7 PREDICTIONS: Health Information Technology in 2022

Seven predictions for healthcare technology trends in 2022

In the wake of a pandemic, shifting care delivery models, and a surge of clinical content, Wolters Kluwer healthcare experts have identified seven healthcare technology trends for 2022.

 1. Building trust in an age of digital information overload
 2. Telemedicine becomes a fixture of the healthcare landscape
 3. Resilience is key to retaining the nursing workforce
 4. Unstructured health data helps researchers build health equity
 5. AI reduces healthcare-associated infections (HAIs)
 6. Quality improvement accelerates evidence to implementation
 7. Virtual simulation and technology transforms nursing education

Source: Wolters Kluwer. November 8, 2021

CITE: https://www.amazon.com/Dictionary-Health-Information-Technology-Security/dp/0826149952/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1254413315&sr=1-5

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Q1 2022 – The Entrepreneurial Digital Health Financing Boom Chills

By Phil Taylor

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US digital health company investment financing experienced a dip in Q1 of 2022, dropping to $6 billion from the $6.7 billion invested in Q1 2021. In addition, the average size of each investment deal dropped from $46 million last year to just shy of $33 million. These declines come after a boom in investments in recent years. The Rock Health Digital health securities index also reflected this year’s trend, including special purpose acquisition company (SPAC) listings.

According to Phil Taylor of PharmaPhorum, “SPACs have been a popular route to public listing for digital health as well as many other sectors, but the deals have underperformed, with steep declines in share prices after they closed that has “exerted downwards pressure” on the Rock Health Digital Health Index (RHDHI).”

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SPACs: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2021/11/12/spac-popularity-soaring-in-healthcare/

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SURVEY: Resources Offered by Health Insurance Plan Transparency Tool

By MCOL

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Percentage of Resources

 •  Finding in-network providers: 72%
 •  Telehealth: 55%
 •  Ability to select PCP online: 53%
 •  Help navigating benefits and healthcare options: 50%
 •  Cost estimates for healthcare services: 50%
 •  Status of deductible: 49%
 •  Reviews of doctors and facilities: 46%
 •  Online appointment scheduling: 41%
 •  Financial incentives/rewards for choosing cost-effective care: 25%

Source: Health Sparq, “2022 Annual Consumer Sentiment Benchmark Report,” January 2022

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/082610254

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METAVERSE: Healthcare Transformation -OR- Not?

By Bertalan Meskó, MD PhD
The Medical Futurist

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HOW THE METAVERSE COULD (OR COULD NOT) TRANSFORM HEALTHCARE


If you’ve browsed the internet in the last couple of months, the term ‘metaverse’ is likely to have been thrown at you at least once. Facebook rebranded itself after the concept and other companies are adopting the metaverse with their own spin; betting heavily that it will be the next iteration of the internet where we will work and play alike.

It was time to dive into what the metaverse could mean to delivering healthcare.

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PODCAST: Dr. Watson Says Good-Bye to IBM?

By Staff Reporters

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Dr. Watson Unsafe and Incorrect? - Authentic Medicine

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IBM has reportedly placed its Watson Health division on the auction block again

Watson is a question-answering computer system capable of answering questions posed in natural language, developed in IBM’s DeepQA project by a research team led by principal investigator David Ferrucci. Watson was named after IBM’s founder and first CEO, industrialist Thomas J. Watson.

READ: https://www.axios.com/ibm-tries-to-sell-watson-health-again-82f691a4-ab81-4b2b-a5bb-13a7556c8ef1.html?utm_campaign=etb&utm_medium=newsletter&utm_source=morning_brew

PODCAST: https://www.cnn.com/2022/01/21/tech/ibm-selling-watson-health/index.html

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DICTIONARY: Health Information Technology and Security

Review

This is a handy, word-packed reference book with health information technology terminology of the past, present, and future. The paperback book is small and compact in size but amazingly full of words, abbreviations, and even names of leaders in the health information technology industry. While any book like this will require updating on a periodic basis, many of the terms will remain relevant for a good period of time. I found the dictionary very useful and recommend it as a good addition to the reference shelf in the office or library.

Doody’s Book Review

From the Back Cover

Over 10,000 Detailed Entries!

“”There is a myth that all stakeholders in the healthcare space understand the meaning of basic information technology jargon. In truth, the vernacular of contemporary medical information systems is unique, and often misused or misunderstood? Moreover, an emerging national Heath Information Technology (HIT) architecture; in the guise of terms, definitions, acronyms, abbreviations and standards; often puts the non-expert medical, nursing, public policy administrator or paraprofessional in a position of maximum uncertainty and minimum productivity ?The Dictionary of Health Information Technology and Security will therefore help define, clarify and explain…You will refer to it daily.””


– Richard J. Mata, MD, MS, MS-CIS, Certified Medical Planner? (Hon), Chief Medical Information Officer [CMIO], Ricktelmed Information Systems, Assistant Professor Texas State University, San Marcos

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10 Reasons Why People Should Not Fear Digital Health Technologies

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Fear NOT!

By  Bertalan Mesko, MD PhD 

10 Reasons Why People Should Not Fear Digital Health Technologies

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Conclusion

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Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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HEALTH INSURANCE, MANAGED CARE, ECONOMICS, FINANCE AND HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY COMPANION DICTIONARY SET

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The Future of Health Insurance?

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Preparing for Dr. Big Brother

Bert Mesko

[By Bert Mesko MD PhD]

While futuristic technologies are becoming available in healthcare, patients often can’t access them and the cost of providing care continues to skyrocket.

However, innovations such as artificial intelligence (AI) and health sensors are set to reshape how healthcare insurance works and by doing so bring much needed reforms to healthcare as a whole.

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Insurance

http://medicalfuturist.com/2016/04/13/the-future-of-health-insurance-preparing-for-dr-big-brother/

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Conclusion

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Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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Overview of Hospital Information Systems Architecture

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On Configurations and Varieties

[By Brent Metfessel MD MIS]

Dr. Metfessel

Hospitals can use a variety of configurations for HIS implementation depending on business needs and budgetary constraints.

Staffing needed for these systems can range from a few full-time equivalents (FTEs) per 100 beds for very basic off-site processing systems to 15 or more FTEs per 100 beds for sophisticated systems that attempt to combine several architectures into one system (e.g., combination of client-server systems with mainframe processing). Resource use and customizability tend to vary in tandem; the greater the flexibility of the system to meet unique user needs, the greater the cost outlay for capital and/or additional FTEs.

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Relationship of Resource Use and Customizability Based on System Architecture Selected

Values range from one (low) to four (high) stars
Architecture Hospital resource use Customizability
Off-site processing * *
Turnkey systems ** **
Mainframe systems *** ***
Client-server *** ****

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The Possibilities

The basic system architecture possibilities are as follows:

Off-site (remote) processing: In this case the hospital contracts with a vendor external to the hospital. The hospital sends data over to the vendor site where the actual processing takes place. When processing is complete, the vendor sends the data back to the hospital, usually in electronic form.

Turnkey systems: A vendor provides the hospital with systems that are “pre-packaged” so that hospital-based system development is minimal. Limited customization of the system is possible using systems analysts or programmers.

Mainframe systems: Most applicable to large hospitals, this configuration is highly centralized. A large and powerful computer performs basically all the information processing for the institution and connects to multiple terminals that communicate with the mainframe to display the information at the user sites. Hospital IT departments usually use in-house programmers to modify the core operating systems or applications programs such as billing and scheduling programs.

eHR diagram

Client-server systems: In this configuration one or more “repository” computers exist, known as “servers,” that store large amounts of data and perform limited processing. Communicating with the server(s) are client workstations that perform much of the data processing and often have graphical user interfaces (GUIs) for ease of use. Both customizability and resource use is high, depending on the desired sophistication.

Many clinical information systems that process data directly related to patient care use this configuration.  For instance, the Veterans Health Administration, which has implemented what is likely the largest integrated healthcare information system in the United States, uses client-server architecture.  Known as the Veterans Health Information Systems and Technology Architecture (VistA), this system provides technology infrastructure to about 1,300 care facilities, including hospitals and medical centers, outpatient facilities, and long-term care centers.  VistA utilizes a client-server architecture that links together workstations and personal computers using software that is accessed via a graphical user interface.

Overall, for hospitals that have the financial and manpower resources for a significant investment in IT, client-server architectures are the fastest-growing and typically the most preferred of the system architectures, due in large part to their local adaptability and flexibility to meet changing hospital and medical center needs.

Broad Categories

The above architectures are broad categories.  Modifications and combinations of the above also exist, such as the use of client-server technology with mainframe systems and the addition of wireless technology, smart phones, laptop PCs and tablets,  and various personal digital assistants (PDAs) to supplement the core computing functionality.

In considering the optimal architecture for a hospital, management needs to take into account factors such as size of the institution, desired sophistication of the application, IT budget, and anticipated level of user community involvement.

Assessment

EHR

Another important aspect of HIS is the need for integration.  Often, different hospital departments have their own stand-alone systems — such as a Laboratory Information System (LIS) and pharmacy systems — that do not communicate with each other.  Duplicate data may be kept in separate systems, creating additional work to enter the data multiple times.

In an integrated system, each departmental system communicates with the other systems through either a centralized or decentralized. A computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system, for example, would be much less effective if it did not communicate electronically with the pharmacy system that would process the medication orders.

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Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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NOTES: Resource use refers to the need for FTEs and hospital capital expenditure. Customizability refers to the ability for users to alter the system structure or function to meet the unique needs of the institution.

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