wiki Project? Free and print versions are available.

LINK: http://www.HealthDictionarySeries.org

LINK: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2011/09/17/order-our-three-newest-best-selling-dictionaries/

HDS

OR, as a doctor maybe your medical practice is growing so much you just hit a wall where you don’t have time to do it all for your patients. After all, with only “so much” time available every day and week, it’s vital to delegate or outsource anything that isn’t really core to your practice and management skill set.

LINK: http://www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com

OR, maybe you are even starting, buying or selling your medical practice and need our financial and valuation services. Part (1) – Part (2) – Part (3) Financial, estate, investing and retirement planning services are also available.

OR, you may just need a second informed opinion about a topic not listed; there are a myriad of issues to consider in the competitive ecosystem today.

LINK: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

Regardless, we may have solutions to help!


So, in the meantime, I hope that the ME-P content continues to be helpful food for thought, and perhaps we’ll have an opportunity to cross paths soon at a future conferences or podcasts. Feel free to invite us to speak at your own seminar/podcast online V-log, as well.

INVITATION LINK: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

With warm regards.

Fraternally.
Ann Miller RN MHA CMP

[Managing Director]

email: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

Phone: 770-448-0769

***

***

Crafting a Medical Practice Business Plan for Entrepreneurial Physicians

Join Our Mailing List

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA

An Essential Document for Start-Up Practices

The analog to a personal financial plan is the medical practice business plan. While mature practitioners may casually be familiar with some elements of the former by default, most new physicians are totally unfamiliar with requirements of the later.  

The Need 

Unfortunately, without an initial business plan, the need for a personal financial plan may become moot. This is because absent financial backing from family, friends or a cushy nest egg, the business plan is a key tool for raising start-up capital for a new medical practice. It may also be demanded by a commercial bank, or the Small Business Administration (SBA), for a loan to finance growth of an existing practice; despite the use of new asset based lending and accounts receivable factoring techniques.  

On the other hand, a comprehensive business plan may be required by investment bankers for funding purposes; in exchange for a healthy percentage of your future large group practice. 

Standard Plan Format 

The following format for medical business plan writing can be used for every new practice, established practice or simply an existing practice that wishes to expand or establish a new service or product line to its existing offers.  

The format for any written business plan is somewhat standard. It usually contains at least the following topics and sub-topics, and perhaps many more depending on your specialty with a varying emphasis on some sections or a de-emphasis of others; also depending on the practice and covering no more than 25-40 numbered pages:

· Cover Sheet

· Table of Contents

· Physician Executive Summary (Statement of Purpose)

· Physician Credentials

· Mission Statement

· Goals and Objectives (Risks and Rewards)

· Business Office Form

· Operational and Facilities Management

· Marketing Plan

· Business Competition

· Patient Targeting

· Advertising Methodology

· SWOT Analysis

· Practice Philosophy

· Human Resources and Personnel

· Financial Management

· Financial and Operating Budget

· Proforma Financial Statements

· Exit Strategy

Assessment

In the past, perhaps the two most important components of a medical business plan were [1] physician credentials and [2] the business model. Today; it is the exit strategy! 

Have you ever written a medical office business plan and what was the outcome? 

Link: MBA Capstone Business Planning

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

 Product DetailsProduct DetailsProduct Details     

 Product Details

***

Financial Ratio Liquidity Analysis for Medical Accounts Receivable

Join Our Mailing List

Understanding Vital Balance Sheet and Income Statement Components

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™

By Dr. Gary L. Bode; MSA, CPA, CMP™ [Hon]

Dr. Gary L. Bode CPA MSAFinancial ratios are derived from components of the balance sheet and income statement. These short and long-term financial ratio values are “benchmarked” to values obtained in medical practice management surveys that become industry standards. Often they become de facto economic indicators of entity viability, and should be monitored by all financial executives regularly.

Defining Terms

One of the most useful liquidity ratiosrelated to ARs is the current ratio. It is mathematically defined as: current assets/current liabilities. The current ratio is important since it measures short-term solvency, or the daily bill-paying ability of a medical practice, clinic  or hospital; etc.  Current assets include cash on hand (COH), and cash in checking accounts, money market accounts, money market deposit accounts, US Treasury bills, inventory, pre-paid expenses, and the percentage of ARs that can be reasonably expected to be collected. Current liabilitiesare notes payable within one year. This ratio should be at least 1, or preferably in the range of about 1.2 to 1.8 for medical practices.

Other Ratios

The quick ratiois similar to the current ratio. However, unlike the current ratio, the quick ratio does not include money tied up in inventory, since rapid conversion to cash might not be possible in an economic emergency. A reasonable quick ratio would be 1.0 – 1.3 for a hospital, since this ratio is a more stringent indicator of liquidity than the current ratio.

Assessment

A point of emphasis in the case of both the current ratio and the quick ratio is that higher is not necessarily better. Higher ratios denote a greater capacity to pay bills as they come due, but they also indicate that the entity has more cash tied up in assets that have a relatively low rate of earnings. Hence, there is an optimum range for both ratios: they should be neither too low nor too high.

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

DICTIONARIES: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko
PHYSICIANS: www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com
PRACTICES: www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com
HOSPITALS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781466558731
CLINICS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439879900
BLOG: www.MedicalExecutivePost.com
FINANCE: Financial Planning for Physicians and Advisors
INSURANCE: Risk Management and Insurance Strategies for Physicians and Advisors

Product DetailsProduct DetailsProduct Details

Product Details  Product Details

   Product Details 

Activity Based Medical Cost Accounting and Management

NON-TRADITIONAL ACCOUNTING METHODS KNOWN IN THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY BUT NOT USED IN HOSPITALS OR HEALTH CARE ORGANIZATIONS

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA CMP® CPHQ

CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Sooner or later – as a practicing physician – you will want to ascertain and then demonstrate the cost effectiveness of your medical care. By using the process of Activity Based Cost (ABC) Management, you will be able to do so.  

ALAS: But, if you’re using a traditional accounting system – like most all hospitals today that use the fictional “average wholesale cost” method – you won’t know a thing about your medical practice or clinic activity costs. Hence, again like most all hospitals, fees become simply vacuous.

Managerial Accounting Assignment Help in Australia

Here’s how: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2007/12/15/activity-based-cost-medical-management/

HOW TO READ A SCIENTIFIC PAPER: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/04/09/how-to-read-and-understand-a-scientific-paper/

DETAILED WHITE PAPERIN-PROGRESS [thru editing but before peer-reviewed publication]: https://healthcarefinancials.files.wordpress.com/2007/12/abcm.pdf

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.amazon.com/Business-Medical-Practice-Transformational-Doctors/dp/0826105750/ref=sr_1_9?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1287563112&sr=1-9

Product Details
Product Details

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.amazon.com/Financial-Management-Strategies-Healthcare-Organizations/dp/1466558733/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1380743521&sr=8-3&keywords=david+marcinko

THANK YOU

***

Medical Practice Human Resource Budgets

Join Our Mailing List

Seeking Optimal FTE-to-Doctor Ratios

 [DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA]

The full-time-equivalent (FTE) – to doctor (provider) – ratio of a medical practice is often more useful to know than the total amount of staff salary expense, according to industry experts like Dr. Jon Hultman MBA, of Los Angeles, CA.  

Why? Because comparable salaries have a wide geographic variance; and it is just more expensive to practice in New York City, than it is in Phenix City, Alabama.  

Introduction 

Payroll (human resources) typically is the largest singe expense and cost-driver of most medical practices. So, an optimal staffing ratio must be determined for every practice, considering quality, productivity and patient satisfaction at the lowest possible cost.

Reducing the FTE ratio, and hence overhead salary expenses, is desirable only when it does not lower productivity, quality or patient satisfaction. 

Most FTE ratios are significantly high, with no corresponding benefit to the typical medical practice (if there even is such an entity).

Moreover, this FTE excess establishes an environment for which “idle-time” for any given point is about 30%. And, corresponding redundant or unnecessary “task-time” is about 25%. 

In fact, it is often a management truism that smaller FTE ratios may be consistent with higher levels of productivity. On the other hand, lower FTE ratios may actually be consistent with lower levels of productivity, lower medical care quality and higher costs; all other things being equal. 

 The NAHC Review

The National Association of Healthcare Consultants (NAHC), Statistical Report 2000, is summarized below and was considered reliable at the time because the numbers were reported by accountants, not doctors. More current information is now available.

Nevertheless, these benchmarks may serve as a cogent starting-point for HR budget analysis and FTE evaluation:

Specialty                                FTE Ratio 

  • Ophthalmology                     5.19
  • OB/GYN                                 4.35
  • Dermatology                         4.30
  • Otolaryngology                     4.22
  • Hematology                          4.19
  • Oncology                               4.19
  • Family Practice                      4.18
  • Orthopedic Surgery               4.12
  • Pediatrics                              3.79
  • Gastroenterology                  3.75
  • Internal Medicine                  3.51
  • Dentistry                               3.00
  • Urology                                 2.94
  • Podiatry                                2.94
  • Neurology                             2.70
  • General Surgery                   2.50

Assessment

Now, consider the specialty FTE-to-physician ratios listed above – index them over time for your medical specialty – and consider that famed investor Warren Buffett once said,

“There is a right size of staff for any business operation. For every dollar of sales (professional service income), there is an appropriate level of expense.”  

And so, how does your medical practice, clinic or healthcare organization stack-up to current NAHC benchmarks and their resulting HR budgets?

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Product Details

PODCAST: Healthcare Stocks, Investing & IPOs?

By Eric Bricker MD

Healthcare Stock and IPO Investing Can Be Confusing. The Story of Privia Health is a Good Case Study in Understanding the Underlying Economics in Healthcare Investing:

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

***

***
YOUR COMMENTS ARE APPRECIATED.

Thank You

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

ORDER: https://www.routledge.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-for-Doctors-and-Advisors-Best/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781482240283

***

Employer Healthcare Cost Management Techniques

On Medical Cost Containment

By http://www.MCOL.com

***

***

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements.

Book Marcinko: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

Subscribe: MEDICAL EXECUTIVE POST for curated news, essays, opinions and analysis from the public health, economics, finance, marketing, IT, business and policy management ecosystem.

Product DetailsProduct Details

***

CASH FLOW ANALYSIS: Real Life ACO Accounting Example

ACCOUNTABLE CARE ORGANIZATION EXAMPLE

Touring with Marcinko | The Leading Business Education ...

BY DR. DAVID EDWARD MARCINKO MBA CMP®

CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

What is an ACO?

ACOs are groups of doctors, hospitals, and other health care providers, who come together voluntarily to give coordinated high-quality care to their Medicare patients. The goal of coordinated care is to ensure that patients get the right care at the right time, while avoiding unnecessary duplication of services and preventing medical errors.

When an ACO succeeds both in delivering high-quality care and spending health care dollars more wisely, the ACO will share in the savings it achieves for the Medicare program.

Citation: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Case Model

Now, suppose that in a new Accountable Care Organization [ACO] contract, a certain medical practice was awarded a new global payment or capitation styled contract that increased revenues by $100,000 for the next fiscal year. The practice had a gross margin of 35% that was not expected to change because of the new business. However, $10,000 was added to medical overhead expenses for another assistant and all Account’s Receivable (AR) are paid at the end of the year, upon completion of the contract.

Cost of Medical Services Provided (COMSP):

The Costs of Medical Services Provided (COMSP) for the ACO business contract represents the amount of money needed to service the patients provided by the contract.  Since gross margin is 35% of revenues, the COMSP is 65% or $65,000.  Adding the extra overhead results in $75,000 of new spending money (cash flow) needed to treat the patients. Therefore, divide the $75,000 total by the number of days the contract extends (one year) and realize the new contract requires about $ 205.50 per day of free cash flows.

Assumptions

Financial cash flow forecasting from operating activities allows a reasonable projection of future cash needs and enables the doctor to err on the side of fiscal prudence. It is an inexact science, by definition, and entails the following assumptions:

  • All income tax, salaries and Accounts Payable (AP) are paid at once.
  • Durable medical equipment inventory and pre-paid advertising remain constant.
  • Gains/losses on sale of equipment and depreciation expenses remain stable.
  • Gross margins remain constant.
  • The office is efficient so major new marginal costs will not be incurred.

Physician Reactions:

Since many physicians are still not entirely comfortable with global reimbursement, fixed payments, capitation or ACO reimbursement contracts; practices may be loath to turn away short-term business in the ACA era.  Physician-executives must then determine other methods to generate the additional cash, which include the following general suggestions:

1. Extend Account’s Payable

Discuss your cash flow difficulties with vendors and emphasize their short-term nature. A doctor and her practice still has considerable cache’ value, especially in local communities, and many vendors are willing to work them to retain their business

2. Reduce Accounts Receivable

According to most cost surveys, about 30% of multi-specialty group’s accounts receivable (ARs) are unpaid at 120 days. In addition, multi-specialty groups are able to collect on only about 69% of charges. The rest was written off as bad debt expenses or as a result of discounted payments from Medicare and other managed care companies. In a study by Wisconsin based Zimmerman and Associates, the percentages of ARs unpaid at more than 90 days is now at an all time high of more than 40%. Therefore, multi-specialty groups should aim to keep the percentage of ARs unpaid for more than 120 days, down to less than 20% of the total practice. The safest place to be for a single specialty physician is probably in the 30-35% range as anything over that is just not affordable.

The slowest paid specialties (ARs greater than 120 days) are: multi-specialty group practices; family practices; cardiology groups; anesthesiology groups; and gastroenterologists, respectively. So work hard to get your money, faster. Factoring, or selling the ARs to a third party for an immediate discounted amount is not usually recommended.

3. Borrow with Short-Term Bridge Loans

Obtain a line of credit from your local bank, credit union or other private sources, if possible in an economically constrained environment. Beware the time value of money, personal loan guarantees, and onerous usury rates. Also, beware that lenders can reduce or eliminate credit lines to a medical practice, often at the most inopportune time.

4. Cut Expenses

While this is often possible, it has to be done without demoralizing the practice’s staff.

5.  Reduce Supply Inventories

If prudently possible; remember things like minimal shipping fees, loss of revenue if you run short, etc.

6. Taxes

Do not stop paying withholding taxes in favor of cash flow because it is illegal.

Hyper-Growth Model:

Now, let us again suppose that the practice has attracted nine more similar medical contracts. If we multiple the above example tenfold, the serious nature of potential cash flow problem becomes apparent. In other words, the practice has increased revenues to one million dollars, with the same 35% margin, 65% COMSP and $100,000 increase in operating overhead expenses.  Using identical mathematical calculations, we determine that $750,000 / 365days equals $2,055.00 per day of needed new free cash flows!  Hence, indiscriminate growth without careful contract evaluation and cash flow analysis is a prescription for potential financial disaster.

ASSESSMENT: Your comments are appreciated.

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

CONTACT: Ann Miller RN MH

[Executive Director]

THANK YOU

BUSINESS: https://www.amazon.com/Business-Medical-Practice-Transformational-Doctors/dp/0826105750/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1448163039&sr=8-9&keywords=david+marcinko

***

Understanding Professional Medical Employer Organizations

Join Our Mailing List PROFESSIONAL Human Resources Options

By Eric Galtress

“In-house service and support activities are monopolies.  They have little incentive to improve productivity. In fact, they have considerable disincentive to improve their productivity. Clerical, maintenance and support work, do not make a direct and measurable contribution to the bottom line.”

       “Sell the Mailroom” by Peter F. Drucker

 ***

Labor Law

Labor Law compliance begins with the hire of your very first employee, thus a well managed human resources (HR) function should be an area of strategic focus by the medical executive, regardless of practice size or the number of employees. Consideration of this vital role can help contribute to an efficient, highly effective and productive professional staff committed to the goals of the practice encompassing a positive and nurturing culture evident to your patients, while maintaining your competitive edge.

HR

Human Resources are the major expense driver of today’s medical practice and addresses staffing requirements, wages and other compensation, payroll and tax compliance, labor law compliance, employee benefits, training, employee turnover, safety, risk management and workers’ compensation. These responsibilities must be performed in accordance with State and Federal guidelines, beginning with the hire of your very first employee.

At specific employee level thresholds, employers are required to comply with a growing number of employee-related requirements including State and Federal Laws.  These laws govern the proper method of how employees must be treated and paid, as well as ensuring that their rights in the workplace are protected. State and Federal Regulators each create vast amounts of workplace legislation every year, many of which become law.

In most cases, the specific requirement (either State or Federal) that affords the employee the most workplace rights and/or protection and benefits takes precedence over the other.  Non-compliance can subject the practitioner/business owner to hefty fines, penalties, business interruption, litigation, and in some cases, even practice failure.

Moreover, these HR efforts are backed by labor attorneys, service providers, brokers and other consultants. Given the typical size of a medical practice, this presents a compelling argument that practices should consider taking advantage of an innovative alternative:  being able to delegate (outsource) part or most of the HR burden as well as the employee / employer related liabilities.

Outsourcing

Simply put, instead of the practitioner/staff performing the HR requirements, part or most of this responsibility can be outsourced to an off-site HR services provider that specializes in labor law compliance, employee management and cost control. The practitioner retains functional control of the employees and the service provider handles the HR issues.

Added value is achieved by the practice in receiving these services more cost effectively since their needs are combined with those of the many other practices and businesses the provider already serves. Outsourcing is a matter of simple economics, enabling the practitioner to gain relief from cumbersome employee administration, while enhancing productivity and benefits for the staff members.

The HR outsourcing relationship is not to be confused with a Physician Practice Management Company (PPMC).  The HR services provider has no financial interest or ownership whatsoever in the practice.

***

student-849825_640

 ***

DEFINITIONS

To have an outside firm take responsibility and much of the liability to perform activities traditionally handled by internal staff and resources because:

  1. They can do it cheaper and/or faster.
  2. They can do it better because of their expertise and experience.
  3. They have all of the required professional staff and/or facilities.
  4. They take all or part of the risk and the liability to do it right.
  5. They can expand their service offering commensurate with your growth needs
  6. They save you the time of doing it yourself or having one or more of your key staff members distracted from the priorities of the practice.
  7. They help safeguard against chaos should the key person handling HR suddenly leave
  8. They help maintain the high standards of the practice with regard to the employees and the workplace.
  9. Outsourcing can benefit all parties.

Human resource management

In general, HR management consists of the activities, responsibilities and issues of any practice/business, corporation, partnership or other business entity that comes as a result of having employees (IRS1099 independent contractors are not considered employees).

Some of these requirements are mandatory such as paying minimum wage and providing workers’ compensation insurance protection; other aspects and their related administrative functions can be at the discretion of the owner(s) of the practice or business such as sponsoring health benefits, retirement plans for their employees or paid vacation and sick time.

Employer POV

What follows is an overview of the HR requirements of being the employer. This includes a condensed view of employment and labor laws, government compliance issues, employee related costs and the alarming upsurge in employee litigation. The last poses a growing level of liability, vulnerability and distraction to today’s medical executive and practitioner/owner, second only to that of medical malpractice.

Assessment

As a result, many physicians without available HR expertise are finding it increasingly difficult to focus on growing their practices.

More:

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

***

[PRIVATE MEDICAL PRACTICE BUSINESS MANAGEMENT TEXTBOOK – 3rd.  Edition]

Product DetailsProduct Details

  [Foreword Dr. Hashem MD PhD] *** [Foreword Dr. Silva MD MBA]

***

New Medical Informed Consent Dilemma

Join Our Mailing List

Emerging Problems

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™

[Publisher-in-Chief]dem21

According to the Dictionary of Health Insurance and Managed Care, informed consent is the oral and written communication process between a patient and physician that results in the agreement to undergo a particular procedure, surgical intervention or medical treatment.

Unfortunately, a lack of standardization surrounding this process represents a major risk for patients and surgeons, and may lead to inaccurate patient expectations, lost or incomplete consent forms, missing encounter documentation and delays in critical surgeries and procedures.

History: Render S. Davis of Emory University [2008 recipient of the Health Care Ethics Consortium’s Heroes in Healthcare Ethics Award] writes for us in the Business of Medical Practice www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com that the concept of informed consent is rooted in medical ethics and codified as a legal principle. It is based on the assertion that a competent person has the right to determine what is done to him or her [self-regulated autonomy].

Rationale: The American Medical Association recommends that its members disclose and discuss the following with their patients:  

  • The patient’s diagnosis, if known,
  • The nature and purpose of a proposed treatment or procedure,
  • The risks and benefits of a proposed treatment or procedure,
  • Alternatives (regardless of cost or health insurance coverage),
  • The risks and benefits of the alternative treatments and,
  • The risks and benefits of not the procedure.

The requirements for informed consent are spelled out in statutes and case law in all 50 states. It is a necessary protocol for all hospitals, medical clinics, podiatry practices and ASCs.

Inadequacy of Traditional Consent Forms-to-Date

The typical informed consent process, particularly one that relies solely on traditional generic consent forms, is often inadequate, incomplete or offers the potential for not fully explaining and documenting a particular procedure to a given patient. 

Traditional consent forms are subject to errors and omissions, such as missing signatures (patient, provider or witness), missing procedure(s), and missing dates that place the validity of consent at risk. Lost or misplaced forms may result in delayed or postponed procedures often at the expensive of costly operating room time. Moreover, far too many forms are generic in nature and wholly unsuited for a specific patient or increasingly sophisticated medical procedure.

Patient Safety Background

According to the Institute of Medicine’s [IOM] repot, To Err is Human, more than 1 million injuries and nearly 100,000 deaths occur annually in the United States due to mistakes in medical care. Wrong patient, wrong-side, wrong-procedure and wrong-toe surgery are particularly egregious. In fact, these are among several other “never-events” that Medicare, and an increasing number of private insurance companies are refusing to reimburse.

Based on the need to make healthcare safer, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) undertook a study to identify patient safety issues and develop recommendations for “best practices”.

AHRQ Evidence Report

The AHRQ report identified the challenge of addressing shortcomings such as missed, incomplete or not fully comprehended informed consent, as a significant patient safety opportunity for improvement.

The authors of the AHRQ report hypothesized that better informed patients “are less likely to experience errors by acting as another layer of protection.” And, the AHRQ study ranked a more interactive informed consent process among the top 11 practices supporting more widespread implementation.

General Accounting Office report found that malpractice insurance premiums were relatively flat for most of the 1990’s, but projections began to increase dramatically to 2010.

Results of Improper Informed Consent

Failure to obtain adequate informed consent, depending on state law, may place surgeons, resident, fellows, ambulatory and office surgery centers, medical clinics and hospitals at risk for litigation ranging from medical negligence to assault and battery.

Proceedings Involving Informed Consent

Informed consent is often a factor in medical malpractice litigation. Some attorneys note that physicians are liable, and that plaintiffs may be able to recover damages, in cases involving improper informed consent, even if the procedure is successful. Inadequate informed consent is often cited as a secondary cause in malpractice complaints and anecdotal evidence suggests this strategy may be especially pursued in podiatric malpractices cases.

Avoiding Litigation

The AMA advises its membership of the following regarding informed consent:  

“To protect yourself in litigation, in addition to carrying adequate liability insurance, it is important that the communications process itself be documented. Good documentation can serve as evidence in a court of the law that the process indeed took place. A timely and thorough documentation in the patient’s chart by the physician providing the treatment and/or performing the procedure can be a strong piece of evidence that the physician engaged the patient in an appropriate discussion.”

Impact of Comprehensive Informed Consent Forms

Another study found that providing informed consent information to patients in written form increased comprehension of the procedure. It was also hypothesized that: 

  • Better informed patients are more compliant with medical advice and recover faster.
  • Informed consent discussions strengthen physician-patient relationships and increase patients’ confidence in their doctor.
  • Well informed patients are more engaged in their own care, and are thus less likely to experience surgical errors than more passive, or less informed patients. 

Medical Ethics

The ethical foundation of informed consent is based on the creation of an environment that supports respect for patients and protects their right to autonomous, informed participation in all collaborative Healthcare 2.0 decisions. 

Assessment 

Thus, the essence of the informed consent problems of modern medicine today!

More: http://www.ePodiatryConsentForms.com 

Channel Surfing the ME-P

Have you visited our other topic channels? Established to facilitate idea exchange and link our community together, the value of these topics is dependent upon your input. Please take a minute to visit. And, to prevent that annoying spam, we ask that you register. It is fast, free and secure.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Product Details  Product Details

Population Health Management Integration

Join Our Mailing List

Of Medical and Pharmacy Benefits 

By http://www.MCOL.com

pop health

 Channel Surfing the ME-P

Have you visited our other topic channels? Established to facilitate idea exchange and link our community together, the value of these topics is dependent upon your input. Please take a minute to visit. And, to prevent that annoying spam, we ask that you register. It is fast, free and secure.

integration (1)

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Product DetailsProduct Details

A Glimpse into Lean Medical Management Tools and Techniques

Join Our Mailing List

A Very Brief Review

By Dr. Mark Matthews with Dr. David Marcinko MBA

As most medical and healthcare executives and consultants are aware, there are a few tools and techniques that are unique to the world of Lean process improvement and management.

These  include: Kaizen Events, The 5-S Technique, Standard Work, Visual Controls and Human Factors Engineering.

We will review the first two techniques in this ME-P. Of course, the last three are reviewed in much greater detail in our new book complete with checklists, figures, tables, drawings, graphs and other illustrations.

Kaizen Events

Kaizen is one of the most powerful tools in the Lean methodology. These events involve intense work sessions aimed at making concrete decisions in a short time period without the need for much data collection. Kaizen events are fairly narrow in scope, ideally concentrating on making one or two decisions at the most.

For example, there may be competing improvement ideas that require more exploration. Using a Kaizen event can provide the necessary structure to make the decision needed to move forward with implementation. The steps in a typical Kaizen Event often include:

  • Determine and define the objectives
  • Determine the current state of the process
  • Determine the requirements of the process
  • Create a plan for implementation
  • Implement the improvements
  • Check the effectiveness of the improvements
  • Document and standardize the improved process
  • Continue the cycle

The 5-S Technique

This technique was developed to allow employees to visually control their work area around visual management techniques. The principles involved in visual management include:

  • Improving workspace efficiency and productivity
  • Helping people share workstations by providing standard layouts
  • Reducing the time required to look for needed supplies or tools
  • Improving the work environment

Each “S” in 5S stands for a step in the process:

  • Sort – classify every item in the designated area as either needed or not needed
  • Set (Straighten) – put “everything in its place”
  • Shine (Sweep) – clean all work environments for order and organization
  • Standardize  – document what goes where, who will clean and who will inspect and on what schedule
  • Sustain-design a system for monitoring process, providing feedback, and rewarding good outcomes

Assessment

Prior to conducting a 5S event, a significant amount of planning is vital. It is important to scope the target area as something that is manageable, draw a physical map of the area under consideration [hospital, ED, OR, clinic, office, etc], and assemble a list of current items in that area. This is usually accomplished by taking photographs (both before and after) of the area.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Health Dictionary Series: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/product/9780826105752

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Hospitals: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439879900

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Buy from Amazon

Learn How to Profit and Thrive in the PP-ACA Era

BOOK FOREWORD / TESTIMONIAL

MEDICAL ETHICS: Managing Risk is a Component of Real Health Caring

Demanding High Moral Standards of Self … and Economic HEALTHCARE Organizations

Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

CMP logo

It has been argued that physicians have abdicated the “moral high ground” in health care by their interest in seeking protection for their high incomes, their highly publicized self-referral arrangements, and their historical opposition toward reform efforts that jeopardized their clinical autonomy. 

Experts Speak

In his book Medicine at the Crossroads, colleague and Emory University professor Melvin Konnor, MD noted that “throughout its history, organized medicine has represented, first and foremost, the pecuniary interests of doctors.” He lays significant blame for the present problems in health care at the doorstep of both insurers and doctors, stating that “the system’s ills are pervasive and all its participants are responsible.” 

In order to reclaim their once esteemed moral position, physicians must actively reaffirm their commitment to the highest standards of the medical profession and call on other participants in the health care delivery system also to elevate their values and standards to the highest level.

Evolution

In the evolutionary shifts in models for care, physicians have been asked to embrace business values of efficiency and cost effectiveness, sometimes at the expense of their professional judgment and personal values.  While some of these changes have been inevitable as our society sought to rein in out-of-control costs, it is not unreasonable for physicians to call on payers, regulators and other parties to the health care delivery system to raise their ethical bar. 

Harvard University physician-ethicist Linda Emmanuel noted that “health professionals are now accountable to business values (such as efficiency and cost effectiveness), so business persons should be accountable to professional values including kindness and compassion.” 

Within the framework of ethical principles, John La Puma, M.D., wrote in Managed Care Ethics, that “business’s ethical obligations are integrity and honesty.  Medicine’s are those plus altruism, beneficence, non-maleficence, respect, and fairness.”

Incumbent in these activities is the expectation that the forces that control our health care delivery system, the payers, the regulators, and the providers will reach out to the larger community, working to eliminate the inequities that have left so many Americans with limited access to even basic health care. 

Charles Dougherty clarified this obligation in Back to Reform, when he noted that “behind the daunting social reality stands a simple moral value that motivates the entire enterprise”. 

ASSESSMENT

Health care is indeed grounded in caring. And, managing risk is a component of caring. It arises from a sympathetic response to the suffering of others.

YOUR THOUGHTS ARE APPRECIATED

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Risk-Management-Liability-Insurance-and-Asset-Protection-Strategies-for/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781498725989

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

THANK YOU

***

Medical Workplace Violence Prevention Guidelines

Join Our Mailing List

Earliest Guidelines in California Program

By Eugene Schmuckler; PhD MBA MEd CTS

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA

UPDATE

At least 5 people are dead and multiple people are injured following a shooting at the Natalie Building at St. Francis Hospital in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Link: https://apnews.com/article/tulsa-oklahoma-c29a239d1c2ac7f7f0bfdc161b72f6f2

***

The impact of medical workplace violence became widely exposed on November 6, 2009 when 39 year old Army psychiatrist Maj. Nidal M. Hasan MD, a 1997 graduate of Virginia Tech University who received a medical doctorate in psychiatry from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland, and served as an intern, resident and fellow at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in the District of Columbia, went on a savage 100 round shooting spree and rampage that killed 13 people and injured 32 others. In April 2010 he was transferred to Bell County Jail in Belton, Texas awaiting trial.

Federal Government Guidelines

The federal government and some states have developed guidelines to assist employers with workplace violence prevention. For instance, one of the earliest sets of guidelines for a comprehensive workplace violence prevention program was published in 1993 by California OSHA. This resulted from the murder of a state employee. In 1996, Guidelines for Preventing Workplace Violence for Healthcare and Social Service Workers was published by OSHA.

Book Link:  www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com

OSHA Guidelines

In its guidelines, OSHA sets forth the following essential elements for developing a violence prevention program:

  • Management commitment — as seen by high-level management involvement and support for a written workplace violence prevention policy and its implementation.
  • Meaningful employee involvement — in policy development, joint management-worker violence prevention committees, post-assault counseling and debriefing, and follow-up are all critical program components.
  • Worksite analysis — includes regular walk-through surveys of all patient care areas and the collection and review of all reports of worker assault. A successful job hazard analysis must include strategies and policies for encouraging the reporting of all incidents of workplace violence, including verbal threats that do not result in physical injury.
  • Hazard prevention and control — includes the installation and maintenance of alarm systems in high-risk areas. It may also include the training and posting of security personnel in emergency departments. Adequate staffing is an essential hazard prevention measure, as is adequate lighting and control of access to staff offices and secluded work areas.
  • Pre-placement and periodic training and education — must include educationally appropriate information regarding the risk factors for violence in the healthcare environment and control measures available to prevent violent incidents. Training should include skills in aggressive behavior identification and management, especially for staff working in the mental health and emergency departments.

On May 17, 1999, Governor Gary Locke signed the New Workplace Violence Prevention Act for the state of Washington. This act mandates that each healthcare setting in the state implement a plan to reasonably prevent and protect employees from violence.

New Washington Workplace Violence Prevention Act

According to this act, prevention plans need to address security considerations related to:

  • physical attributes of the healthcare setting;
  • staffing, including security staffing;
  • personnel policies;
  • first aid and emergency procedures;
  • reporting of violent acts; and
  • employee education and training.

Prior to the development of an actual plan, a security and safety assessment needs to be conducted to identify existing or potential hazards. The training component of the plan must include the following topics:

  • general safety procedures;
  • personal safety procedures;
  • the violence escalation cycle;
  • violence-predicting factors;
  • means of obtaining a patient history form from a patient with violent behavior;
  • strategies to avoid physical harm;
  • restraining techniques;
  • appropriate use of medications as chemical restraints;
  • documenting and reporting incidents;
  • the process whereby employees affected by a violent act may debrief;
  •  any resources available to employee for coping with violence; and
  • the healthcare setting’s workplace violence prevention plan.

Assessment

The act further mandates that any hospital operated and maintained by the State of Washington for the care of the mentally ill is required to provide violence prevention training to affected employees identified in the plan on a regular basis and prior.

Front Matter: Front Matter BoMP – 3 

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

DICTIONARIES: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko
PHYSICIANS: www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com
PRACTICES: www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com
HOSPITALS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781466558731
CLINICS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439879900
BLOG: www.MedicalExecutivePost.com
FINANCE: Financial Planning for Physicians and Advisors
INSURANCE: Risk Management and Insurance Strategies for Physicians and Advisors

Product Details 

When Routine Medical Tests Trigger a Cascade of Costly, Unnecessary Care

By N.P.R

***

***

READ: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2022/06/13/1104141886/cascade-of-care?utm_source=pocket-newtab

***

COMMENTS APPRECIATED

Thank You

***

***

***

Business Plan for Creatives … and Doctors!

CMP logo

A Detailed Plan for Medical Professionals

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

***

***

MBA Business Plan CAPSTONE Outline

PODCAST Transcript: Podcast

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, urls and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

[PRIVATE MEDICAL PRACTICE BUSINESS MANAGEMENT TEXTBOOK – 3rd.  Edition]

Product DetailsProduct Details

  [Foreword Dr. Hashem MD PhD] *** [Foreword Dr. Silva MD MBA]

***

ENTREPRENEURIAL MANAGEMENT EFFICIENCY: “Slowly I Turned … Step by Step … Inch by Inch”

By Staff Writers

***

***

Venture capitalists who are in a rut should stop talking about how hard it is to raise a $100 million fund. Instead, raise a $5 million fund.

Rather, they should stop trying to invest $5 million at a time (with an 18-month window before going public). A better strategy is to start doing smaller investments with longer time horizons.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/082610254

Just like chili, low and slow is the way to maximum flavor.

READ: https://tinyurl.com/2ewwvz2c

***

COMMENTS APPRECIATED

Thank You

***

***

%d bloggers like this: