Hospital Revenue Cycle Recruitment Survey

By Staff Reporters

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Entry-level Revenue Cycle Recruitment Takes 84 Days on Average

A recent AKASA survey of 514 chief financial officers and revenue cycle leaders at hospitals and health systems in the U.S. found:

 •  Entry-level revenue cycle talent (0-5 years): On average, costs $2,167 for recruitment and takes 84 days to fill vacant roles.
 •  Mid-level revenue cycle talent (6-10 years): On average, costs $3,581 for recruitment and takes 153 days to fill vacant roles.
 •  Senior-level revenue cycle talent (10+ years): On average, costs $5,699 for recruitment and takes 207 days to fill vacant roles.

Source: AKASA via PR Newswire, “Survey: Recruitment Costs, Long Hiring Timelines Negatively Impact Healthcare Finance Teams”, January 26, 2022

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The Medical Practice Business Plan EXECUTIVE SUMMARY?

WHAT IT IS – HOW IT WORKS

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

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CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

THE BUSINESS PLAN STANDARD FORMAT

Physician Executive Summary

The Physician Executive Summary is always included at the beginning of a formal business plan and represents a brief synopsis of the medical prarctice entire plan.  Its appearance, grammar and style should be sharp and crisp as it represents an enticement for the reader to maintain interest and contribute intelligent or economic input into the new venture.

It should contain information about the practice, advertising and marketing opportunities, physician management, proposed financing with four Pro Forma financial statements, business operations and exit strategy.  This last point, while unpleasant is often overlooked by naive practitioners.  Business experts however, look favorably upon an escape plan and view it as the mark of mature professional that realizes the possibility of success as well as failure. 

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See the source image

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Ultimately, the plan must explain to potential investors how you will make the practice   profitable and produce the required Return on Investment (ROI) for them.  It must describe medical services, patient acceptance and benefits, provider qualifications and accomplishments, the amount of capital required, market size, potential practice growth rate, and market niche. 

Additional information may include office location, proximity to labor, transportation, license requirements, business entity status, proprietary technology and potential working agreements with various insurance, managed care, ACA and HMO plans.  If all of the above seems bewildering to the uninitiated, you are correct. 

Remember however, that if you do not have, or can’t borrow the funds to begin a private practice, you will just have to become an employed practitioner until you can.  It is therefore imperative to start off on the right foot, with a sound business plan, as you begin your medical career.

YOUR COMMENTS ARE APPRECIATED.

Thank You

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PODCAST: 15 Metrics for Successful Healthcare Companies

Phil Fisher Was One of the Greatest Entrepreneurial Investors of the 20th Century and a Source of Wisdom for Warren Buffett

By Eric Bricker MD

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Related: https://thehealthcareblog.com/blog/2022/02/03/after-the-crash/?utm_campaign=THCB%20Reader&utm_medium=email&utm_source=Revue%20newsletter

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COMMENTS APPRECIATED

Thank You

Subscribe to the Medical Executive-Post

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Product Details

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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PODCAST: “Blowing up the Business Plan” at U.C. Berkeley Haas Business School

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Berkeley’s Lester Center for Entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurship is a Calling

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By Steve Blank

During the Cold War with the Soviet Union, science and engineering at both Stanford and U.C. Berkeley were heavily funded to develop Cold War weapon systems. Stanford’s focus was Electronic Intelligence and those advanced microwave components and systems were useful in a variety of weapons systems. Starting in the 1950’s, Stanford’s engineering department became “outward facing” and developed a culture of spinouts and active faculty support and participation in the first wave of Silicon Valley startups.

At the same time Berkeley was also developing Cold War weapons systems. However its focus was nuclear weapons – not something you wanted to be spinning out. So Berkeley started a half century history of “inward facing innovation” focused on the Lawrence Livermore nuclear weapons lab. (See the presentation here.)

Given its inward focus, Berkeley has always been the neglected sibling in Silicon Valley entrepreneurship. That has changed in the last few years.

Today the U.C. Berkeley Haas Business School is a leader in entrepreneurship education. It has replaced how to write a business plan with hands-on Lean Startup methods. It’s teaching the LaunchPad® and the I-Corps for the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health, as well as corporate entrepreneurship courses.

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Blowing up the Business Plan at U.C. Berkeley Haas Business School

[Synopsis]

  • Early-stage investors don’t read business plans
  • We are in the middle of a shift in entrepreneurship education from teaching the waterfall model of startup development (enshrined in business plans) to teaching the lean startup model
  • The Lean LaunchPad process works across a wide range of domains – from science and engineering to healthcare, energy, government, the social sector and for corporate innovation
  • Customer Development works outside Silicon Valley. In fact, it works globally
  • The Lean LaunchPad is a business process that teaches entrepreneurs and innovators to make business-focused, evidence-based decisions under conditions of chaos and uncertainty. It’s a big idea.

Invite Dr. Marcinko

Get your FREE Medical Office Start-Up Business Plan from iMBA, Inc.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

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“When a practicing physician thinks about their risk exposure resulting from providing patient care, medical malpractice risk immediately comes to mind. But; malpractice and liability risk is barely the tip of the iceberg, and likely not even the biggest risk in the daily practice of medicine. There are risks from having medical records to keep private, risks related to proper billing and collections, risks from patients tripping on your office steps, risks from medical board actions, risk arising from divorce, and the list goes on and on. These liabilities put a doctor’s hard earned assets and career in a very vulnerable position.

These new books from Dr. David Marcinko and Prof. Hope Hetico show doctors the multiple types of risk they face and provides examples of steps to take to minimize them. They are written clearly and to the point, and are a valuable reference for any well-managed practice. Every doctor who wants to take preventive action against the risks coming at them from all sides needs to read these books.”

Richard Berning MD FACC [New Haven, Connecticut, USA]

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