• Member Statistics

    • 789,797 Colleagues-to-Date [Sponsored by a generous R&D grant from iMBA, Inc.]
  • David E. Marcinko [Editor-in-Chief]

    As a former Dean and appointed Distinguished University Professor and Endowed Department Chair, Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA was a NYSE broker and investment banker for a decade who was respected for his unique perspectives, balanced contrarian thinking and measured judgment to influence key decision makers in strategic education, health economics, finance, investing and public policy management.

    Dr. Marcinko is originally from Loyola University MD, Temple University in Philadelphia and the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in PA; as well as Oglethorpe University and Emory University in Georgia, the Atlanta Hospital & Medical Center; Kellogg-Keller Graduate School of Business and Management in Chicago, and the Aachen City University Hospital, Koln-Germany. He became one of the most innovative global thought leaders in medical business entrepreneurship today by leveraging and adding value with strategies to grow revenues and EBITDA while reducing non-essential expenditures and improving dated operational in-efficiencies.

    Professor David Marcinko was a board certified surgical fellow, hospital medical staff President, public and population health advocate, and Chief Executive & Education Officer with more than 425 published papers; 5,150 op-ed pieces and over 135+ domestic / international presentations to his credit; including the top ten [10] biggest drug, DME and pharmaceutical companies and financial services firms in the nation. He is also a best-selling Amazon author with 30 published academic text books in four languages [National Institute of Health, Library of Congress and Library of Medicine].

    Dr. David E. Marcinko is past Editor-in-Chief of the prestigious “Journal of Health Care Finance”, and a former Certified Financial Planner® who was named “Health Economist of the Year” in 2010. He is a Federal and State court approved expert witness featured in hundreds of peer reviewed medical, business, economics trade journals and publications [AMA, ADA, APMA, AAOS, Physicians Practice, Investment Advisor, Physician’s Money Digest and MD News] etc.

    Later, Dr. Marcinko was a vital recruited BOD member of several innovative companies like Physicians Nexus, First Global Financial Advisors and the Physician Services Group Inc; as well as mentor and coach for Deloitte-Touche and other start-up firms in Silicon Valley, CA.

    As a state licensed life, P&C and health insurance agent; and dual SEC registered investment advisor and representative, Marcinko was Founding Dean of the fiduciary and niche focused CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER® chartered professional designation education program; as well as Chief Editor of the three print format HEALTH DICTIONARY SERIES® and online Wiki Project.

    Dr. David E. Marcinko’s professional memberships included: ASHE, AHIMA, ACHE, ACME, ACPE, MGMA, FMMA, FPA and HIMSS. He was a MSFT Beta tester, Google Scholar, “H” Index favorite and one of LinkedIn’s “Top Cited Voices”.

    Marcinko is “ex-officio” and R&D Scholar-on-Sabbatical for iMBA, Inc. who was recently appointed to the MedBlob® [military encrypted medical data warehouse and health information exchange] Advisory Board.

    entrepreneur

    Frontal_lobe_animation

  • ME-P Information & Content Channels

  • ME-P Archives Silo [2006 – 2020]

  • Ann Miller RN MHA [Managing Editor]

    ME-P SYNDICATIONS:
    WSJ.com,
    CNN.com,
    Forbes.com,
    WashingtonPost.com,
    BusinessWeek.com,
    USNews.com, Reuters.com,
    TimeWarnerCable.com,
    e-How.com,
    News Alloy.com,
    and Congress.org

    Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners(TM)

    Product Details

    Product Details

    Product Details

  • CERTIFIED MEDICAL PLANNER® program

    New "Self-Directed" Study Option SinceJanuary 1st, 2018
  • Most Recent ME-Ps

  • PodiatryPrep.org


    BOARD CERTIFICATION EXAM STUDY GUIDES
    Lower Extremity Trauma
    [Click on Image to Enlarge]

  • ME-P Free Advertising Consultation

    The “Medical Executive-Post” is about connecting doctors, health care executives and modern consulting advisors. It’s about free-enterprise, business, practice, policy, personal financial planning and wealth building capitalism. We have an attitude that’s independent, outspoken, intelligent and so Next-Gen; often edgy, usually controversial. And, our consultants “got fly”, just like U. Read it! Write it! Post it! “Medical Executive-Post”. Call or email us for your FREE advertising and sales consultation TODAY [770.448.0769]

    Product Details

    Product Details

  • Medical & Surgical e-Consent Forms

    ePodiatryConsentForms.com
  • iMBA R&D Services

    Commission a Subject Matter Expert Report [$250-$999]January 1st, 2019
    Medical Clinic Valuations * Endowment Fund Management * Health Capital Formation * Investment Policy Statement Analysis * Provider Contracting & Negotiations * Marketplace Competition * Revenue Cycle Enhancements; and more! HEALTHCARE FINANCIAL INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX
  • iMBA Inc., OFFICES

    Suite #5901 Wilbanks Drive, Norcross, Georgia, 30092 USA [1.770.448.0769]. Our location is real and we are now virtually enabled to assist new long distance clients and out-of-town colleagues.

  • ME-P Publishing

  • SEEKING INDUSTRY INFO PARTNERS?

    If you want the opportunity to work with leading health care industry insiders, innovators and watchers, the “ME-P” may be right for you? We are unbiased and operate at the nexus of theoretical and applied R&D. Collaborate with us and you’ll put your brand in front of a smart & tightly focused demographic; one at the forefront of our emerging healthcare free marketplace of informed and professional “movers and shakers.” Our Ad Rate Card is available upon request [770-448-0769].

  • Reader Comments, Quips, Opinions, News & Updates

  • Start-Up Advice for Businesses, DRs and Entrepreneurs

    ImageProxy “Providing Management, Financial and Business Solutions for Modernity”
  • Up-Trending ME-Ps

  • Capitalism and Free Enterprise Advocacy

    Whether you’re a mature CXO, physician or start-up entrepreneur in need of management, financial, HR or business planning information on free markets and competition, the "Medical Executive-Post” is the online place to meet for Capitalism 2.0 collaboration. Support our online development, and advance our onground research initiatives in free market economics, as we seek to showcase the brightest Next-Gen minds. ******************************************************************** THE ME-P DISCLAIMER: Posts, comments and opinions do not necessarily represent iMBA, Inc., but become our property after submission. Copyright © 2006 to-date. iMBA, Inc allows colleges, universities, medical and financial professionals and related clinics, hospitals and non-profit healthcare organizations to distribute our proprietary essays, photos, videos, audios and other documents; etc. However, please review copyright and usage information for each individual asset before submission to us, and/or placement on your publication or web site. Attestation references, citations and/or back-links are required. All other assets are property of the individual copyright holder.
  • OIG Fraud Warnings

    Beware of health insurance marketplace scams OIG's Most Wanted Fugitives at oig.hhs.gov

Giving Thanks for Thanksgiving Day Dinner Costs in 2019

Join Our Mailing List

Dear World … and ME-P Readers,

A PRE-Thanksgiving Day Tribute for 2019

The Rational Optimist

Matt Ridley, a journalist referring to himself as the rational optimist, recently focused on all the reasons we are luckier than those who lived before us.

Here are some of the highlights of his research (click here to see his article in its entirety):

  • The average person on the planet earns roughly three times as much as he or she did 50 years ago, adjusted for inflation. If anything, this understates the improvement in living standards because it fails to take into account many of the incredible improvements in the things you can buy with that money. However rich you were in 1964 you had no computer, no mobile phone, no budget airline, no Prozac, no search engine, no gluten-free food. The world economy is still growing every year at a furious lick — faster than Britain grew during the industrial revolution. 
  • As for inequality, the world as a whole is getting rapidly more equal in income, because people in poor countries are getting richer at a more rapid pace than people in rich countries. That has now been true for two decades, but it has accelerated since the great recession. The GDP per capita of Mozambique is 60 percent higher than it was in 2008; that of Italy is 6 percent lower. A country like Mozambique has been out of the headlines recently – is back in  – and now you know why: things are mostly going right/wrong there. 
  • The amount of food available per head has gone up steadily on every continent, despite a doubling of the population. Famine is now very rare. 
  • The death rate from malaria is down by nearly 30 percent since the start of the century. HIV-related deaths are falling. Measles, yellow fever, diphtheria, cholera, typhoid, typhus — they killed our ancestors in droves, but they are now rare diseases. 
  • We think we are getting ever more selfish, but it is not true. We give more of our earnings to charity than our grandparents did.  
  • Violent crimes of almost all kinds are on the decline — murder, rape, theft, domestic violence. So are capital and corporal punishment and animal cruelty. We are less prejudiced about gender, homosexuality and race. Paedophilia is no more prevalent, just hushed up less.Morgan Housel, columnist at Motley Fool, also recently wrote a column titled “50 Reasons We’re Living Through the Greatest Period in World History.” Mr. Housel notes that we tend to ignore progress, which is the really important news because it happens slowly, but we obsess over trivial news because it happens all day long.

Here are some of my favorite thoughts from the article (click here to view the entire piece).

***

Love Life

***

The Motley Fool

  • In 1900, 1% of American women giving birth died in labor. Today, the five-year mortality rate for localized breast cancer is 1.2%. Being pregnant 100 years ago was almost as dangerous as having breast cancer is today.
  • U.S. life expectancy at birth was 39 years in 1800, 49 years in 1900, 68 years in 1950, and 79 years today. The average newborn today can expect to live an entire generation longer than his great-grandparents could. The average American now retires at age 62. Enjoy your golden years — your ancestors didn’t get any of them. 
  • Infant mortality in America has dropped from 58 per 1,000 births in 1933 to less than six per 1,000 births in 2010, according to the World Health Organization. In 1952, 38,000 people contracted polio in America alone, according to the Centers for Disease Control. In 2012, there were fewer than 300 reported cases of polio in the entire world. The death rate from strokes has declined by 75% since the 1960s, according to the National Institutes of Health. Death from heart attacks has plunged too.
  • According to the Federal Reserve, the number of lifetime years spent in leisure — retirement plus time off during your working years — rose from 11 years in 1870 to 35 years by 1990. Given the rise in life expectancy, it’s probably close to 40 years today. Which is amazing: The average American spends nearly half his life in leisure. If you had told this to the average American 100 years ago, that person would have considered you wealthy beyond imagination.
  • Worldwide deaths from battle have plunged from 300 per 100,000 people during World War II, to the low teens during the 1970s, to less than 10 in the 1980s, to fewer than one in the 21st century, according to Harvard professor Steven Pinker. “War really is going out of style,” he says. 
  • According to the Census Bureau, only one in 10 American homes had air conditioning in 1960. That rose to 49% in 1973, and 89% today — the 11% that don’t are mostly in cold climates. Simple improvements like this have changed our lives in immeasurable ways. 
  • In 1900, African Americans had an illiteracy rate of nearly 45%, according to the Census Bureau. Today, it’s statistically close to zero. In 1940, less than 5% of the adult population held a bachelor’s degree or higher. By 2012, more than 30% did, according to the Census Bureau. 
  • The average American work week has declined from 66 hours in 1850, to 51 hours in 1909, to 34.8 hours today, according to the Federal Reserve. Enjoy your weekend. 
  • More than 40% of adults smoked in 1965, according to the Centers for Disease Control. By 2011, 19% did.
  •  The percentage of Americans age 65 and older who live in poverty has dropped from nearly 30% in 1966 to less than 10% by 2010. For the elderly, the war on poverty has pretty much been won. 
  • If you think Americans aren’t prepared for retirement today, you should have seen what it was like a century ago. In 1900, 65% of men over age 65 were still in the labor force. By 2010, that figure was down to 22%. The entire concept of retirement is unique to the past few decades. Half a century ago, most Americans worked until they died. 
  • No one has died from a new nuclear weapon attack since 1945. If you went back to 1950 and asked the world’s smartest political scientists, they would have told you the odds of seeing that happen would be close to 0%. You don’t have to be very imaginative to think that the most important news story of the past 70 years is what didn’t happen. Congratulations, world.
  • You need an annual income of $34,000 a year to be in the richest 1% of the world, according to World Bank economist Branko Milanovic’s 2010 book “The Haves and the Have-Nots.” To be in the top half of the globe you need to earn just $1,225 a year. For the top 20%, it’s $5,000 per year. Enter the top 10% with $12,000 a year. To be included in the top 0.1% requires an annual income of $70,000. America’s poorest are some of the world’s richest.
  • Only 4% of humans get to live in America. Odds are you’re one of them. We’ve got it made. Be thankful.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

***

Product DetailsProduct Details

Product Details  Product Details

***

WHO / WHAT Are the Best Predictors of Stock Market Performance?

Join Our Mailing List

ME-P Special Report

Lon Jefferies

By Lon Jefferies MBA CFP®

WHO Are the Best Predictors of Stock Market Performance?

Every day CNBC airs dozens of “financial professionals” making market forecasts. Similarly, every financial publication has multiple pieces regarding the future of the stock market. With so much information, how is it possible to determine who is worth listening to and what information to incorporate into your investment strategy?

Dropping Names

Without dropping any names, I’d suggest that the more confident a market pundit is about his or her prediction, the more you should question their advice.

People who make strong, unwavering forecasts are interesting to watch and appear as intelligent, appealing leaders whose advice is worth following. Meanwhile, people who frequently say phrases such as “it depends,” “maybe,” or even “I don’t know” don’t seem to be adding much value and don’t appear to be any more knowledgeable than the average investor. Yet, I’d suggest you tune out the stanch forecaster pounding his fist on the table as he speaks and rather listen closely to the individual who is less willing to make firm predictions.

Stock market performance

Stock market performance is clearly not a result of any singular factor such as whether or not companies will generate more profits than expected. If this was the case, making market predictions would be easy – one could simply guess the answer to be yes or no and have a 50% chance of being correct. Rather, hitting profit targets is only point A on a long list of factors impacting stock market performance.

Point B may be whether or not the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates during their next meeting. Again, our market forecaster could guess yes or no to this question and have a 50% chance of being correct. However, when considering both factors A and B, now our market forecaster has to be right twice on two issues where there is only a 50% probability of being correct on each. Simple math tells us there is only a 25% chance that this will occur (50% x 50% = 25%).

Point C may be whether the republicans or the democrats win the 2016 election. Again, there is a 50% chance of either possibility. Now there are three factors in play, each with a 50% probability, so the probability that the market pundit will get all three factors correct is 12.5% (50% x 50% x 50% = 12.5%).

Point D may be whether the US dollars strengthens or weakens when compared to other currencies. Again, there is a 50% chance of getting this right, so when we consider all four factors, there is now a 6.25% chance of getting it right (50% x 50% x 50% x 50% = 6.25%).

The equation

There are hundreds of factors that go into this equation. Will Greece have another economic crisis? Will the price of oil go up or down? Will a war breakout with Russia? This is exactly why forecasting market performance is so difficult!

For this reason, the people who make the best forecasters are people who say phrases such as “perhaps,” “however,” and “on the other hand” a lot. Doing so illustrates that the individual has looked at the situation from a lot of different perspectives and realizes that everything may not go according to plan. These types of people also tend to admit when they are wrong more willingly and update their analysis utilizing the latest information available, even if the new information doesn’t reflect what they previously anticipated. Their thought process is likely: “I got point A wrong, so I need to adjust my thinking on point B, which will have an impact on point C, so how does this change my perspective on point D.” We’ll call this a point-A-to-point-B-to-point-C-to-point-D mentality.

By comparison, the forecaster who makes the strong prediction while staring into the camera likely utilizes more of a point-A-to-point-D mentality. They are less likely to admit that there are more factors affecting market performance than can be managed, and less likely to incorporate new information that doesn’t coincide with his previous prediction when making forward-looking forecasts. Their thought process is likely: “I may have gotten point A wrong, but that doesn’t matter. All that matters is point D and I believe I got that right when making my prediction.” This approach is obviously less logic-based than the approach taken by the forecaster who knows there are too many factors to enable an individual to make a confident prediction.

***

idea

***

Assessment

While people who make confident predictions regarding market performance are entertaining to watch and provide advice that is simple to follow (he said buy, so I’ll buy), their advice is not likely to be any more accurate than other market pundits. In fact, if they are unwilling to admit when they get any potential factor concerning market performance wrong, their advice may be more damaging then useful.  By comparison, market forecasters who utilize phrases such as “however,” “it is hard to say,” and “I’m not sure” provide advice that may come off as unhelpful or impossible to follow, but it is these people who provide logic-based nuggets of information that are likely to benefit your investment portfolio.

ABOUT

Lon Jefferies, a Certified Financial Planner™ (CFP), is a fee-only financial advisor and trusted fiduciary at Net Worth Advisory Group in Salt Lake City, Utah. He is dedicated to providing comprehensive financial planning and investment management on a fee-only basis.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

 ***

[PHYSICIAN FOCUSED FINANCIAL PLANNING AND RISK MANAGEMENT COMPANION TEXTBOOK SET]

  Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™  Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

[Dr. Cappiello PhD MBA] *** [Foreword Dr. Krieger MD MBA]

***

A [Physician] Investor’s Worst Enemy?

Join Our Mailing List

Fear of Missing Out

By Lon Jefferies CFP MBA

Lon JefferiesFear of missing out (FOMO) is an increasingly powerful emotion in our daily lives – so much so that FOMO was officially added to the Oxford English Dictionary in 2013.

DEFINITION

Have you ever looked at your Facebook feed and been jealous of someone’s picture from a beautiful viewpoint, or enviable of a friend’s photo of an expensive dinner with a strategically placed bottle of fancy wine in the background?

That is FOMO – the fear that at any given moment someone is doing something more appealing than what we are doing at the time.

Part of Life

A fear of missing out has always been part of life, but it has become more prevalent with the emergence of social media. Personally, I can’t help but check my Twitter feed every hour or so to make sure that I’m not missing out on an article published by one of my favorite financial writers. Yet, social media has increased the power of FOMO more than I realized.

Example

I have absolutely zero interest in horse racing – frankly, I dislike the sport. However, due to all the hype on Facebook and Twitter, I couldn’t help but watch the Belmont Stakes out of fear of missing American Pharaoh become the first Triple Crown winner of my lifetime.

FOMO is frequently a counter-productive emotion, leading to jealousy of others, dissatisfaction with our own lives, and bad decision-making processes. Nowhere is the negative impact of FOMO more apparent than in some individuals’ investment strategy. For years, no one has enjoyed going to the neighborhood BBQ only to have to listen to their next door neighbor brag about how his portfolio has outperformed the S&P 500 index over the last six months. Not only is listening to the boasting annoying, it makes us discontent with the return our own portfolio has achieved and makes us wonder if we should adapt a different strategy (i.e. take more risk right after the market achieved a new all-time high).

Social media has expanded the impact of FOMO on investment strategies. For the last year, the internet has ensured we are aware that large cap indexes like the S&P 500, Dow Jones Industrial Average, and NASDAQ are at all-time highs and achieving appealing returns, and we wonder why our more diversified portfolio isn’t behaving in a similar fashion. It is hard to be content with our diversified strategy when every media outlet is constantly reminding us how we are missing out on the stellar performance that could be obtained if only we had a non-diversified portfolio that invested only in the asset category that is currently in the middle of a hot streak.

When it comes to investing, FOMO is significantly impacted by recency bias. Our fear of missing out becomes more and more intense after the market has just experienced an uptick. If we take a couple of steps back, it is clear why we maintain a diversified portfolio – it provides the most appealing tradeoff between maximizing returns and minimizing risk.

***

FOMA
                                

Fear Of Missing Out

***

Yet, it is hard to remind ourselves of this when it seems like everyone around us is taking advantage of the latest market trends and we are missing out.

Of course, changing our portfolio to try and take advantage of a run that has already taken place would be foolish, as we would be selling assets with prices that have remained flat and may now be undervalued relative to the market in order to buy assets that have recently experience significant growth and are likely now expensive. These are the type of decisions that FOMO can cause and we would be wise to avoid this type of thinking.

A Re-Do?

We have been in this position before. In the late 1990s, people wanted to abandon their diversified portfolio and put a heavy focus on the technology stocks that were making all their neighbors rich. In the mid 2000s, everyone wanted to borrow as much money as possible and utilize the funds to buy and flip real estate.

In the early 2010s, everyone was wondering if they should sell their stocks before a double-dip recession began and use the resulting funds to buy gold. In each of these scenarios we were hearing individual stories of others who had implemented these strategies and were doing better than we were.

Of course, with the benefit of hindsight, we can see that changing our long-term investment strategy due to a fear of missing out on what was working for others over a short time period would have been a drastic mistake in each of these circumstances. After the market has done well, recency bias and FOMO causes investors to be more afraid of missing a bull market than of suffering large losses.

However, in these times, we need to remember that we chose a diversified investment strategy because it provides us with the highest probability of obtaining our financial goals while exposing us to the least amount of volatility possible.

Assessment

When the media and our acquaintances insist on informing us how we would have been better off placing heavy bets on the asset categories that have recently done well, we would be well served to remember that a diversified portfolio strategy will almost certainly provide us with the best chance to achieve long-term investment success. 

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners(TM)

Front Matter with Foreword by Jason Dyken MD MBA

logos

“BY DOCTORS – FOR DOCTORS – PEER REVIEWED – FIDUCIARY FOCUSED”

***

The Stock Market Has Been Flat For Six Months

Join Our Mailing List

This is Great News!

By Lon Jefferies MBA CFP® http://www.NetWorthAdvice.com

Lon JefferiesInvestors have experienced a very uneventful 2015.

In fact, for seven months the Dow Jones Industrial Average was at essentially the same value.* This lack of fluctuation has been even more pronounced over the last two months. As of the market close on May 14th, 2015, the S&P 500 has closed between 2,040 and 2,120 for 71 days in a row.

Further, for nearly a full month, the DOW hasn’t experienced a 1-month high OR low and traded within a 2% range the entire time (always between -1% and 1%).** This was the longest streak in over 100 years!

***

one-month-return

***

Believe it or not, this may be the best pattern possible for the U.S. stock market.

***

Trendline Image

***

History tells us that the market is likely to increase in value over time. If we were to plot the market’s value from the time the market first opened to the current day, a chart of those two points would illustrate a return as such:

Trendline Image

However, we all know that the market doesn’t provide a consistent return. On individual trading days, the market can either increase or decrease in value, and the range of potential gains or losses is wide. Over extended periods of time, the market’s actual value may be above or below the expected trend line. In fact, the market’s actual historical return may look more like:

Historical vs Trendline

***

Historical vs Trendline

***

Anyone who is familiar with Net Worth Advisory Group is likely aware that we are not the type to make market predictions. We have no idea whether the market is near a temporary top or is still experiencing the upward trend after hitting the bottom of an S curve in 2008. However, let’s assume the market has reached the top of an S curve and is currently above the trend line that would represent consistent growth (similar to the illustration above).

If that is the case, there are two ways the market could get back in line with the trend line representing consistent long-term growth. The first and most obvious way this could happen is for actual market performance to curve downwards towards the trend line. This would represent a market correction or even crash.

***

crash

***

The second, and perhaps less obvious way that actual returns could become aligned with the long-term trend line is for time to allow the trend line to catch up to the actual returns we have experienced since 2008.

In this scenario, the market doesn’t slump but remains stable while time enables price-to-earnings ratios, valuations, and the economy a chance to catch up.

Time Catch Up

***

Time Catch Up

***

Very few investors enjoy or take advantage of a market correction. In fact, most investors lose control of their emotions when the market experiences a drastic downturn, and do exactly the opposite of what they should do: they sell at market lows – hardly a profitable investment strategy.

Consequently, if we are to avoid an over-heated market, it is likely better for most investors if the market realigns itself with the long-term growth rate by remaining flat for awhile and allowing the trend line time to catch up.

Allow me to reemphasize that I am not predicting that the market is in fact at a temporary high and above where it should be. I have no idea what the market will do tomorrow, over the next month, or over the next year. That is why I’m a believer in having a well diversified portfolio that represents your risk tolerance and you stick to it through thick and thin.

However, let’s look at the other side of the coin and assume the market is still at the bottom of an S curve, below the long-term trend line, and needs to experience further growth in order to catch up. Even in this scenario, an extended period of flat market performance is hardly a bad thing – it would simply make the potential upside needed to get back to market norms all the larger.

Market Under Valued

***

Market Under Valued

***

Assessment

It turns out that an extended period of flat market performance may very well be a positive for investors in any environment, regardless of whether the market is currently over or under-valued.

Channel Surfing

Have you visited our other topic channels? Established to facilitate idea exchange and link our community together, the value of these topics is dependent upon your input. Please take a minute to visit. And, to prevent that annoying spam, we ask that you register.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Sponsors Welcomed

And, credible sponsors and like-minded advertisers are always welcomed.

Support Med Executive-Post

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

How Your 2013 Federal Tax Dollars Were Spent

Join Our Mailing List 

A Spreadsheet Breakdown

By Lon Jefferies MBA CFP

Lon JeffriesClick here for a calculator that shows you how the tax you paid in 2013 was spent.

Simply input the amount you paid in federal income tax in 2013 and you’ll see a breakdown of how your money was utilized.

  1. What would you cut in the budget?
  2. What areas would you spend more, or less, on?

 

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Product Details  Product Details

The Superior Retirement Account – Will that be Traditional or Roth?

Join Our Mailing List 

Weighing the Costs

Lon Jeffries[By Lon Jefferies MBA CFP®]

As an informed investor and reader of this ME-P, you’re likely familiar with the difference between a traditional IRA/401(k) and a Roth IRA/401(k).

While the traditional account enables you to postpone taxes on both the income invested and its growth until the funds are withdrawn, a Roth account does not provide an initial tax benefit but investment growth is tax free. So which is better?

Let’s answer the question with some simple math. Suppose an investor in the 25 percent federal tax bracket invests $1,000 of pre-tax income, obtains an 8 percent annual return over the next 10 years, and is still in the 25 percent tax bracket in the future. Would this investor profit more investing in a traditional or a Roth account?

As the chart below illustrates, the investor in this scenario would end up with the exact same amount in either a traditional or a Roth account.

So does the decision to invest in a traditional or Roth retirement account not matter? Not so fast.

Constant Tax Rate
Traditional Roth
Initial Tax Bill (25%) $0 $250
Invested Amount (after-tax) $1,000 $750
Future Investment Value $2,159 $1,619
Future Tax Bill (25%) $540 $0
After-Tax Value in 10 Years $1,619 $1,619

Lower Tax Bracket in Future

Let’s assume our investor will have a reduced income when she retires in 10 years, causing her to be in the 15 percent tax bracket in the future. Perhaps the worker is in her prime earning years and will have less income during retirement. In this scenario, due to the up-front 25 percent tax bill, investing the funds in a Roth would lead to the same after-tax value of $1,619. But investing the funds in a traditional account would allow the full $1,000 to experience growth for 10 years, with a reduced future tax bill of 15 percent, leaving $1,835 of after-tax value in the account. This investor would benefit from delaying taxes into the future when she would be in a lower tax bracket.

Lower Tax Rate in the Future
Traditional Roth
Initial Tax Bill (25%) $0 $250
Invested Amount (after-tax) $1,000 $750
Future Investment Value $2,159 $1,619
Future Tax Bill (15%) $324 $0
After-Tax Value in 10 Years

$1,835

$1,619

Higher Tax Bracket in Future

On the other hand, if the investor was in the 15 percent tax bracket this year but expected to be in the 25 percent bracket during retirement (potentially a young employee expecting his earnings to rise), paying taxes now at 15 percent would allow $850 to be invested, which after 10 years of 8 percent growth would be worth $1,835 tax free.

Higher Tax Rate in the Future
Traditional Roth
Initial Tax Bill (15%) $0 $150
Invested Amount (after-tax) $1,000 $850
Future Investment Value $2,159 $1,835
Future Tax Bill (25%) $540 $0
After-Tax Value in 10 Years $1,619 $1,835

Roth Advantages

What if you expect to pay a comparable tax rate both now and in the future? A Roth account offers several advantages in this scenario.

First, as taxes have already been paid on a Roth account, the government doesn’t require investors to take required minimum distributions (RMDs) from these accounts, whereas RMDs are required from traditional retirement accounts beginning at age 70½. Without RMDs, Roth accounts can grow tax free for the investor’s entire lifespan.

Additionally, upon death, Roth accounts pass to an investor’s heirs without any tax liability, while those who inherit a traditional retirement account must pay taxes on the assets.

***

IRA

***

Second, money withdrawn from a traditional retirement account before the investor is 59½ may be subject to a 10 percent penalty. Yet contributed funds to a Roth account (but not the growth on the contributed funds) can be withdrawn at any time without penalty. While withdrawing funds before retirement isn’t advisable, the added liquidity of the Roth account can prove useful in emergencies.

Finally, even if your income is expected to remain constant, investing in a Roth account allows you to lock in your taxes at today’s rate as opposed to taking the risk that national tax rates might be raised in the future.

If you’re unsure how your future tax bracket will compare to your current rate, diversify. Nothing prevents you from having both a traditional and a Roth retirement account. This not only allows you to hedge your bets, but puts you in a position during retirement to take distributions from your tax-deferred account in low-income years and from the tax-free account in years when you are in a high tax bracket.

Assessment

http://www.utahbusiness.com/articles/view/weighing_the_costs/?pg=1

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Product DetailsProduct DetailsProduct Details

Product Details  Product Details

Why You Should [Still] Know Your Marginal Tax Rate?

Join Our Mailing List

And … Other Financial Planning Topics of Import

Lon JefferiesBy Lon Jefferies MBA CFP®

In 2014, the federal tax brackets are 10%, 15%, 25%, 28%, 33%, 35%, and 39.6%. For a taxpayer who is married and files jointly, regardless of how much the household makes, the first $18,150 of income after accounting for deductions and exemptions will only be taxed at the 10% rate.

Similarly, any income the household makes that is more than $18,150 but less than $73,800 is taxed at the 15% rate. At that point, the next $75,050 is taxed at 25%, and so on.

Consequently, not all income a household makes during the course of the year is taxed at the same rate. A marginal tax bracket is the tax rate that applies to the last dollar the household made.

It is crucial for all taxpayers to know their marginal tax rate. This information can help a client identify which type of investment accounts fits their situation best, how to structure an investment portfolio, and how to determine the value of certain deductions when filing their tax return.

Roth or Traditional Retirement Accounts

Contributions to traditional retirement accounts like IRAs and 401(k)s allow taxpayers to avoid recognizing income earned during the tax year and push the need to acknowledge the revenue into a future year. This is valuable because many people are in a higher tax bracket during their working years than they are during retirement. For instance, for a person who is currently in the 25% marginal tax bracket, it may be advantageous to delay recognizing the income until the investor retires and has less income, causing him to be in only the 15% marginal tax bracket. Doing this would enable the taxpayer to pay taxes at only 15% as opposed to 25%.

Alternatively, a Roth IRA or Roth 401(k) allows an investor to pay taxes on contributed income during the year it was earned but the money then grows tax-free. Consequently, a Roth retirement account is great for someone who believes they may be in a higher marginal tax bracket in the future. For example, a young employee in the early stages of his career who is in the 15% tax bracket but believes he may be in the 25% or 28% bracket in the future would benefit from paying all taxes on the income at his current rate of 15% and then getting tax-free investment growth. This would prevent the investor from having to pay the higher future tax rate of 25% or 28% on the invested dollars.

Knowing your marginal tax bracket can help you determine if you would favor paying taxes on your invested dollars at your current tax rate or if you believe you may benefit from pushing the need to recognize the income into a future tax year. This is a critical decision when planning for retirement and it can’t accurately be made without knowing your marginal tax rate.

Capital Gains Rate

A long term capital gains tax rate is the rate that applies to the growth of any asset held for longer than a year that is not within a tax-advantaged account. If you buy stock outside a tax-advantaged account, or purchase investment property, any growth in the value of the investment will be taxed as capital gains when sold.

An investor’s capital gains tax rate is determined by the investor’s marginal tax rate. For most taxpayers the long term capital gains tax rate is 15%. However, if a taxpayer is in the 10% or 15% marginal tax bracket, the long term capital gains tax rate is an amazing 0%! Additionally, many taxpayers in either the 35% or 39.6% tax bracket may end up paying capital gains at a rate of 20%.

Clearly, knowing your marginal tax bracket will help you analyze the appeal of making investments outside of tax-advantaged accounts. People who qualify for the 0% capital gains tax should actively search for ways to take advantage of this benefit.

Additionally, knowing your marginal tax rate can help you determine the best time to recognize long-term capital gains. If your marginal tax rate will be 25% in 2014 — leading to a capital gains tax rate of 15% — but you believe your marginal rate will be 15% in 2015 — leading to a capital gains tax rate of 0% — it would save you money and lower your tax bill to defer recognizing long-term capitals gains until next year.

***

FP

***

Annuities

Annuities are promoted as a way for invested dollars to obtain tax-deferred growth. However, when money is withdrawn from an annuity it is taxed at the investor’s marginal tax rate as opposed to his long term capital gains tax rate. Knowing your marginal tax bracket can help determine whether an annuity adds any value to your portfolio, or whether it could actually be detrimental.

Suppose an investor is in the 15% marginal tax bracket. If this person invests in an annuity, he will avoid paying taxes on any of the investment’s growth until the funds are withdrawn from the annuity. However, at that point the investment’s growth will be taxed at the taxpayer’s marginal income tax bracket of 15%. Alternatively, if this same investor utilized a taxable investment account rather than an annuity, the investment’s growth would be taxed at the investor’s capital gains tax rate of 0% when sold. In this case, investing in an annuity actually created a tax bill for this investor!

Clearly, knowing your marginal tax rate and your resulting capital gains tax rate can help you determine the best type of investment accounts for your personal situation.

Itemized Deductions

The value of your itemized deductions is essentially determined by your marginal tax bracket. For a simplified example, consider a taxpayer who could generate an additional $10,000 of deductions. Doing so would mean the individual would pay taxes on $10,000 of income less than he would without the deduction. If the individual is in the 15% tax bracket, generating the deduction would lower the person’s tax bill by $1,500 dollars ($10,000 x 15%). However, if the individual is in the 25% tax bracket, the same deduction would lower the person’s tax bill by $2,500 ($10,000 x 25%).

Consequently, knowing your marginal tax bracket can help determine when large itemized deductions should be taken. If you would like to donate funds to your favorite charitable institution, knowing which year you will be in the highest marginal tax bracket can help you determine the best time to make the contribution.

***

FA

***

Marginal Tax Rates Change

Many people’s income is relatively constant year-after-year. For these people, there may not be much fluctuation in their marginal tax bracket. However, any time you have a significant increase or decrease in income recognized during a year, your marginal tax rate may change. Whenever possible, it is best to anticipate how your current marginal tax rate might compare to your future marginal tax rate.This is another strong factor that can impact all the key financial decisions effected by your marginal tax rate.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Product DetailsProduct DetailsProduct Details

Product DetailsProduct Details

Product Details

%d bloggers like this: