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    Dr. Marcinko is originally from Loyola University MD, Temple University in Philadelphia and the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in PA; as well as Oglethorpe University and Emory University in Georgia, the Atlanta Hospital & Medical Center; Kellogg-Keller Graduate School of Business and Management in Chicago, and the Aachen City University Hospital, Koln-Germany. He became one of the most innovative global thought leaders in medical business entrepreneurship today by leveraging and adding value with strategies to grow revenues and EBITDA while reducing non-essential expenditures and improving dated operational in-efficiencies.

    Professor David Marcinko was a board certified surgical fellow, hospital medical staff President, public and population health advocate, and Chief Executive & Education Officer with more than 425 published papers; 5,150 op-ed pieces and over 135+ domestic / international presentations to his credit; including the top ten [10] biggest drug, DME and pharmaceutical companies and financial services firms in the nation. He is also a best-selling Amazon author with 30 published academic text books in four languages [National Institute of Health, Library of Congress and Library of Medicine].

    Dr. David E. Marcinko is past Editor-in-Chief of the prestigious “Journal of Health Care Finance”, and a former Certified Financial Planner® who was named “Health Economist of the Year” in 2010. He is a Federal and State court approved expert witness featured in hundreds of peer reviewed medical, business, economics trade journals and publications [AMA, ADA, APMA, AAOS, Physicians Practice, Investment Advisor, Physician’s Money Digest and MD News] etc.

    Later, Dr. Marcinko was a vital and recruited BOD  member of several innovative companies like Physicians Nexus, First Global Financial Advisors and the Physician Services Group Inc; as well as mentor and coach for Deloitte-Touche and other start-up firms in Silicon Valley, CA.

    As a state licensed life, P&C and health insurance agent; and dual SEC registered investment advisor and representative, Marcinko was Founding Dean of the fiduciary and niche focused CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER® chartered professional designation education program; as well as Chief Editor of the three print format HEALTH DICTIONARY SERIES® and online Wiki Project.

    Dr. David E. Marcinko’s professional memberships included: ASHE, AHIMA, ACHE, ACME, ACPE, MGMA, FMMA, FPA and HIMSS. He was a MSFT Beta tester, Google Scholar, “H” Index favorite and one of LinkedIn’s “Top Cited Voices”.

    Marcinko is “ex-officio” and R&D Scholar-on-Sabbatical for iMBA, Inc. who was recently appointed to the MedBlob® [military encrypted medical data warehouse and health information exchange] Advisory Board.

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WHAT CAN A Certified Financial Planner® REALLY DO FOR YOU?

That a NON-CFP® Certificant … CAN-NOT?

[By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®]

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

OK – I was a Certified Financial Planner® before my academic team launched the Certified Medical Planner™ online and on-ground chartered education and board certification designation program a few years ago. I am now reformed and in remission.

MORE: Enter CPMs

Enter the Certified Medical PlannerChartered Designation

Today, we are gratified that Certified Medical Planner™ mark notoriety is growing organically in the healthcare, as well as financial services, industry.

In fact, even uber-blogger Mike Kitces MSFS, MTAX, CFP, CLU, ChFC, RHU, REBC, CASL has taken note of us in his musings on the Nerd’s Eye View website.

And, the reality is that there are a growing number of CFP educational programs at the post-CFP niche market level. But, none for healthcare industrial complex: for doctors … by doctors!

CMP

QUERY

Nevertheless, I was a bit flummoxed when a physician college recently asked me this simple question:

Q: What can a CFP® mark holder do for me that a non-CFP® certificant can not?

Assessment

Now, much like a good interrogating attorney, I think I already know the answer to this question. Nevertheless, it is important to determine and understand what our ME-P readers believe; and why they believe it!

MORE: Enter CPMs

So, please opine and tell us what you think.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements.

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Changes are Afoot at the CFP-Board of Directors

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Well-intentioned attempts to protect consumers backfire?

By Rick Kahler CFP® http://www.KahlerFinancial.com

Rick Kahler CFPIntegrity. Trustworthiness.

A commitment to clients’ best interests. These are all essential qualities for any advisor you entrust with your financial affairs.

One clue to financial planners’ trustworthiness is the certifications they hold. Designations such as CFP® (Certified Financial Planner) and Chartered Financial Consultant (ChFC) require adhering to certain professional standards and codes of ethics.

The organizations that maintain these standards safeguard the integrity of their professional designations and especially the well-being of consumers who seek out their members’ services. Yet sometimes, their well-intentioned attempts to protect consumers can backfire.

New Rules

The CFP® Board recently adopted new rules meant to prevent financial planners from calling themselves “fee-only” while still receiving commissions by selling financial products through separate companies. Now, CFP®s and members of their families can no longer own an interest in financial service companies that earn commissions if they wish to brand themselves as “fee only.”

This would be good, except the Board has cast its net so wide that it is catching the dolphins along with the sharks. It defines “financial service company” too broadly, including real estate firms, mortgage companies, and property management companies. It also illogically focuses on what clients could pay and what the planner could receive, rather than what clients do pay and what the planner does receive.

Example:

I have a minority interest in and occasionally receive dividends from a real estate brokerage and a property management firm. While I do maintain a license as a real estate broker, I am not active in the business. Because I could potentially receive a commission for selling real estate and because I do receive dividends, I’ve been told by a representative of the CFP® Board that I can no longer call myself “fee only” and must advertise myself as a “fee and commission” financial planner.

This would dishonestly insinuate I sell mutual funds, life insurance, or annuities. “Fee-only,” which to consumers means I sell no financial products, is much more accurate.

Disgruntled Calls Growing

I’ve received calls from other CFP®s affected in similar ways by the new rules.

Example:

One is a young fee-only planner who does not sell any financial products or own a portion of any company that does. Yet, he recently married a woman who owns a minority interest in her family’s property casualty insurance company. She holds an insurance license but does not work in the business. Because she, a “related party,” could legally receive commissions, her husband can no longer hold himself out as a “fee-only” CFP® and must list himself as a “fee and commission” planner.

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Is the CFP-BOD, and the CFP® mark, in Jeopardy? [VOTE]

If a financial planner’s clients pay only fees and do not purchase financial products like mutual funds, insurance, and annuities from a related company, the CFP® Board needs to designate the planner as “fee only.” The same applies to planners who maintain financial services licenses (as those in Illinois must if they give insurance advice) but do not receive commissions. The CFP® Board should not consider companies that offer services unrelated to financial planning, such as selling and managing real estate or originating mortgages, as financial services companies.

I understand and fully support the CFP® Board’s intent to stop those who were abusing the brand of “fee only.” Yet the Board’s rules in their present form will only devalue the CFP® designation.

Assessment

It appears the only way I can continue to honestly advertise my practice as “fee-only” is to terminate as a CFP®. What’s most important for me is to be seen as a fiduciary planner, working with integrity in the best interest of my clients. I won’t dishonestly brand myself as a “fee and commission” planner to keep my CFP® designation.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

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How to Become A Financial Advisor [Learned Profession or Professional Sales Force?]

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A Recent E-mail that I Received

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA, CMP™

www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

[Editor-in-Chief]

As a former certified financial planner for almost 15 years, I was surprised to recently receive the following unedited e-mail correspondence.

Dear Marcinko,

If you are clever, have a way with people, or are a born salesperson, then becoming financial advisor could be your ticket to paradise.

Maybe not exactly paradise, but you could definitely have a ticket to a rewarding career. If you’re thinking about starting out as a new financial advisor – you may already be half the way there.

Why?

Because it’s an occupation where your life challenges will give you the understanding and empathy needed to work with your clients. Have you ever been in the position where you had to figure out a budget for your children’s education? Or manage an over extended credit card? These life situations will aid an individual on the path to become a financial consultant.

Requirements to Be a Financial Advisor

Even though a formal education is not a necessity to become financial adviser, it helps if you’ve taken certain courses.

What degree do you need to become a financial advisor? A bachelor’s degree in Finance, Economics, Accounting, Commerce, Business or Marketing would be a good start. A degree won’t assure you of a startling career but it may help get your foot in the door.

Rumor has it that a degree in psychology is also an asset as financial advising is as much about counseling as it is about advising. There are a plethora of people with all sorts of emotional entanglements around their financial lives.

Licenses

So, what licenses do you need to be a financial advisor? Some companies will assist a newbie in the financial advisory business and place them into a special program that will help them to obtain the required regulatory licenses such as a Series 66, this license permits them to vend annuities and mutual funds. It’s also possible to manage your own training. You can take part-time courses in order to qualify for the CFP (Certified Financial Planner) exam.

There are roughly over 286 universities and colleges that will assist you in preparing for the CFP exam. How long does it take to become a financial advisor? In order to qualify for the exam you will also need three years full-time working experience with a financial planning establishment.

Statistics state that over 40% regularly fail this all important exam. Its worth the time and effort as with this certification you are deemed as a certified financial planner and demand a higher salary.

Assessment

Hot tip: Stay away from insurance companies for financial employment. They’ll insist that you sign everyone including the dog and your grandmother. Then get rid of you if you don’t procure sufficient business. Banks are better they will bring in the clients for you.

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Are financial advisors true professionals; or a truely professional sales force?

Please review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure. Are financial advisors true professionals, or a professional sales force?

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VOTE-Would You Retain a Bankrupt CFP® for Financial Advice?

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###

According to colleague and financial advisor, Mike Kitces CFP®:

As the difficult economic environment continues, bankruptcy filings in the United States continue to occur at an elevated rate.

And it appears that financial planners are having their share of bankruptcies as well … requiring the CFP Board via their disciplinary process to adjudicate whether a CFP® certificant should receive a public letter of admonition, or has his/her marks suspended or revoked. 

With a rising number of financial planner bankruptcies putting pressure on their disciplinary resources, the CFP Board has proposed a change to how it treats such bankruptcy situations. The upshot: a bankruptcy by a financial planner will no longer bar him/her from getting or keeping the CFP® marks. However, going forward, any bankruptcy by a financial planner will be publicly disclosed for the following 10 years on the CFP Board’s website.

Question: And so, as a doctor, nurse, management consultant or even another financial advisor, would you ever retain a Certified Financial Planner® who had declared bankruptcy?

VOTE AND OPINE

Assessment

Link: http://www.kitces.com/blog/archives/240-CFP-Board-Relaxes-Its-Position-On-Financial-Planner-Bankruptcies…-Sort-Of.html

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

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Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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The One-Woman Physician Investors Should Not Trust

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Why We Should “Run” from the SEC’s Mary Schapiro

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP™

[Publisher-in-Chief]

OK, I’ve opined about fiduciary accountability for stock brokers, FAs and FPs – as well as Mary Schapiro [Chairman of the SEC] before – on this ME-P. And usually, in not so glowing terms!

But now, Mary really chaps my ethical and linguistic sensibilities.

Why I’m So P…… Off!

According to Bloomberg, and Advisor One [a financial services industry trade magazine], the chairwoman is considering something called the “business model neutral” rule that retains proprietary financial products, and brokerage sales commissions.

This concept of ‘business neutral’ is the one sought by many in the brokerage and insurance industry in order to redefine the term ‘fiduciary’ as an enhanced form of ‘suitability’ with opt-out provisions.

But, it is not sought by me, and should not be accepted by physicians.

Definitions

Suitability Rule – According to the Free Dictionary:

A stated or implied requirement by a regulatory body that a broker or investment adviser must reasonably believe that a certain investment decision will benefit a client before making a recommendation to him/her. That is, the broker or investment adviser must act in good faith, and may not knowingly recommend bad investments. Different regulators and self-regulating organizations incorporate suitable rules in different places in their bylaws. Two commonly referenced suitability rules are Rule 2310 for the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority and Rule 405 for the NYSE. See also: Due diligence, Prudent-person rule, Twisting.

Fiduciary Rule – According to the Free Dictionary:

A uniform standard for financial advisors that requires them to put retail customer interests ahead of their own financial interests.

This is clearly a higher duty [level of care] than suitability. Insurance agents, stock brokers, BDs and most “financial advisors” hate it.

Link: http://www.advisorone.com/2011/12/09/reaction-to-schapiro-comments-on-fiduciary-rule-ar?ref=hp

“Suitability on Steroids”

Some pundits suggest we think of this new “business model neutral” rule as “suitability on steroids.”

However, as most of us in medicine know, steroids are not a panacea and are typically used as a quick fix for short term gain, only.

Otherwise, the excessive use of anabolic steroids is bad for our physical health. Just like Mary Schapiro is bad for our fiscal health. But, a Certified Medical Planner™ is a fiduciary at all times http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

More: Enter the CMPs

Assessment       

And so, your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. I was an insurance agent and certified financial planner for almost 15 years [Series 7, 63 and 65] before I resigned all – in disgust over the fiduciary flap.

Doctors are fiduciaries. I am a fiduciary, a doctor, and a financial advisor. Shouldn’t all physician-investors demand same from their own financial advisors [NASD-FINRA, RIAs, RIA-Reps]?

But hey – I’m just a medical provider.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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***

Are Financial Services “Professional” Certifications Important? [A Poll]

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Often of Murky Respect – Usually Confusing to Clients

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA, CMP™

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

[Editor-in-Chief]

There are more than 100 “certifications” which represent the often nebulous field of “financial advisory, or planning credentials” that presently exist in the market place today.

Some of these “professional” designations are awarded to individuals in the financial planning or financial “advisory” space after [some] diligent study, and [often not so] arduous testing; others not so.

And so, are such “credentials” more important to you, or your clients; pleas opine.

More:

Disclaimer: I am a reformed Certified Financial Planner®, Series 7 [stock-broker], 63 and 65 license holder, and RIA representative who also held all applicable insurance and security licenses.

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Events Planner: November 2010

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Events-Planner: NOVEMBER 2010

By Staff Writers

“Keeping track of important health economics and financial industry meetings, conferences and summits”

Welcome to this issue of the Medical Executive-Post and our Events-Planner. It contains the latest information on conferences, news, and relevant resources in healthcare finance, economics, research and development, business management, pharmaceutical pricing, and physician/entity reimbursement!  Watch for a new Events-Planner each month.

First, a little about us! The Medical Executive-Post is still a relative newcomer. But today, we have almost 175,000 visitors and readers each month from all over the country, in addition to our growing subscriber base. We have been a successful collaborative effort, thanks to your contributions.  As a result, we are adding new resources daily. And, we hope the website continues to provide the best place to go for journals, books, conferences, educational resources, tools, and other things you need to establish the value your healthcare consulting and financial advisory intervention.

So, enjoy the Medical Executive-Post and this monthly Events-Planner with our compliments. 

A Look Ahead this Month: Now, the important dates:

November 07: World Congress Health Innovation Meeting. Alexandra, VA

November 08: Patient Centered Medical Homes and ACOs, Hartford, CT

November 08: Medical Compliance Meeting in a Post Reform World, Baltimore, MD

November 11: Conducting Effective internal Medical Investigations, HCCA, Orlando, FL

Please send in your meetings and dates for listing in the next issue of our Events-Planner.

MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com 

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Understanding Medical Practice Stock Sale vs. Assets Sale

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Insights for Physician-Focused Financial Advisors

By Dr. Charles F. Fenton III, FACFAS, JD

www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com

In most cases, healthcare knowledgeable financial advisors [FAs] recommend that the physician buyer of a medical practice solely purchase the assets of the practice and not the stock of the practice itself http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

A Risk Reduction Strategy

Why? By purchasing selected assets, the buyer is ensured that he will not become responsible for the known or unknown liabilities of the corporation; thus a risk reduction strategy. In prior days, avoiding purchasing the stock of the corporation was a wise recommendation www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com

Enter the Managed Care Era

However, with the advent of managed care, the purchase of the stock of the corporation can provide the new practitioner with certain competitive advantages.

For example, it may take a new practitioner three to nine months to get onto enough managed care panels to make the practice profitable. Purchase of the stock of the corporation ensures the new practitioner of acquiring the Federal tax identification number of the corporate entity.

Assessment

Since most managed care corporations identify providers by the Federal tax identification number, purchase of the stock of the corporation should allow the new practitioner to be enrolled on managed care panels in a shorter period of time. Instead of applying anew to the managed care entity, the new practitioner merely needs to be listed as a new member of a provider already on the managed care panel.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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On American Health Care and Financial Services Competitiveness

A MEMORIAL DAY OPINION – EDITORIAL

[Innovation – Not Nationalization – Can Again Lead]

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; FACFAS, MBA, CPHQ, CMP™

[Publisher-in-Chief]

By Hope Rachel Hetico; RN, MHA, CPHQ, CMP™

[Managing Editor]

Ann Miller; RN, MHA

[Executive-Director]

American Flag

On this 2010 Memorial Day weekend, please allow us to directly reflect for a moment on the decline of the healthcare, banking and financial services industry in America. And; then somewhat indirectly comment on the hopeful emergence of the web 2.0 phenomena of which we all are a part. The competitive applicability to these sectors should be appreciated by the insightful ME-P reader.

Collapse of Command and Control Monopolies and Oligarchies   

Old monopolies everywhere are crumbling because of tougher new competitors and the transparency wrought by electronic connectedness. For example, our old newspaper has to compete with the internet, your electric utility company battles low-cost local start-ups, telephone companies must begin installing fiber optic lines to fend off cable companies; and RIAs and fiduciary focused financial advisors [FAs] will supplant BDs and stock brokers in the financial services sector.

www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

cmp-logo

The airline industry collapsed a few years ago, the banking industry has just collapsed, and the auto industry is recovering as we pen this post. [We have a particular affinity for the auto sector however, as the son of a UAW member and step-daughter of Michiganders]. Regardless, the rush to more intense competition cannot be stopped. As a doctor, FA or other business competitor; you either keep pace or get crushed by quasi-oligarchic organizations like the American Medical Association [AMA], American Podiatric Medical Association [FPMA], American Dental Association [ADA], American Osteopathic Medical Association AOMA], Financial Planning Association [FPA], Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards [CFP BoS], College for Financial Planning [CFP] or the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors [NAPFA], etc. What have they, and Wall Street, done for you … lately? Scandal, taint, doubt, lost-credibility, a business-as-usual ennui, lethargy and ruin! Enter www.Sermo.com

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2009/04/19/calling-for-cfp%c2%ae-fiduciary-status-real-education-and-higher-duty/#comment-4136

Health Insurance Companies

In the last-generation of health insurance companies and related fraternal medical organizations, patients exercised great control over physician selection, had quicker access to specialists and encountered fewer restrictions on care. The reverse was true with financial services. But, because of advancing technology, aging demographics, intense R&D, global manufacturing, and escalating domestic HR costs – competitive market forces against traditional and structured staff model managed care companies – many industry analysts [like us] predicted growth would decline [Yes, greed was also involved as healthcare was presumed a recession-proof sector; and didn’t we all own behemoth big-pharma and HMO stocks in our 401-K, and 403-B plans]? But now, many former stock-brokers and FAs are going rogue; er – independent!

“Although inefficiencies in any business often open up in the short term, and can be greatly exploited by creative and visionary entrepreneurs – as in most business structures – market forces will prevail in the long run”.

Leo F. Mullin, MBA

[Former CEO – Delta Airlines]Shadows

Next-Gen with “Fly”

Fortunately, a new generation of enlightened physician and FA entrepreneurs is coming “out-of-the-shadows” as new-wave web 2.0 corporations and RIAs are becoming more flexible, competitive and market responsive. Simultaneously, monolithic and collectivist political ideas keep trying to regulate the medical and financial services workplace with rules, regulations and contracts to control entire populations. Yet, in the new healthcare economy, this new generation of doctors and FAs with “fly,” is headed toward more competition; not less – with more collaboration with patients and clients – regaining self autonomy.

Physician and FA Advocates

Meanwhile, as medical professionals, FAs and patient advocates, we must all choose between staying flexible to ride out tough times – or – adopting a hard, brittle line that will crack under the pressure of competition. We know where we stand at the ME-P, do you?

Flexibility and Virtual Reality

In recent years, many large corporations and top-down business models were not market responsive and change was not inherent in their DNA. These traditional organizations represented a rigid or “used-to-be” mentality, not a flexible or “wanna-be” mindset; according to business columnist Alan Webber. Some financial advisory corporations, and today’s emerging health 2.0 initiatives, may possess the market nimbleness that cannot be recreated in a controlled or collectivist [nationalistic] environment. And so, going forward, it is not difficult to imagine the following new rules for the new financial and virtual medical ecosystem.

[A] Rule No. 1

Forget about “SEC suitability and FINRA rules”, large office suites, surgery centers, fancy equipment, larger hospitals and the bricks and mortar that comprised traditional medical practices or financial product delivery systems. One doctor or niche focused FA with a great idea, good bedside manners or competitive advantage, can outfox a slew of public servants, the AMA, SEC, ADA or FINRA “faux copy-cat examiners”, while still serving the public – and patients – and making money. It’s now a unit-of-one economy where “Me Inc.”, is the standard. Physicians and FAs must maneuver for advantages that boost their standing and credibility among patients, peers, payers, customers and clients. Examples include patient satisfaction surveys; outcomes research analysis, evidence-based-medicine, physician economics credentialing and true integrated fiduciary-focused financial planning.

However, we should also realize the power of networking, vertical integration and the establishment of virtual RIAs or medical practices, which come together to treat a patient, or help a client, and then disband when a successful outcome is achieved. Job security is earned with more successful outcomes; not necessarily a degree, automatic AUMs, certifications or onsite presence. In fact, some competition experts, like Shirley Svorny PhD, a professor of economics and chair of the Department of Economics at California State University, wonder if a medical degree is a barrier – rather than enabler – of affordable healthcare.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2009/01/08/medical-licensing-obstacle-to-affordable-quality-care

Others even presume the establishment of virtual medical schools and hospitals, where students and doctors learn and practice their art on cyber-entities that look and feel like real patients, but are generated electronically through the wonders of virtual reality units. The same can be said for the financial services industry, although much farther down-line given its current slow rate of real education and quasi-professional acceptance.

[B] Rule No. 2

Challenge conventional wisdom, think outside the traditional box, recapture your dreams and ambitions, disregard conventional gurus and work harder than you have ever worked before. Remember the old saying, “if everyone is thinking alike, then nobody is thinking”. Do collective-nistas and nationalized healthcare advocates react rationally; or irrationally? [THINK: Wall Street, medical unions]

[C] Rule No 3

Differentiate yourself among your healthcare and financial advisory peers. Do or learn something new and unknown by your competitors. Market your accomplishments and let the world know. Be a non-conformist. Conformity is an operational standard and a straitjacket on creativity. Doctors and FAs should create and innovate, not blindly follow organization or political “union” leaders [shop stewards, BDs, etc] into oblivion.

[D] Rule No 4

Realize that the present situation is not necessarily the future. Attempt to see the future and discern your place in it. Master the art of the quick change with fast but informed decision making. Do what you love, disregard what you don’t, and let the fates have their way with you. Then, decide for yourself if you are of this ilk – and adhere to any of the above rules? Or, just become an employed [government, BD] doctor or FA shill. Just remember that the political party, or monopoly that can give you a job, can also take it away [THINK: LB, ML, Wachovia, national healthcare, etc].

CP 1

Memorial Day Considerations

Finally, on this Memorial Day weekend, consider that life and career is a journey, and that in this country we have the choice to ponder or pursue any, and all of the above options, and more. We have the ability to think, cogitate and ruminate, as we have done here today. So – please – thank those who have helped turn this idealistic philosophy, into pragmatic daily reality.

For us personally, we thank Bonze Star Medal Winner Captain Cecelia T. Perez, RN. Now – ponder and consider – who do you thank? If no one has impacted you up-close on this Memorial Day weekend and national holiday, please visit our military channel to reflect, comment and opine.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/category/military-medicine

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

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Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com  or Bio: www.stpub.com/pubs/authors/MARCINKO.htm

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Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

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About the Covestor Mutual Fund Portfolio Sharing Service

Certified Medical Planner

What it is – How it works

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™

[Publisher-in-Chief]

Covestor, with offices in New York and London, is a web platform started by entrepreneurs Perry Blancher, Richard Tachta and Simon Veingard http://www.covestor.com. Their belief was that salaried mutual fund managers have no monopoly on investment talent and shouldn’t have a lock on the rewards that come with investment success. As financial services, and online netizens, they also believed in democratizing the investment management industry and helping proven self-investors compete with the large institutions. This is known as the power of “crowd-sourcing.” All core philosophies seem to be shared by this ME-P.

What it is

According to their website, Covestor is both a portfolio sharing service for proven self-investors and for those wishing to track them; where data is private, secure and anonymous. With Covestor, one can coat-tail successful investors and follow their real trade activity. Or, have their moves auto-traded for you by Covestor Investment Management. Members can also keep track of their investments andBuild a free track record comparable to professional mutual funds. Members earn fees for their hard work, and Manage a model that their clients can mirror thru shared management fees.

Profit Sharing Investors

Covestor investors sharing portfolios include professionals, full time amateurs and industry specialists. They are a serious bunch with an average reported portfolio size of over $200,000 (excluding cash). Positions are typically held in over 5,000 different equities; are based in 50 countries and span the full range of ages, backgrounds and styles.

Issues

As a doctor-investor, health economist and former certified financial planner, there are at least three issues needed to be raised about this firm.

The first is SEC/NASD/FINRA rules and applicable SRO and state regulations for brokers, RIAs, FAs and related others? The status of suitability versus fiduciary accountability for ERISA regulated plans is also questioned. The third [and least important] is the potential negative impact on traditional financial services “professionals.”

In other words, is this another example of how technology will flatten the “intermediary curve” and reduce the profit of middle sales-men and sales-women? Oh! What about medical specificity for our target audience?

www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Assessment

I am sure there are other issues as well. Your thoughts and comments on this ME-Pare appreciated; especially from financial services “professionals”, lawyers and FAs, etc, Give em’ a click and tell us what you think http://www.covestor.com?

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

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INSURANCE: Risk Management and Insurance Strategies for Physicians and Advisors

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Our Recent Experience with CFP® Mark Utility

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Certification Falling from Grace – Deserved or Not?

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™

[Publisher-in-Chief] dem21 

The Premise

In the summer [2008], we sent a random email blast to the first 200 Certified Financial Planners® on our list-serve. These were folks who had previously contacted us, and/or purchased our textbooks, handbooks, tools and/or dictionaries that assist accountants, financial advisors, attorneys, medical management consultants and all those working to assist physicians and medical professionals on business and economics matters.

The “Straw-Poll” Query

Our email blast asked the simple question:

“Did you ever voluntarily resign your license to use the CFP® mark?”

First Round Results

We received four positive responses [2%]. We then followed up to learn that 2 of the 4 were CPAs, one was a CFA and another was an MBA. Now, what do these results signify – probably nothing – or maybe an emerging trend?

Repeat

So, last summer [2009], after the continuing Wall Street collapse, and the Somnath Basu PhD article on “CFP Trust” in Financial Advisor magazine and this blog, we sent out a follow-up email to the exact same 200 Certified Financial Planners® as before; but carved-out and replaced the 4 CFPs who had resigned the mark, with 4 others.

Link: I Jealously “Shake my Fist” at Somnath Basu PhD

This time we asked the question:

“Have you recently considered allowing your CFP mark to lapse; or resigning it?”

Second Round Results

This time we received exactly eight positive replies [4%] or double the number from the first round. One CFP® said:

“I am rethinking my entire business and marketing philosophy. This includes separation from any taint left over from recent industry scandals – and yes – even including my CFP® mark”

 CMP logo

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Assessment

This little experiment was not statistically significant by any means. And, again it probably is indicative of nothing. Yet, these types of questions must be boldly asked today; even if they were not even timidly asked yesterday.

Nevertheless, cited plausible reasons for the increased negative CFP® mark response may be:

 

  • CFP BoS lacks modernity and membership alliance. 
  • SEC mismanagement.
  • NASD/FINRA impotence.
  • Wall Street greed.
  • Lack of true fiduciary accountability.
  • Client anger and public distrust.
  • Advisor frustration at lost income.
  • College for Financial Planning and American College credibility.  
  • ME-P operations in the medical niche advisory space.
  • CFP® mark and related industry certification taint.
  • Alternative degrees and available designations.
  • Rise of RIAs and the fiduciary CMPmark for healthcare specificity.
  • Resigning [doing] and considering [thinking] are not equivalent;
  • etc, etc. 

It is interesting to note that no CFP® resigned their mark who did not hold either another graduate degree [MBA, MSFS, MA, MS, PhD], or more rigorous industry [CFA and CPA] certification.

Assessment 

So, is CFP mark allegiance just a union-like mentality of “united we stand – divided we fall”, by those with little to no gravitation pull of their own – or something else; ie., industry group think? You decide; and do tell us what you think.

Note: I am the founder of the CMP online education and certification program for financial advisors and consultants interested in the health economics, finance and medical practice management space, and a former [resigned] certified financial planner www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org 

Update 2013:

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

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Why Most Financial Advisors Won’t be Fiduciaries

Industry Groups Differ On Fiduciary Standard

By Staff ReportersBenjamin Bills

The House Financial Services Committee recently heard two takes on the fiduciary standard – investment advisors who want it applied to broker dealers – and broker-dealers who want to apply a universal standard of care to all advisors, including investment advisors.

Assessment

And so, we encourage all ME-P subscribers to read industry trade magazines [aka ”trade rags”] to learn how some financial advisors fleece physicians and other investors by not being fiduciaries; with sincere apologies to all honest and hard working fiduciary advisors.Become a CMP IOW: Follow the money.

Link: http://www.financialadvisormagazine.com/fa-news/4532-industry-groups-differ-on-fiduciary-standard-.html

www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Channel Surfing

Have you visited our other topic channels? Established to facilitate idea exchange and link our community together, the value of these topics is dependent upon your input. Please take a minute to visit. And, to prevent that annoying spam, we ask that you register. 

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Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

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Sponsors Welcomed

And, credible sponsors and like-minded advertisers are always welcomed.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2007/11/11/advertise

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Take the Hospital Endowment Fund Management Challenge!

Calling all Financial Advisors – Are You CMP™ Worthy?

By Staff ReportersBecome a CMP

After conducting a comprehensive fundraising program, the Hoowa Medical Center received initial gifts of $50 million to establish an endowment. Its status as the community’s only trauma center and neonatal intensive care unit causes it to provide substantial amounts of unreimbursed care every year. This phenomenon, together with the declining reimbursements and an estimated 6% increase in operating costs, leaves the Center with a budgeted cash shortfall of $4 million next fiscal year. Although the new endowment’s funds are available to cover such operating shortfalls, the donors also expect their gifts to provide perpetual support for a leading-edge medical institution.

The Treasurer

Bill, the Center’s treasurer, has been appointed to supervise the day-to-day operations of the endowment. One of his initial successes was convincing his investment committee to retain a consultant who specializes in managing endowment investments. The consultant has recommended a portfolio that is expected to generate long-term investment returns of approximately 10%. The allocation reflects the consultant’s belief that endowments should generally have long-term investment horizons. This belief results in an allocation that has a significant equity bias. Achieving the anticipated long-term rate of returns would allow the endowment to transfer sufficient funds to the operating accounts to cover the next year’s anticipated deficit. However, this portfolio allocation carries risk of principal loss as well as risk that the returns will be positive but somewhat less than anticipated. In fact, Bill’s analysis suggests that the allocation could easily generate a return ranging from a 5% loss to a 25% gain over the following year.

The Committee

Although the committee authorized Bill to hire the consultant, he knows that he will have some difficulty selling the allocation recommendation to his committee members. In particular, he has two polarizing committee members around whom other committee members tend to organize into factions. John, a wealthy benefactor whose substantial inheritances allow him to support pet causes such as the Center, believes that a more conservative allocation that allows the endowment to preserve principal is the wisest course. Although such a portfolio would likely generate a lower long-term return, John believes that this approach more closely represents the donors’ goal that the endowment provide a reliable and lasting source of support to the Center. For this committee faction, Bill hopes to use MVO to illustrate the ability of diversification to minimize overall portfolio risk while simultaneously increasing returns. He also plans to share the results of the MCS stress testing he performed suggesting that the alternative allocation desired by these “conservative” members of his committee would likely cause the endowment to run out of money within 20 to 25 years.

The Polarizer

Another polarizing figure on Bill’s committee is Marcie, an entrepreneur who took enormous risks but succeeded in taking her software company public in a transaction that netted her millions. She and other like-minded committee members enthusiastically subscribe to the “long-term” mantra and believe that the endowment can afford the 8% payout ratio necessary to fund next year’s projected deficit. Marcie believes that the excess of the anticipated long-term rate of return over the next year’s operating deficit still provides some cushion against temporary market declines. Bill is certain that Marcie will focus on the upside performance potential. Marcie will also argue that, in any event, additional alternative investments could be used as necessary to increase the portfolio’s long-term rate of return. Bill has prepared a comparative analysis of payout policies illustrating the potential impact of portfolio fluctuations on the sustainability of future payout levels. Bill is also concerned that Marcie and her supporters may not fully understand some of the trade-offs inherent in certain of the alternative investment vehicles to which they desire to increase the allocated funds.

Key Issues:

1. Given the factors described in the case study (anticipated long-term investment return, anticipated inflation rate, and operating deficit) how should Bill recommend compromise with respect to maximum sustainable payout rates?

2. How should Bill incorporate the following items into his risk management strategy?

a. educating the committee regarding types of risk affecting individual investments, classes, and the entire portfolio;

b. measuring risk and volatility;

c. provisions for periodic portfolio rebalancing;

d. using tactical asset allocation; and,

e. developing and implementing a contingency plan.

3) What additional steps should Bill take to form a group consensus regarding the appropriate level of endowment investment risk?

4) What additional elements should Bill add to his presentation to target the concerns of the “conservative” and “aggressive” committee members, respectively?

Assessment

And so, financial advisors, planners and wealth managers; are you up to answering this challenge? We dare you to respond! Visit: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com 

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Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

ME-P Thought-Leader [MD] in the News

Brian J. Knabe MD of Savant Capital Management

By Max Alexander

Dow Jones Newswires; 212-416-2245 Brian J. Knabe MD

Lots of doctors get burnt out dealing with the business end of medicine. But Brian Knabe, a family practice physician in Rockford, Ill., had such a passion for crunching numbers that he became a financial planner.

Knabe, 42 years old, still sees patient’s two half-days a week. He also teaches residents for another half-day at the University of Illinois – College of Medicine.

Most of the week, he’s a certified financial planner with Savant Capital Management.

“I hear all the jokes,” says Knabe, “the most popular being some version of, ‘Hey I guess my portfolio’s doing so badly, they had to bring in the doctor.'”

When the laughter dies down – it doesn’t take long – people often ask what motivated him to transition from medicine into finance.

His short answer is what you’d expect from a wealth adviser: “I wanted to diversify my career.”

The long answer includes a lifelong passion for math that runs in the family. Knabe’s father and brother are both engineers, and the doctor himself majored in bioengineering at Marquette University. “In college, I loved calculus, statistics and differential equations,” he says.

Growing up in Rockford, his best friend was Brent Brodeski, a partner at Savant, and Knabe had been a client of the firm since 1995. “For years, I joked with Brian, ‘If you ever get bored with medicine, you can join us,'” says Brodeski. “Three years ago he called and said, ‘I’ll take you up on that.’ I was floored.”

Knabe wasn’t bored with medicine. “I love taking care of patients, and the intellectual stimulation of the field,” he says. “So I told the partners at Savant that I would only do this if they allowed me to continue practicing medicine part-time.” Meanwhile, he went back to Marquette and got his CFP credentials.

About half of Knabe’s financial clients are doctors, who appreciate his insider’s knowledge of their work and financial issues. Both fields involve privacy and trust, he notes, and both involve planning for the future. They also involve an element of uncertainty.

Sometimes his advice is specifically health-related.

“One client I was working with was a couple where the husband had a terminal illness,” recalls Knabe. “I worked closely with the family in planning living will issues and durable power of attorney for health care. I’ve helped other clients wade through health insurance and disability issues.”

Yes, financial clients do sometimes ask him for medical advice, but he stops them before they can unbutton their shirt.

“If they have a problem and need a diagnosis, I’ll tell them where to go to get a second opinion,” he says.

Link: http://online.wsj.com/article_email/BT-CO-20090914-711325-kIyVDAtMEM5TzEtNDIxMDQwWj.html 

Managing Editor’s Note:Become a CMP

Dr. Knabe is also enrolled in the www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com program in health economics and medical practice management for financial advisors and healthcare consultants.

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com 

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Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Evaluating a Sample Physician Financial Plan III

Stress Testing Results a Decade Later

[By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; CPHQ, MBA, CMP™]

[By Hope Rachel Hetico; RN, MHA, CPHQ, CMP™]dave-and-hope4

We are often asked by physicians and colleagues; medical, nursing and graduate students, and/or prospective clients to see an actual “comprehensive” financial plan. This is a reasonable request. And, although most doctors who are regular readers of this Medical Executive-Post have a general idea of what’s included, many have never seen a professionally crafted financial plan. This not only includes the outcomes, but the actual input data and economic assumptions, as well.

The ME-P Difference

And so, in a departure from our pithy and typically brief journalistic style, we thought it novel to present such a plan for hindsight review. But; we present same in a very unusual manner befitting our iconoclastic and skeptical next-generation Health 2.0 philosophy. And, we challenge all financial advisors to do same and compare results with us.

How so?

By using a real life plan constructed a decade ago and letting ME-P reader’s review, evaluate and critique same.

  • Part I is for a married drug-rep, then medical school student [51 pages] with no children.
  • Part II is for the same mid-career practicing physician [28 pages] with 2 children.
  • Part III is for the same experienced practitioner at his professional zenith [56 pages].

Part III: Sample Financial Plan III

Fiduciary Advisors

fp-book2

As former financial advisors and licensed insurance agents – and a reformed certified financial planner – it is our duty to act as economic fiduciaries for clients. In other words; to put client interests above our own. This culture was incumbent in our participatory online www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org educational program in health economics and medical practice management; since inception in 2000.

Assessment

And so, as Edward I. Koch famously asked as Mayor of New York City from 1978-1989: “how am I doing”; we sought to ask and answer same. What did we do right or wrong; and how were our assumptions correct or erroneous?  As Certified Professionals in Healthcare Quality this is the question we continually seek to answer in medicine. And, as health economists, this is the financial advisory equivalent of Evidence Based Medicine [EBM] or Evidence Based Dentistry [EBD] etc. It is a query that all curious FAs should ask.

Note: Be sure to review sample plan I and II, right here:

Link: Sample Financial Plan I

Link: Sample Financial Plan II

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. As a financial advisor, accountant, financial planner, etc., we challenge you to lay bare your results as we have done. And, be sure to “rant and rave” – and – “teach and preach” about this post in the style of Socrates, with Candor, Intelligence and Goodwill, to all. Doctors – chime in – too. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

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Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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FINANCE: Financial Planning for Physicians and Advisors
INSURANCE: Risk Management and Insurance Strategies for Physicians and Advisors

 

ASSUMPTIONS

Sample Mega Plan for a New Physician

Joe Good, a 30-year-old pharmaceutical sales representative, and his pregnant wife Susie Good, a 30-year-old accountant, sought the services of a certified financial planner because of a $150,000 inheritance from Joe’s grandfather. The insecurity about what to do with the funds was complicated by their insecurity over future employment prospects, along with Joe’s frustrated boyhood dream of becoming a physician, along with only a fuzzy concept of their financial future.

After several information-gathering meetings with the CFP, concrete goals and objectives were clarified, and a plan was instituted that would assist in financing Joe’s medical education without sacrificing his entire inheritance and current lifestyle. They desired at least one more child, so insurance and other supportive needs would increase and were considered, as well. Their prioritized concerns included the following:

1. What is the proper investment management and asset allocation of the $150,000?

2. Is there enough to pay for medical school and support their lifestyle?

3. Can they indemnify insurance concerns through this transitional phase of life,  including the survivorship concerns of premature death or disability?

4. Can they afford for Susie to be the primary bread winner through Joe’s medical school,   internship, and residency years?

5. Can they afford another child?

Current income was not high, and current assets were below the unified estate tax-credit. Therefore, income and estate-planning concerns were not significant at that time.

After thoroughly discussing the gathered financial data, and determining their risk profile, the CMP™ made the following suggestions:

1. Reallocate the inheritance based on their risk tolerance, from conservative to long-term growth.

2. Maximize group health, life, and disability insurance benefits.

3. Supplement small quantities of whole life insurance with larger amounts of term insurance.

4. Create simple wills, for now.

Sample Mega Plan for a Mid-Life Physician

A second plan was drawn up 10 years later, when Joe Good was 40 years old and a practicing internist. Susan, age 40, had been working as a consultant for the same company for the past decade. She was allowed to telecommunicate between home and office. Daughter Cee is nine years old, and her brother Douglas is seven years old.

The preceding suggestions had been implemented. The family maintained their modest lifestyle, and their investment portfolio grew to $392,220, despite the withdrawal of $10,000 per year for medical school tuition. The financial planning aspects of the family’s life went unaddressed. Educational funding needs for Cee and Douglas prompted another frank dialogue with their CMP. Their prioritized concerns at this point were as follows:

1. Reallocation of the investment portfolio

2. Educational funding for both children

3. Tax reduction strategies

4. Medical partnership buy-in concerns

5. Maximization of their investment portfolio

6. Review of risk management needs and long-term care insurance

7. Retirement considerations

The following suggestions were made:

1. Grow the $392,220 nest egg indefinitely.

2. Project future educational needs with current investment vehicles.

3. Maximize qualified retirement plans with tax efficient investments.

4. Update wills to include bypass marital trust creation, and complete proper testamentary planning, including guardians for Cee and Douglas.

5. Retain a professional medical practice valuation firm for the practice buy-in.

Sample Mega Plan for a Mature Physician

At age 55, Dr. Joseph B. Good was a board-certified and practicing internist and partner of his group. Susan, age 55, was the office manager for Dr. Good’s practice, allowing her to provide professional accounting services to her husband’s office and thereby maximizing benefits to the couple from the practice. Daughter Cee was 24 years old, and her brother Douglas was 22 years old. The preceding suggestions had been implemented.  They upgraded their home and modest lifestyle within the confines of their current earnings. They did not invade their grandfather’s original inheritance, which grew to $1,834,045. Reallocation was needed. The other financial planning aspects of their lives had gone unaddressed. Retirement and estate planning issues prompted another revisit with their original CMP’s junior partner.

Their prioritized concerns at this point were as follows:

1. Long-term care issues

2. Retirement implementation

3. Estate planning

4. Business continuity concerns

The following suggestions were made:

1. Analyze the cost and benefits of long-term case insurance, funded with current income until retirement.

2. Reallocate portfolio assets and  plan for estate tax reduction, with offspring and charitable planning consideration..

3. Retain a professional practice management firm for practice sale, with proceeds to maintain current lifestyle until age 70.

If you want the opportunity to reach a personalized weekly audience of health care industry insiders, innovators and watchers, the Medical Executive-Post and its educational forums may be right for you?

Advertise with us:

https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2007/11/11/advertise/

Ann Miller; RN, MHA

[Executive Director]

Medical Executive-Post

Product DetailsProduct DetailsProduct Details

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Meet Brian J. Knabe MD CFP™ CMP™

A New ME-P Thought-Leader

By Ann Miller; RN, MHA

[Executive Director]Brian J. Knabe MD

Brian J Knabe MD is a financial advisor with Savant Capital Management www.SavantCapital.com. He uses his experience from the medical field in his work with clients, portfolio managers, physicians and other financial advisors to develop comprehensive planning, investment, and tax strategies for professionals.

Medical and Financial Background

Brian is a magna cum laude graduate of Marquette University with an honors degree in biomedical engineering. He earned his medical degree from the University Illinois College of Medicine. Brian also attended the University of Illinois for his family practice residency, where he served as chief resident. Brian is currently pursuing his Certified Financial Planner (CFP®) designation, and he recently passed the exam.

Certified Medical Planner™

Dr. Knabe is also matriculating in the online www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org [CMP™] charter-designation program for financial advisors and medical management consultants, from the Institute of Medical Business Advisors, Inc.

Personal Background

As if the above were not enough to keep him busy, Brian is also a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Family Medicine with the University of Illinois. He is a member of several professional organizations, including the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Medical Association [AMA], and the Catholic Medical Association. Brian has also served as the vice president of membership for the Blackhawk Area Council of the Boy Scouts of America.

Our Congratulations

And so, we trust all ME-P readers will give a congratulatory “shout-out” to Brian J. Knabe MD, our newest “thought-leader.” Read his position paper here:

Evidence Based Investing [A Scientific Framework for the Art of Investing]

Link: Evidence Based Investing[1][1]

We trust we will hear much more from him in the future.

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Tell us what you think about the credentials of Dr. Knabe. Is this extreme education a new-wave of fiduciary focus for all financial advisors and planners in the healthcare space? Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

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Sponsors Welcomed

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How to Become a ME-P Thought-Leader

Answering a Growing Chorus of Inquiries

By Professor Hope Rachel Hetico; RN, MHA, CMP™

[Managing Editor]hetico

The Medical Executive-Post is the complimentary companion blog to the premium peer-reviewed quarterly subscription journal: Healthcare Organizations [Financial Management Strategies]. While the perspective of our blog is private medical practitioners, the focus of our e-journal on CD-ROM is large medical groups, healthcare organizations, hospitals, healthcare-systems, ASCs, emerging healthcare institutions and medical business entities  TABLE OF CONTENTS

HOFMS

The ME-P is for Doctors

 

Currently, the ME-P is being developed as a common venue for medical professionals to share their insights on how to best manage a private medical practice. A well-established practice will have a solid financial and executive-management foundation, and will have protocols, procedures and contingency plans in place before they are ever needed in an emergency. And so, we seek new-wave and next-generation input from physicians, osteopaths, podiatrists, dentist, nurses, PAs, CRNAs and optometrists who have experience starting and running medical practices in the Health 2.0 modern era. The goal is better patient care as doctors avoid costly or tragic management mistakes.

biz-book

The ME-P is for Financial Advisors and Management Consultants

Physician advisors like attorneys, accountants, practice managers, medical billing experts, insurance agents, commercial realtors, healthcare IT experts and others are invited to display their expertise, too. You may not become rich here, but you may become famous, or at least develop an excellent client base from the doctors and practitioners reading your articles, posts and comments! Financial advisors, CMAs, CFAs, MBAs, PhDs, CFP® and Certified Medical Planners [CMP™] are also invited to strut “cognitive-stuff”, as free-labor publishing entrepreneurs! Then, we aim to unite both sectors for success.  

fp-book3

Steps to Becoming a Thought-Leader

1. Send us an email with your bio and contact info.

2. Tell us why you want to write for the ME-P.

3. Send in an original writing sample.

We may follow-up and discuss your credentials and the topics you’re interested in writing about.

Assessment  

Speaking engagements, travel to exotic locales, and print or e-book chapter contributions may all be in your future because of your career launching contributions to the ME-P. Everyone has something to share and teach, and we look forward to learning from everyone joining us here. And, please feel free to contact us for deeper involvement in all www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com, www.HealthDictionarySeries.com or www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com activities. Take your career to the next level with the ME-P.

HDS

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Tell us what you think. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com 

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Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest ME-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

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Sponsors Welcomed

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Selecting Financial Advisors the Risky Way

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Physician Due Diligence is Important

[By Daniel B. Moisand; CFP®, and the ME-P Staff]Tall Shadows

While the merits of hiring the right financial advisor [FA] may be clear, hiring the wrong one can be devastating. Medical professionals still tend to have higher incomes and are an attractive target for most financial institutions and scam artists. This fear is a poor excuse for not getting the assistance necessary. Advice about who to engage for financial assistance comes from a hodge-podge of disjointed sources. This leads to good intentions and bad results. Take caution when using the following as sources of advice.

Relying on Family and Friends

By far more people seek financial advice from trusted family members and friends than any other source.  This is only natural. It is essential to trust that you are getting advice from a source that means well. It is also important that you get along well with your advisors. Hesitating to communicate with your advisor, even a great advisor, can cause problems even more problematic that getting bad advice from someone you like. While these sources have a good handle on the essential elements of trust and rapport, it is the competence of the advice that is most often the issue. The life and money experiences of those who are close to you certainly have value, but they are not necessarily relevant to your unique goals and circumstances. THINK: Bernie Madoff.

Media

A few years ago, the dominant media force in consumer oriented financial matters was the print media.  Magazines and newsletters proliferated with the bull market. More recently however, television has supplanted print even in the bear market. For example, a study now estimates that 80 percent of what the average American knows about current events comes from TV. Why wait three weeks for the next issue when you can get a commentary instantly on the television? There is nothing wrong with watching shows that cover the markets or subscribing to a consumer finance magazine. It is certainly a good idea to be informed. However, be wary of the quality and applicability of information put out by the media.

The Internet

It is easy to run across an ad for prescriptions drugs on television. Images prance across the screen followed by a litany of potential side effects and the obligatory, “Ask your doctor about”. With the expansion of the information superhighway, more and more companies are going direct to the consumer in some manner or another.

Financially speaking this information can be of great benefit but should also generate more concern. It is very easy to project a particular image via the web. The webmaster controls the interaction from what you see to what you hear. One of the results of this is that the Internet has already garnered a reputation as a breeding ground for new scams. More prevalent, however, is the presentation of information meant to be useful that is simply wrong, misinterpreted, or misapplied. The most terrifying source of misinformation on the net is the chat rooms. Here the entire interaction is clouded by anonymity. Some people enter chat rooms because there is a comfort in anonymity when asking a question. There is also a danger in an anonymous answer. When it comes to something as important as your finances or your health, the prudent course should be to take all the advice with a grain of salt. A great deal of consideration to the quality of the source is in order. It is also essential that one understand the level of accountability a source may possess.   fp-book2

Assessment

Much has been written on financial advisor selection, here on the ME-P and elsewhere; but little on how not to select an advisor. We trust this information will be of assistance to the medical professional in some small increment. Send in your FA stories; both good and bad.

Channel Surfing the ME-P

Have you visited our other topic channels? Established to facilitate idea exchange and link our community together, the value of these topics is dependent upon your input. Please take a minute to visit. And, to prevent that annoying spam, we ask that you register. It is fast, free and secure.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Dictionary of Health Insurance and Managed Care

Product Details  Product Details

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

***

Discount Brokerages versus On-Line Brokerages

Physicians Must Appreciate the Differences

By Daniel B. Moisand; CFP® and the ME-P StaffME-P Blogger

Here are a few questions for all physician-investors to consider in 2009:

1. True or False? 

The key to investment success is to pay as little for a trade as possible.

2. True or False? 

The higher the number of trades in an investment account, the better the investment results.

3. True or False? 

The majority of revenue of a discount or on-line brokerage comes from trades. 

A: The answers should be crystal clear! False, False and True. It is almost entirely that simple.

Cost Control

Much like a medical practice, keeping costs down is an important objective of personal finance but, it is certainly not the key to success.  There are many studies that show that active trading garners inferior results compared to a longer term buy and hold type of strategy. One of the most publicized recently was conducted by a UC-Davis team led by Dr. Terrance Odean. The study examined the actual tracing activity of thousands of self-directed accounts at a major discount brokerage over a six-year period. The results were clear. Regardless of trading level, most of the accounts underperformed the market and showed that the higher the number of trades, the worse the result.

Of Bulls and Bears

While the U.S. markets were on a dramatic upswing a decade ago, the general interest level in them increased as well.  More households owned financial assets than ever before. Demographics drive much of this surge. The older edge of the baby boom generation is finding that as the children leave home, they have more income than ever before and saving for retirement becomes a higher priority. The proliferation of defined contribution [401-k, 403-b] retirement plans has also forced more people to take responsibility for their long-term security. When, the US stock market was on a tear; one would have be wise to remember an old Wall Street saying – “Don’t confuse brains with a bull market.” Unfortunately today, far too many self-directed investors did not heed the warnings. The media is full of stories about investors whose portfolios were decimated by the recent bear market. While this loss of wealth is somewhat tragic, in almost all cases the losses were made possible by poor planning and/or poor execution that a mediocre advisor would have avoided.

The Business of Advice

One also cannot conclude that everyone is acting as his or her own investment advisor. The advice business continues to thrive. Sales of load mutual funds have continued to grow, as has commission revenue at full-service firms. No-load funds have continued to grow as well and gain market share from the load funds. However, it would be inaccurate to tie that growth to do-it-yourselfers. Much of the growth of no-load funds can be attributed to the advice of various types of advisors who are recommending the funds. In addition, several traditionally no-load fund families have begun to offer funds through brokers for a load.

The Discounters

For physicians and all clients, the primary attraction to a discounter is cost. Everyone loves a bargain. Once it is determined that it is a good idea to buy say 100 shares of IBM, the trade needs to get executed. When the trade settles one owns 100 shares of IBM, regardless of what was paid for the trade. There is no harm in saving a few bucks. However, the decision to buy the IBM shares and when to sell those shares will have a far greater impact on the investment results than the cost of the trade as long as the level of trading is kept at a prudent level. The fact is that most good advisors use discount firms for custodial and transaction services. The leading providers to advisors are Schwab, Fidelity, and Waterhouse.fp-book1

Ego Driven

In addition to cost savings, discounters appeal to one’s ego for business. Everyone wants to feel like a smart investor; especially doctors. Often, marketing materials will cite the IBM example and portray the cost difference as an example of how the investor is either stupid or being ripped off. There is also a strong appeal to one’s sense of control. An investor is made to feel like they are the masters of their own destiny.  All of this is a worthy goal. One should feel confident, in control, and smart about financial issues. Hiring a professional should not result in losing any of these feelings, rather solidify them. Getting one’s affairs in order is smart. The advisor works for the client so a client should maintain control by only delegating tasks to the extent one is comfortable. Knowing that the particular circumstances are being addressed effectively should yield enhanced confidence.

Sales Pressure Release

The final reason people turn to discount and on-line brokerages is to avoid sales pressure. Unlike the stereotypical stockbroker, no one calls to push a particular stock. Instead, sales pressure is created within the mind of the investor. By maintaining a steady flow of information about stocks and the markets to the account holders, brokerages keep these issues in the forefront of the investor’s minds. This increases the probability that the investor will act on the information and execute a trade. Add some impressive graphics and interfaces and the brokerage can keep an investor glued to the screen. The Internet has made this flow easier and cheaper for the brokerages, lowering costs and increasing the focus on trade volume to achieve profitability.

Assessment

The pressurized information flow however, does little to protect investors during a bear market. Ironically, this focus on trading is one of the very conflicts investors are trying to avoid by fleeing a traditional full service broker.

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. What are your feelings on discount and internet brokers? Tell us what you think. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, be sure to subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com 

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Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest ME-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

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Sponsors Welcomed

And, credible sponsors and like-minded advertisers are always welcomed.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2007/11/11/advertise

ME-P Marks Post Number One Thousand

Milestone Reached in Record Time

By Ann Miller; RN, MHA

[Executive Director]dave-and-hope2

I’ve had the great pleasure of working with Dr. Dave Marcinko and Hope Hetico since the launch of this Medical Executive-Post; 18 months ago. To watch its growth, and the momentum of their efforts and passion to share protean knowledge on behalf of the profession, serves as a personal beacon for me. And, our target market; medical executives, financial advisors and related management consultants seems to agree.

www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

1,000 Posts

When we launched this companion blog to our institutional, 2-volume, print journal, Healthcare Organization [Financial Management Strategies], the attainment of one thousand posts seemed a long way off. We were not even sure we would still be “in-business” today. We are, and with post number 1,010 – time sure does fly.

www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Definition of a Post

A post is a unit of knowledge. Think: knol. Our goal for each post is to offer industry essays, insider columnists, interviews, definitions, case models, expert opinions, news, gossip and investigative reportage and comments; all in a moderated business forum ecosystem. New-wave is good; so is professional expertise, as well as a short and pithy writing style; so is leading-edge and next-generation information with “fly.” 

www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Congratulations

Dave and Hope deserve a huge Mazel-Tov as the ME-P marches on, connecting medical professionals, financial advisors and management consultants, nationally. Now, by my calculations:

1,000 post / 18 months = 55 post per month / 30 day / month = about 2 cognitive posts per day. Oh, by the way: we don’t include advertising or classified ads in our posting counts. And, let us not forget the support and efforts of our dedicated staff, as well.

Assessment

The motto of the ME-P matches the philosophy of iMBA, Inc:

“Seeking Solutions and Providing Essential Economics Information for Physicians, Business Executives and Financial Leaders of the Healthcare Enterprise” 

www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com

Conclusion

And so, to keep receiving the Medical Executive-Post, please place our widget on your blog, wiki or website; and be sure to actually subscribe today. We enjoy being delivered to your desktop, each day.

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Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com  or Bio: www.stpub.com/pubs/authors/MARCINKO.htm

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Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

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Developing a Financial – Management – Advisory Practice for Doctors

Deep Knowledge and Personalized Marketing Brings in New Clients

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™

BY Professor Hope Rachel Hetico; RN, MHA, CMP™

[ME-P Publisher and Managing Editordave-and-hope]

In any marketing situation, the more you know about your target audience, the more successful you will be. Accordingly, all of the old rules still hold true, such as “do your homework.” Unfortunately, for some financial advisors and management consultants, homework means researching broad (i.e., vague) demographic information such as zip codes, income, and age. This broadband approach to marketing is insufficient and unlikely to succeed. For example, SWOT analysis is best done in-house, while related medical marketing information can be obtained from the Institute of Medical Business Advisors, Inc.

www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com

Focus like a Laser Beam

An absolute of communication is to focus on the person receiving your message. If you don’t know anything about the person, you can’t focus on what is important to him or her, and you end up placing too much emphasis on yourself. Your message then carries less weight and has less impact.

Defining Your Niche

Instead of approaching all people in a certain neighborhood or age group, look for people within professional subcategories—people who use their talents in a specific way. Primary care physicians, dentists, podiatrists and optometrists apply their talents differently than surgeons or pediatricians. And, private management consultants and entrepreneurs use their talents differently than large corporate managers.

Develop a Profile

Let’s look at the medical entrepreneur niche space. Perhaps you regularly work with such entrepreneurs who manufacture or deal in medical gadgets, Durable Medical Equipment [DME], healthcare IT devices, instruments etc., and would like to increase the number of clients you serve in this niche.biz-book

The Process

First, you need to develop a profile that gives you specific information about those who manufacture said medical widgets in your area (i.e., more than just their zip codes), bearing in mind of course, that the profile is a point of departure. The general profile is then divided into several subsets based upon their specialty sales-type, devices, locations, market size, gender, etc. Concentrate on developing niches in which you have existing clients. Next, consider the attitudes, values, and mental processes common to all of your clients within a given niche. Knowing (or at least being able to project) what those qualities are will make your marketing efforts more successful because you already are familiar with who they are, their values, and how they want to receive information.

Client Values

How do you find out what someone’s values are? Just watch the person work. Ask questions. What do you want? Why do you do that? What’s important to you? To what words and phrases do you relate? What words and phrases do you resent? What does your desk look like? How do you prefer to receive information? Do you prefer a structured or a more relaxed environment?

The Value of Profiles

Developing profiles of specific groups within any given niche helps you establish rapport with people who are not yet clients. Many marketers make their initial contact through a letter. That’s dangerous, unless you are able to establish rapport in the letter. If not, you have diminished your reputation and accomplished little.

Mirroring

If you understand the concept of mirroring, you know it is important to mimic the other person’s breathing, vocal tonality and body language. That works amazingly well in meetings or even during telephone conversations.

Beware Letters

However, you can’t mimic in a letter, so you have to mirror the other person’s mentality. You have to match his or her attitudes, values, and mental processes in your marketing. Again, to consider sending a marketing letter – without first developing a profile – may be a foolish gamble.

Assessment

In short, relationship niche marketing can work to increase your practice without diminishing your reputation.

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Enter the Certified Medical Planner™

For those fiduciaries interested in the medical management and the healthcare financial advisory deep-space, for doctors and medical professionals, please visit www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com for more information.

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated? Despite the CFP imbroglio, how do you niche market, or attract physicians or other “high-value” clients, to your advisory practice? Do you possess any special deep-knowledge or “gravitational pull?” 

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I Jealously “Shake my Fist” at Somnath Basu PhD

On CFP® Mis [Trust] – One Doctor’s Painful Personal Experience

[“So Sorry to Say it … but I Told You So”]

By: Dr David Edward Marcinko; FACFAS, MBA, CMP™

[Publisher-in-Chief]dem21

According to Somnath Basu, writing on April 6, 2009 in Financial Advisor a trade magazine, the painful truth is that many financial practitioners are merely sales people masquerading, as financial planners [FPs] and/or financial advisors [FAs] in an industry whose ethical practices have a shameful track record. Well, I agree, and completely. This includes some who hold the Certified Financial Planner® designation, as well as the more than 98 other lesser related organizations, logo marks and credentialing agencies [none of which demand ERISA-like fiduciary responsibility]. For more on this topic, the ME-P went right to the source last month, in an exclusive interview with Ben Aiken; AIF® of Fi360.com  

fp-book4

The CFP® Credential – What Credential?

Basu further writes that stockbrokers and insurance agents who earn commissions from buying and selling stocks, insurance and other financial products realize that a Certified Financial Planner® credential will help grow the volume of their business or branch them into other related and lucrative products and services. After all, there are more than 55,000 of these “credentialed” folks. And, this marketing designation seems to have won the cultural wars in the hearts and minds of an unsuspecting – i.e., duped public; probably because of sheer numbers. Didn’t a CFP Board CEO state that its’ primary goal was growth, a few years ago? Can you say “masses of asses”, as the oft quoted Bill Gates of Microsoft used to say when only 2,000 micro-softies defeated 400,000 IBMers during the PC operating system wars of the early 1980’s. Quantity, and marketing money, can trump quality in the public-relations business; ya’ know … if you repeat the lie often enough … yada … yada … yada! Yet, as the so-called leading industry designation, the CFP® entry-barrier standard is woefully low. Moreover, the SEC’s [FINRA] Series #7 general securities licensure sales examination is not worth much more than a weekend’s study attention, even to the uninitiated.

insurance-book2

Easy In – Worth Less Out

In our experience, we agree with Basu and others who suggest that scores of lightly educated, and sometimes wholly in-articulate and impatient individuals are zipping through the CFP® Board of Standards approved curriculum in three to six months of online, on-ground, or “self-study”. But, that some can do so without a bachelor’s degree when they join wire-houses and financial institutions, which cannot be trusted to adequately train them, is an abomination. And, even more sadly, some of these CFP™ mark-holders, and other folks, believe they have actually received an “education” from same. Of course, their writing skills are often non-existent and I have cringed when told that, in their opinion, advertiser-driven trade magazines constitute “peer-reviewed” and academic publications. Incidentally, have you noticed how thin these trade-rags are getting lately? Much like the print newspaper industry, are they becoming dinosaurs? One agent even told me, point-blank, that his CLU designation was the equivalent of an “academic PhD in insurance.” This was at an industry seminar, where he thought I was a lay insurance prospect.

THINK: No critical thinking skills.

biz-book4

Education

There is another sentiment that may be applied in many of these cases; “hubris.” I mean, these CFP® people … just don’t know – how much they don’t know.”  The very real difference between training versus education is unknown to many wire-houses and FAs, isn’t it? And, please don’t get me started on the differences in pedagogy, heutagogy and androgogy. Moreover, it’s sad when we see truly educated youngsters become goaded by wire-houses into thinking that these practices are de-rigor for the industry. One such applicant to our Certified Medical Planner™ program, for example, had both an undergraduate degree in finance and a graduate degree in economics from the prestigious Johns Hopkins University – in my home town of Baltimore, MD [name available upon request]. He was told, in his Smith Barney wire-house training program, to eschew CMP™ accountability and RIA fiduciary responsibility, when working with potential physician and lay clients; but to get his CFP® designation to gather more clients. To mimic my now 12 year-old daughter; it seems that: SEC Suitability Rules – and – Fiduciary Accountability Drools. And, to quote Hollywood’s “Mr. T”; I pity the fools, er-a, I mean clients. But, T was an actor, and this is serious business.

cmp-logo1

Of CEU Credits and Ethics

Beside trade-marks and logos, we are all aware that continuing education, and a code of ethics, is another important marketing and advertising component of state insurance agents and CFP licensees. It’s that old “be” – or “pretend to be” – a trusted advisor clap-trap. Well, I say horse-feathers for two reasons. First, both my insurance and CFP® Continuing Educational Unit [CEU] requirements were completed by my daughter [while age 7-10], by filling in the sequentially identical and bubble-coded, multiple-choice, answer-blanks each year. Second, this included the mandatory “ethics” portions of each test. When I complained to my CEU vendor, and state insurance department, I was told to “enjoy-the-break.”  My daughter even got fatigued after the third of fourth time she took the “home-based tests” for me.  After I opened my big mouth, the exact order of questions was changed to increase acuity, but remained essentially the same, nevertheless. My daughter got bored, and quit taking the tests for me, shortly thereafter. She always “passed.”dhimc-book3

Thus, like Basu, I also find that far too many financial advisors are unwilling to devote the time necessary to achieve a sound education that will help attain their goals, and would rather sell variable or whole life products than simple term life, even when the suitability argument overwhelmingly suggests so, for a higher payday. We not only have met sale folks without undergraduate degrees, but also too many of those with only a HS diploma, or GED. Perhaps this is why a popular business truism suggests that the quickest way for the uneducated/under educated class to make big bucks, is in sales. Just note the many classified ads for financial advisors placed in the newspaper job-section, under the heading “sales.” Or, in more youthful cultural terms, “fake it – until you make it.”

Of the iMBA, Inc Experience

According to Executive Director Ann Miller RN MHA, and my experience at the Institute of Medical Business Advisors, Inc:

“Far too many financial advisors who contact us about matriculation in our online Certified Medical Planner™ program – in health economics and management for medical professionals – don’t even know what a Curriculum Vitae [CV] is? Instead, they send in Million Dollar Roundtable awards, Million Dollar Producer awards, or similar sales accomplishments as resume’ boosters. It is also not unusual for them to list some sort of college participation on their resumes, and websites, but no school affiliation or dates of graduation, etc. And, they become furious to learn that we require a college degree for our fiduciary focused CMP™ program, and not from an online institution, either. The onslaught of follow-up nasty phone-calls; faxes and emails are laughable [frightening] too.”  

www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com

Assessment

More often than not, it is the financial institutions that FAs and CFP™ certificants’ work for that reward sales behavior with higher commissions, rather than salaries; which encourage such behavior and create the vicious cycles that are now the norm.

THINK: ML, AIG, Citi, WAMU, Wachovia, Hartford, Prudential, etc.

Note: Original author of Restoring Trust in the CFP Mark, Somnath Basu PhD, is program director of the California Institute of Finance in the School of Business at California Lutheran University where he’s also a professor of finance. He can be reached at (805) 493 3980 or basu@callutheran.edu. We have asked him to respond further.

My Story: I am a retired surgeon and former Certified Financial Planner® who resigned my “marketing trademark” over the long-standing fiduciary flap. I watched this chicanery for more than a decade after protesting to magazines like Investment Advisor, Financial Advisor, Registered Rep, Financial Planner, the FPA, etc; up to, and even including the CFP® Board of Standards; to no avail. Feel free to contact me for a copy of a 43 page fax, and other supportive documentation from the CFP® Board of Standards – and their outsourced intellectual property attorneys – over a Federal trademark infringement lawsuit they tried to institute against me for innocent website errors placed by a visually impaired intern. Obviously, they disliked the launch of our CMP™ program. As a health economist and devotee of Ken Arrow PhD, I polity resigned my license, as holding no utility for me, to the shocked CFP Board. They later offered to consider re-instatement for a mere $600 fee with letter of explanation, to which I politely declined. Of course, my first thought after living in the streets of South Philadelphia while in medical school, during the pre-Rocky era, was to say f*** off – but I didn’t. Nevertheless, I still seem to be on their mailing list, years later. No doubt, the list is sold, and re-sold, to various advertisers for much geld. And, why shouldn’t they; an extra bachelor, master and medical degree holder on their PR roster looks pretty good. I distrust the CFP® Board almost as much as I distrust the AMA, and its parsed and disastrous big-pharma funding policies. Right is right – wrong is wrong – and you can’t fool all of the people, all of the time, especially in this age of internet transparency.

Shaking my Fist at Somnath … in Envy

And so, why do I shake my fist at Somnath Basu? It’s admittedly with congratulations, and a bit of schadenfreude, because he wrote an article more eloquently than I ever could, and will likely receive much more publicity [good or slings-arrows] for doing so. You know, it’s very true that one is never a prophet in his own tribe. Oh well, Mazel Tov anyway for stating the obvious, Somnath. The financial services industry – and more specifically – the CFP® emperor have no clothes! Duh!

ho-journal5

Good Guys and White Hats

Now that Basu’s article has appeared in Financial Advisor News e-magazine, the other industry trade magazines are sure to follow the CFP® certification denigration reportage, in copy-cat fashion. And, the fiduciary flap is just getting started. This is indeed unfortunate, because I do know many fine CFP® certificants, and non-CFP® certified financial advisors, who are well-educated, honest and work very diligently on behalf of their clients. It’s just a shame the public has no way of knowing about them – there is no white hat imprimatur or designation for same – most of whom are Registered Investment Advisors [RIAs] or RIA reps. For example, we know great folks like Douglas B. Sherlock MBA, CFA; Robert James Cimasi MHA, AVA, CMP™; J. Wayne Firebaugh, Jr CPA, CFP®, CMP™; Lawrence E. Howes MBA, CFP®; Pati Trites PhD; Gary A. Cook MSFS, CFP®, CLU; Tom Muldowney MSFS, CLU, CFP®, CMP™;  Jeffrey S. Coons PhD, CFP®; Alex Kimura MBA, CFP®; Ken Shubin-Stein MD, CFA; and Hope Hetico RN, MHA, CMP™; etc. And, to use a medical term, there are TNTC [too many, to count] more … thankfully!

Conclusion

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Impact of Performance Fees on Mutual Funds and Physician Portfolios

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More Complex than Realized by Some Doctors

[By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; FACFAS, MBA, CMP™]

[By Professor Hope Rachel Hetico; RN, MHA, CMP™]dave-and-hope4

Physician-investors may find themselves paying advisory fees, brokerage commissions, and other sales charges and expenses. All of these layers of expense can reduce or eliminate the advantage of professional management, if not monitored carefully. Also, fees can have a major impact on investment results. As a percentage of the portfolio, they normally range from low of 15–30 basis points (or .15% to .30%, a basis point is one one-hundredth of one percent) to a high of 300–400 basis points or even higher.

Charges are Universal

All portfolio managers, mutual funds, and investment advisors charge fees in one form or another. Ultimately, they must justify their fees by creating value added, or they would not be in business. Value added includes tangibles, such as greater investment return, as well as intangibles, such as assurance that the investment plan is successfully implemented and monitored, investor convenience, and professional service.

Comparisons Required

Always compare investment performance of funds or managed accounts after fees are deducted; only then can adequate comparisons be made. Also, compare fees within asset classes. Management fees and expenses of investing in bonds or bond funds are much different than the fees of investing in, for example, small companies or emerging market stocks. Whereas 100–200 basis points of fees may be appropriate for an equity portfolio or fund, similar charges may offset the advantages of a managed bond portfolio. With managed bond portfolios, real bond returns have limited long-term potential, because returns are ultimately based on interest rates. For example, if a 3% real (i.e., after inflation) return is expected, 200 basis points in fees may produce a negative after-tax result: 3% real return minus 2% fees minus 10% taxes equals a negative 9% total return.fp-book22

Sales Charges

Mutual funds (and some private portfolio managers) charge sales charges to sell or “distribute” the product. Investors who buy funds through the advice of brokers or “commission based” financial planners will pay a sales load. The many combinations of sales charges fall into three basic categories: front-end, deferred (or back-end), and continuous.

Front-End Fees

Front-end fees are a direct assessment against the initial investment and are limited to a maximum of 8.5%. They usually are stated either as a percentage of the investment or as a percentage of the investment, net of sales charges. For example, a 6% charge on a $10,000 investment is really a $600 charge to invest $9,400 or a real charge of 6.4%. Many low-load funds charge in the range of 1% to 3%. Rather than pay brokers or other purveyors, these fund companies or sponsors use the charges to offset selling or distribution costs. Although rare, some funds charge a load against reinvested dividends.

Deferred Charges

Deferred charges (or back-end loads, or redemption fees) come in many forms. Often, the longer the investor stays with the fund the smaller the charge is upon fund redemption. A typical sliding scale used for deferred charges may be 5-4-3-2-1, where redemption in year 1 is charged 5%, and redemption in year 5 is charged 1%; after year 5, there are no sales charges. Sometimes deferred charges are combined with front-end charges.

Redemption Fees

Certain quoted redemption fees may not apply after a period, such as one year. Funds often use such fees to discourage the trading of funds. Frequently, these charges are paid to the fund itself rather than to the fund management company; or broker. Long-term physician investors actually benefit from this fee structure; short-term shareholders who redeem shares bear the additional liquidation costs to satisfy redemption requests.

Continuous Charges

Continuous sales charges, known as 12b-1 fees for the SEC rule governing such charges, represent ongoing charges to pay distribution costs, including those of brokers who sell and maintain accounts, in which case they are known as “trail commissions.” The fund company may be reimbursed for distribution costs as well. In the prospectus, funds quote 12b-1 charges in the form of a maximum charge. This does not mean that the full charge is incurred, however. For example, a fund with a .75% 12b-1 approved plan may actually incur much lower expenses than .75%. Compared to front-end charges, a .75% per year sales charge of this type could be more costly to investment performance, given enough time.

Sales Loads

Portfolio managers can charge sales loads as well, usually in the form of a traditional WRAP fee arrangement (the investor pays a broker an all-inclusive fee that covers portfolio manager fees and transactions costs). No-load funds can be purchased through brokers or discount brokerage firms. The broker charges a commission for such purchases or sales.

Management Advisory Fees

Private account managers and mutual funds charge a fee for managing the portfolio. These fees typically range between 25 and 150 basis points. Bond funds tend to charge in the range of 25 to 100 basis points, and equity funds charge 75 to 150 basis points. Fees charged by private account managers usually are higher because of the direct attention given to a single doctor client. These managers do not pass along additional administrative costs, however, because they pay them out of the management fee. These management fees come in many forms. Tiered fees can charge smaller accounts a higher fee than larger accounts. Mutual funds often charge “group fees”: a fund family may tier its fee structure to encompass all funds offered by the fund family or by a group of similar funds (such as all international equity funds). Performance fees, although subject to SEC regulations, may be charged as well. A performance fee may be charged if the manager exceeds a certain return or outperforms a particular index or benchmark portfolio.

Administrative Expenses and Expense Ratios

Most private managers are compensated with higher management fees, as mentioned above. Therefore, many private accounts usually do not incur separate administrative expenses. Some management firms charge custodial fees or similar account maintenance fees. Mutual funds incur a number of administrative expenses, including shareholder servicing, prospectuses, reporting, legal and auditing costs, and registration and custodial costs. Mutual funds report these expenses and management fees as an expense ratio—the ratio of expenses to the average net assets of the fund. Expense ratios also include distribution costs or 12b-1 charges.insurance-book10 

Brokerage Commissions

Almost all buyers and sellers of securities incur brokerage commissions. Private “wealth managers” usually provide commission schedules to prospective physician-investors or current clients. Some private managers charge higher management fees and a discounted commission schedule, while others charge lower fees and higher commissions. These combinations of management and commission fees make comparison of prospective managers’ cost structures a difficult task. Most portfolio managers obtain research from brokerage firms, which can affect the commission relationship between broker and manager. Reduced commission schedules exchanged for information are known as “soft dollar costs.” Mutual funds may negotiate similar reduced commission schedules. In this regard, more-competitive brokerage firms can charge lower fees to investors. Commissions are not part of the expense ratio, because they are a part of the security cost basis. Firms with higher portfolio turnover are more likely to have higher commission costs than those with low turnover. Asset class impacts such costs as well. For example, small-cap stocks may be more expensive than large-cap stocks, or foreign bonds may be more expensive than domestic bonds.

Total Cost Approach

To arrive at a relevant comparison of fees among funds and managers, and to see what the total effect of fees on investment performance is, analyze the various charges on a net present value basis. Begin with a given investment amount (e.g., $10,000) and factor in fees over time to arrive at the present value of those fees. Present the comparisons in an easy-to-use table.

Sources of Fee Information

Consult the mutual fund prospectus for fee information. The prospectus has a fund expenses section that summarizes sales charges, expense ratios, and management fees; it does not cover commissions, however. Expense ratios usually are reported for the past 10 years. Commission or brokerage fees are more difficult to find. The statement of additional information and often the annual report disclose the annual amounts paid for commissions. When the total commission paid is divided by average asset values a sense of commission costs can be determined. Private wealth managers disclose fee structures in the ADV I filed with the SEC. Managers must disclose these fees to potential and current clients by providing either ADV Part II or equivalent form to the investor.

Reporting Services

Reporting services, such as Morningstar and Lipper, provide similar information from their own research of mutual funds. These services can be extremely beneficial, because fee information is summarized and often accounted for in the reports’ investment return calculations. This helps the investor and planner make good comparisons of funds. Information services that cover private managers provide information, primarily about management fees.

Assessment

To the extent that online trading, deep discount brokerages, lack of SEC and FINRA oversight, and the recent financial, insurance and banking meltdown has affected the above, it is left up to your discretion and personal situation. Generally, all fess are, and should be, negotiable.

Disclaimer: Both contributors are former licensed insurance agents and financial advisors.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

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Advetising in “Worth” and “Bloomberg” Magazines

Advertisers – Give Me a Break!

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™dr-david-marcinko16

Did you know that financial advisor Judith Zabalaoui, age 71, considered a pioneer of the fee-only business-model of financial services sales, pleaded guilty to using a Ponzi scheme to embezzle more than $3 million from her New Orleans area clients between 1993 and 2007? Yep, it’s true, but this is not really noteworthy to many pundits considering the current financial meltdown on Wall Street. But, do you know … the rest of the story?

Resource Management Inc.

Most of Zabalaoui’s clients came from Resource Management Inc. in Metairie, La., which she founded in 1974, according to the Times Picayune. Apparently, she became a Certified Financial Planner® in 1979, but the certification expired in 1999.

Link: http://www.nola.com/business/t-p/index.ssf?/base/money-1/1233728420253000.xml&coll=1

Assessment

So, here’s the rub. According to reports, Resource Management Inc. was the only firm in the country where each of the principals were allegedly “selected” by Worth [1996 to present], Money [1987] and/or both magazines as one of the top financial consultants in the country. The company also made Bloomberg Wealth Manager’s list of top wealth managers in 2004.

Industry Indignation Index: 55

Now, with all due respect and humility, I have been asked several times by Worth and Bloomberg to “promote yourself” in their “advertiser-driven” publications as a top financial consultant; but never Money magazine. I have always refused their selection charges for same of $12-18,000.

Full disclosure: I am the Founder of www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com and a reformed insurance agent, registered investment advisor and Certified Financial Planner™.

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Was Judith Zabalaoui a fiduciary and what about these magazine “best-of” awards? Are they worthwhile monikers or worthless sales advertisements? What about all the so-called financial certifications, designations and charters; meaningful or meaningless? What is your opinion?

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com  or Bio: www.stpub.com/pubs/authors/MARCINKO.htm

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Integrating Financial and Medical Practice Succession Planning

Some Steps to Consider

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™

[Publisher-in-Chief]dr-david-marcinko8

Medical practice succession planning is a dynamic process requiring current physician ownership and management to plan for the future and implement the resulting plan. Many doctors approach succession planning initially through retirement planning. Once they understand the issues and realities of the tax laws, they are much more amenable to working out a viable succession plan. At the Institute of Medical Business Advisors Inc, we find that some physician-clients have not clearly articulated their goals, but have many pieces of the plan that need to be organized and analyzed to meet their objectives; including both personal and financial issues.

Link: www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com

A Step Wise Process

The steps necessary for successful succession planning are as follows: 

  • Gathering and analyzing data and personal information
  • Contacting the doctor’s other advisors
  • Valuing the practice according to USPAP and IRS guidelines
  • Indentifying the right qualified physician purchaser
  • Projecting estate and transfer taxes
  • Presenting liquidity needs
  • Gathering additional corporate information
  • Identifying dispositive and financial goals
  • Analyzing the needs and desires of non-key employees

An Integrated Approach 

Succession planning can help address financial and nonfinancial issues in a timely manner. Proper planning can also help the doctor accomplish goals with effective, appropriate strategies that satisfy family needs as well as tax issues. Here is a triad approach:

1. First: Address financial and nonfinancial issues in a timely manner

As with other estate planning engagements, there is no due date for succession planning. The owner of a medical practice is busy growing and managing the office. S/he is often not focused on the desirable outcomes in an orderly practice succession. For example, if family members are involved in the practice, there is a good chance that personal issues will need to be addressed. These nonfinancial issues can be just as important as financial concerns when building a comprehensive, workable succession plan.

2. Next: Focus on taxes

Taxes are important because the medical practice probably represents the largest concentration of wealth in the doctor’s estate. When planning for estates with large amounts of wealth, doctors frequently ignore personal issues. It’s important not to make the critical error of maximizing tax savings but destroying the practice through a poor succession plan.

3. Finally: Identify and reach goals

When the physician-owner has addressed succession planning issues in a timely manner, s/he has the opportunity to develop the most effective objectives to accomplish goals. Given enough time, the doctor can even modify goals to reflect changes in the economic environments, as well changes in his or her personal life.

Assessment 

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Medical practices exhibit particular strengths and weaknesses not typically found in publicly owned companies or non-professional family businesses. For example, many times the doctor doesn’t realize the type and amount of planning that needs to be done to transfer the business to a new doctor for maximum value. That is why doctors often need the advice of professionals to define goals and formulate medical practice succession strategies.

Conclusion

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Physician Household Borrowing and/or Investing

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Deciding What Works?

[By Staff Reporters]fp-book4

Another way of asking the above titled question might be, “Is it smart for a doctor’s household to build savings while they are getting out of debt?”  

Financial Priorities

In the first instance, the doctor already has debt and would be increasing the terms of any loans by deferring some of the payments to savings, which is equivalent to borrowing the same amount.

In the second instance, the doctor would be taking on debt to save more money. The answer is that it makes sense to borrow money for investment purposes only if the financial gains derived from the investment are larger than the financial benefits of paying off the debt. But, who can know for sure?

www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com

Minimum Account Payments

Assuming that a medical professional has more debt than needed, and doesn’t make contributions to a retirement account, the concern becomes: [1] should he/she make minimum payments to the debt and contribute to a retirement account; or [2] should he/she make the maximum payments toward the debt or loans, etc?

Downside Risks

It is important to understand the downside risks of a lower payment strategy. Just as stocks return more than bonds due to their higher risk, the lower payment strategy returns more because of its’ higher risk. Taking on debt to finance an investment is riskier than paying off debt for a number of reasons.

First, the US economy may continue its’ current depressionary spiral, and investments and savings could disappear as financial institutions fail. This would leave the doctor with debt that he or she could not service.

Second, the rate-of-return required to decide whether or not to borrow for investment purposes may not be achieved, leaving the doctor in worse financial shape than if he or she had just paid off the debt.

Assessment

Ultimately, the doctor must decide if the added risks are worth the possible gain. But, the services of a fiduciary financial advisor may also be required. However, some doctors may not be ready to receive the sort of “tough-love” required in this case. 

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Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners(TM)

Debt Consolidation for Physicians

Advantages and Disadvantages

By Staff Reportersfp-book5

The main advantage of debt consolidation is that it allows a doctor to make one payment instead of many, and this helps avoid late fees for missed payments. The doctor may save time by having to make only one payment per month instead of many.

Other Advantages

Another advantage is that debt consolidation promotes self-discipline by transferring credit card debt (and other lines of credit) that does not require mandatory principal payments into a fixed-term loan – with mandatory payments that include both principal and interest. This is a useful tool for doctors who may find it difficult to make more than the minimum payments on their loans because they spend too much. It should be obvious that budgeting should go hand-in-hand with this process, because if the doctor continues to spend at the former level, yet now has a mandatory payment, the result can be financially devastating.

A final advantage to debt consolidation is it may result in a lower overall interest rate. This is, of course, conditional on the lender providing the consolidation.

Disadvantages

One disadvantage of debt consolidation is that it can lock a doctor into mandatory payments. Depending on the situation, this can be either a blessing or a curse. It becomes a curse when the fixed payments are so high that he/she can no longer make the full debt payments each month. Depending on the lender, and the terms of the consolidation loan, this could result in the loan being called. The effects of this are obviously detrimental to the doctor.

Other Disadvantages

A second disadvantage is that the doctor loses flexibility when he or she takes on a fixed payment that is larger than the combination of all smaller minimum payments. The fixed-payment schedule becomes detrimental when h/she has an unexpected reduction in income. The doctor without a fixed-payment schedule can increase payments to many small individual loans, and if income reduction occurs, drop the payments back down to the lower level. Then; when normal levels of income return, the higher payments can be resumed.insurance-book2

Assessment

Making larger payments requires discipline; because a lack of same was likely causative of the debt in the first place.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Have you ever been in this situation? Feel free to opine anonymously.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com  or Bio: www.stpub.com/pubs/authors/MARCINKO.htm

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Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

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Defining “Deep” Physician Debt

Exiting the Quagmire

By Staff Reportersfp-book3

There is no magical method or SIMPLE button that a physician or lay household can use to get out of debt. The two most critical factors in this process are budgeting and discipline, as discussed elsewhere on this ME-P blog forum. And, a payment plan that pays off debt by a selected target date will help. Debt consolidation can also be of assistance in this regard.

Defining “Deep-Debt”

According to Eugene Schmuckler PhD, MBA, of the Institute of Medical Business Advisors Inc:

“deep debt” is any financial burden that produces negative daily thoughts, interferes with professional work and/or keeps the doctor awake at night.”

www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com

Payment Plans and Budgets

Once a payment plan has been computed, the doctor should develop a budget that will free up enough money to make the payments. If this isn’t possible because the monthly payments are too high, the payoff period should be lengthened until the amount available for debt payment is equal to (or greater than) the readjusted monthly payment. After this, the doctor should set up a more disciplined approach to spending, budgeting and investing, going forward.

www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Consumer Credit Counseling Services

Unfortunately, more than a few doctors get themselves so deeply into debt that they can’t make the minimum payments required by lenders. This is a very serious situation and usually involves negotiation for payment adjustments. Unless the doctor or his fiduciary financial advisor has experience in this area; it is a good idea to seek help from to an organization like the Consumer Credit Counseling Service.

The CCCS

The CCCS is an organization that works with those who are struggling to manage their financial debt through counseling in the areas of budgeting, understanding credit reports, and debt management. CCCS also provides educational courses for the public, with fee services ranging from $0 to a few hundred dollars. The counseling sessions focus on developing a budget that allows the client to pay all of his/her monthly expenses. The debt management program teaches about debt and also negotiates with lenders for adjusted monthly payments. CCCS tries to get the payment reduced by spreading the payments over a longer period of time and has been successful at getting lenders to reduce or even waive interest on the loans, in some cases.

Bill Consolidation

Another service of the debt-management program is bill consolidation. The debtor sends one payment a month to CCCS, who in turn pays the client’s bills. The education service provides seminars at which various speakers address different financial issues. A medical professional can find the location of the nearest CCCS office (or similar organizations) by calling the National Foundation for Consumer Credit referral line at 800-388-2227.

Assessment

In the climate of today, the above post is no longer one that some physicians might not heed. In fact, the days of the financial super-specialist with arcane products or sophisticated strategies that depend on a perfect storm of economic indicators, is long over. It is time to call in the financial primary care doctor and get back to basics; live on less than you make, and invest prudently, watching all costs.

www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Have you ever used the serves of CCCS, or similar? Feel free to opine anonymously.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com  or Bio: www.stpub.com/pubs/authors/MARCINKO.htm

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Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

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Upcoming Health Economics Interview with Dr. David Marcinko

Coming Soon from Medical Business News, Inc

By Ann Miller; RN, MHA

ME-P Executive-Directordr-david-marcinko22

Medical Business News, Inc., the publisher of Medical News of Arkansas, is a leading source for healthcare industry news that is truly useful. With a professional readership comprised of physicians and key industry decision makers, Medical News publications are devoted entirely to healthcare issues that impact both clinical and administrative best practices. Written and edited specifically for healthcare professionals, MBN writers work with experts at the local, regional and national level to keep stakeholders informed about the ever-evolving healthcare system.

Out Reach

It is no wonder then, why local market MNA editor Jennifer Boulden recently contacted us to arrange an interview with Dr. David Edward Marcinko, our Publisher-in-Chief, who is also a former insurance agent, registered investment advisor, health economist and Certified Financial Planner™

Link: www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com  

Interview Topics

The wide open topic in this environment of medically specific lethargy and macro economic insecurity – personal and business planning for physicians. Of course, since this is a broad field, we will use the rating and ranking system of this blog to help Jennifer and her staff, winnow down categories to top-of-mind concerns of our ME-P subscribers and her MNA readers.

Link: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Assessment

But, we also ask you to send in any particular issues that you may have in order to make the interview helpful and exciting for all concerned.

Link: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated.

Link: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com  or Bio: www.stpub.com/pubs/authors/MARCINKO.htm

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A Due-Diligence ‘Condom’ for Physician Investors

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Using Financial Advisors with Increased Safety

[By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™]dr-david-marcinko8

Following the Bernie Madoff investment scheme, and related financial industry scandals, here are seven “red-flags” that should have alerted physician-investors to proceed with extreme caution. Always consider them before making an investment with any financial advisor [FA], registered representative [RR] or financial advisory firm, regardless of reputation, size, referral recommendation or so-called industry certifications and designations. In other words, according to Robert James Cimasi; MHA, AVA, and a Certified Medical Planner™ from Health Capital Consultants LLC, of St. Louis, MO;” trust no one and paddle your own canoe.”

Red Flags of Cautious Investing

As a former insurance agent, financial advisor, registered representative, investment advisor and Certified Financial Planner™ for more than a decade, the existence of any one of the following items may be a “red-flag” of caution to any investor:

  • Acting as its’ own custodian, clearance firm or broker-dealer, etc.
  • Lack of a well-known accounting firm review with regular reporting.
  • Unreliable or sporadic written performance reports.
  • Rates-of-return that don’t seem to track industry benchmarks.
  • Seeming avoidance of regulatory oversight, transparency or review.
  • Lack of recognized written fiduciary accountability in favor of lower brokerage “sales suitability” standards.
  • No Investment Policy Statement [IPS]. 

Assessment

Let a word to the wise be sufficient going forward. But, in hindsight, a healthy dose of skepticism might have prevented this situation in the first place. As is the usual case, fear and greed often seem to rule the day. Just as there is no such thing as safe sex – just safer sex – there is no thing as safe intermediary investing. But, exercising some common sense will surely make investing with any financial advisor much safer. It’s like a condom for your money. 

For more information on the topic of fiduciary standards – which we have championed for the last ten years in our books, texts, white-papers, journal and online educational Certified Medical Planner™ program for FAs – watch out for our exclusive Medical Executive-Post interview with Bennett Aikin AIF®, Communications Coordinator of www.fi360.com coming in March. Ben, an Accredited Investment Fiduciary® did a great job with the tough questions submitted by our own Ann Miller; RN, MHA and Hope Hetico; RN, MHA, CMP™. Don’t miss it!

Disclaimer

I am the Managing Partner for http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org and I agree with this message.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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