PODCAST: General Electric Healthcare!

WHY NO GROWTH?

BY ERIC BRICKER MD

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MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/05/11/a-general-electric-physician-investor-update/

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PODCAST: The Growing Tele-Medicine Adoption

By First Stop Health

What is Telemedicine?

Even Through the Waxing and Waning of the Pandemic Over the Subsequent Months, Consumers Are Still 4X More Likely to Use Telemedicine Than They Were Previously.

PODCAST: https://tinyurl.com/druhseb5

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What is “SWARM” Learning?

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA

SWARM INTELLIGENCE IN MEDICINE

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Swarm learning, or swarm intelligence, is how swarms of bees or birds move in response to their environment.

When applied to data there is “more peer-to-peer communications, more peer-to-peer collaboration, more peer-to-peer learning and that’s the reason why swarm learning will become more and more important as … as the center of gravity shifts” from centralized to decentralized data.

DZNE : AI with Swarm Intelligence

Medicine Example:

Consider this example,  “A hospital trains their machine learning models on chest X-rays and sees a lot of tuberculosis cases, but very little of lung collapsed cases. So therefore, this neural network model, when trained, will be very sensitive to what’s detecting tuberculosis and less sensitive towards detecting lung collapse.”

“However, we get the converse of it in another hospital. So what you really want is to have these two hospitals combine their data so that the resulting neural network model can predict both situations better. But since you can’t share that data, swarm learning comes in to help reduce that bias of both the hospitals.”

And this means, “each hospital is able to predict outcomes, with accuracy and with reduced bias, as though you have collected all the patient data globally in one place and learned from it.”

Moreover, it’s not just hospital and patient data that must be kept secure. What swarm learning does is to try to avoid or reduce the sharing of data, or totally prevent the sharing of data, to [a model] where you only share the insights, or you share the learnings.

So, that’s why it is fundamentally more secure.

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Litigation and Legacy in Education and Medicine

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Distinct Fields Bound by Certain Parallels

[By Jeffrey M. Hartman]  [Dr. David Marcinko MBA]

jhThe fields of education and medicine are distinct, yet bound by certain parallels. In particular, litigation has shaped present practices in each field. Case law has expanded the rights of students and parents while increasing protections for patients. Resulting improvements in the quality of education or health care vary depending on perspective.

Of greater certainty is the comparable increase in procedures, protocols, and overall bureaucracy needed in each field as a result of litigation.

Compensation Culture

Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, a perceived rise in civil cases led some pundits to ascribe a compensation culture to certain segments of America. Sensationalistic stories about plaintiffs seeking outrageous damages generated concern that this compensation culture was real and threatening to business interests across the country.

Media outlets frequently portrayed those behind the questionable suits as poor but entitled people looking to take advantage of tort law for personal gain. Pundits claimed these cases represented a decline in personal responsibility matched by an increase in shameless greed. At the same time, the notion of frivolous litigation creating unnecessary layers of bureaucracy took hold in the American conscious and remained there.

Predatory Litigation

The actual incidence and impact of supposedly predatory litigation remains debatable. Some civil liberties advocates suggest American companies created smear campaigns in the media to make the issue appear more prevalent than it was while attempting to curtail future suits. Without question, some companies have had to pay significant damages, particularly in class action cases.

However, the claims against these companies typically haven’t materialized without cause. Tort law always has existed as a protection. A few plaintiffs and attorneys may have exploited these laws and others may continue to do so. Such exploitative cases haven’t outnumbered cases built around legitimate claims.

Ethics

Questions about the ethics and even the prevalence of civil suits are the stuff of legal philosophy. The more immediate question is whether or not such cases have impacted particular fields and if so, what has been the nature of the impact. Legal precedents often lead to regulation of industries. Some forms of regulation can alter business practices. This can be for the better of all involved. Even if regulation increases costs, it often improves safety or quality.

In fields such as education and medicine, litigation has profoundly influenced practices. Influence on quality is another matter.

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Education

The impact of litigation on education has been most apparent in special education. Class action suits resulted in the foundational special education law in America. Case law continues to establish precedents and corresponding mandates that states and school districts must follow. Many of the cases parents bring against districts stem from these districts struggling to abide by demanding mandates. Large districts retain teams of attorneys who spend a disproportionate amount of their time handling special education cases. Special education bureaucracy requires many schools to employ administrators who deal solely with compliance and protocol. In special education, litigation has led to more litigation.

Special Education

Special education litigation affects school practices in several additional ways. Compensatory education losses in special education pull from overall budgets. Teachers need to compile data on special education students not just for planning, but to protect themselves and their schools in disputes with parents. School members of IEP teams construct programs from the perspective of how readily they can defend themselves should a legal case develop. Decisions about goals for students are often based on the likelihood of students appearing to make progress in a way that prevents potential conflict. When lawsuits do emerge, school districts have demonstrated a historic willingness to settle and give parents what they want rather than getting involved in lengthy and costly legal battles.

Medicine

In medicine, public perception of the effects of litigation are somewhat skewed. Malpractice cases make for attention-getting headlines. However, the number of malpractice suits has decreased in recent years. The average amount for damage claims has leveled off as well. These cases tend to be reserved for incidents involving serious injury and death. Although this might seem counter-intuitive, plaintiffs often lose malpractice cases. Preventable mistakes still account for a massive amount of loss in medicine, but the public perception of malpractice suits driving up insurance costs isn’t exactly accurate.

Malpractice Liability

This isn’t to say litigation has had no effect. Some health care professionals have had their careers upended by ruinous malpractice suits. A few states have enacted damage caps to limit what plaintiffs can claim. Expensive malpractice insurance has become ubiquitous for health care professionals. Many physicians have been suspected of practicing defensive medicine, or over-diagnosing for their own protection from suits. Defensive medicine resembles the tendency of special education teachers to write IEPs that ensure student progress. Layers of bureaucracy weigh on health care systems. Much of this exists as liability protections. Again, this parallels how schools have to handle special education.

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Improvements?

So, has litigation improved either field? In education, programs for students with special needs have expanded opportunities for equitable education. The expansion stems directly from litigation. However, special education has not solved the dearth of opportunities waiting for students with special needs after high school. At the same time, the expense of special education—including the continuing need for defense against further litigation—mires the most vulnerable school districts.

Health care has improved in many ways in recent decades, but most of these improvements are tied to technological advancements rather than litigation. Technological innovations also have contributed to increases in costs. The surge in bureaucracy does more to protect health care systems than patients, but patients have indirectly benefitted somewhat from the precautions litigation has made necessary. Patient behavior continues to drive the incidence of illness, but widespread health education campaigns have made some impact in behaviors such as smoking. Litigation has aided the creation of such public campaigns through pressure on lawmakers.

Imperfect Analogues

Education and medicine aren’t perfectly analogous, so certain comparisons can’t be made fairly. Despite differences, each field has had to respond in similar ways to changes in society. Pressure from litigation is just one of these changes. Other changes have involved how each field interacts with the public it serves. Schools and hospitals have increasingly become de facto social service providers for needy communities. Educators and physicians have had to become wary of their reputations via online ratings sites and their presence in social media in general.

Experts in both fields have their positions challenged by what information parents and patients find online. These similarities might be more analogous than similarities wrought by litigation.

Although the effects of litigation have been different in the two fields, the response in each field has been noteworthy. Litigation more or less created special education. The burgeoning field has improved equitable opportunities while creating logistical quagmires for schools. Outcomes for students have been limited by factors schools can’t control, thus derailing some of the idealistic aims of litigation. Poor outcomes haven’t lessened the burden special education law places on schools.

Meanwhile, public perception of how malpractice has affected medicine differs from the actual effects. Litigation has affected physician practices more than it has affected costs. Patient care has improved through technology more than through legal mandates. Protections have improved vicariously through the threat of litigation, but this might be inadvertently affecting how physicians offer treatment.

Assessment

Overall, litigation has complicated each field by adding layers of protective bureaucracy. Improvements in quality might not be commensurate with the effort expended. Often what the public gains in protection is loses in simplicity and effectiveness. These fields exemplify this maxim.

ABOUT

Jeffrey M. Hartman is a former teacher who blogs at http://jeffreymhartman.com/

MORE:

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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A Brief History of Managed Medical Care in the USA

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By National Council on Disability

The origins of managed care can be traced back to at least 1929, when Michael Shadid, a physician in Elk City, Oklahoma, established a health cooperative for farmers in a small community without medical specialists or a nearby general hospital. He sold shares to raise money to establish a local hospital and created an annual fee schedule to cover the costs of providing care. By 1934, 600 family memberships were supporting a staff that included Dr. Shadid, four newly recruited specialists, and a dentist. That same year, two Los Angeles physicians, Donald Ross and Clifford Loos, entered into a prepaid contract to provide comprehensive health services to 2,000 employees of a local water company.endnote[i]

Development of Prepaid Health Plans

Other major prepaid group practice plans were initiated between 1930 and 1960, including the Group Health Association in Washington, DC, in 1937, the Kaiser-Permanente Medical Program in 1942, the Health Cooperative of Puget Sound in Seattle in 1947, the Health Insurance Plan of Greater New York in New York City in 1947, and the Group Health Plan of Minneapolis in 1957. These plans encountered strong opposition from the medical establishment, but they also attracted a large number of enrollees.

Today, such prepaid health plans are commonly referred to as health maintenance organizations (HMOs). The term “health maintenance organization,” however, was not coined until 1970, with the aim of highlighting the importance that prepaid health plans assign to health promotion and prevention of illness. HMOs are what most Americans think of when the term “managed care” is used, even though other managed care models have emerged over the past 40 years.

Public Managed Care Plans

The enactment of the Health Maintenance Organization Act of 1973 (P. L. 93-222) provided a major impetus to the expansion of managed health care. The legislation was proposed by the Nixon Administration in an attempt to restrain the growth of health care costs and also to preempt efforts by congressional Democrats to enact a universal health care plan. P. L. 93-222 authorized $375 million to assist in establishing and expanding HMOs, overrode state laws restricting the establishment of prepaid health plans, and required employers with 25 or more employees to offer an HMO option if they furnished health insurance coverage to their workers. The purpose of the legislation was to stimulate greater competition within health care markets by developing outpatient alternatives to expensive hospital-based treatment. Passage of this legislation also marked an important turning point in the U.S. health care industry because it introduced the concept of for-profit health care corporations to an industry long dominated by a not-for-profit business model.endnote[ii]

In the decade following the passage of P. L. 93-222, enrollment in HMOs grew slowly. Stiff opposition from the medical profession led to the imposition of regulatory restrictions on HMO operations. But the continued, rapid growth in health care outlays forced government officials to look for new solutions. National health expenditures grew as a proportion of the overall gross national product (GNP) from 5.3 percent in 1960 to 9.5 percent in 1980.endnote[iii] In response, Congress in 1972 authorized Medicare payments to free-standing ambulatory care clinics providing kidney dialysis to beneficiaries with end-stage renal disease. Over the following decade, the Federal Government authorized payments for more than 2,400 Medicare procedures performed on an outpatient basis.endnote[iv]

Responding to the relaxed regulatory environment, physicians began to form group practices and open outpatient centers specializing in diagnostic imaging, wellness and fitness, rehabilitation, surgery, birthing, and other services previously provided exclusively in hospital settings. As a result, the number of outpatient clinics skyrocketed from 200 in 1983 to more than 1,500 in 1991,endnote[v] and the percentage of surgeries performed in hospitals was halved between 1980 (83.7%) and 1992 (46.1%).endnote[vi]

mind-investing-behavioral-finance

The Influence of Medicare Prospective Payments

Health care costs, however, continued to spiral upward, consuming 10.8 percent of GNP by 1983. In an attempt to slow the growth rate, Congress in 1982 capped hospital reimbursement rates under the Medicare program and directed the secretary of HHS to develop a case mix methodology for reimbursing hospitals based on diagnosis-related groups (DRGs). As an incentive to the hospital industry, the legislation (the Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act (P. L. 97-248)) included a provision allowing hospitals to avoid a Medicare spending cap by reaching an agreement with HHS on implementing a prospective payment system (PPS) to replace the existing FFS system. Following months of intense negotiations involving federal officials and representatives of the hospital industry, the Reagan Administration unveiled a Medicare PPS. Under the new system, health conditions were divided into 468 DRGs, with a fixed hospital payment rate assigned to each group.

Once the DRG system was fully phased in, Medicare payments to hospitals stabilized.endnote[vii] However, since DRGs applied to inpatient hospital services only, many hospitals, like many group medical practices, began to expand their outpatient services in order to offset revenues lost as a result of shorter hospital stays. Between 1983 and 1991, the percentage of hospitals with outpatient care departments grew from 50 percent to 87 percent. Hospital revenues derived from outpatient services doubled over the period, reaching 25 percent of all revenues by 1992.endnote[viii]

Since DRGs were applied exclusively to Medicare payments, hospitals began to shift unreimbursed costs to private health insurance plans. As a result, average per employee health plan premiums doubled between 1984 and 1991, rising from $1,645 to $3,605.endnote[ix] With health insurance costs eroding profits, many employers took aggressive steps to control health care expenditures. Plan benefits were reduced. Employees were required to pay a larger share of health insurance premiums. More and more employers—especially large corporations—decided to pay employee health costs directly rather than purchase health insurance. And a steadily increasing number of large and small businesses turned to managed health care plans in an attempt to rein in spiraling health care outlays.

Managed Long-Term Services and Supports

Arizona became the first state to apply managed care principles to the delivery and financing of Medicaid-funded LTSS in 1987, when the federal Health Care Financing Administration (later renamed the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services) approved the state’s request to expand its existing Medicaid managed care program. Medicaid recipients with physical and developmental disabilities became eligible to participate in the Arizona Long-Term Care System as a result of this program expansion. Over the following two decades, a number of other states joined Arizona in providing managed LTSS, and by the summer of 2012, 16 states were operating Medicaid managed LTSS programs.endnote[x]

Scientists at work

Growth of Commercial Managed Care Plans

During the late 1980s and early 1990s, managed care plans were credited with curtailing the runaway growth in health care costs. They achieved these efficiencies mainly by eliminating unnecessary hospitalizations and forcing participating physicians and other health care providers to offer their services at discounted rates. By 1993, a majority (51%) of Americans receiving health insurance through their employers were enrolled in managed health care plans.endnote[xi] Eventually, however, benefit denials and disallowances of medically necessary services led to a public outcry and the enactment of laws in many states imposing managed care standards. According to one analysis, nearly 900 state laws governing managed health practices were enacted during the 1990s.endnote[xii] Among the measures approved were laws permitting women to visit gynecologists and obstetricians without obtaining permission from their primary care physician, establishing the right of patients to receive emergency care, and establishing the right of patients to appeal decisions made by managed care firms. Congress even got into the act in 1997 when it passed the Newborns’ Mother Health Protection Act, prohibiting so-called “drive-through deliveries” (overly restrictive limits on hospital stays following the birth of a child).endnote[xiii]

Research studies have yielded little evidence that managed health care excesses have undermined the quality of health care services. For example, in a survey of 2,000 physicians, Remler and colleagues found that managed care insurance plans denied only about 1 percent of recommended hospitalizations, slightly more than 1 percent of recommended surgeries, and just over 2.5 percent of referrals to specialists.endnote[xiv] In another study, Franks and colleagues found that medical outcomes were similar for participants in HMOs versus FFS health plans.endnote[xv] Franks also reported that HMO patients were hospitalized 40 percent less frequently than FFS patients, and the rate of inappropriate hospitalizations was lower among HMO patients.

Link: http://www.ncd.gov/publications/2013/20130315/20130513_AppendixB

Recent Developments

Over the past 15 to 20 years, the public outcry against draconian managed care practices has waned, primarily due to the expanded out-of-network options afforded to participants in HMOs, PPOs, and POS health plans. But the perception that managed care represents an overly cost-conscious, mass market approach to delivering medical services lingers among the American public, even though more than 135 million people with health insurance coverage now receive their primary, preventive, and acute health services through a managed care plan.endnote[xvi]People with disabilities, especially high users of medical care and LTSS, share many of the same negative perceptions of managed care as the general public.

More:

Footnotes

[i]. R. Kane, R. Kane, N. Kaye, R. Mollica, T. Riley, P. Saucier, K. I. Snow, and L. Starr, “Managed Care Basics,” in Managed Care: Handbook for the Aging Network (Minneapolis: Long-Term Care Resource Center, University of Minnesota, 1996).

[ii]. D. Mitchell, Managed Care and Developmental Disabilities: Reconciling the Realities of Managed Care with the Individual Needs of Persons with Disabilities (Homewood, IL: High Tide Press, 1999).

[iii]. M. Freeland and C. Schendler, “Health Spending in the 1980s,” Health Care Financing Review 5 (Spring 1984): 7.

[iv]. D. Drake, Reforming the Health Care Market: An Interpretive Economic History (Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press, 1994).

[v]. Ibid.

[vi]. Mitchell, Managed Care and Developmental Disabilities.

[vii]. Drake, Reforming the Health Care Market.

[viii]. L. Weiss, Private Medicine and Public Health (Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1997).

[ix]. Employee Benefits Research Institute, EBRI Databook on Employee Benefits (Washington, DC: Employee Benefits Research Institute, 1992).

[x]. P. Saucier, “Managed Long-Term Services and Supports,” a presentation to the National Policy Forum, May 11, 2012.

[xi]. J. Iglehart, “Physicians and the Growth of Managed Care,” The New England Journal of Medicine 331, no. 17 (1994): 1167–71.

[xii]. R. Cauchi, “Where Do We Go From Here?” State Legislatures (March 1999): 15–20.

[xiii]. U.S. Department of Labor, Fact Sheet: Newborns’ and Mothers’ Protection Act, http://www.dol.gov/ebsa/newsroom/fsnmhafs.html.

[xiv]. D. Rembler, K. Donelan, R. Blendon, L. Lundberg, D. Leape, K. Binns, and J. Newhouse, “What Do Managed Care Plans Do to Affect Care: Results of a Survey of Physicians,” Inquiry 34 (1997): 196–204.

[xv]. P. Franks, C. Clancy, and P. Nutting, “Gatekeeping Revisited: Protecting Patients from Overtreatment,” The New England Journal of Medicine 337, no. 6 (1992): 424–9.

[xvi]. Statistics taken from Managed Care Online, http://www.mcol.com/factsheetindex.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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The “BUSINESS” of Transformational Medical Practice Skills

[3rd] THIRD EDITION

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

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How to READ and UNDERSTAND a Scientific Paper!

A Guide for non-scientists


By Jennifer Raff

Via Bert Mesko MD PhD  

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How to read and understand a scientific paper: a guide for non-scientists

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RELATED: https://getpocket.com/explore/item/3-questions-to-ask-yourself-next-time-you-see-a-graph-chart-or-map?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

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PODCAST: On Electronic Medical Records

EMR OVERVIEW

BY ERIC BRICKER MD

Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) are Used by 80-90% of Hospitals and Physician Practices. One Study Found that EMRs Have Lowered Patient Mortality by 0.09%.

YOUR COMMENTS ARE APPRECIATED

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On Excess IRA and Roth IRA Contributions

BY DAN MOISAND CFP®

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See the source image

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READ HERE: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/other/i-contributed-too-much-to-my-ira-and-roth-ira-%e2%80%94-what-now/ar-AANP1IP?li=BBnb7Kz

MORE: https://www.irs.gov/retirement-plans/plan-participant-employee/retirement-topics-ira-contribution-limits

EDITOR’S NOTE: Colleague Dan Moisand contributed to our textbook on “Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors.”

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YOUR THOUGHTS AND COMMENTS ARE APPRECIATED.

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PODCAST: Physician Relative Value Units?

HOW DOCTORS GET PAID!

By Eric Bricker MD

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What is a BALACLAVA?

What is a Balaclava; Anyway?

Courtesy: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

What it is?

A Balaclava, also known as a balaclava helmet or Bally or ski mask, is a form of cloth headgear designed to expose only part of the face, usually the eyes and mouth.

Now, depending on style and how it is worn, only the eyes, mouth and nose, or just the front of the face are unprotected. Versions with a full face opening may be rolled into a hat to cover the crown of the head or folded down as a collar around the neck.

Here is my version for the Corona Virus pandemic! Glasses and a mouth cover complete the look and proposed utility.

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So, I’ve written 30 major medical, business, economics and finance textbooks including three dictionaries of 30,000 peer-reveiwed terms. But, this was a new word previously unknow to me. How about you?

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RUNNER-UPS

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masks

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ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts and comments are appreciated.

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BUSINESS TEXTS FOR PHYSICIAN-EXECUTIVES AND MEDICAL CXOs

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PODCAST: Stark and AKS Final Rules

ANTI-KICKBACK STATUTE Overview and Impact

Do you want to learn more about the Stark Law and Anti-Kickback Statute Final Rules and how they impact your practice? Join us for a one-hour webinar, presented with Hancock Daniel.

Health Capital Topics Newsletter

By Health Capital Consultants, LLC

PODCAST: https://www.healthcapital.com/resources/stark-and-aks-final-rules-overview-and-impact

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Bundled Payment Model Success Unaffected by Type of Participation

BY HEALTH CAPITAL CONSULTANTS, LLC

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Bundled Payment Model Success Unaffected by Type of Participation


Historically, Medicare has offered value-based payment models to healthcare organizations on both a voluntary and a mandatory participation basis. Because voluntary participants could self-select into programs to reduce spending, it was assumed that they achieved greater savings than mandated participants, but until recently, no data had tested this.

However, a June 2021 study in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) found no difference in risk-adjusted episodic spending between voluntary and mandatory payment model participants. (Read more…) 

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More on Concierge, Retail, Cash Pay and Boutique Medicine; etc [SAM’S CLUB]

Sam’s Club Launches Innovative Pilot to Help Make Healthcare More Affordable

 

cropped-dem

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA

I devoted a full chapter of my book; “The Business of Medical Practice” to concierge and boutique medicine, retail medicine, direct, cash and private pay medicine; etc. We included terms and definitions, process and methodologies, marketing and advertising, and examples, etc. In fact, who knew I was so prescient and the landscape would finally begin evolving.

For example, we recently learned about Sam’s Club offering targeted “bundles” of health care services collaborating with Humana. https://lnkd.in/ejHGGzk

And, earlier, we learned of Amazon’s new virtual / primary care clinic model. And of course, in the past couple of weeks, Walmart’s (Sam’s affiliate) opening their freestanding clinics, along with new behavioral health services, as well.

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Assessment: Your thoughts are appreciated.

THANK YOU

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PODCAST: Hospital 340-B Drug Programs

BY ERIC BRICKER MD

YOUR COMMENTS ARE APPRECIATED.

KFF MORE: https://www.kff.org/medicare/issue-brief/whats-the-latest-on-medicare-drug-price-negotiations/

HRSA MORE: https://www.hrsa.gov/opa/index.html

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On “FACE MASKS”

FACE MASKS

By Anonymous

I love freedom and personal liberty. But I also don’t want to contract or share COVID-19.

I wear a seat belt – I will comply with any mask  requirement.

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RISK MANAGEMENT: https://www.routledge.com/Risk-Management-Liability-Insurance-and-Asset-Protection-Strategies-for/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781498725989

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PODCAST: Tips for the Medical Educator’s “Elevator Pitch”

On Medical Academic – Not Business – Planning

Courtesy: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA

We’ve written and opined about medical business entrepreneurs and business start-up plans; before:

MY ESSAY: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2020/01/20/creating-a-medical-practice-business-plan-in-2020/

MY SCRIPT: https://healthcarefinancials.files.wordpress.com/2017/08/podcast.pdf

QUERY: But, did you ever wonder what to say when you’re standing next to a senior physician colleague who could help further your academic and educational work?

MOOCS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2018/09/25/moocs-are-you-an-i-t-educational-futurist/

FLIPPED CLASSROOM: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2019/05/17/the-flipped-classroom/

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Now, for some granular specificity; let’s cue the elevator pitch with David Acosta MD and Daniel Hashimoto MD MS who demonstrate what to do (and what not to do) to successfully deliver your medical educator’s elevator pitch.

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Image result for elevator speech

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PODCAST: http://academicmedicineblog.org/tips-for-the-medical-educators-elevator-pitch/

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TEXTS FOR PHYSICIAN EXECUTIVES AND HOSPITAL CXOs

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PODCAST: Role of the “Entrepreneur” in Society

ACCORDING TO AUSTRIAN ECONOMISTS

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BY PER BYLUND

Colleague Peter R. Quinones and Per Bylund return to the show to talk about the role of the entrepreneur not only in society, but according to the Austrian School of Economics. Medical perspectives are implied.

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The Medical Entrepreneur Symposium Adds "LifeScience Innovation Roadmap"

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PODCAST: https://freemanbeyondthewall.libsyn.com/episode-312

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PODCAST: What Exactly is a Human Sneeze?

All About “STERNUTATION”

Courtesy: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

A Silly Question Until Covid-19!

A “Sternutation” is a sudden involuntary expulsion of air from the lungs through the nose and mouth due to irritation of the nasal passage.

LINK: https://www.amazon.com/Dictionary-Health-Insurance-Managed-Care/dp/0826149944/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1275315485&sr=1-4

A sneeze is not always related to an underlying medical condition. It may be caused by:

  • Nasal irritants (dust, pepper, pollen etc)
  • Sudden exposure to bright light
  • Breathing cold air
  • Object struck in nose.

Self-treatment helpful in some less- serious cases include:

  • Change the furnace or air conditioner filters
  • Do not have pets in the house if allergic to animal dander
  • Wash linens in very hot water (at least 130 degrees Fahrenheit) to kill dust mites
  • Vacuum and dust frequently
  • Use a good humidifier especially at night, if the air is too dry
  • Drink plenty of water if suffering from flu/common cold.

See a doctor if you notice the following :

  • Fever greater than 101.3 F (38.5 C)
  • Fever lasting five days or more or returning after a fever- free period
  • Shortness of breath
  • Wheezing
  • Severe sore throat, headache or sinus pain
  • Allergy does not resolves in a few days.

See a doctor immediately if you notice:

  • Sneezing is continuous
  • Causes severe ear pain, drowsiness.

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PODCAST: https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=sneeze&&view=detail&mid=C4DA4CD281B4AD36C2A5C4DA4CD281B4AD36C2A5&&FORM=VRDGAR&ru=%2Fvideos%2Fsearch%3Fq%3Dsneeze%26FORM%3DHDRSC3

VIDEO: https://www.msn.com/en-us/video/science/see-how-a-mask-affects-how-a-cough-travels/vi-BB13AQBH?ocid=SK2LDHP

Assessment: Your thoughts and comments are appreciated.

***

BUSINESS, FINANCE AND INSURANCE TEXTS FOR DOCTORS

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“Robo-Examiners” Let CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER™ Candidates Take Control

“Robo-Examiners” Let Adult-Learners Take Control

Dr. David Marcinko MBA
[Founding CEO and President]

Enter the CMPs

cmp

The concept of a self-taught and student motivated, but automated outcomes driven classroom may seem like a nightmare scenario for those who are not comfortable with computers. Now everyone can breathe a sigh of relief, because the Institute of Medical Business Advisors just launched an “automated” final examination review protocol that requires no programming skill whatsoever.

In fact, everything is designed to be very simple and easy to use. Once a student’s examination “blue-book” is received, computerized “robotic reviewers” correct student assignments and quarterly test answers. This automated examination model lets the robots correct tests and exams, while the students concentrate on guided self-learning.

***

http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

***

Assessment

According to Eugene Schmuckler PhD MBA MEd, Dean of the CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER® professional designation and certification program,

“This option allows the modern adult-learner save both time and money as s/he progresses toward the ultimate goal of board certification as a CMP® mark holder.”

The trend is growing and iMBA, Inc., is leading the way.

***

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

***

PODCAST: Why Bitcoin is a “Once-in-a-Species” Asset Class

In this episode, DWealthMuse host, Dara Albright, and guest Jeff Ross, CIO of Vailshire Capital Management, discuss why bitcoin may just be that once-in-a-species asset class that saves the planet from economic and, yes, even environmental ruin.

This episode is loaded with so many great insights including:

See the source image
  • Why Jeff believes bitcoin’s investment risk has evaporated;
  • How bitcoin fits into Warren Buffet’s investment thesis;
  • Two characteristics bitcoin skeptics share: a lack of understanding and deep ties to the traditional banking system;
  • Why bitcoin is a dishonest politician’s worst nightmare;
  • Why every modern retirement portfolio should have bitcoin exposure;
  • Why regulatory scrutiny may be turning away from bitcoin and heading straight towards ethereum and altcoins;
  • How bitcoin could solve the world’s energy problems;
  • Why we may be nearing the end of the Keynesian economic experiment;
  • How bitcoin forces an honest unit of accounting by governments;
  • Why fiat is destined to self-destruct while bitcoin is designed to appreciate in time;
  • Whether bitcoin can reach a new all-time high by Jeff’s August 29th birthday and cross 100,000 by Dara’s December 24th birthday?

PODCAST: https://dwealthmuse.podbean.com/e/episode25bitcoinbulls/

Your comments are appreciated.

THANK YOU

****

PRACTICE RISKS IN CORRECTIONAL CARE MEDICINE

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Some Thoughts and Some Statistics

dr-david-e-marcinko-mba-msl[By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA]

Most primary care doctors, psychologists and psychiatrists who work in corrections long enough will end up being named in a lawsuit or having a complaint filed against them with their licensing board.

And, it is a fact that physicians who treat inmates are at greater risk of litigation.

Bureau of Justice Statistics

According to the 2011-12 National Inmate Survey conducted by the Bureau of Justice Statistics:

  • Half of state and federal prisoners and jail inmates reported a history of a chronic medical condition.
  • About 2/3 of females in prisons (63%) and jails (67%) reported ever having a chronic condition
  • An estimated 40% of prisoners and inmates reported having a current chronic medical condition.
  • About 1 in 5 (21%) of prisoners and 14% of jail inmates reported ever having an infectious disease.
  • Approximately 1% of prisoners and jail inmates reported being HIV positive.
  • High blood pressure was the most common condition reported by prisoners (30%) and inmates (26%).
  • Nearly a quarter (24%) of prisoners and jail inmates reported ever having at least 2 chronic conditions.
  • 66% of prisoners and 40% of jail inmates with a chronic condition reported taking prescription medication.And, although specific figures are not available, malpractice carriers are quite aware of this risk.

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gavel stethoscope

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Risks Not a Work Deterrent

Yet, according to colleague Eric A. Dover MD and Jeffrey Knuppel MD, a psychiatrist who blogs at The Positive Medical Blog, the risk of litigation should not be a deterrent to working as a health care professional in correction facilities if:

1. You truly like working in the correctional setting. This work is not for everyone. If you don’t really like it anyway, then the thought of getting sued is just likely to decrease your career satisfaction further.

2. You have ability to be assertive yet get along well with most people. If you frequently find yourself in power struggles with people or cannot politely set limits, then do not work in corrections. If you let your ego get involved in you interpersonal interactions very often, then you’re likely to irritate many inmates, and you probably will become a target for lawsuits and complaints [personal communication]. 

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

“With time at a premium, and so much vital information packed into one well organized resource, this comprehensive textbook should be on the desk of everyone serving in the healthcare ecosystem. The time you spend reading this frank and compelling book will be richly rewarded.”

Dr. J. Wesley Boyd MD PhD MA [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts]

The BUSINESS of Medical Practice

BY DR. David Edward Marcinko MBA

***

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PODCAST: On Digital Health Start-Ups

On Medical Entrepreneurs

****

BY ERIC BRICKER MD

Your comments are appreciated.

THANK YOU

***

Evaluating the “Flipped Classroom”

What it is – How it Works?

[By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA M.Ed]

According to Wikipedia, a flipped classroom is an instructional strategy and a type of blended learning that reverses the traditional learning environment by delivering instructional content, often online, outside of the classroom. It moves activities, including those that may have traditionally been considered homework, into the classroom.

In a flipped classroom, students watch online lectures, collaborate in online discussions, or carry out research at home while engaging in concepts in the classroom with the guidance of a mentor.

**

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MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2018/09/25/moocs-are-you-an-i-t-educational-futurist/

MORE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2018/10/02/what-is-your-teaching-philosophy/

MORE: https://teachthought.com/learning/10-pros-cons-flipped-classroom/

Assessment:

But, does it work? In vivo -OR- in vitro? Your thoughts are appreciated

***

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

***

 

Rags to Riches thru [Medical] Education?

Or … Riches to Rags for Docs and the ACA?

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American society prides itself on being a meritocracy, particularly with the fruition of the ‘American Dream’ being achieved by individuals from all types of backgrounds; like doctors, Financial Advisors [FAs] and all medical professionals.

Success

Success today typically involves some form of higher education, to expand intellectual capacity and to hone a skill-set.

However, the highest quality education is not the most easily accessible. And so, this infographic takes a look at how the elite tend to fare well, and how the disadvantaged aren’t provided the same opportunities.

Source: www.onlineschools.org

Conclusion

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Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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FINANCE: Financial Planning for Physicians and Advisors
INSURANCE: Risk Management and Insurance Strategies for Physicians and Advisors

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MOOCs & MOODLES – Are You An Educational Futurist?

On Massive Open Online Courses

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA

Courtesy: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Today, colleges and universities are beginning to identify students who are adept at learning online and reward top achievers and professors. Employers, graduate and business schools are beginning to troll MOOCs [massive open online courses] seeking viable job, and academic, candidates.

Definition

A massive open online course ( MOOC / m uː k / ) is an online course aimed at unlimited participation and open access via the web.  In addition to traditional course materials such as filmed lectures, readings, and problem sets , many MOOCs provide interactive courses with user forums to support community interactions among students, professors, and teaching assistants (TAs) as well as immediate feedback to quick quizzes and assignments.

Dictionary: https://www.amazon.com/Dictionary-Health-Information-Technology-Security/dp/0826149952/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1254413315&sr=1-5

Update

In fact, when I last checked, the nation’s graduate, B-school and MBA students were enrolled in more than 118 online MBA/MPH/MSH healthcare administration programs. MOOCs offer greater access for a larger number of students, at significantly lower costs than on-site programs.

By the same token, technology like Blackboard®, Cengage, eXplorance, BANNER and Kalture must be used to full potential. Smart phones, PCs and tablets, videos, interactive games, A.I. simulators and apps with Skype®-like virtual classrooms and cloud storage are obvious embellishments to online initiatives.

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Definition

A Moodle is a free and open-source learning management system written in PHP and distributed under the GNU General Public License. Developed on pedagogical principles, Moodle is used for blended learning, distance education, flipped classroom and other e-learning projects in schools, universities, workplaces and other sectors.

Note: PHP is a popular general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited to web development. Fast, flexible and pragmatic, PHP powers everything from your blog to the most popular websites in the world.

Dictionary: https://www.amazon.com/Dictionary-Health-Information-Technology-Security/dp/0826149952/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1254413315&sr=1-5

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated. Are you a didactic educational futurist? MOOCs or MOODLES anyone?

MORE BUSINESS, EDUCATION AND FINANC FOR DOCTORS:

“Insurance & Risk Management Strategies for Doctors” https://tinyurl.com/ydx9kd93

“Fiduciary Financial Planning for Physicians” https://tinyurl.com/y7f5pnox

“Business of Medical Practice 2.0” https://tinyurl.com/yb3x6wr8

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PODCAST: Traditional Medicare Hospital Value Based Payments Explained

THREE CATEGORIES OF VBC

By Eric Bricker MD

Medicare Value-Based Payments (also Called Alternative Payment Models) to Hospitals Fall Into 3 Main Categories:

PODCAST: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YEqtpCNwzSg

Your Thoughts Are Appreciated.

THANK YOU

******

Professional Medical Education Costs

Average Full Time – Full Year Tuition 2015-2016

By Wall Street Journal

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Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure. 

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/ 

Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

***

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

Dr. Dave Marcinko at YOUR Service in 2021

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Book Marcinko for your next Seminar, Meeting or Medical Business Event 

By Ann Miller RN MHA

Professor and physician executive David Edward Marcinko MBBS DPM MBA MEd BSc CMP® is originally from Loyola University MD, Temple University in Philadelphia and the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in PA; Oglethorpe University, and Atlanta Hospital & Medical Center in GA; and the Aachen City University Hospital, Koln-Germany. He is one of the most innovative global thought leaders in health care business and entrepreneurship today.

Dr. Marcinko is a multi-degreed educator, board certified physician, surgical fellow, hospital medical staff President, Chief Education Officer and philanthropist with more than 400 published papers; 5,150 op-ed pieces and over 125+ international presentations to his credit; including the top 10 biggest pharmaceutical companies and financial services firms in the nation. He is also a best-selling Amazon author with 30 published text books in four languages [National Institute of Health, Library of Congress and Library of Medicine].

Dr. Marcinko is past Editor-in-Chief of the prestigious “Journal of Health Care Finance”, and a former Certified Financial Planner®, who was named “Health Economist of the Year” in 2001. He is a Federal and State court approved expert witness featured in hundreds of peer reviewed medical, business, management and trade publications [AMA, ADA, APMA, AAOS, Physicians Practice, Investment Advisor, Physician’s Money Digest and MD News].

As a licensed insurance agent, RIA and SEC registered endowment fund manager, Dr. Marcinko is Founding Dean of the fiduciary focused CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER® chartered designation education program; as well as Chief Editor of the HEALTH DICTIONARY SERIES® Wiki Project. His professional memberships include: ASHE, AHIMA, ACHE, ACME, ACPE, MGMA, FMMA and HIMSS.

Dr. Marcinko is a MSFT Beta tester, Google Scholar, “H” Index favorite and one of LinkedIn’s “Top Cited Voices”.

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PODCAST: Health Insurance Carriers Now Subject to Anti-Trust Regulations

Congress Passed and the President Signed the Competitive Health Insurance Reform Act of 2020 (CHIRA)

By Eric Bricker MD

PODCAST: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AbOHzYTYbPM

YOUR THOUGHTS ARE APPRECIATED

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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****

Face Masks and Human Sneezes

Now – Do You Get It?

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PODCAST: Medicare Launched the First VBC Initiative 40 Years Ago!

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See the source image

BY DR. ERIC BRICKER MD

***

Value-Based Care Happened 40 Years

Why Was Medicare Able to Bring About So Much Value-Based Payment Change in 3 Years (’83-’86) Compared to the Relatively Little Change That Has Occurred in the 11 Years Since the Affordable Care Act?

Watch the Video to Find Out.

YOUR COMMENTS ARE APPRECIATED.

Thank You

***

What Kind of [Physician] Entrepreneur Are You?

More Doctors are Joining the Ranks

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[Medical] entrepreneurs, doctors and nurses, clinics and small-to-medium size healthcare business are on the forefront of  job creation in the United States because of the Affordable Care Act [ACA] of 2010.

And so, we now preview this infographic to celebrate the entrepreneur, their styles, and to investigate the data behind startup growth. Hopefully, it will encourage the next generation of physician-entrepreneurs.

Who knows, there just may be the next Steve Jobs MD out there!

Source: BizSugar

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

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FINANCIAL PLANNING: Strategies for Doctors and Advisors

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

***

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On Hobson’s Economics “Choice”

The Philosophical Tradeoff

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA

[Publisher-in-Chief]

In economics, Hobson’s choice is a free choice in which only one option is offered, and one may refuse to take that option. The philosophical choice is therefore between taking the option; and not taking it. 

A False Choice 

The phrase is said to originate from Thomas Hobson [1544-1630], a livery stable owner who, in order to rotate the use of his horses, offered customers the choice of either taking the horse in the stall nearest the door – or taking none at all. It is analogous to the expression “my way or the highway”. 

In other words, it is in many respects a faux choice – or no choice at all. 

Financial Tradeoff 

Some retired physicians and other retired people live on a fixed income and many of them live right on the edge of their financial capability.  At some time in their life, they may have to make a choice regarding many purchases.  

In this case, we will illustrate “choice” using a couple’s purchase of Long Term Care Insurance. Of course, economics is the study of choice; wants, needs and scarcity, etc. 

In our case, if they decide to make the purchase they commit to a lifetime of premium payments. 

The financial tradeoff is this; if they make the commitment to purchase LTCI, they must give up something else.

Example: 

In order to maintain a monthly premium of $100 ($1,200per year), an elderly doctor, retired layman or couple must essentially relegate about $30,000 of financial assets to generate the $100 necessary to make an average premium payment (assumes a 7% rate of return with 4% withdrawal rate) or [4% X $30,000 = $1,200 year]. 

Thus, if the monthly premium cost is $500 per month, the elder must give up the use of $150,000 of retirement asset just to generate enough cash flow to pay for the LTC insurance. 

The married elder couple has to make the choice between lifestyle (dinners, vacations, gifts to children, prescription drugs, medical care or food and shelter) versus paying an insurance premium to provide for nursing home coverage for a need, which may be very real, but will not occur until sometime in the ambiguous future. 

Assessment 

When faced with such a tough economics – Hobsonian – choice, neither of which delivers peace of mind or a respectable solution; many will simply decide that, in either case, they may already end up impoverished. 

Thus, many will often opt for the better lifestyle now … while they can enjoy it … together. 

Conclusion 

A health economist or financial advisor often has to dispel the myths, hopes and misconceptions of clients and deal with the realities they face. Alternative risk management strategies are important, and health economic choices must be considered in any comprehensive financial plan. 

And so, what are your thoughts and comments on Hobson’s choice [dilemma]? 

Speaker: If you need a moderator or a speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA – Editor and Publisher-in-Chief – is available for speaking engagements. Contact him at: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com 

***

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™  Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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PODCAST: Using “GoodRx” to Check Prescription Prices

BY ERIC BRICKER MD

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Understanding Hobson’s Choice in Medicine

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Hobson’s choice  in Public Health

DEM white shirt

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA

[From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia]

A Hobson’s choice is a free choice in which only one thing is offered. Because a person may refuse to accept what is offered, the two options are taking it or taking nothing. In other words, one may “take it or leave it.”

The phrase is said to have originated with Thomas Hobson (1544–1631), a livery stable owner in Cambridge, England, who offered customers the choice of either taking the horse in his stall nearest the door or taking none at all.

***

An oil portrait of Thomas Hobson, in the National Portrait Gallery, London. He looks straight to the artist and is dressed in typical Tudor dress, with a heavy coat, a ruff, and tie tails

[Thomas Hobson, the National Portrait Gallery, London]

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In Medicine

One of the first examples that springs readily to mind in trying to look for examples of Hobson’s Choice in Medicine is the issue of defensive medicine. While the physician actually has the option of not “shotgunning” a patient (that is, shooting randomly large number of tests in order to cover legal liability and prevent medicolegal backlashes), the risk of missing a diagnosis and the fall outs thereof are so large, that it basically degenerates into a Hobson’s Choice.

The idiosyncrasies of medicine and the way the body reacts to them always leaves us open to the risk of working within the constraints of Hobson’s Choice.

***

pills+capsules+other

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For example, antibiotics have saved more lives than we can count, yet, an idiosyncratic, unpredictable reaction may just be waiting for us around the corner.

In Public Health

In the Indian Public Health scenario, all that the patients are offered in a primarily paternalistic system is the choice Hobson had offered all those years ago. Much like Henry Ford, who told customers lining up to buy his revolutionary Ford Model T that they could have their cars in “any color so long as it is black”, the Indian system, hobbled by the lack of an empowered public, and a patient choice scheme, functions on the basis of Hobson’s choice.

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Assessment

Even in the clinical sciences, with shared decision making and user driven healthcare still in their infancy in the nation, a paternalistic physician offers naught but “this or none” choice to their patients. While one can say that the lack of general awareness of the public tends to spawn this issue, we cannot shake off our personal stake in this matter just by hiding behind the façade of moral determinism!

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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DICTIONARY: Health Economics and Finance

BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA

Designated a Doody’s Core Title!

“”Medical economics and finance is an integral component of the health care industrial complex. Its language is a diverse and broad-based concept covering many other industries: accounting, insurance, mathematics and statistics, public health, provider recruitment and retention, Medicare, health policy, forecasting, aging and long-term care, are all commingled arenas.

The Dictionary of Health Economics and Finance will be an essential tool for doctors, nurses and clinicians, benefits managers, executives and health care administrators, as well as graduate students and patients? With more than 5,000 definitions, 3,000 abbreviations and acronyms, and a 2,000 item oeuvre of resources, readings, and nomenclature derivatives? it covers the financial and economics language of every health care industry sector.””
– From the Preface by David Edward Marcinko

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PODCAST: Improving Healthcare Outcomes & Supporting Providers in Value-Based Care

BY NIHCM

****

Value-based care has the potential to transform health care, improving quality and access for millions of people, while addressing COVID-19 related disparities. As a result of the pandemic, many rural communities and communities of color face significant reductions in access to health care.

More than 8% of practicing physicians nationwide closed during COVID-19 despite 82 million Americans living in “health professional shortage areas.” The financial strain and burnout experienced by providers has fueled interest in accelerating the adoption of value-based care. As of 2017, only 34% of health care dollars were the result of value-based care payments. This low rate of adoption exists despite evidence tying payments to patient health outcomes and rewarding higher quality care leads to reduced costs.

This webinar brought together experts who are driving innovative initiatives, achieving excellence in health outcomes, and uncovering more effective ways to implement value-based care.

YOUR COMMENTS ARE APPRECIATED.

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Management Strategies, Operational Techniques, Tools, Templates and Case Studies

FOR HOSPITALS AND HEALTHCARE ORGANIZATIONS

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BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA

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PODCAST: The American Rescue Plan and Health Care

BY ERIC BRICKER MD

***

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Do We Really Need Electronic Dental Records [EDRs]?

BY DARRELL K. PRUITT DDS

Do you really need digital records, Doc?

Why?

The Important Role of Dental Records - Fiorillo Dental


“Ransomware criminals’ demands rise as aggressive tactics pay off – Average ransomware demands and payments are up as criminal enterprises pour money into the profitable operations.”

By Brooke Crothers for FOXBusiness, August 14, 2021.
https://www.foxbusiness.com/technology/ransomware-criminals-demands-rise-aggressive-tactics-pay-off

Crothers: “The ransomware crisis just keeps getting worse as criminal enterprises pour money into highly profitable ransomware operations, according to a report from Palo Alto Networks’ Unit 42 security consulting group. The average ransomware payment climbed 82% to a record $570,000 in the first half of 2021 from $312,000 in 2020.”

I am asking Dr. Roger P. Levin, DDS, founder and CEO of Levin Group, why he and his international consultant group still promote electronic dental records.

How about it, Dr. Levin? Can you describe how practice management software benefits dental patients? The software doesn’t make dentistry safer or less expensive than paper records – even if digital is more convenient for dentists and staff (most of the time).

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PODCAST: Confessions of a Hospital Chief Financial Officer

HOSPITAL FINANCES REVEALED

By Eric Bricker MD

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CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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National “Financial Awareness Day” 2021

MAKE IT EVERYDAY FOR PHYSICIANS AND MEDICAL COLLEAGUES

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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Use National Financial Awareness Day to your Advantage

Aug. 14th is National Financial Awareness Day. Financial awareness is about more than just understanding the basics on how money works. It’s also about evaluating your own budget, savings and investments to make sure your finances are working for your needs.

HERE: https://nationaltoday.com/national-financial-awareness-day/

So if it’s been a while since your last financial “check up,” National Financial Awareness Day can be the extra push you’ve needed to finally take a look under the hood.

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RELATED TEXTS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/04/29/why-are-certified-medical-planner-textbooks-so-darn-popular/

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-

Second Opinions: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

THANK YOU!

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SECOND OPINIONS: Physician Financial Planning, Investing, Medical Practice Management and Business Valuations; etc!

BY DR. DAVID EDWARD MARCINKO MBA CMP

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Financial Planning for Medical Professionals

HERE: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

CONTACT: Ann Miller RN MHA

email: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

THANK YOU

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PODCAST: US Hospital Bond Debt Explained

Do Patients Come First or CREditors?

By Eric Bricker MD

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Citation: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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Thank You

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What is the “DeMark” Investing Indicator

A TECHNICAL ANALYSIS STOCK TRADING SIGNAL?

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA

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See the source image

READ: https://www.tradingview.com/scripts/demark/

TECHNICAL ANALYSIS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2007/12/03/the-technicians/

YOUR THOUGHTS ARE APPRECIATED.

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PODCAST: Physician Specialties with Hospital System Bargaining Power

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Certain Doctor Specialties Have Great Power within Hospital Systems Because They Generate High-Margin Patient Volume.

By Eric Bricker MD

YOUR THOUGHTS ARE APPRECIATED.

Thank You

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