OUTCOMES: In-Person and Tele-Health Encounters During COVID-19

By Staff Reporters and MCOL

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Outcomes of In-Person and Tele-Health Encounters During COVID-19

 •  Ambulatory encounters decreased by 1.0% and the number of in-person encounters per enrollee decreased by 17.0% from 2019 to 2020.
 •  For members with an initial telehealth encounter for a new acute condition, the adjusted odds ratio was 1.44 for all follow-ups combined and 1.11 for an emergency department encounter.
 •  For members with an initial telehealth encounter for a new chronic condition, the adjusted odds ratios were 0.94 for all follow-ups combined and 0.94 for in-patient admissions.

Source: JAMA Network, April 26, 2022

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HOSPITALS: Management, Operations and Strategies

Tools, Templates and Case Studies

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Biden Administration to Overhaul Vertical [Health Systems] Merger Guidelines

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By Health Capital Consultants, LLC

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Biden Administration to Overhaul Vertical Merger Guidelines

The U.S. healthcare industry has seen a rise in vertical integration transactions since the passage of the ACA, especially among physician groups integrating with health systems or insurers, as providers seek to fill gaps in their continuum of care. In response to these trends and resulting market imbalances, the Biden Administration is aggressively pursuing antitrust enforcement by updating and revising U.S. antitrust law guidance.

This Health Capital Topics article will discuss the vertical integration movement and the proposed changes to antitrust laws that may affect the future of healthcare. (Read more…) 

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CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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COMMENTS APPRECIATED

Thank You

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PODCASTS: The GREAT ECONOMIC MODERATION / RESIGNATION in Medicine?

A HISTORICAL REVIEW WITH UPDATE

Dr. David Edward Marcinko | The Leading Business Education Network for  Doctors, Financial Advisors and Health Industry Consultants

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

What was the Great Economic Moderation?

The Great Moderation is the name given to the period of decreased macroeconomic volatility experienced in the United States starting in the 1980s.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

During this period, the standard deviation of quarterly real gross domestic product (GDP) declined by half and the standard deviation of inflation declined by two-thirds, according to figures reported by former U.S. Federal Reserve Chair Ben Bernanke. The Great Moderation can be summed up as a multi-decade period of low inflation and positive economic growth.

But, what about health economics, writ large? And, the actual practice of medicine by physicians in the trenches. Consider this historical review.

GOLDEN AGE OF MEDICINE

The ‘golden age of medicine’ – the first half of the 20th century, reaching its zenith with Jonas Salk’s 1955 polio vaccine – was a time of profound advances in surgical techniques, immunization, drug discovery, and the control of infectious disease; however, when the burden of disease shifted to lifestyle-driven, chronic, non-communicable diseases, the golden era slipped away. Although modifiable lifestyle practices now account for some 80% of premature mortality, medicine remains loathe to embrace lifestyle interventions as medicine Here, we argue that a 21st century golden age of medicine can be realized; the path to this era requires a transformation of medical school recruitment and training in ways that prioritize a broad view of lifestyle medicine. Moving beyond the basic principles of modifiable lifestyle practices as therapeutic interventions, each person/community should be viewed as a biological manifestation of accumulated experiences (and choices) made within the dynamic social, political, economic and cultural ecosystems that comprise their total life history. This requires an understanding that powerful forces operate within these ecosystems; marketing and neoliberal forces push an exclusive ‘personal responsibility’ view of health – blaming the individual, and deflecting from the large-scale influences that maintain health inequalities and threaten planetary health. The latter term denotes the interconnections between the sustainable vitality of person and place at all scales. We emphasize that barriers to planetary health and the clinical application of lifestyle medicine – including authoritarianism and social dominance orientation – are maintaining an unhealthy status quo.

NOTE: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31828026/

GOLDEN AGE OF MEDICAL PRACTICE

To listen to all those desperate to reform health care, you get the impression that physicians are pretty horrible people. We are all sexist, greedy, money grubbing tyrants who will perform unnecessary tests and procedures just to make money. We don’t care about quality or cost. We are killing off 250,000 patients every year with our ignored “errors.”

We purposely keep our patients in pain, or we addict them to narcotics just to shut them up. We are constantly told by lawyers that lawsuits are necessary to protect patients from doctors. We provide unsafe drugs just because the drug reps give us free pens and coffee cups. The government must step in to clean up the mess.

PODCAST: https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2017/08/9-reasons-golden-age-medicine-golden.html

GOLDEN AGE OF PATIENT TRUST

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THE GREAT PHYSICIAN RETIREMENT AND RESIGNATION: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/11/09/healthcare-industry-hit-with-the-great-resignation-retirement/

YOUR COMMENTS ARE APPRECIATED.

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Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

RETIREMENT PLANNING: https://www.routledge.com/Risk-Management-Liability-Insurance-and-Asset-Protection-Strategies-for/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781498725989

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Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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Valuation of Home Health Agencies [The Reimbursement Environment]

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By Health Capital Consultants, LLC

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Valuation of Home Health Agencies: Reimbursement Environment

The U.S. government is the largest payor of medical costs, through Medicare and Medicaid, and has a strong influence on reimbursement for home healthcare services. In 2020, Medicare and Medicaid accounted for an estimated $829.5 billion and $671.2 billion in healthcare spending, respectively. The outsized prevalence of these public payors in the healthcare marketplace often results in their acting as a price setter, and being used as a benchmark for private reimbursement rates. This effect may be even stronger in the home health industry.

The third installment of this home health valuation series will discuss the reimbursement environment in which these organizations operate. (Read more…) 

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CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

COMMENTS APPRECIATED

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INTERVIEW: A Solution for Healthcare Financing?

HEALTHCARE FINANCING

Former: CEO and Founder
Superior Consultant Company, Inc.
[SUPC-NASD]

EDITOR’S NOTE: I first met Rich in B-school, when I was a student, back in the day. He was the Founder and CEO of Superior Consultant Holdings Corp. Rich graciously wrote the Foreword to one of my first textbooks on financial planning for physicians and healthcare professionals. Today, Rich is a successful entrepreneur in the technology, health and finance space.

-Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

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Staff & Contributors - CHAMPIONS OF WAYNE

By Richard Helppie

Today for your consideration – How to fix the healthcare financing methods in the United States?

I use the term “methods” because calling what we do now a “system” is inaccurate. I also focus on healthcare financing, because in terms of healthcare delivery, there is no better place in the world than the USA in terms of supply and innovation for medical diagnosis and treatment. Similarly, I use the term healthcare financing to differentiate from healthcare insurance – because insurance without supply is an empty promise.

This is a straightforward, 4-part plan. It is uniquely American and will at last extend coverage to every US citizen while not hampering the innovation and robust supply that we have today. As this is about a Common Bridge and not about ideology or dogma, there will no doubt be aspects of this proposal that every individual will have difficulty with. However, on balance, I believe it is the most fair and equitable way to resolve the impasse on healthcare funding . . . .

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

Let me start in an area sure to raise the ire of a few. And that is, we have to start with eliminating the methods that are in place today. The first is the outdated notion that healthcare insurance is tied to one’s work, and the second is that there are overlapping and competing tax-supported bureaucracies to administer that area of healthcare finance.

Step 1 is to break the link between employment and health insurance. Fastest way to do that is simply tax the cost of benefits for the compensation that it is. This is how company cars, big life insurance policies and other fringe benefits were trimmed. Eliminating the tax-favored treatment of employer-provided healthcare is the single most important change that should be made.

Yes, you will hear arguments that this is an efficient market with satisfied customers. However, upon examination, it is highly risky, unfair, and frankly out of step with today’s job market.

Employer provided health insurance is an artifact from the 1940’s as an answer to wage freezes – an employer could not give a wage increase, but could offer benefits that weren’t taxed. It makes no sense today for a variety of reasons. Here are a few:

1. Its patently unfair. Two people living in the same apartment building, each making the same income and each have employer provided health insurance. Chris in unit 21 has a generous health plan that would be worth $25,000 each year. Pays zero tax on that compensation. Pat, in unit 42 has a skimpy plan with a narrow network, big deductibles and hefty co-pays. The play is worth $9,000 each year. Pat pays zero tax.

3. The insurance pools kick out the aged. Once one becomes too old to work, they are out of the employer plan and on to the retirement plan or over to the taxpayers (Medicare).

4. The structure is a bad fit. Health insurance and healthy living are longitudinal needs over a long period of time. In a time when people change careers and jobs frequently, or are in the gig economy, they are not any one place long enough for the insurance to work like insurance.

5. Creates perverse incentives. The incentives are weighted to have employers not have their work force meet the standards of employees so they don’t have to pay for the health insurance. Witness latest news in California with Uber and Lyft.

6. Incentives to deny claims abound. There is little incentive to serve the subscriber/patient since the likelihood the employer will shop the plan or the employee will change jobs means that stringing out a claim approval is a profitable exercise.

7. Employers have difficulty as purchasers. An employer large enough to supply health insurance has a diverse set of health insurance needs in their work force. They pay a lot of money and their work force is still not 100% happy.

Net of it, health insurance tied to work has outlived its usefulness. Time to end the tax-favored treatment of employer-based insurance. If an employer wants to provide health insurance, they can do it, but the value of that insurance is reflected in the taxable W-2 wages – now Pat and Chris will be treated equally.

Step 2 is to consolidate the multiple tax-supported bureaus that supply healthcare. Relieve the citizens from having to prove they are old enough, disabled enough, impoverished enough, young enough. Combine Medicare, Medicaid, CHIP, Tricare and even possibly the VA into a single bureaucracy. Every American Citizen gets this broad coverage at some level. Everyone pays something into the system – start at $20 a year, and then perhaps an income-adjusted escalator that would charge the most wealthy up to $75,000. Collect the money with a line on Form 1040.

I have not done the exact math. However, removing the process to prove eligibility and having one versus many bureaucracies has to generate savings. Are you a US Citizen? Yes, then here is your base insurance. Like every other nationalized system, one can expect longer waits, fewer referrals to a specialist, and less innovation. These centralized systems all squeeze supply of healthcare services to keep their spend down. The reports extolling their efficiencies come from the people whose livelihoods depend on the centralized system. However, at least everyone gets something. And, for life threatening health conditions, by and large the centralized systems do a decent job. With everyone covered, the fear of medical bankruptcy evaporates. The fear of being out of work and losing healthcare when one needs it most is gone.

So if you are a free market absolutist, then the reduction of vast bureaucracies should be attractive – no need for eligibility requirements (old enough, etc.) and a single administration which is both more efficient, more equitable (everyone gets the same thing). And there remains a private market (more on this in step 3) For those who detest private insurance companies a portion of that market just went away. There is less incentive to purchase a private plan. And for everyone’s sense of fairness, the national plan is funded on ability to pay. Bearing in mind that everyone has to pay something. Less bureaucracies. Everyone in it together. Funded on ability to pay.

Step 3 is to allow and even encourage a robust market for health insurance above and beyond the national plan – If people want to purchase more health insurance, then they have the ability to do so. Which increases supply, relieves burden on the tax-supported system, aligns the US with other countries, provides an alternative to medical tourism (and the associated health spend in our country) and offers a bit of competition to the otherwise monopolistic government plan.

Its not a new concept, in many respects it is like the widely popular Medigap plans that supplement what Medicare does not cover.

No one is forced to make that purchase. Other counties’ experience shows that those who choose to purchase private coverage over and above a national plan often cite faster access, more choice, innovation, or services outside the universal system, e.g., a woman who chooses to have mammography at an early age or with more frequency than the national plan might allow.  If the insurance provider can offer a good value to the price, then they will sell insurance. If they can deliver that value for more than their costs, then they create a profit. Owners of the company, who risk their capital in creating the business may earn a return.

For those of you who favor a free market, the choices are available. There will be necessary regulation to prevent discrimination on genetics, pre-existing conditions, and the like. Buy the type of plan that makes you feel secure – just as one purchases automobile and life insurance.For those who are supremely confident in the absolute performance of a centralized system to support 300+ million Americans in the way each would want, they should like this plan as well – because if the national plan is meeting all needs and no one wants perhaps faster services, then few will purchase the private insurance and the issuers will not have a business. Free choice. More health insurance for those who want it. Competition keeps both national and private plans seeking to better themselves.

Step 4 would be to Permit Access to Medicare Part D to every US Citizen, Immediately

One of the bright spots in the US Healthcare Financing Method is Medicare Part D, which provides prescription drug coverage to seniors. It is running at 95% subscriber satisfaction and about 40% below cost projections.

Subscribers choose from a wide variety of plans offered by private insurance companies. There are differences in formularies, co-pays, deductibles and premiums.

So there you have it, a four part plan that would maintain or increase the supply of healthcare services, universal insurance coverage, market competition, and lower costs. Its not perfect but I believe a vast improvement over what exists today. To recap:

1. Break the link between employment and healthcare insurance coverage, by taxing the benefits as the compensation they are.

2. Establish a single, universal plan that covers all US citizens paid for via personal income taxes on an ability-to-pay basis.  Eliminate all the other tax-funded plans in favor of this new one.

3. For those who want it, private, supplemental insurance to the national system, ala major industrialized nations.

4. Open Medicare Part D (prescription drugs) to every US citizen. Today.

YOUR THOUGHTS ARE APPRECIATED.

Thank You

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PODCAST: Health Insurance Plans Confusing and Largely Misunderstood

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By Eric Bricker MD

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According to One Survey, only 4% of People Understand the Basic Insurance Terms of Deductible, Co-Insurance, Copay and Out-of-Pocket Maximum.

In Another Survey by United Healthcare Itself, Only 9% Understood the Terms Premium, Deductible, Co-Insurance and Out-of-Pocket Max.

This Lack of Understanding is Not the Fault of the Employee Benefits Professionals or the Employees… Rather, the Health Insurance Plan Designs Are Just Too Complicated.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/082610254

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PODCAST: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yp6TI7iu-m0

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Comments Appreciated

THANK YOU

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A 4/20 [Medical] Cannabis Culture Day Pictorial

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About Four-Twenty Day

[By Anonymous DEA Agent]

Today is … 420, 4:20, or 4/20 (pronounced four-twenty)

And, it refers to consumption of cannabis and, by extension, a way to identify oneself with cannabis subculture. Observances based on the number include the time (4:20 p.m.) as well as the date (April 20).

Again … that’s today as this ME-P was published @ 4:20 p.m., EST!

THE DEA DESTROYS A POT FARM

PHOTOS: 

  1. Photo taken after the “grow” was eradicated. There is still no “pot” of gold at the end of the rainbow.
  2. DEA taking one of many seized vehicles/equipment.
  3. The marijuana farm was operating under the name “Brian’s Green Thumb Farm.”
  4. Inside the barn, Agents found rows and rows of drying marijuana.
  5. Over 2,000 pounds of drying marijuana from the barn, bagged and ready for destruction.
  6. Air view of the massive “grow” from the guard tower.
  7. One of two sleeping shelters, each guarding the middle perimeter. In the back, one of four tents, each positioned in the corners for guards.
  8. The plant being ripped out of the ground by the backhoe.

© iMBA Inc. All rights reserved.

Assessment

Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/420_(cannabis_culture)

In 2019: Carl’s Jr. was become the first major fast-food chain to debut a cannabis-infused burger.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

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MEDICAL PRACTICE: Business Uses of Life Insurance for Doctors

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Dr. David Edward Marcinko | The Leading Business Education Network for  Doctors, Financial Advisors and Health Industry Consultants

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

[A] Key Person Insurance

Hospitals, a local family practice office, a pharmaceutical company, all likely have one thing in common. Somewhere within these companies or partnerships, there are key employees or profit makers. Due to their expertise, management skills, knowledge, or “history of why,” they have become indispensable to their employers.

If this key employee were to die prematurely, what would potentially happen to the company?  In many cases, especially in smaller companies, it would have a devastating effect on the bottom line, or even precipitate a bankruptcy. In these circumstances, a form of business insurance, called key person coverage, is recommended in order to alleviate the potential financial problems resulting from the death of that employee.

The business would purchase and own a life insurance policy on the key person. Upon the death of the employee, the life insurance proceeds could be used to:

  • Pay off bank loans.
  • Replace the lost profits of the company.
  • Establish a reserve for the search, hiring and training of a replacement.

[B] Business Continuation Funding

See the chapters on buy-sell agreements and asset protection planning.

[C] Executive Bonus Plan

An executive bonus plan (or § 162 plan) is an effective way for a company to provide valued, select employees an additional employment benefit.  One of the main advantages to an executive bonus plan, when compared to other benefits, is its simplicity. In a typical executive bonus plan, an agreement is made between the employer and employee, whereby the employer agrees to pay for the cost of a life insurance policy, in the form of a bonus, on the life of the employee.

The major benefits of such a plan to the employee are that he or she is the immediate owner of the cash values and the death benefit provided.  The only cost to the employee is the payment of income tax on any bonus received.  The employer receives a tax deduction for providing the benefit, improves the morale of its selected employees, and can use the plan as a tool to attract additional talent.

[D] Non-Qualified Salary Continuation

Commonly referred to as deferred compensation, this is a legally binding promise by an employer to pay a salary continuation benefit at a specific point in the future, in exchange for the current and continued performance of its employee.  These plans are normally used to supplement existing retirement plans.

Although there are different variations of deferred compensation, in a typical deferred compensation agreement, the employer will purchase and own a life insurance policy on the life of the employee. The cash value of the policy grows tax deferred during the employee’s working years. After retirement, these cash values can be withdrawn from the policy to reimburse the company for its after-tax retirement payments to the employee. 

Upon the death of the employee, any remaining death benefit would likely be received income tax free by the employer (Alternative Minimum Taxes could apply to any benefit received by certain larger C corporations).  The death benefit could then be used to pay any required survivor benefits to the employee’s spouse, or provide partial or total cost recovery to the employer.

In a typical plan, the terms of the agreement are negotiated as to the amount of benefit received by the employee, when retirement benefits can begin, how long retirement benefits will be paid, and if benefits will be provided for death or disability.  The business has established what is commonly referred to as “golden handcuffs” for the employee.  As a result, the benefit will only be received if the employee continues to work for the company until retirement. If the employee is terminated or quits prior to retirement, the plan would end and no benefits would be payed.

[E] Split Dollar Plans

Split dollar arrangements can be a complicated and confusing concept for even the most experienced insurance professional or financial advisor. This concept is, in its simplest terms, a way for a business to share the cost and benefit of a life insurance policy with a valued employee. In a normal split dollar arrangement, the employee will receive valuable life insurance coverage at little cost to them. The business pays the majority of the premium, but is usually able to recover the entire cost of providing this benefit at termination of employment, death or surrender of the policy.

Following the publication of IRS Notices 2002-8 and 2002-59, there are currently two general approaches to the ownership of business split-dollar life insurance: Employer-owned or Employee-owned.

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[1] Employer-Owned Method

In the employer-owned method the employer is the sole owner of the policy. A written split-dollar agreement usually permits the employee to name the beneficiary for most of the death proceeds. The employer owns all the cash value and has the unfettered right to borrow or withdraw it as necessary. At the end of the formal agreement, the business can generally (1) continue the policy as key person insurance, (2) transfer ownership to the insured and report the cash values as additional income to the insured, (3) sell the policy to the insured, or (4) use a combination of these methods. This is commonly referred to as “rollout.”

Practitioners should be careful not to include rollout language in the split-dollar agreement. The reason the rollout should not be included is that if the parties formally agree that after a specified number of years—or following a specific event—related only to the circumstances surrounding the policy, that the policy will be turned over to the insured, the IRS could declare that the entire transaction was a sham and that its sole purpose was to avoid taxation of the premiums to the employee, generating substantial interest and penalties in addition to the additional taxes due.

The death proceeds available to the insured employee’s beneficiary is considered a current and reportable economic benefit (REB), and it is an annually taxable event to the employee. If an individual policy is involved, the REB is calculated by multiplying the face amount times the government’s Table 2004 rates or the insurance company’s alternative term rates, using the insured’s age. If a second-to-die policy is involved, the government’s PS38 rates or the company’s alternative PS38 rates will be used. Any part of the premium actually paid by the employee is used to offset any REB dollar-for-dollar.

[2] Employee-Owned Method

With the employee-owned method, the insured-employee is generally the applicant and owner of the policy. Any premiums paid by the business are deemed to be loans to the employee and the employee reports as income an imputed interest rate on the cumulative amount of loan based on Code § 7872. A collateral assignment is made for the benefit of the business to cover the cumulative loan amount. In some cases, the assignment may allow the assignee to have access to the cash values of the policy by way of a policy loan. This method is unavailable for officers and executives of publicly- held corporations because of the current restrictions on corporate loans (the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002).

The employee-owned method is somewhat similar to the older collateral assignment form of split-dollar. The benefits for the employee are both the ability to control large amounts of death proceeds as well as developing equity in the policy. Whether or not this new method catches on will depend greatly on the imputed interest rate published by the IRS every July. If set low enough, this may be an excellent opportunity for the employee to use inexpensive business dollars to pay for life insurance. 

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CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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Your Comments are appreciated.

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors : Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™ book cover

Risk Management Textbook: https://www.routledge.com/Risk-Management-Liability-Insurance-and-Asset-Protection-Strategies-for/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781498725989

THANK YOU

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INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION: For Hospitals, Clinics and Healthcare CXOs, CEOs, CMOs and CTOs, etc.

MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES, TOOLS TEMPLATES AND CASE STUDIES

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Reviews:

Hospitals and Health Care Organizations is a must-read for any physician and other health care provider to understand the multiple, and increasingly complex, interlocking components of the U.S. health care delivery system, whether they are employed by a hospital system, or manage their own private practices.

The operational principles, methods, and examples in this book provide a framework applicable on both the large organizational and smaller private practice levels and will result in better patient care. Physicians today know they need to better understand business principles and this book by Dr. David E. Marcinko and Professor Hope Rachel Hetico provides an excellent framework and foundation to learn important principles all doctors need to know.
―Richard Berning, MD, Pediatric Cardiology

… Dr. David Edward Marcinko and Professor Hope Rachel Hetico bring their vast health care experience along with additional national experts to provide a health care model-based framework to allow health care professionals to utilize the checklists and templates to evaluate their own systems, recognize where the weak links in the system are, and, by applying the well-illustrated principles, improve the efficiency of the system without sacrificing quality patient care. … The health care delivery system is not an assembly line, but with persistence and time following the guidelines offered in this book, quality patient care can be delivered efficiently and affordably while maintaining the financial viability of institutions and practices.
―James Winston Phillips, MD, MBA, JD, LLM

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PURCHASE: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BC9IIUM?ref_=k4w_oembed_faGUzLlJ9ojLIx&tag=kpembed-20&linkCode=kpd

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PODCAST: Training the Next Generation of Public Health Professionals

By American Journal of Public Health

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DEFINITION: Public health is “the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health through the organized efforts and informed choices of society, organizations, public and private, communities and individuals”.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/082610254

CDC: https://www.cdcfoundation.org/what-public-health

PODCASTS: https://www.apha.org/what-is-public-health

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READ HERE: https://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/10.2105/AJPH.2022.306756

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COMMENTS APPRECIATED

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PODCAST: What is Public Health?

By American Journal of Public Health

NATIONAL PUBLIC HEALTH WEEK

April 4th-8th, 2022

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Public health is now part of the political conversation but everyone doesn’t understand it in the same way. Hence the idea of interviewing Governor John Kasich, former governor of Ohio, who has been promoting a greater attention to public health, about what is public health for him.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/082610254

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COMMENTS APPRECIATED

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Necessary Pillars to Expand the Free Medical Markets

 Join Our Mailing List

 By Jay Kempton

[Free Market Medical Association]

Download the presentation Here

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

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PODCAST: Ray Dalio on How the Economy Works in Healthcare

Ray Dalio’s ‘How the Economy Works’ Applied to Healthcare … Credit Cycles and Healthcare Policy

By Eric Bricker MD

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CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

RELATED: https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/savingandinvesting/ray-dalio-warns-stagflation-will-send-america-back-to-the-1970s/ar-AAVSYgF

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PODCASTS: All You Need to Know About Government Healthcare

By Eric Bricker MD

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1) Traditional Medicare: Health Insurance for Seniors 65 and older. Medicare Part A is coverage for hospital services. Medicare Part B is coverage for doctor, physical therapist and other provider services and for outpatient services such as labs and imaging.

2) Medicare Advantage: Health Insurance for Seniors 65 and older administered through a private health insurance company. It is sometimes referred to as Medicare Part C. It can be chosen instead of Traditional Medicare and often includes Dental Insurance, Vision Insurance, Hearing Aid Insurance and Prescription Drug Coverage.

3) Medicare Part D Prescription Coverage: Additional insurance for people on Traditional Medicare to cover their prescription medications as well. Medicare Part D is administered by private insurance companies.

4) Medicare Supplement Plans: Insurance that can be purchased in addition to Traditional Medicare to cover the expenses that Traditional Medicare does not cover, such as hospitalization deductibles and Medicare Part B co-insurance.

5) Medicaid: The health insurance program administered by each state for it’s economically disadvantaged residents. It is funded in part by the Federal Government and in part by each state. It is administered by private health insurance companies.

6) Affordable Care Act (ACA) Exchange Plans: Health insurance for people under 65 who make too much money to qualify for Medicaid, but do not received health insurance through their employer. ACA Exchange Plans are subsidized by the Federal Government and administered by private insurance companies.

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COMMENTS APPRECIATED.

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Subscribe to the Medical Executive-Post

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FINANCIAL PLANNING: Strategies for Doctors and their Advisors

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BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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REVIEWS:

Written by doctors and healthcare professionals, this textbook should be mandatory reading for all medical school students—highly recommended for both young and veteran physicians—and an eliminating factor for any financial advisor who has not read it. The book uses jargon like ‘innovative,’ ‘transformational,’ and ‘disruptive’—all rightly so! It is the type of definitive financial lifestyle planning book we often seek, but seldom find.
LeRoy Howard MA CMPTM,Candidate and Financial Advisor, Fayetteville, North Carolina

I taught diagnostic radiology for over a decade. The physician-focused niche information, balanced perspectives, and insider industry transparency in this book may help save your financial life.
Dr. William P. Scherer MS, Barry University, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

This book was crafted in response to the frustration felt by doctors who dealt with top financial, brokerage, and accounting firms. These non-fiduciary behemoths often prescribed costly wholesale solutions that were applicable to all, but customized for few, despite ever-changing needs. It is a must-read to learn why brokerage sales pitches or Internet resources will never replace the knowledge and deep advice of a physician-focused financial advisor, medical consultant, or collegial Certified Medical Planner™ financial professional.
—Parin Khotari MBA,Whitman School of Management, Syracuse University, New York

In today’s healthcare environment, in order for providers to survive, they need to understand their current and future market trends, finances, operations, and impact of federal and state regulations. As a healthcare consulting professional for over 30 years supporting both the private and public sector, I recommend that providers understand and utilize the wealth of knowledge that is being conveyed in these chapters. Without this guidance providers will have a hard time navigating the supporting system which may impact their future revenue stream. I strongly endorse the contents of this book.
—Carol S. Miller BSN MBA PMP,President, Miller Consulting Group, ACT IAC Executive Committee Vice-Chair at-Large, HIMSS NCA Board Member

This is an excellent book on financial planning for physicians and health professionals. It is all inclusive yet very easy to read with much valuable information. And, I have been expanding my business knowledge with all of Dr. Marcinko’s prior books. I highly recommend this one, too. It is a fine educational tool for all doctors.
—Dr. David B. Lumsden MD MS MA,Orthopedic Surgeon, Baltimore, Maryland

There is no other comprehensive book like it to help doctors, nurses, and other medical providers accumulate and preserve the wealth that their years of education and hard work have earned them.
—Dr. Jason Dyken MD MBA,Dyken Wealth Strategies, Gulf Shores, Alabama

I plan to give a copy of this book written
by doctors and for doctors’ to all my prospects, physician, and nurse clients. It may be the definitive text on this important topic.
—Alexander Naruska CPA,Orlando, Florida

Health professionals are small business owners who need to apply their self-discipline tactics in establishing and operating successful practices. Talented trainees are leaving the medical profession because they fail to balance the cost of attendance against a realistic business and financial plan. Principles like budgeting, saving, and living below one’s means, in order to make future investments for future growth, asset protection, and retirement possible are often lacking. This textbook guides the medical professional in his/her financial planning life journey from start to finish. It ranks a place in all medical school libraries and on each of our bookshelves.
—Dr. Thomas M. DeLauro DPM,Professor and Chairman – Division of Medical Sciences, New York College of Podiatric Medicine

Physicians are notoriously excellent at diagnosing and treating medical conditions. However, they are also notoriously deficient in managing the business aspects of their medical practices. Most will earn $20-30 million in their medical lifetime, but few know how to create wealth for themselves and their families. This book will help fill the void in physicians’ financial education. I have two recommendations: 1) every physician, young and old, should read this book; and 2) read it a second time!
—Dr. Neil Baum MD,Clinical Associate Professor of Urology, Tulane Medical School, New Orleans, Louisiana

I worked with a Certified Medical Planner™ on several occasions in the past, and will do so again in the future. This book codified the vast body of knowledge that helped in all facets of my financial life and professional medical practice.
Dr. James E. Williams DABPS, Foot and Ankle Surgeon, Conyers, Georgia

This is a constantly changing field for rules, regulations, taxes, insurance, compliance, and investments. This book assists readers, and their financial advisors, in keeping up with what’s going on in the healthcare field that all doctors need to know.
Patricia Raskob CFP® EA ATA, Raskob Kambourian Financial Advisors, Tucson, Arizona

I particularly enjoyed reading the specific examples in this book which pointed out the perils of risk … something with which I am too familiar and have learned (the hard way) to avoid like the Black Death. It is a pleasure to come across this kind of wisdom, in print, that other colleagues may learn before it’s too late— many, many years down the road.
Dr. Robert S. Park MD, Robert Park and Associates Insurance, Seattle, Washington

Although this book targets physicians, I was pleased to see that it also addressed the financial planning and employment benefit needs of nurses; physical, respiratory, and occupational therapists; CRNAs, hospitalists, and other members of the health care team….highly readable, practical, and understandable.
Nurse Cecelia T. Perez RN, Hospital Operating Room Manager, Ellicott City, Maryland

Personal financial success in the PP-ACA era will be more difficult to achieve than ever before. It requires the next generation of doctors to rethink frugality, delay gratification, and redefine the very definition of success and work–life balance. And, they will surely need the subject matter medical specificity and new-wave professional guidance offered in this book. This book is a ‘must-read’ for all health care professionals, and their financial advisors, who wish to take an active role in creating a new subset of informed and pioneering professionals known as Certified Medical Planners™.
—Dr. Mark D. Dollard FACFAS, Private Practice, Tyson Corner, Virginia

As healthcare professionals, it is our Hippocratic duty to avoid preventable harm by paying attention. On the other hand, some of us are guilty of being reckless with our own financial health—delaying serious consideration of investments, taxation, retirement income, estate planning, and inheritances until the worry keeps one awake at night. So, if you have avoided planning for the future for far too long, perhaps it is time to take that first step toward preparedness. This in-depth textbook is an excellent starting point—not only because of its readability, but because of his team’s expertise and thoroughness in addressing the intricacies of modern investments—and from the point of view of not only gifted financial experts, but as healthcare providers, as well … a rare combination.
Dr. Darrell K. Pruitt DDS, Private Practice Dentist, Fort Worth, Texas

This text should be on the bookshelf of all contemporary physicians. The book is physician-focused with unique topics applicable to all medical professionals. But, it also offers helpful insights into the new tax and estate laws, fiduciary accountability for advisors and insurance agents, with investing, asset protection and risk management, and retirement planning strategies with updates for the brave new world of global payments of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Starting out by encouraging readers to examine their personal ‘money blueprint’ beliefs and habits, the book is divided into four sections offering holistic life cycle financial information and economic education directed to new, mid-career, and mature physicians.

This structure permits one to dip into the book based on personal need to find relief, rather than to overwhelm. Given the complexity of modern domestic healthcare, and the daunting challenges faced by physicians who try to stay abreast of clinical medicine and the ever-evolving laws of personal finance, this textbook could not have come at a better time.
—Dr. Philippa Kennealy MD MPH, The Entrepreneurial MD, Los Angeles, California

Physicians have economic concerns unmatched by any other profession, arriving ten years late to the start of their earning years. This textbook goes to the core of how to level the playing field quickly, and efficaciously, by a new breed of dedicated Certified Medical Planners™. With physician-focused financial advice, each chapter is a building block to your financial fortress.
Thomas McKeon, MBA, Pharmaceutical Representative, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

An excellent resource … this textbook is written in a manner that provides physician practice owners with a comprehensive guide to financial planning and related topics for their professional practice in a way that is easily comprehended. The style in which it breaks down the intricacies of the current physician practice landscape makes it a ‘must-read’ for those physicians (and their advisors) practicing in the volatile era of healthcare reform.
—Robert James Cimasi, MHA ASA FRICS MCBA CVA CM&AA CMP™, CEO-Health Capital Consultants, LLC, St. Louis, Missouri

Rarely can one find a full compendium of information within a single source or text, but this book communicates the new financial realities we are forced to confront; it is full of opportunities for minimizing tax liability and maximizing income potential. We’re recommending it to all our medical practice management clients across the entire healthcare spectrum.
Alan Guinn, The Guinn Consultancy Group, Inc., Cookeville, Tennessee

Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP™ and his team take a seemingly endless stream of disparate concepts and integrate them into a simple, straightforward, and understandable path to success. And, he codifies them all into a step-by-step algorithm to more efficient investing, risk management, taxation, and enhanced retirement planning for doctors and nurses. His text is a vital read—and must execute—book for all healthcare professionals and physician-focused financial advisors.
Dr. O. Kent Mercado, JD, Private Practitioner and Attorney, Naperville, Illinois

Kudos. The editors and contributing authors have compiled the most comprehensive reference book for the medical community that has ever been attempted. As you review the chapters of interest and hone in on the most important concerns you may have, realize that the best minds have been harvested for you to plan well… Live well.
Martha J. Schilling; AAMS® CRPC® ETSC CSA, Shilling Group Advisors, LLC, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

I recommend this book to any physician or medical professional that desires an honest no-sales approach to understanding the financial planning and investing world. It is worthwhile to any financial advisor interested in this space, as well.
David K. Luke, MIM MS-PFP CMP™, Net Worth Advisory Group, Sandy, Utah

Although not a substitute for a formal business education, this book will help physicians navigate effectively through the hurdles of day-to-day financial decisions with the help of an accountant, financial and legal advisor. I highly recommend it and commend Dr. Marcinko and the Institute of Medical Business Advisors, Inc. on a job well done.
Ken Yeung MBA CMP™, Tseung Kwan O Hospital, Hong Kong

I’ve seen many ghost-written handbooks, paperbacks, and vanity-published manuals on this topic throughout my career in mental healthcare. Most were poorly written, opinionated, and cheaply produced self-aggrandizing marketing drivel for those agents selling commission-based financial products and expensive advisory services. So, I was pleasantly surprised with this comprehensive peer-reviewed academic textbook, complete with citations, case examples, and real-life integrated strategies by and for medical professionals. Although a bit late for my career, I recommend it highly to all my younger colleagues … It’s credibility and specificity stand alone.
Dr. Clarice Montgomery PhD MA,Retired Clinical Psychologist

In an industry known for one-size-fits-all templates and massively customized books, products, advice, and services, the extreme healthcare specificity of this text is both refreshing and comprehensive.
Dr. James Joseph Bartley, Columbus, Georgia

My brother was my office administrator and accountant. We both feel this is the most comprehensive textbook available on financial planning for healthcare providers.
Dr. Anthony Robert Naruska DC,Winter Park, Florida

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DOJ Recoveries for False Claims Act Cases Doubled in 2021

BY HEALTH CAPITAL CONSULTANTS, LLC.

DEFINITION: The False Claims Act, also called the “Lincoln Law”, is an American federal law that imposes liability on persons and companies who defraud governmental programs. It is the federal Government’s primary litigation tool in combating fraud against the Government. The law includes a provision that allows people who are not affiliated with the government, called “relators” under the law, to file actions on behalf of the government. Persons filing under the Act stand to receive a portion of any recovered damages.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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DOJ Recoveries for False Claims Act Cases Doubled in 2021

On February 1, 2022, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced their recovery of $5.6 billion in settlements and judgments from civil cases involving fraud and false claims for fiscal year (FY) 2021. Over $5 billion was recouped from the healthcare industry for federal losses alone, and included recoveries from drug and medical device manufacturers, managed care providers, hospitals, pharmacies, hospice organizations, laboratories, and physicians.

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This figure is more than double the amount of healthcare-related recoveries secured in FY 2020, which totaled $1.8 billion. (Read more…)

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PODCAST: Healthcare “Certificate of Need” Laws Explained

By Eric Bricker MD

C.O.N. Legislation is Not New!

Certificate of need laws are state-level regulations that require healthcare institutions to obtain approval from state officials before moving forward on large capital expenditure projects, such as the construction of a new facility or the purchase of expensive new equipment.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/082610254

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“Best” Physician Focused Financial Planning and Medical Practice Management Books for 2022

[Doctor-Advisor]

CAREER DEVELOPMENT

Buy from Amazon

Learn How to Profit and Thrive in the PP-ACA Era

BOOK FOREWORD / TESTIMONIAL

Best Sellers

Product Details

Product DetailsProduct Details

Product DetailsProduct DetailsProduct Details

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Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners(TM)

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants

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PODCAST: More on Health Insurance from a Medical Technology CEO

A Professional and Personal look at Health Insurance, with Karl Albrecht
Rich talks with the president of Action Benefits, Karl Albrecht about the state of Health Insurance. 

Albrecht also gives a candid insight to his personal fight with pancreatic cancer and how being a Health Insurance executive as well as a patient, has given him a unique perspective on how things work, and how they could improve.
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BY RICHARD HELPPIE

PODCAST: https://richardhelppie.com/karl_albrecht/

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BALANCE BILLING: The Emerging “No Surprise” Act

Balance Medical Billing

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

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The No Surprises Act is looking to make the practice of out of network balance billing a thing of the past.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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No Surprises Act: New Law to Protect Against Surprise ...

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Beginning in 2022, there will be few situations in which a patient can receive a bill for out-of-network care they believed would be covered by their insurance company. This new rule should especially benefit patients in emergency situations who don’t have the time or luxury to dig up the details on every provider they encounter.

CONGRESS: https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/house-bill/3630/

The No Surprises Act also requires insurance companies to provide patients with at least 90 days of coverage if an in-network provider moves out of network. That way, patients aren’t forced to switch providers immediately if such a move happens while they’re in the middle of a treatment plan.

DOCTORS: https://www.elixirehr.com/what-the-no-surprises-act-means-for-healthcare-providers/

Now, the No Surprises Act does have its limitations. Patients can still get a bill for out-of-network care if they visit an urgent care clinic for non-emergency purposes. Also, if consumers are informed that the care they’re about to receive is out of network and they give written consent to move forward, then they may get billed for that care even once the new rule takes effect.

CMS: https://www.cms.gov/nosurprises

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PODCAST: On the Corporate Practice of Medicine Laws

IS PRIVATE EQUITY BUYING DOCTORS ILLEGAL?

By Eric Bricker MD

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Physician Owned Hospitals Myths DeBunked

BY HEALTH CAPITAL CONSULTANTS, LLC

Literature Review Debunks Claims Against Physician-Owned Hospitals


Approximately 250 hospitals across the U.S. are completely or partially physician owned. These physician-owned hospitals (POHs) can offer a variety of services, from general care to specialty services, such as cardiovascular or orthopedic care, known as “focused factories.”

Over the past several decades, healthcare providers and policymakers have claimed that POHs have a negative impact on the healthcare industry, suggesting that: (1) POHs “cherry-pick” the most profitable patients; (2) the quality of care provided at POHs is substandard; and, (3) conflicts of interest exist due to the financial incentive for physician owners to refer patients to their POHs. (Read more…) 

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PODCAST: Hospital Healthcare Finance Explained

By Eric Bricker MD

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CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/082610254

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MEDICAL RISK MANAGEMENT, Liability Insurance and Asset Protection Strategies

FOR PHYSICIANS AND THEIR FINANCIAL ADVISORS

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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REVIEWS:

“Physicians who don’t understand modern risk management, insurance, business, and asset protection principles are sitting ducks waiting to be taken advantage of by unscrupulous insurance agents and financial advisors; and even their own prospective employers or partners. This comprehensive volume from Dr. David Marcinko and his co-authors will go a long way toward educating physicians on these critical subjects that were never taught in medical school or residency training.”
Dr. James M. Dahle, MD, FACEP, Editor of The White Coat Investor, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA


“With time at a premium, and so much vital information packed into one well organized resource, this comprehensive textbook should be on the desk of everyone serving in the healthcare ecosystem. The time you spend reading this frank and compelling book will be richly rewarded.”
—Dr. J. Wesley Boyd, MD, PhD, MA, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

ORDER TEXTBOOK: https://www.routledge.com/Risk-Management-Liability-Insurance-and-Asset-Protection-Strategies-for/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781498725989

SECOND OPINIONS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

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PODCAST: The No Surprises [Medical Billing] Act

Surprise Medical Bills Outlawed?

By Eric Bricker MD

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QPA DEFINITION: The qualifying payment amount is generally the median of contracted rates for a specific service in the same geographic region within the same insurance market as of January 31, 2019. The rate will be adjusted per the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U).

MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2017/01/07/a-small-step-forward-on-surprise-medical-care-balance-billing/

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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HEALTHCARE: 2021 M&A in Review

Indications for 2022

BY HEALTH CAPITAL CONSULTANTS, LLC

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2021 M&A in Review: Indications for 2022

After an understandable slowdown in 2020, due to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, merger & acquisition (M&A) activity in the healthcare industry accelerated in 2021, and the industry is expected to continue the high number of deals and high deal volume in 2022.

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This Health Capital Topics article will review the U.S. healthcare industry’s M&A activity in 2021, and discuss what these trends may mean for 2022. (Read more…)

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CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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FINANCIAL HEALTH INSURANCE CO-PAY CARDS & DRUG COUPONS?

The “Real Deal”

A co-payment is a fixed amount ($20, for example) you pay for a covered health care service after you’ve paid your deductible.

Let’s say your health insurance plan’s allowable cost for a doctor’s office visit is $100. Your copayment for a doctor visit is $20.

  • If you’ve paid your deductible: You pay $20, usually at the time of the visit.
  • If you haven’t met your deductible: You pay $100, the full allowable amount for the visit.
  • Partial deductible payments incur hybrid fees.

Copayments (sometimes called “copays”) can vary for different services within the same plan, like drugs, lab tests, and visits to specialists. Generally plans with lower monthly premiums have higher copayments. Plans with higher monthly premiums usually have lower copayments.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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Invite Dr. Marcinko | The Leading Business Education Network for Doctors,  Financial Advisors and Health Industry Consultants

BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

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SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Co-Pay Cards May Be Creating More Controversy Instead of Solutions

Instead of reducing the actual price of their excessively priced medications, many companies have opted to provide co-pay cards / coupons as an affordable solution. However, co-pay cards may only lower the cost for some consumers and patients.

Novartis: https://www.copay.novartispharma.com/nvscopay/#

Pfizer: https://www.pfizerpro.com/co-pay-cards-patient-savings-offers

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But – The insurer is still left to pay the high price, which will eventually be passed back on to the patient / consumers in the form of higher health insurance deductibles. So – It doesn’t really seem like much of a solution when we all end up paying for these co-pay cards / coupons; does it?

Find out more here. (Source: Rebecca Mayer Knutsen, MM&M, 8/26/16)

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MEDICAL OFFICE CREDIT CARDS:

We stopped taking credit cards altogether. The only credit cards we take are for call-in payments of balances. We have placed ATM machines in our lobbies and we educate patients in advance of their visits that we only take cash or check. Our cash income has increased, our credit card fees have decreased, and we make $1.50 from each transaction through our ATM. Our patients have taken to the idea so much that they use the ATM for personal cash for other transactions because our fee is the lowest of any ATM. It has been a win-win-win.  

Dr. Farshid Nejad, Beverly Hills, CA [PM Magazine]

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For anyone contemplating taking credit cards for payments or copayments in your office, please be aware that some of the credit card companies require you to sign a contract. Don’t do that! If you do and you either have a problem with the company or find out that they are overcharging you, they will hold you responsible for the contract and may take you to court. There are enough credit card companies out that that do not require contracts and are highly competitive. 

-Dr. Elliot Udell, DPM, Hicksville, NY [PM Magazine]

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BUSINESS PLAN CONSTRUCTION: For Health Industry Modernity

FOR MEDICAL AND HEALTHCARE ENTREPRENEURS AND INNOVATORS

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA MEd CMP®

I was asked by business schools and medical colleagues – and their bankers, CPAs and advisors – to speak about this topic several times last year before the pandemic.

Now, with the specter of M-4-A etc; it certainly is a vital concern to all young entrepreneurs, doctors & medical professionals whether live, audio recorded or in podcast form. And so, here is a written transcript of a recent presentation for your review.

Now, with the specter of tele-health, tele-medicine, M-4-A etc; it certainly is a vital concern to all young doctors & medical professionals whether live, audio recorded or in podcast form. And so, here is a written transcript of a recent presentation for your review.

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New Product Business Plan Sample [2021 Updated] | OGScapital

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READ: https://healthcarefinancials.files.wordpress.com/2017/08/mba-business-plan-capstone-outline.pdf

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COVID INFECTIONS: The Un-Vaccinated

By Staff Reporters

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33.6% of COVID Infections Were in Unvaccinated Persons

According to a recent CDC study. Among 422,966 reported SARS-CoV-2 infections in LAC residents aged ≥18 years during November 7, 2021–January 8, 2022:

 •  33.6% were in unvaccinated persons
 •  13.3% were in fully vaccinated persons with a booster
 •  53.2% were in fully vaccinated persons without a booster
 •  Unvaccinated persons were most likely to be hospitalized, representing 2.8% of COVID infections
 •  Unvaccinated persons were most likely to be admitted to an ICU, or 0.5% of COVID infections
 •  Unvaccinated persons were most likely to be require intubation for mechanical ventilation, or 0.2% of COVID infections.

Source: CDC, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, February 1, 2022

Lost Vaccine Card: https://portal.ct.gov/vaccine-portal/Vaccine-Knowledge-Base/Articles/Lost-Vaccine-Card?language=en_US

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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Hospital Revenue Cycle Recruitment Survey

By Staff Reporters

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Entry-level Revenue Cycle Recruitment Takes 84 Days on Average

A recent AKASA survey of 514 chief financial officers and revenue cycle leaders at hospitals and health systems in the U.S. found:

 •  Entry-level revenue cycle talent (0-5 years): On average, costs $2,167 for recruitment and takes 84 days to fill vacant roles.
 •  Mid-level revenue cycle talent (6-10 years): On average, costs $3,581 for recruitment and takes 153 days to fill vacant roles.
 •  Senior-level revenue cycle talent (10+ years): On average, costs $5,699 for recruitment and takes 207 days to fill vacant roles.

Source: AKASA via PR Newswire, “Survey: Recruitment Costs, Long Hiring Timelines Negatively Impact Healthcare Finance Teams”, January 26, 2022

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MedPAC: Recommends Payment Updates for 2023

Medicare Payment Advisory Commission

By Health Capital Consultants, LLC

HC Topics Banner Image

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MedPAC Recommends Payment Updates for 2023

DEFINITION: The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission is an independent, non-partisan legislative branch agency headquartered in Washington, D.C. MedPAC was established by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/082610254

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In a January 2022 meeting of MedPAC, commissioners reviewed various recommendations related to the Medicare fee schedule for various health sectors, and unanimously agreed to update Medicare payments to hospitals and keep physician payment rates the same for 2023. This Health Capital Topics article will review the recommendations made by MedPAC for each of the health sectors and their respective payment systems. (Read more…)

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PODCAST: Medicare Provider Payment Changes

By Eric Bricker MD

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Announce Changes to Doctor and Healthcare Provider Payments

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/082610254

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PODCAST Related Medical Payments: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/10/01/podcast-on-medicare-payments-to-doctors/

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Health Consumption Expenditures Per Capita

By Staff Reporters

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KFF: Health Consumption Expenditures Per Capita

 •  United States: $11,946
 •  Switzerland: $7,138
 •  Germany: $6,731
 •  Netherlands: $6,299
 •  Austria: $5,899
 •  Sweden: $5,754
 •  France: $5,564
 •  Belgium: $5,458
 •  Canada: $5,370
 •  United Kingdom: $5,268
 •  Australia: $4,919
 •  Japan: $4,691

Notes: U.S. value obtained from National Health Expenditure data. Data from Australia, Belgium, Canada, Japan and Switzerland are from 2019. Data for Australia, France, and Japan are estimated. Data for Austria, Canada, Germany, Netherlands, and Sweden are provisional. Health consumption does not include investments in structures, equipment, or research. Data for 2020 except as noted.
Source: KFF analysis of National Health Expenditure (NHE) and OECD data, January 21, 2022

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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PODCAST: Health Insurance Costs Have Risen 55% in the Last Decade

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By Eric Bricker MD

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Health Insurance Cost Has Risen 55% in the last 10 Years. The Annual Health Insurance Cost for Family Coverage is Now $21,000 Per Year

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Dysfunctional Employee Benefits Article in Journal of the American Medical Association

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CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/082610254

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ORACLE Buys CERNER Electronic Medical Records

By Staff Reporters

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Perks of Using EMR Systems on Locum Assignments | Medicus Healthcare  Solutions

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According to reporter Neal Freyman, Tech giant Oracle said it’s paying $28.3 billion to buy electronic medical records company Cerner, because anything that makes paperwork less excruciating seems like a savvy business play.

Oracle is known for being aggressive with acquisitions (it even rallied a group to try and buy TikTok last year), but Cerner is Oracle’s biggest purchase in its history. The deal is further evidence that health care is “on par with banking in terms of the importance to our future,” as cofounder Larry Ellison told analysts earlier this month.

  • In Cerner, Oracle will get the Klay Thompson of the electronic medical records market—a very influential player, but in second place behind Epic, which owns a 31% market share.

Bottom line: Big tech companies see a golden opportunity in bringing the health care industry to the cloud, given its size (health care spending accounts for almost 20% of US GDP), and its old-school record-keeping process. A Mayo Clinic study cited by Oracle showed that doctors and nurses spend an average of 1–2 hours on desk work for every hour they take to see patients.

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EMR PODCAST: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/08/29/podcast-on-electronic-medical-records/

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HISTORY: Medical Education and Practice in the USA

Domestic Medical SCHOOL Education

Robert James Cimasi

Todd A. Zigrang

Health Capital Consultants - Healthcare Valuation

U.S. medical education began in the late eighteenth century as an apprenticeship program in which physicians taught their trade to a few pupils, a pedagogical learning style which relied heavily upon the capacity, skills, and knowledge of the individual physician.[1] However, as learning newly discovered information and utilizing new technologies became more necessary to the industry’s practice, many physicians found the apprenticeship system no longer adequate as a manner of educating the next generation of physicians.[2] As a result, the conventional concept of medical education that originated in the U.S. in the 1750s was manifested through informal courses and demonstrations by private individuals or for-profit institutions. Those individuals who were not satisfied with a typical U.S. medical education, consisting of two identical 16-week lecture terms, might venture to Europe for a more formalized and detailed manner of learning.[3]

One of these students who studied in Europe was William Shippen, who began teaching an informal course on midwifery when he returned to the American colonies in 1762.[4] He later addressed the limitations of what might be taught in one informal course when he began teaching a lecture series on anatomy to help educate those who wished to be a physician, but could not travel abroad. John Morgan, a classmate of Shippen, noticed the potential of his friend’s endeavor and proposed the idea to create a professorship for the practice of medicine to the board of trustees of the College of Philadelphia.[5] Just across town, Thomas Bond, who conceived the idea of, and successfully established, the Pennsylvania Hospital with Benjamin Franklin, recognized the value to allowing medical students to participate in bedside training.[6] When Bond agreed to a partnership with the College of Philadelphia, the University of Pennsylvania became home to America’s first medical school.[7]

In 1893, Johns Hopkins University also made history by housing the first medical school that was able to operate out of a university-owned hospital.[8] The medical school not only encouraged clinical research to be performed by every member of their faculty, but the program also included a clinical research clerkship for every student during their rotation.[9] This program quickly became the model to which schools aspired and set the foundation for national medical education by connecting science and medical research with clinical medicine.[10]

With these early examples of medical schools, America’s field of medical education and clinical medicine made monumental strides. However, the societal pressures, caused by the U.S.’s population growth and demand for educated physicians,[11] did not allow many other universities to build on Johns Hopkins’ or the University of Pennsylvania’s foundation model, and led to the development of medical schools that had their own unique set of entrance and graduation requirements. While some focused entirely on medicine, other schools (termed Studia Generalia) also incorporated law, theology, and philosophy in their curricula.[12] In an attempt to both understand and make uniform the field of medical education, the American Medical Association (AMA) founded the Council on Medical Education (CME) in 1904.[13] The CME created minimum national educational standards for training physicians, and subsequently found that many schools did not meet these established standards.[14] However, the CME did not share the ratings of any of these medical schools “outside the medical fraternity.”[15]

In 1910, the AMA commissioned the Carnegie Foundation for Advancement of Teaching to conduct a study of medical education and schools.[16] Abraham Flexner conducted the inquiry and detailed his findings in what became known as The Flexner Report.[17] In his review of the U.S. medical education system, Flexner found that many of the proprietary medical schools met the AMA’s educational goals, but an imbalance existed between the pursuit of science and medical education.[18]  Professors were focused solely on student throughput, and did not ensure a high level of medical training that reflected the developments in the medical industry.[19] As aptly noted by Dr. John Roberts in his book entitled The Doctor’s Duty to the State, “[m]any of you remember the struggle to wrest from medical teachers the power to create medical practitioners with almost no real knowledge of medicine. The medical schools of that day were, in many instances, conducted merely as money-makers for the professors.”[20] As the AMA gained more influence over the provision of healthcare in the U.S., the value and power of medical education also gained recognition. Notably, teaching hospitals had the power to influence the development of their disciplines through their research initiatives, the quality of care they provided, and their ability to operate as an economy of scale, allowing them to dictate the evolution of medical education.[21]

Since the establishment of the first medical school in the U.S., medical education has been the foundation for shaping standards of care in the practice of medicine and defining medical errors as deviations from the norms of clinical care.[22] When Thomas Bond helped establish the University of Pennsylvania medical school, he envisioned a normal day where the physician:

…meets his pupils at stated times in the Hospital, and when a case presents adapted to his purpose, he asks all those Questions which lead to a certain knowledge of the Disease and parts affected; and if the Disease baffles the power of Art and the Patient falls a Sacrifice to it, he then brings his Knowledge to the Test, and fixes Honour [sic] or discredit on his Reputation by exposing all the Morbid parts to View, and Demonstrates by what means it produced Death, and if perchance he finds something unexpected, which Betrays an Error in Judgement [sic], he like a great and good man immediately acknowledges the mistake, and, for the benefit of survivors, points out other methods by which it might have been more happily treated.[23]

Originally, students were to study and learn from medical errors and adverse events through medical education as a means of improving the quality of care. However, it is difficult to effectively implement any significant advancement learned through the research and investigation of prior errors in a timely and cost-effective manner. Additionally, physician supply shortages have only increased the amount of patients that a physician must see daily, while simultaneously decreasing the amount of time they can spend with each patient. Although medical education continues to be one of the central underpinnings to the development of the medical industry, outside pressures that shape the clinical practice of physicians continue to limit physician effectiveness in providing quality care to patients.[24]

While improving the quality and rigor of medical education has been a constant focus throughout the history of U.S. medical education, the challenges of replicating it on a scale that produces enough qualified physicians to meet the growing demands of the U.S. population, with constantly changing technologies, has consistently been a central issue. Notably, in the 13 years preceding 1980, the ratio of actively practicing physicians to patients increased by 50%.[25] This increased physician-to-patient ratio led to concerns over quality of care and cost-effectiveness, which in turn caused the creation of a government committee to evaluate physician manpower allocation and distribution. The Graduate Medical Education National Advisory Committee (GMENAC) was first chartered in April 1976, and later extended through September 1980.[26] Its purpose was to “analyze the distribution among specialties of physicians and medical students and to evaluate alternative approaches to ensure an appropriate balance,”as well as to“encourage bodies controlling the number, types, and geographic location of graduate training positions to provide leadership in achieving the recommended balance.”[27] GMENAC produced seven volumes of recommendations regarding physician manpower supply,[28]  through the development of several models by which to determine the projected number of physicians that would be needed in the future by different subspecialties to achieve “a better balance of physicians.”[29] Ignoring critics of the report, U.S. medical schools adjusted their enrollment numbers in response to the GMENAC’s recommendations, causing a significant decrease in the supply of new physicians going into the 21st century.

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History of Conventional Medicine - 24 Hour Translation ...

[1]       “Healthcare Valuation: The Four Pillars of Healthcare Value,” Volume 1, Robert James Cimasi, MHA, ASA, FRRICS, MCBA, CVA, CM&AA, John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, NJ: 2014, p. 22-23.RR

[2]       “Before There Was Flexner,” American Medical Student Association, 2014,

         http://www.amsa.org/AMSA/Homepage/MemberCenter/Premeds/edRx/Before.aspx (Accessed 1/7/15).

[3]       “Time to Heal: American Medical Education from the Turn of the Century to the Era of Managed Care,” By Kenneth M. Ludmerer, New York, NY:

          Oxford University Press, 1999, p. 4.

[4]       “The Flexner Report on Medical Education in the United States and Canada in 1910,” By Abraham Flexner, Bethesda, MD: Science and Health

         Publications, Inc., p. 3-5.

[5]       “The Flexner Report on Medical Education in the United States and Canada in 1910,” By Abraham Flexner, Bethesda, MD: Science and Health

         Publications, Inc., p. 3-5.

[6]       “The Flexner Report on Medical Education in the United States and Canada in 1910,” By Abraham Flexner, Bethesda, MD: Science and Health

         Publications, Inc., p. 3-5.

[7]       “Before There Was Flexner,” American Medical Student Association, 2014,

         http://www.amsa.org/AMSA/Homepage/MemberCenter/Premeds/edRx/Before.aspx (Accessed 1/7/15).

[8]       “Time to Heal: American Medical Education from the Turn of the Century to the Era of Managed Care,” By Kenneth M. Ludmerer, New York, NY:

          Oxford University Press, 1999, p. 18-19.

[9]       “Time to Heal: American Medical Education from the Turn of the Century to the Era of Managed Care,” By Kenneth M. Ludmerer, New York, NY:

          Oxford University Press, 1999, p. 18-19.

[10]     “Science and Social Work:  A Critical Appraisal,” By Stuart A. Kirk, and William James Reid, New York, NY: Columbia University Press, 2002, Chapter 1, p. 2-3.

[11]     “The Flexner Report on Medical Education in the United States and Canada in 1910,” By Abraham Flexner, Bethesda, MD: Science and Health

          Publications, Inc., p. 6-7.

[12]     “Western Medicine: An Illustrated History,” By Irvine Loudon, New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 1997, p. 58.

[13]     “Western Medicine: An Illustrated History,” By Irvine Loudon, New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 1997, p. 58.

[14]     “Western Medicine: An Illustrated History,” By Irvine Loudon, New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 1997, p. 58.

[15]     “Western Medicine: An Illustrated History,” By Irvine Loudon, New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 1997, p. 58.

[16]     “U.S. Health Policy and Politics: A Documentary History,” By Kevin Hillstrom, Thousand Oaks, CA: CQ Press, 2012, p. 141.

[17]     “The Flexner Report on Medical Education in the United States and Canada in 1910,” By Abraham Flexner, Bethesda, MD: Science and Health

         Publications, Inc., p. 3-19.

[18]     “The Flexner Report on Medical Education in the United States and Canada in 1910,” By Abraham Flexner, Bethesda, MD: Science and Health

         Publications, Inc., p. 3-19.

[19]     “The Flexner Report on Medical Education in the United States and Canada in 1910,” By Abraham Flexner, Bethesda, MD: Science and Health

         Publications, Inc., p. 3-19.

[20]     “The Doctor’s Duty to the State: Essays on The Public Relations of Physicians,” By John B. Roberts, AM, MD, Chicago, IL: American Medical Association Press, 1908, p. 23.

[21]     “Time to Heal: American Medical Education from the Turn of the Century to the Era of Managed Care,” By Kenneth M. Ludmerer, New York, NY:

          Oxford University Press, 1999, p. 19.

[22]     “Science and Social Work:  A Critical Appraisal,” By Stuart A. Kirk, and William James Reid, New York: Columbia University Press, 2002, Chapter 1, p. 2-3.

[23]     “Dr. Thomas Bond’s Essay on the Utility of Clinical Lectures,” By Carl Bridenbaugh, Journal of the History of Medicine (Winter 1947), p. 14; “The Flexner Report on Medical Education in the United States and Canada in 1910,” By Abraham Flexner, Bethesda, MD: Science and Health

         Publications, Inc., p. 4.

[24]     “Time to Heal: American Medical Education from the Turn of the Century to the Era of Managed Care,” By Kenneth M. Ludmerer, New York, NY:

          Oxford University Press, 1999, p. xxi.

[25]     “How many doctors are enough?” By J.E. Harris, Health Affairs, Vol. 5, No. 4 (1986), p.74.

[26]   “Report of the Graduate Medical Education National Advisory Committee to the Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services – Volume VII,” Graduate Medical Education National Advisory Committee, Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1981, p. 5, 16.

[27]     “Report of the Graduate Medical Education National Advisory Committee to the Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services – Volume VII,” Graduate Medical Education National Advisory Committee, Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1981, p. 73.

[28]     “Report of the Graduate Medical Education National Advisory Committee to the Secretary, Department of Health and Human Services – Volume VII,” Graduate Medical Education National Advisory Committee, Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1981, p. 5-6.

[29]     “GMENAC: Its Manpower Forecasting Framework,” By D.R. McNutt, American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 71, No. 10 (October 1981), p. 1119.

[30]     “Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century,” Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, 2001, front matter.

[31]     “Overview of Medical Errors and Adverse Events,” By Maité Garrouste-Orgeas, et al., Annals of Intensive Care, Vol. 2, No. 2 (2012), p. 6.

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The Ever Evolving Future of Medical Education

By Staff Reporters

Medical education in the U.S. and Canada has changed considerably in the last several decades.

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Lessons from Pre-clinical Medical Education | Biomedical Odyssey

According to the AMA, the major changes are the following:

  • Reducing medical school programs leading to the medical degree to three years. Since graduate medical education (i.e., residency) is many years in duration and includes virtually all the information, that would be part of the typical fourth year..
  • Introducing clinical medicine early in the curriculum.
  • Including medical information and activities into the basic science component of the curriculum.
  • De-emphasizing inactive learning by markedly reducing the number of lectures and employing problem-based learning (PBL) which typically takes place in small groups (e.g., 6-8 students led by a single faculty member). 
  • Employing objective structured clinical examinations (OSCE) in which students are asked to solve a problem in which they are faced with a simulated patient and are asked to solve a clinical problem. Students are evaluated as to how well they communicate/interact with patients, take a medical history, arrive at a clinical diagnosis, and come up with a treatment plan. The simulated patients are trained to act as if they were actual patients. The OSCE includes individual students interacting with a single patient, emulating a real patient-doctor interaction. How well the student performs is evaluated by a faculty member observing the activity via video and by the simulated patient who evaluates the student doctor for such activities as his/her communication skills. 

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PANDEMIC “versus” EPIDEMIC: A Review

PANDEMIC “versus” EPIDEMIC

Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA

Courtesy: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Is there a Difference? – Know the Difference!

A Pandemic (from Greek πᾶν pan “all” and δῆμος demos “people”) is an epidemic of disease that has spread across a large region; for instance multiple continents, or even worldwide. A widespread endemic disease that is stable in terms of how many people are getting sick from it is not a pandemic.

Further, flu pandemics generally exclude recurrences of seasonal flu. Throughout history, there have been a number of pandemics, such as smallpox and tuberculosis. One of the most devastating pandemics was the Black Death, which killed an estimated 100 million people in the 14th century. Some recent pandemics include: HIV, Spanish flu, 2009 flu pandemic and H1N1.

LINK: https://www.amazon.com/Dictionary-Health-Insurance-Managed-Care/dp/0826149944/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1275315485&sr=1-4

An Epidemic is the rapid spread of infectious disease to a large number of people in a given population within a short period of time, usually two weeks or less.

For example, in meningococcal infections, an attack rate in excess of 15 cases per 100,000 people for two consecutive weeks is considered an epidemic.

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Epidemic vs Pandemic | Technology Networks

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LINK: https://www.amazon.com/Dictionary-Health-Insurance-Managed-Care/dp/0826149944/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1275315485&sr=1-4

Key Differences

  • Epidemics is the outbreak of the disease in a community while pandemic is the outbreak of the disease globally.
  • SARS was an epidemic while AIDS was an pandemic.
  • Pandemic disease has the same origin or source where so ever it gets spread while the same disease is spreading with different sources in each country, it refers to epidemic.
  • Epidemic when extending to greater levels becomes a pandemic.

MORE: https://www.verywellhealth.com/difference-between-epidemic-and-pandemic-2615168

ENDEMIC: If you translate it literally, endemic means “in the population.” It derives from the Greek endēmos, which joins en, meaning “in,” and dēmos, meaning “population.” “Endemic” is often used to characterize diseases that are generally found in a particular area; malaria, for example, is said to be endemic to tropical and subtropical regions. This use differs from that of the related word epidemic in that it indicates a more or less constant presence in a particular population or area rather than a sudden, severe outbreak within that region or group.

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PODCAST: Hospital Charity Care Explained

BY ERIC BRICKER MD

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PODCAST: Ray Dalio on How the Healthcare Economy Works

Economy Works’ Applied to Healthcare … Credit Cycles and Healthcare Policy

By Eric Bricker MD

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New Study Compares Medicare-Commercial Payment Gaps by Specialty

New Study Compares Medicare-Commercial Payment Gaps by Specialty

BY HEALTH CAPITAL CONSULTANTS


Utilizing data from FAIR Health, the Urban Institute conducted an October 2021 study which reviewed commercial insurance claims across the U.S. (for approximately 60 insurers and third-party administrators covering over 150 million Americans under age 65) from March 2019 through February 2020.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

This study assessed the gap between commercial insurance payments and Medicare payments for professional physician services to determine whether the payment gap between Medicare and commercial insurance differs by specialty. (Read more…)

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CMS Innovation Center Launches “Bold New” Strategy

BY HEALTH CAPITAL CONSULTANTS, LLC

CMS Innovation Center Launches “Bold New” Strategy


When President Joe Biden was elected in 2020, there was much anticipation and speculation regarding what his election would mean for the U.S. healthcare industry in the coming years.

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Thriving in a value-based health care model - Biotricity

As an ardent supporter of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) who campaigned on offering a public insurance option similar to Medicare, many in the healthcare industry assumed that the Biden Administration would be a strong proponent of continuing the shift to value-based care, which shift was largely spurred by his predecessor and former boss, Barack Obama, with the passage of the ACA. (Read more…)

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What is Health Insurance Network STEERAGE?

By Staff Reporters

What is health plan network steerage?

Network steerage is the practice of directing employees and members on your benefits plan to in-network doctors, hospitals, and other points of care. A network steerage strategy is crucial for healthcare payers who are looking to tackle high healthcare costs. An admirable goal.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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But, what is steerage – really?

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has raised concerns about a hospital practice known as “steerage”–which involves a provider buying commercial insurance coverage for patients who are already eligible for Medicare or Medicaid coverage in order to obtain higher levels of reimbursement.

IOW: The plan charges a fixed monthly fee so its members can receive health care. There will be a small co-payment for each doctor visit; however with the HMO, fees can be fore-casted unlike a fee-for-service insurance plan. Although freedom of choice is given up, out-of-pocket expenses are very low.

RELATED CONCERNS: https://www.fiercehealthcare.com/finance/cms-looking-for-data-practice-steerage-hospitals-voice-concern

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PODCAST: Low-Value Healthcare Remains Even Without Fee-for-Service Incentives

BY ERIC BRICKER MD

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Physician Medical Practice “Misrepresentation” Risks

BUSINESS FRAUD RISKS

True Case Report

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By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP©

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A Medical Practice Misrepresentation Case Model

Let’s say a physician decided to sell his practice and move to another state. The value of the sale was based, in part, on the yearly gross of the practice. The physician accepted installment payment terms from the buyer and moved to the new state. The buyer began to practice medicine at his new office. Although he was busy, his gross never approached the gross of the prior physician.

Eventually the buyer defaulted on the loan. The selling physician sued for the deficit. The defaulting physician and his forensic consultants then performed an in-depth evaluation of the seller’s practice. The buyer and his team noticed some discrepancies in the billing patterns and practices of the seller. Considering these discrepancies to constitute Medicare and insurance billing fraud, the seller counter-sued the buyer on the grounds of misrepresentation, alleging the gross receipts of the practice purchase price, was grossly inflated.

Citation: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

ASSESSMENT: Therefore, the buyer determined that the seller had fraudulently misrepresented the potential of the practice. He also notified state and federal authorities and filed complaints of insurance fraud against the seller.

The seller thought that he would move to the good life in the new state, but his old practice kept him in constant legal trouble.

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PODCAST: Health Plan Innovation

ALIGNMENT / MISALIGNMENT INNOVATION?

By Dr. Eric Bricker MD

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