• Member Statistics

    • 847,264 Colleagues-to-Date [Sponsored by a generous R&D grant from iMBA, Inc.]
  • David E. Marcinko [Editor-in-Chief]

    As a former Dean and appointed University Professor and Endowed Department Chair, Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA was a NYSE broker and investment banker for a decade who was respected for his unique perspectives, balanced contrarian thinking and measured judgment to influence key decision makers in strategic education, health economics, finance, investing and public policy management.

    Dr. Marcinko is originally from Loyola University MD, Temple University in Philadelphia and the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in PA; as well as Oglethorpe University and Emory University in Georgia, the Atlanta Hospital & Medical Center; Kellogg-Keller Graduate School of Business and Management in Chicago, and the Aachen City University Hospital, Koln-Germany. He became one of the most innovative global thought leaders in medical business entrepreneurship today by leveraging and adding value with strategies to grow revenues and EBITDA while reducing non-essential expenditures and improving dated operational in-efficiencies.

    Professor David Marcinko was a board certified surgical fellow, hospital medical staff President, public and population health advocate, and Chief Executive & Education Officer with more than 425 published papers; 5,150 op-ed pieces and over 135+ domestic / international presentations to his credit; including the top ten [10] biggest drug, DME and pharmaceutical companies and financial services firms in the nation. He is also a best-selling Amazon author with 30 published academic text books in four languages [National Institute of Health, Library of Congress and Library of Medicine].

    Dr. David E. Marcinko is past Editor-in-Chief of the prestigious “Journal of Health Care Finance”, and a former Certified Financial Planner® who was named “Health Economist of the Year” in 2010. He is a Federal and State court approved expert witness featured in hundreds of peer reviewed medical, business, economics trade journals and publications [AMA, ADA, APMA, AAOS, Physicians Practice, Investment Advisor, Physician’s Money Digest and MD News] etc.

    Later, Dr. Marcinko was a vital and recruited BOD  member of several innovative companies like Physicians Nexus, First Global Financial Advisors and the Physician Services Group Inc; as well as mentor and coach for Deloitte-Touche and other start-up firms in Silicon Valley, CA.

    As a state licensed life, P&C and health insurance agent; and dual SEC registered investment advisor and representative, Marcinko was Founding Dean of the fiduciary and niche focused CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER® chartered professional designation education program; as well as Chief Editor of the three print format HEALTH DICTIONARY SERIES® and online Wiki Project.

    Dr. David E. Marcinko’s professional memberships included: ASHE, AHIMA, ACHE, ACME, ACPE, MGMA, FMMA, FPA and HIMSS. He was a MSFT Beta tester, Google Scholar, “H” Index favorite and one of LinkedIn’s “Top Cited Voices”.

    Marcinko is “ex-officio” and R&D Scholar-on-Sabbatical for iMBA, Inc. who was recently appointed to the MedBlob® [military encrypted medical data warehouse and health information exchange] Advisory Board.

    entrepreneur

    Frontal_lobe_animation

  • ME-P Information & Content Channels

  • ME-P Archives Silo [2006 – 2021]

  • Ann Miller RN MHA [Managing Editor]

    ME-P SYNDICATIONS:
    WSJ.com,
    CNN.com,
    Forbes.com,
    WashingtonPost.com,
    BusinessWeek.com,
    USNews.com, Reuters.com,
    TimeWarnerCable.com,
    e-How.com,
    News Alloy.com,
    and Congress.org

    Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners(TM)

    Product Details

    Product Details

    Product Details

  • CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER® program

    New "Self-Directed" Study Option SinceJanuary 1, 2020
  • Most Recent ME-Ps

  • PodiatryPrep.org


    BOARD CERTIFICATION EXAM STUDY GUIDES
    Lower Extremity Trauma
    [Click on Image to Enlarge]

  • ME-P Free Advertising Consultation

    The “Medical Executive-Post” is about connecting doctors, health care executives and modern consulting advisors. It’s about free-enterprise, business, practice, policy, personal financial planning and wealth building capitalism. We have an attitude that’s independent, outspoken, intelligent and so Next-Gen; often edgy, usually controversial. And, our consultants “got fly”, just like U. Read it! Write it! Post it! “Medical Executive-Post”. Call or email us for your FREE advertising and sales consultation TODAY [770.448.0769]

    Product Details

    Product Details

  • Medical & Surgical e-Consent Forms

    ePodiatryConsentForms.com
  • iMBA R&D Services

    Commission a Subject Matter Expert Report [$2500-$9999]January 1, 2020
    Medical Clinic Valuations * Endowment Fund Management * Health Capital Formation * Investment Policy Statement Analysis * Provider Contracting & Negotiations * Marketplace Competition * Revenue Cycle Enhancements; and more! HEALTHCARE FINANCIAL INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX
  • iMBA Inc., OFFICES

    Suite #5901 Wilbanks Drive, Norcross, Georgia, 30092 USA [1.770.448.0769]. Our location is real and we are now virtually enabled to assist new long distance clients and out-of-town colleagues.

  • ME-P Publishing

  • SEEKING INDUSTRY INFO PARTNERS?

    If you want the opportunity to work with leading health care industry insiders, innovators and watchers, the “ME-P” may be right for you? We are unbiased and operate at the nexus of theoretical and applied R&D. Collaborate with us and you’ll put your brand in front of a smart & tightly focused demographic; one at the forefront of our emerging healthcare free marketplace of informed and professional “movers and shakers.” Our Ad Rate Card is available upon request [770-448-0769].

  • Reader Comments, Quips, Opinions, News & Updates

  • Start-Up Advice for Businesses, DRs and Entrepreneurs

    ImageProxy “Providing Management, Financial and Business Solutions for Modernity”
  • Up-Trending ME-Ps

  • Capitalism and Free Enterprise Advocacy

    Whether you’re a mature CXO, physician or start-up entrepreneur in need of management, financial, HR or business planning information on free markets and competition, the "Medical Executive-Post” is the online place to meet for Capitalism 2.0 collaboration. Support our online development, and advance our onground research initiatives in free market economics, as we seek to showcase the brightest Next-Gen minds. THE ME-P DISCLAIMER: Posts, comments and opinions do not necessarily represent iMBA, Inc., but become our property after submission. Copyright © 2006 to-date. iMBA, Inc allows colleges, universities, medical and financial professionals and related clinics, hospitals and non-profit healthcare organizations to distribute our proprietary essays, photos, videos, audios and other documents; etc. However, please review copyright and usage information for each individual asset before submission to us, and/or placement on your publication or web site. Attestation references, citations and/or back-links are required. All other assets are property of the individual copyright holder.
  • OIG Fraud Warnings

    Beware of health insurance marketplace scams OIG's Most Wanted Fugitives at oig.hhs.gov

On Accounting -VERSUS- Economic Profit

Yes – There is A Difference

[By staff reporters]

***

***

***

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

***

Congress Passes Permanent Tax Provisions

Join Our Mailing List

By Cindy Freking CPA

[Tax Manager ]

cfreking@whirleyproactive.com

Late on December 15th, a bipartisan agreement was reached on tax extenders—i.e., the 50 or so temporary tax provisions that are routinely extended by Congress on a one- or two-year basis—and numerous other tax provisions in the “Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act of 2015” (the Act). This agreement makes permanent many of the individual and business extenders and contains provisions on Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs), IRS administration and the Tax Courts and miscellaneous other provisions.

Below are some provisions that have been made permanent:

DEPRECIATION & EXPENSING PROVISIONS

  • The Act makes permanent the $500,000 expensing limitation and $2 million phase out amounts under Code Section 179
  • For property placed in service after Dec 31, 2015, the Act provides that air conditioning and heating units are now eligible for expensing
  • Assets for which the De Minimis election applies are not counted in determining the Code Section 179 expensing election or the ceiling
  • 15 Year Write off for Qualified Leasehold , Retail Improvements & Restaurant Property

INDIVIDUALS

  • American Opportunity Credit
  • Enhanced Earned Income Tax Credit
  • Above the line Educator Expenses
  • Exclusion for Employer Provided Mass Transit & Parking
  • State and Local Sales deduction
  • Liberalized rules for Qualified Conservation Contributions
  • Nontaxable IRA transfers to eligible charities

BUSINESSES

  • Research & Development credit & offset now available against taxes in addition to income taxes
  • Reduction in S-Corporation recognition period for Built in Gains Tax
  • Exclusion of 100% Gain on certain small business stock
  • Enhanced deduction for Food Inventory
  • Differential Wage Payment Credit (active duty employees)

Assessment

The above provides a brief overview of the Act. There are various provisions that have been extended through 2016 and 2019 and other miscellaneous provisions. If you need additional information or have questions, please contact your CPA.

***

IRS

***

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

***

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

***

PERSONAL FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING AND INCOME TAXATION FOR DOCTORs

Join Our Mailing List

A SPECIAL ME-P REPORT

[The Ethical Pursuit of Tax Reduction and Avoidance]

perry-dalessio-cpa

[By Perry D’Alessio CPA]

The objective of tax planning is to arrive at the lowest overall tax cost on the activities performed.  In as much as physicians constitute 14% of the so-called and maligned “one-percenters” [$388,905 earned-not passive income/year]; this essay will address some methods and strategies to reduce federal and state income taxes. It is applicable to all physicians and medical professionals; as independent practitioners or employees.

So, how much in income taxes do the wealthy pay? The top 10 percent of taxpayers paid over 70 percent of the total amount collected in federal income taxes in 2010, the latest year figures are available, according to the Tax Foundation, a think tank that advocates for lower taxes. That’s up from 55 percent in 1986. The remaining 90 percent bore just under 30 percent of the tax burden. And, 47 percent of all Americans pay hardly anything at all.

Realize, that’s just federal income tax and doesn’t include payroll tax for Social Security and Medicare (which the vast majority of people pay), plus state taxes and all of the other taxes we face. When you add them all together; using figures from the Tax Policy Center and the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy. Earners in the top 1 percent pay about 43 percent of their incomes in tax. People in the middle quintile pay 25 percent while the poorest fifth pays 13 percent.

Finally, before you assume these one- and 10-percenters are living on luxury yachts and in million-dollar mansions, consider how little money it takes to be a top wage earner.

According to 2011 IRS data, the top 1 percent have adjusted gross incomes of $388,905 per year or more. To be in the top 10 percent, you need an adjusted gross income of just $120,136 or more. These are good incomes to be sure, but definitely not enough to be out work, or the medical office, for more than a few weeks each year.

***

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners(TM)

***

Now consider the following more specifically:

  • 42 percent of all federal tax revenue came from individual income taxes in 2010 and it has been the largest single source of revenue since 1950.
  • Individuals paid more than $2.2 trillion in 2010.
  • Bush-era tax cuts have finally expired, giving us the 20th century tax rates with the top income tax rate of 39.6%, we have not seen rates this high in almost 15 years.
  • 39.6% tax rate kicks in at $400,000 for individual taxpayers and $450,000 for married couples filing jointly.
  • Taxpayers who make over $200,000 ($250,000 for married taxpayers) will be subject to the Medicare surtax. If that’s you, Medicare surtax will be tacked on to your wages, compensation, or self-employment income over that amount. The amount of the surcharge is .9%. 
  • Net Investment Income Tax (NIIT) new as of 2013; if you have both net investment income and modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) of at least $200,000 for an individual taxpayer and $250,000 for taxpayers filing as married an additional 3.8 percent of the net investment income is an added tax. 

ASSESMENT

So, where do you fall on this schematic, doctor?

Channel Surfing

Have you visited our other topic channels? Established to facilitate idea exchange and link our community together, the value of these topics is dependent upon your input. Please take a minute to visit. And, to prevent that annoying spam, we ask that you register.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

ABOUT

Perry D’Alessio has twenty years’ experience in public accounting. He specializes in the taxation of closely held businesses and their owners, as well as high wealth individuals. He has a broad range of experience that includes individual, corporate, partnership, fiduciary, estate, and gift taxation. Business development has also been a focus. Particularly in the Healthcare and Fitness Industry, he worked with successful entities whose emphasis was on growth through development of strategic relationships and unit building.  Mr.  D’Alessio received his Bachelor of Business Administration degree in Accounting from Baruch College. He is a Certified Public Accountant in New York. He is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA), the New York State Society of Certified Public Accountants (NYSSCPA). He served on several New York State Society tax committees including: PCAOB and HealthCare. Mr. D’Alessio presents at financial and medical associations throughout the region, and authored a book chapter in the “Financial Management Strategies for Hospitals and Healthcare Organizations” for the Institute of Medical Business Advisors, Inc.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

Understanding Healthcare Employment Benefits that are NOT Taxed at Full Economic Value

Join Our Mailing List 

On Entirely Legal AUTOMOBILE Employment Fringe Benefit Strategies 

[By Perry Dalessio CPA]

perry-dalessio-cpaWhen an employment fringe benefit does not qualify for exclusion under a specific statute or regulation, the benefit is considered taxable to the recipient.  It is included in wages for withholding and employment-tax purposes, at the excess of its fair market value over any amount paid by the employee for the benefit.

Examples:

For example, hospitals often provide automobiles for use by employees. Treasury regulations exclude from income the value of the following types of vehicles’ use by an employee:

  • Vehicles not available for the personal use of an employee by reason of a written policy statement of the employer
  • Vehicles not available to an employee for personal use other than commuting (although in this case commuting is includable)
  • Vehicles used in connection with the business of farming [in which case the exclusion is equal to the value of an arbitrary 75% of the total availability for use, and the value of the balance may be includable or excludable, depending upon the facts (Treas. Regs. § 1.132-5(g)) involved)]
  • Certain vehicles identified in the regulations as “qualified non-personal-use vehicles,” which by reason of their design do not lend themselves to more than a de minimus amount of personal use by an employee [examples are ambulances and hearses].
  • Vehicles provided for qualified automobile demonstration use
  • Vehicles provided for product testing and evaluation by an employee outside the employer’s work place

If the employer-provided vehicle does not fall into one of the excluded categories, then the employee is required to report his personal use as a taxable benefit. The value of the availability for personal use may be determined under one of several approaches.

jag346_SWHT

Assessment

Under any of the approaches, the after-tax cost to the employee is substantially less than if the employee used his or her own dollars to purchase the automobile and then deducted a portion of the cost as a business expense.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Product Details  Product Details

Product Details

Social Media for Accountants

Join Our Mailing List

A Brief Audio Teaser

By @PhilBumann – #AcctgChat

Accountants are an important part of healthcare organizations and economies. Whether they work in private practice, corporate enterprise or government, accounts do have vital perspectives and understandings of the language of business.

The Accounting profession has been slow to adopt social and other digital software, but there are value propositions that these financial professionals ought to consider.

This SoundCloud is a brief tease of why accountants should intelligently consider the use of social media to further their professional development, find and strengthen connections, and even market (in a human way) their services.

Assessment

Not the sexiest topic, but even accountants can get something out of social media. The hashtag that has been around for years is #AcctgChat. Tell your accountant friends.

Link:  http://soundcloud.com/philbaumann/social-media-for-accountants

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Product DetailsProduct DetailsProduct Details

Product Details  Product Details

Product Details

Financial Planning and Risk Management Strategies for Physicians

Financial Planning Handbook for Physicians and Advisors

Product Details

 • http://www.jblearning.com/catalog/9780763745790/

Insurance Planning and Risk Management Strategies for Physicians and Advisors

Product Details

http://www.jblearning.com/catalog/9780763733421/

ADVERTISEMENT

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com and http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko

Lehman Brothers Autopsy

Repo 105 and Why Auditors Have Some “Splainen to Do”

Join Our Mailing List

[By Staff Reporters]

According to ProPublica on March 16, 2010 on 9:07 am EDT, a post-mortem report on Lehman Brothers revealed a shady accounting maneuver through which the bank hid its financial troubles for nearly a decade.

Pleading Ignorance

In this repot, Marian Wang takes a closer look at the parties pleading ignorance and the auditors who admit they knew, but insist they did no wrong.

Assessment

Link: http://www.propublica.org/ion/bailout/item/lehman-brothers-autopsy-repo-105-explained-auditors-in-trouble

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest ME-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Product Details  Product Details

Proactive Medical Accounts Receivable Monitoring

Forewarned is Forearmed

Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP™

By Dr. Gary L. Bode; MSA, CPA, CMP™

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

All hospitals, medical clinics, healthcare entities, and doctors are aware that accounts receivable (ARs) represent money that is owed to them, usually by a patient, insurance company, health maintenance organization (HMO), Medicare, Medicaid, or other third party payor. In the reimbursement climate that exists today, it is not unusual for ARs to represent 75% of a hospital’s investments in current assets. And, a medical practice may have ARs in the range of several hundred thousand dollars. ARs are a major source of cash flow, and cash flow is the life-blood of any healthcare entity. It pays bills, meets office payroll, and satisfies operational obligations.

Avoidance Management

The best way to manage AR problems is to avoid them in the first place by implementing a good system of AR control. Answering the following questions may help upgrade a system of AR control:

  • Is an AR policy in place for the collection of self-pay accounts (de minimus and maximus amounts, annual percentage rate (APR), terms, penalties, etc.)?
  • Do employees receive proper AR, bad debt, and follow-up training within legal guidelines?
  • Are AR exceptions approved by the doctor, office manager, or accounting department, or require individual scrutiny?
  • Are AR policies in place for dealing with hardship cases, pro bono work, co-pay waivers, discounts, or no-charges?
  • Are collection procedures within legal guidelines?
  • Are AR policies in place for dealing with past due notices, telephone calls, dunning messages, collection agencies, small claims court, and other collection methods?
  • Are guidelines in place for handling hospital, clinic, or medical practice consultations, unpaid claims, refilling of claims, and appealing claims?
  • Are office AR policies periodically revised and reviewed, with employee input?
  • Does the doctor, hospital, or clinic agree with and support the guidelines?

Assessment

It is  typical that poor control occurs because the doctor and/or hospital is too busy treating patients, or the front office or administrative staff does not have, or follow a good system of AR control.

www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.combiz-book1

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest ME-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Sponsors Welcomed

And, credible sponsors and like-minded advertisers are always welcomed.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2007/11/11/advertise

Product DetailsProduct Details

***

Become a Published Print Author with Us

The Business of Medical Practice [3rd Edition]

By Hope Rachel Hetico RN, MHA, CMP™

[Managing Editor]biz-book7

Dear Colleagues,

As you may know, we are commencing work on the third edition of our best selling book: The Business of Medical Practice

TOC 1st: http://www.amazon.com/Business-Medical-Practice-Maximizing-Doctors/dp/0826113117/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1231111232&sr=1-8

TOC 2nd: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Invitation to Contribute

Accordingly, we would be honored for you to consider contributing a new or revised chapter, in your area of expertise, for a low-effort but high-yield contribution. Our goal is to help physician colleagues and management executives benefit from nationally known experts, as an essential platform for their success in the healthcare 2.0 business industry. Many topics are still available: [health accounting and costing; law, policy and administration; Medicare fraud and abuse; coding and insurance; HIT, grid and cloud computing; finance and economics, competitive models, collaboration and leadership, etc].

Support Always Available

Editorial support is available, and you would enjoy increasing subject-matter notoriety, exposure and public relations in an erudite and credible fashion. As a reader, or preferably a subscriber to the ME-P, your synergy in this space may be ideal. Time line for submission of a 5,000-7,500 word chapter is ample, and in a prose writing style that is “wide, not deep.” 

A Health 2.0 Initiative

And, be sure to address health 2.0 modernity. Update chapters from the second edition are also available. 

Definition: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2008/09/12/emerging-healthcare-20-initiatives

Assessment

Please contact me for more details, if interested. A best selling-book is rare; while a third-edition volume even more so. Join us in this project. Regardless, we trust you will remain apostles of our core ME-P vision, “uniting medical mission and financial profit margin”, promoting it whenever possible.

Front Matter Link: frontmatter1advancedbusinessmedicine4 

Contact Info:

MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

770.448.0769

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Tax Tips for Under or Unemployed Medical Professionals

Status Still Possible for Physicians and Nurses

By Sean G. Todd, Esq., M. Tax, CFP©, CPA

Tax Attorney

Certified Public Accountant
Certified Financial Planner™ practitioner

Terminated, reduced-in-force, or out of work in 2009? As the April 15th tax deadline approaches, medical professionals and all other under/unemployed folks might have questions regarding their tax returns – unchartered waters for many. More people than ever before may be experiencing the effects of losing their jobs for the first time, or receiving unemployment benefits, and are uncertain about the tax consequences that relate to all this. So, in these difficult times, give some consideration to working with a professional to help you make the right decisions.   

Labor Department Reports

The US Labor Department report issued on February 6, 2009 showed that nearly 2.6 million jobs were lost over the course of 2008, the highest yearly job loss total since 1945. The official unemployment rate is at 7.2%, a 16 year high, according to the labor department. For your assistance, I’ve prepared some of the most common questions along with the answers. Here are several questions and answers to help you through this stressful time.

1. Do I have to still pay my taxes if I was out of work in 2008?

More likely than not! The IRS requires anyone who received a W-2 from their employer and made at least $8,950 (if you’re single and under 65 years old), or made at least $400 if you’re self employed, to file a tax return. These are the baseline cutoff numbers. If you’re anticipating a tax refund, you must file – even if you didn’t work at all. The IRS will not just send you a refund – you must file and claim your refund. Despite being unemployed, you still are required to file your taxes – often times a new level of frustration begins during this already confusing and frustrating time.    

2. Will I have a tax liability? 

It depends. It depends on a variety of factors since every taxpayer’s tax situation is unique, based on the facts and circumstances of the taxpayer. Some factors may impact a person’s filing requirement such as: if you only had unemployment compensation throughout the year, you may owe some tax on the checks you received. A severance package could also give you a tax bill, as could dividends and interest from investment income. Other factors which also need to be considered would include tax deductions and other life changes as a result of being unemployed: out-of-pocket medical expenses; sale of your home as a result of downsizing or even independent contractor income you might have received.

3. Do I have to include my unemployment checks in taxable income?

In a word, yes. Unemployment compensation is included as taxable income for federal purposes and most state tax returns. When applying for unemployment, we recommend that you elect tax withholding. You can choose whether you want federal and/or state income taxes automatically taken out of your unemployment benefits. If you choose to withhold, federal income taxes are withheld at a 10% rate, while the state rate varies. But since many cash-strapped Americans opt not to withhold – come April they may have to pay up during an already stressful time when extra cash is often times not available. So if you are not electing any tax withholding, a tax bill may be an unwelcome surprise when you file your 2008 return.

4. What if I “took” money from my 401(k)?

The answer depends on the definition of “took”. If you took a loan from your 401(k), exclude this from taxable income. You may owe taxes if you took money out of a retirement plan or 401(k) to supplement your unemployment checks. That counts as income and is taxable too. The taxes are in addition to a 10% penalty on early withdrawals if you’re below the age of 59-1/2. A special election is available to many taxpayers to avoid this 10% penalty on early withdrawals which many do not know about – costing even more in taxes. 

5. What if I did some supplemental work as an independent contractor?

In the attempt to continue to earn an income after being unemployed, you might have done some freelance or project work. Being unemployed allowed you the flexibility to become self-employed. That is the positive side of things – you earned income. Here is the negative side: if you earned some income doing odd jobs or consulting services while unemployed, you’re subject to income tax AND self-employment tax on that income. To report that supplemental work, taxpayers must include a Schedule C with their income tax return, which details the income and expenses for the year. This is where we see a lot of errors – individuals do not prepare schedule C for this type of earnings. If you earned over $30,000 and are now unemployed – you may go to www.lostmyjobtaxprep.com for an exclusive offer.  If you earned more than $600 during one of the projects, expect to receive tax form 1099 and you must include that as taxable income on your income tax return. Also note that if you made less than $600, then you will not be issued a 1099 but are still required to report this income as well on your tax return.

6. Relocated for the new job?

If the new job required you to relocate for the position, you may be able to deduct the moving expenses not reimbursed by your new employer. But there’s a distance test you must meet to qualify for the deduction. The new job site has to be 50 miles further than the distance from your old residence was from the old job, according to Tom Ochsenschlager, vice president of taxation for the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants [AICPA]. This basically prevents you from trying to deduct a move within the same metropolitan area.

7. Are my job search expenses deductible?

Those who were on the job hunt last year can utilize the tax code to their benefit and qualify for a larger refund. There are a slew of tax deductions available. In fact, many of the expenses incurred while looking for a job can be deducted, which can result in some serious tax savings.

Tax Checklists

As readers and subscribers to the Medical Executive-Post are aware, there is a quality initiative in clinical medicine that promotes the use of checklists. So, here is a good, but partial list of those things you need to keep track of:

  • Anything you spend on creating, printing and mailing your resume is deductible.
  • Anything you spend on a career coach or headhunter.
    Any long distance, cell or fax charges directly associated with your job search.
  • Transportation costs such as a bus, taxi, train or plane to an interview is deductible.
  • Mileage costs accrued when you drive to interviews and even to the unemployment office. [Between Jan. 1, 2008, and June 30, 2008, taxpayers can claim 50.5 cents per mile, between July 1, 2008 and Dec. 31 2008 taxpayers can claim 58.5 cents per mile].
  • All job related parking fees and tolls; and,
  • All meals and lodging if the interview was out of town.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2009/01/20/a-homer-simpson-moment-of-clarity-on-medical-quality

Further Explanations

You cannot deduct the cost of the “new interview suit” as it does not qualify as a uniform. Also forget about deducting the value of your time as the IRS deems it to be worthless for tax deduction purposes. So too, forget about deducting your new Coach “briefcase” and matching “interview” shoes – they too are disallowed.  It’s the responsibility of each taxpayer to keep receipts related to any of these expenses in order to substantiate them when filing. In a self-serving interest, we always recommend consulting a professional tax preparer for help.  

Two New Websites

There are two websites especially beneficial for individuals who have lost their jobs and are concerned about protecting their 401(k) account. Individuals who are still employed can benefit from the information provided on the site as well.

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated.

Speaker:If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com 

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest ME-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Product Details  Product Details

NEW: Health Industry Indignation Index

Foibles of Industry Movers-Shakers

New Beta Feature

By Staff Reporterssubmission-frenzy3

What it is – How it works

The Industry Indignation Index [III] is an occasional survey feature of the Medical Executive-Post. Our goal is to chronicle the dubious, ironic or humiliating behavior that we humans in the healthcare industrial, financial and health economics complex are prone to do or say. Related sectors are fertile topics, as well.

Our Industry Indignation Score Card

The mathematical scores measured on a scale of 1 [just smelly and cheesy] – to 100 [utterly indignant and totally shameless] are subjective and not-statistically significant. They are non-representative samples however, of the obnoxious behavior of some in the news and their public foibles. 

User Generated Content

Feel free to send in your items, stories or political gossip for consideration.  We will rate-em, rank-em, post-em, and do the rest for you!

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this new Medical Executive-Post feature are appreciated.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com  or Bio: www.stpub.com/pubs/authors/MARCINKO.htm

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest E-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Seeking Missing Tax Deductions

A New-Year Check List

By Sean G. Todd, Esq., M. Tax, CFP©, CPA

[Atlanta GA]   

Just as the ball dropped after New Year’s Eve – here are a couple of things you might just want to consider to help you save more and pay the IRS less.  These are guaranteed returns – for doctors and laymen alike – which can accumulate thousands of dollars in tax savings.  

Tax Deductions

The numbers say approximately one-third of all taxpayers itemize their returns’; much more so for medical professionals. Those who itemize their returns typically know about the big deductions, mortgage interest, charitable giving, and qualified retirement related contributions. But, there are a number of other deductions falling into different categories that many self-preparers overlook.

Did you know an estimated 40 million people rely on tax software? Based on the following, I’m not sure if that is the best tax planning strategy.  When working with clients, we make inquiries about our clients’ finances so to avoid paying the IRS too much.  Here are some of the questions we pose to our clients so we don’t miss opportunities to reduce their 2008 tax bill:

• Did you refinance your mortgage last year?

Any “points” you paid to reduce your mortgage interest rate are deductible, along with your mortgage interest. Are they fully deductible or do you need to prorate the point over the new loan term?  Did you pay a prepayment penalty to get out of your old mortgage? That may be deductible as well. If you purchased a new home we would want to review your closing statement to learn of other tax deductible items shown on the statement.  

• A major medical problem in 2008?

The IRS allows you to deduct medical expenses that exceed 7.5% of your adjusted gross income (AGI). That sounds like a lot; someone with an AGI of $50,000 could deduct any expenses beyond $3,750. We make sure to review the extensive list of what qualifies as medical expenses for each of our clients. Be sure to add up all the health insurance premiums you pay out of pocket, co-pays, prescriptions, and lodging for medical purposes (subject to limitations) are all deductible, as are therapies to stop smoking. In addition, don’t forget about all those miles you drove to the doctor’s office yourself, an X-ray facility, physical therapy, or a medical supply store to pick up crutches or a wheelchair, you get a deduction for this also.  Be sure not to deduct the speeding ticket on the way to the doctor’s office. If you are paying long term care insurance premiums; are you entitled to a full or partial deduction for the premiums you pay?

• Do you have a home office?

A lot of individuals qualify to take a deduction but are afraid to. If you qualify and don’t take the deduction you are overpaying your taxes. If you have the home office, you can deduct a percentage of your rent or mortgage, utilities, homeowner’s insurance, and maintenance for the room. Just make sure it’s your primary office, and doesn’t double as a guest suite since the space has to be exclusive use for office functions. The rules are a bit tricky and I’m not convinced a software program asking you “yes” and “no” questions is going to provide you with the right answers.

• Did you pay for education for yourself or dependents?

You can deduct up to $2,500 of the interest on a student loan. Depending on your income, you can take advantage of the Hope Credit for qualified expenses for the first two years of undergraduate education or the Lifetime Learning Credit from sophomore year through graduate school.  Are you allowed to claim both simultaneously?

• Did you pay for child care for a child under age 13 while you worked full-time?

You can deduct expenses up to $3,000 related to a babysitter, day care center and summer day camp for 1 child and up to $6,000 for 2 or more children.  Does after-school care expense qualify?

• Did you purchase a car or boat in 2008?

You are allowed to deduct either state income tax or sales tax, whichever is higher. The big winners here are residents of the nine states that collect no income tax, such as Nevada and Florida.  To figure out if the sales tax deduction makes more sense than deducting state income tax, you just have to run the numbers.

• Did you make energy efficient home improvements in 2008?

The IRS offers a $500 credit to property owners who upgraded windows, doors, roofs, insulation, HVAC equipment, and non-solar water heaters last year (2007). Can you still use this provision for 2008 or is it expired?  In 2008, you can also get credit on your return for solar water heaters and panels installed in 2008.

Miscellaneous Deductions

The IRS also has what I call “cats and dogs” deductions which may include many work-related expenses that aren’t reimbursed by your employer or medical clinic – think laptop. You can claim only the amount of these expenses that total more than 2 percent of your adjusted gross income:

• Did you have job search expenses?

Even if you were unsuccessful in your quest, you can deduct expenses for the phone, travel, employment agency and job counseling, resume preparation, copies, and postage. Are you eligible to take this deduction if you’re searching for your first job out of college?  What if you are changing careers?

• Did you have to travel or buy work-related clothing or supplies?

You are eligible to deduct work related travel expenses your employer does not reimburse. Are you eligible to take depreciation on a cell phone or home computer your employer requires for work-related needs? Subscriptions to industry publications and professional journals, and some qualifying legal fees are also deductible. Medical union dues, nursing uniforms, protective gear, tools, equipment, or other work-related clothing and supplies are also deductible.  You need to know the “work-related clothing” rules – this is an easy audit item for the IRS.   

• Did you pay for job-related continuing education?

You can take this deduction if it helps you maintain your position, but not if it’s to get you a new position.  That’s not always very clear. A law student who wants to take the Bar exam can’t deduct the cost of the review course. But, once he becomes an attorney, he can deduct the cost of continuing education required to maintain his law license; ditto for doctors and nurses!

• How long do I keep my documentation?

Be sure to hang onto the receipts related to tax deductions and your copy of your taxes for at least three years. If you already filed and missed a mentioned deduction, you have three years to file an amended return and receive your refund.

Assessment

After reading this post, you might begin to realize given the complexity of the Internal Revenue Code. So, a CPA, tax attorney or other professional is often needed to help you avoid making costly mistakes.

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. What did we miss?  

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com  or Bio: www.stpub.com/pubs/authors/MARCINKO.htm

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest E-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Product DetailsProduct DetailsProduct Details       

Product Details  Product Details

Retained Earnings and Employed Children

Payroll Tax Strategies for Doctorsdv2034034

By Edwin P. Morrow; III, JD, LLM

Staff Writers

Any business, like a medical practice with employees, has to concern itself with payroll taxes. This includes any C or S Corporation with a sole owner/employee. 

Payroll Taxes

Payroll taxes include: 1) income tax withholding for any employee for federal, state and local taxes; 2) the employer portion of federal social security and Medicare taxes (also called OASDI – old age, survivors and disability insurance); 3) the employee portion of federal social security and Medicare taxes; 4) state and federal unemployment tax [See IRS Publication 15, Employer’s Tax Guide]. These include a social security tax of 12.4% on earned income up to $106,800 (2009 number increases annually) and Medicare taxes of 2.9%. And, although there are not nearly as many tax “loopholes” with payroll taxes as with income taxes, impacting issues like these two should be noted.

1] Employ your children under 18

A sole proprietor physician may not be required to pay social security taxes on wages of his or her child under the age of 18.  This exception does not apply to an incorporated business IRC § 3121(b)

2] Understanding Retained Earnings

As some doctors are aware, earnings retained in a C or S Corporation and not distributed to shareholders are not subject to social security and Medicare taxes. This may be a substantial savings of 15.3% when you have owners working in the company. This technique is not as likely to work in a tax partnership and will certainly not work in a sole proprietorship.

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this brief Medical Executive-Post are appreciated.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com  or Bio: www.stpub.com/pubs/authors/MARCINKO.htm

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest E-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Understanding Payroll Taxes

Accounting Issues for Doctors56371606

By Edwin P. Morrow; III, JD, LLM

Staff Writers

Any business, like a medical practice with employees, has to concern itself with payroll taxes.  This includes any C or S Corporation with a sole owner / employee. 

Payroll Taxes

Payroll taxes include: 1) income tax withholding for any employee for federal, state and local taxes; 2) the employer portion of federal social security and Medicare taxes (also called OASDI – old age, survivors and disability insurance); 3) the employee portion of federal social security and Medicare taxes; 4) state and federal unemployment tax [See IRS Publication 15, Employer’s Tax Guide].

Non-Employees

A non-employee business or medical practice owner (which may be a partner in a tax partnership) must pay the equivalent of these taxes, called Self-Employment Taxes, in lieu of the above taxes  IRC § 1401. These include a social security tax of 12.4% on earned income up to $106,800 (2009 number increases annually) and Medicare taxes of 2.9%. Instead of income tax withholding, the owner doctor pays Estimated Taxes on a quarterly basis. A non-employee owner is unlikely to be required to pay unemployment taxes.

Impacting Issues 

Both the employer and the employee must pay a social security tax of 6.2% of wages up to $106,800, and a Medicare tax of 1.45% of all wages. This totals 15.3% of the first $106,800, and 2.9% of all wages above that. You will notice that when combined, the employee and employer tax rates equal the self-employment tax rates. 

Assessment

Although tax planners often only discuss income tax planning, payroll taxes may sometimes be greater than the corporate income tax (starting at 15%) or individual income tax (which may be as low as 0, 10 or 15%), and should be considered just as important in planning to avoid excessive taxation.  Unlike income taxes, there is no standard deduction, exemption or delayed starting point for these taxes. The tax starts on the first dollar.  Although there are not nearly as many tax “loopholes” with payroll taxes as with income taxes, impacting issues should be noted.

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com  or Bio: www.stpub.com/pubs/authors/MARCINKO.htm

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest E-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Getting IRS Answers

Join Our Mailing List

Even When You Shouldn’t Ask

By Staff Writers

Our complex tax system has sparked moves toward a flat tax in 2008 and other efforts at simplification. But until such a change occurs—if it ever does—we are stuck with what we have. This means many doctors and all taxpayers will continue to be confused and uncertain about their tax situations, and they will have a lot of questions.

The IRS Source

According to many experts, the IRS, which should be the best source for doctor answers, does not come through nearly often enough. But, it does offer some options. Which one you choose depends on the complexity and nature of the problem. Some simple, straightforward questions may be readily answered by a phone call. But for questions that are more complicated, it might be better to do it in a letter—following IRS guidelines—and get a written answer. And, in some cases, you may be better off not asking the question in the first place.

Phoning the IRS

Getting through to the IRS can be difficult. Its lines are often busy, especially during tax season. According to a not-so-recent report by the General Accounting Office, only 20% of callers got through to the IRS on the first call during last year’s tax return season (50% eventually got through). The IRS itself says you should avoid calling during lunch hours or on Mondays. But more serious is the reliability of the information you get. And, as a rule, the IRS will not stand behind its oral advice.

Example:

—Emma and James Clarke called an IRS helpline and asked whether they would be taxed on funds they wanted to withdraw from an individual retirement account (IRA) to buy a home. The Clarkes believed that they were told the transactions would result in no tax. So they withdrew the funds. When the IRS taxed them on the withdrawals, the Clarkes went to the Tax Court. They argued that they should not be taxed because they had relied on the erroneous advice of an IRS representative.

The IRS said that the Clarkes had misunderstood. According to the IRS, its representative told them only that they would not face the 10% tax on early withdrawals since they were over age 59½.

The Tax Court had no way of knowing whether the Clarkes had misunderstood or had been given mistaken advice. But the court said it did not matter. The tax law calls for taxes on IRA withdrawals, and the IRS had to follow the law.

Note: The IRS is not legally bound by mistakes its agents may make.

Precautions

The risk of getting incorrect advice does not mean that you should never call the IRS. But you should do some things to protect yourself. In particular, after you get an answer to your question, ask the IRS representative if information on the subject appears in any IRS publication. Then order the publication from the IRS and check the answer you received.

For example, suppose you want to know whether you can claim your father as your dependent. Even if the IRS representative says you can, you would be smart to check the IRS’s Publication 17, Your Federal Income Tax, which sets forth all the requirements for claiming someone as a dependent. Even if the representative is knowledgeable, it’s easy in a conversation for one party to misunderstand the other.

The same basic principles apply if you visit a local IRS office and speak to an agent. You can then easily pick up the publications you need, too.

If you use your computer to surf the Internet, you now can get some forms and basic information from the IRS via the World Wide Web (www.irs.ustreas.gov). But you cannot yet ask questions and get tax help this way.

Writing for Help

You will get the most protection by writing to the IRS with your question, because it will have to send you the answer. Then, if you follow this written advice and it turns out to be wrong, penalties you would otherwise owe will be avoided.

Private letter rulings

—These are among the most common forms of IRS guidance. You would request a private letter ruling from the IRS National Office when you want to know the tax impact of some strategy or transaction you are considering. Such a ruling is like insurance. As long as you give full and accurate details of the proposed transaction, you can rely on the ruling. (You cannot rely on private letter rulings issued to other taxpayers, but you can study them for signs of how the IRS views particular transactions.)

A small medical business might seek a letter ruling to be sure, for instance, that fringe-benefit plans or corporate restructuring will be tax-free.

Example

—A company was engaged in two businesses, A and B. The company needed capital to finance B’s new technology product. It found a venture capitalist willing to invest in B, but not in A. So the company sought to spin off B to a new corporation. The IRS said that there would be no tax on the transaction.

If your transaction will achieve the desired results, the IRS may suggest ways you can fix it. If the IRS plans to issue a negative ruling, it may offer you a chance to withdraw your request.

Technical advice memos

—Similar to letter rulings, these also come from the IRS National Office but are most often requested when a technical question comes up during the course of an audit. IRS agents themselves regularly request them. But, as a taxpayer, you can request such advice yourself. Technical advice memos are usually retroactive, but you can request relief from retroactivity if it would hurt you.

Technical advice memos may be issued on some of the same matters as letter rulings. Typical memos deal with such issues as whether a medical office worker is an employee or an independent contractor, validity of pension plans, and use of accounting methods.

Example

—A repairman had worked in an auto body shop for several years. Originally, he was classified as an employee. Then the shop owner turned the business over to his son, who designated the worker as an independent contractor. But the worker’s job did not change. He worked eight to 10 hours a day at the shop, using some of his own tools—but also some of the shop’s tools and equipment. He was paid half of the total amount of the bill for the repairs he did. But receiving his pay did not hinge on whether the customer paid; he took no risk. The IRS ruled in a technical advice memo that the worker was an employee.

Example

—A company asked the IRS to rule on whether its pension plan was qualified for tax breaks. The IRS said yes. A year later, the IRS realized the plan violated the rules because it excluded some workers who put in more than 1,000 hours a year. In a technical advice memo, the IRS said that the company would have to amend the plan to comply with the tax law. But because the company had relied on the IRS ruling in good faith and had originally disclosed all of the facts, the change did not have to be made retroactively.

When Not to Ask

There is no reason not to call the IRS with a basic question so you can fill out your tax return correctly. You probably will not even have to give your name. But if you want a letter ruling, first weigh the pros and cons.

In some situations—for example, to change your accounting method—you must get an advance ruling. In other cases, an advance ruling may be desirable because you want to be sure of the tax consequences of a transaction. Moreover, as we said, the IRS may suggest ways to restructure the transaction to get the tax result you want.

However, sometimes it’s unwise to seek IRS advice. You may not have time for a ruling—they generally take two or three months. Or, if the transaction offers no chance for flexibility, you will be stuck if the IRS gives you a negative response. (You must attach the ruling—favorable or not—to your return.) The National Office will review all related issues and transactions when it examines your request. So you must also be sure such scrutiny will not create a problem for you.

Cost is another factor. Fees vary by type of ruling, but a typical one would be $500. Then you need professional assistance in preparing your request and responding to IRS questions.

Assessment

The IRS will not answer every question. It will not give you a “comfort ruling”—where the answer is clear or reasonably certain. And it will not rule in hypothetical situations.

Letter rulings are public information, but you don’t lose your privacy. The IRS will have you sign a deletion statement: You can tell it to block out items that would reveal your identity. Most all physicians and medical professionals should do this.

Conclusion

Your comments are appreciated. What has been your experience with IRS queries?

Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Subscribe Now:Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest ME-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Referrals: Thank you in advance for your electronic referrals to the Medical Executive-Post.

Product Details  Product Details

“S” Corporation [Case Law] Tax Advantages

Family Owned Business [FOB]

Staff Writers

fp-book1

Some doctors understand the advantages that S corporations have over regularly taxed C corporations—and vice versa. But, an unfamiliar Tax Court decision, more than a decade ago, points up an advantage for S corporations that are sometimes overlooked.

Scenario

Suppose the owners of a family corporation are about to retire. Their children will buy their stock, giving them a note for the purchase price. The children will, of course, pay interest on the note.

Tax Difference

If the corporation is an S corporation, the younger generation will be able to write off their interest payments in full.

On the other hand, if it’s a C corporation, they may have few or no deductions.

Why the difference?

Because interest you pay to buy S corporation stock is considered “business” interest, and that’s fully deductible. On the other hand, interest paid to purchase C corporation stock is treated as “investment” interest. And the tax rules say that investment interest is deductible only to the extent of your investment income (dividends, interest income, etc.). If you don’t have any investment income, you get no deduction for your interest payments.

Naturally, that brings up another question: Why is the ownership of a C corporation considered an investment, while the ownership of an S corporation is treated as a business? For the answer to that, let’s look at the above mentioned Tax Court case.

Case Report

Three brothers, Milton, Leo, and Dale Russon, founded Russon Brothers Mortuary as a regular C corporation. The business did well, and the Russon brothers began training their four sons, Scott, Brent, Robert, and Gary, in the mortuary business.

Eventually, the four younger Russons were trained and actively involved in the business, and the older Russons were ready to hang up their hats. The younger Russons agreed to buy all the stock in Russon Brothers for $999,000. Each of the four younger Russons agreed to pay one-fourth of the purchase price, with 10% payable up front and the remainder to be paid in 180 equal monthly payments at 9% interest.

Agreement

The agreement gave the four younger Russons their right to exercise ownership rights, including “the right to all dividends from the stock,” subject to certain limitations. One of those limitations provided that the buyers could not “declare or pay any dividends or make any distributions” without written permission from the older Russons. After the sale, the four younger Russons continued to run the mortuary business, and their fathers retired.

On his tax returns following the sale, Scott Russon deducted the interest he paid on the purchase price for the Russon Brothers stock. However, the IRS denied the deduction on the grounds that the interest was subject to the investment-interest limitation.

Scott Russon countered that his interest should be treated as fully deductible business interest. After all, he bought the stock so that he and the other younger Russons could conduct the business full time and “earn a living.” Moreover, he contended that he couldn’t have purchased the stock as an investment since Russon Brothers had never paid a dividend in its entire history.

Tax Payer Loser

The Tax Court concluded that the Russon Brothers stock was “held for investment,” and the interest paid to acquire the stock was subject to the investment-interest limitation [Russon, 107 T.C. No. 15].

The court pointed out that property “held for investment” includes any property of the type which produces interest, dividend, or royalty income. And, in the court’s view, that means property that normally produces those types of income—regardless of whether it actually produces such income.

The tax law does not require corporate stock to pay a dividend before it becomes investment property. What’s more, the court pointed out that the definition of investment property is inclusive and applies uniformly to every taxpayer; it does not depend on a taxpayer’s mind-set when buying the property.

Finally, the court pointed out that the possibility of the Russon Brothers stock actually paying dividends was clearly contemplated by all the Russons when they drew up the sales agreement. The agreement gave the younger Russons the right to “all the dividends from the stock,” subject only to the written consent of the older Russons until the purchase price was fully paid.

S Corporation Advantage

If Russon Brothers had been an S corporation; it would have been a different story. The IRS has said that interest paid to buy an S corporation is treated as interest to purchase the corporation’s assets, not its stock [Notice 89-50]. Thus, the interest the Russons paid would have been treated as fully deductible business interest to the extent the assets were used in the corporation’s business [Notice 88-20]. And since virtually all of Russon Brothers’ assets were used in the active conduct of its mortuary business, Scott Russon would have been entitled to his deductions.

Assessment

There is one bright spot for astute doctors and other buyers of C corporations. You can switch. The IRS has ruled that once a C corporation is converted to an S corporation, interest paid thereafter will be treated as paid for the assets, not the stock. So your interest will become fully deductible business interest [Ltr. Rul. 9040066].

Conclusion

Of course, switching to an S corporation has other important tax consequences. So you will want to talk things over with your tax adviser before making a final decision. And so, your thoughts and comments are appreciated.

Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest E-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Referrals: Thank you in advance for your electronic referrals to the Executive-Post.

%d bloggers like this: