The BUSINESS of Medical Practice

“NO MARGIN – NO MISSION”

Within Reason

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BY DR. DAVID E. MARCINKO MBA CMP®

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

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CELEBRATE: National Women’s Health Week 2022

MAY 8 – 14th, 2022

By Staff Reporters

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Prioritizing your health – both physical and mental – has never been more important. Over the past few years, many women have put off taking care of their general health and wellness needs. They have adjusted their daily routines, including the way they connect with family and friends. The combination has led to serious health problems for some women.

LINK: https://www.womenshealth.gov/nwhw/about

DAY: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2022/03/08/today-is-international-womens-day/

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Understanding Risk Adjusted Portfolio Performance

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A Vital Feedback Loop for any Medical Professional’s Investment Program

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA, CMP™

[Publisher-in-Chief]

While recently visiting the beautiful Johns Hopkins University and Medical School in Baltimore Maryland, I realized that investment portfolio performance measurement — much like an annual physical exam in the Spring — is an important feedback loop to monitor progress towards the goals of the medical professional’s investment program.

Performance comparisons to market indices and/or peer groups are a useful part of this feedback loop, as long as they are considered in the context of the market environment and with the limitations of market index and manager database construction.  Inherent to performance comparisons is the reality that portfolios taking greater risk will tend to out-perform less risky investments during bullish phases of a market cycle, but are also more likely to under-perform during the bearish phase.  The reason for focusing on performance comparisons over a full market cycle is that the phases biasing results in favor of higher risk approaches can be balanced with less favorable environments for aggressive approaches to lessen/eliminate those biases.

THINK: The “flash crash” of March 2009, and the DJIA now hovering near 12,000 of  late.

The Biases

Can we eliminate the biases of the market environment by adjusting performance for the risk assumed by the portfolio?  While several interesting calculations have been developed to measure risk-adjusted performance, the unfortunate answer is that the biases of the market environment still tend to have an impact even after adjusting returns for various measures of risk.

http://www.amazon.com/Financial-Planning-Handbook-Physicians-Advisors/dp/0763745790/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1276795609&sr=1-1

Assessment

However, medical professionals and their advisors will have many different risk-adjusted return statistics presented to them, so understanding the Sharpe ratio, Treynor ratio, Jensen’s measure or alpha, Morningstar star ratings, etc. and their limitations should help to improve the decisions made from the performance measurement feedback loop.

And, these are discussed elsewhere on this ME-P.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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Fake Prescription Drug Rx Example

Altered and Poorly Written Rx for Vicodin

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA

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Poorly-written Rx for vicodin

Drug: Rx Vicodin

Disp: # 10

Sig: Take I, as needed for pain.

Refills: 1 2 3 4 or 5

AM2685591

David Edward Marcinko, MBBS DPM MBA

The patient abuser may change drug quantity numbers, copy or remember the doctors’ DEA number, or take extra Rx pads. For this reason, a physician’s Rx pad should contain his/her name, address and telephone number. The doctor’s DEA number should not be pre-printed on the pad, for fear of mis-use.

Example:

  • Increase the quantity 10, to 100, by adding a zero, so that the additional capsules can be used, sold or bartered with on the street.
  • Change the directions to take 2 capsules, rather than 1 in order to produce greater euphoria.
  • Increase the Rx refills, from one to two, by extending the underline, or checking an additional quantity box.
  • Pre-printed DEA number can be stolen, sold or reused.
  • Pre-printed (not original) physician signature can be reproduced and widely distributed for more prescriptions.

Altered Rx for vicodin

Drug: Rx Vicodin

Disp: # 100

Sig: Take II, as needed for pain.

Refills: 1 2 3 4 or 5

AM2675591

David Edward Marcinko, MDBBS DPM MBA

 The doctor drug addict, or a doc in need of funds, may write for more narcotic agent than needed, and receive the additional pills back from the patient-shill for personal consumption, sell them on the street himself for money, or receive a monetary kickback from the patient-shill.

A pharmacist may also indirectly alter a prescription using the above methods, or simply short-change the patient with fewer narcotic capsules than the prescription intends. This is more difficult to do with pills or tablets in the out patient setting, but easy to do in the in-patient setting when liquid IV drugs are used, by dilution and placing less than the full amount in IV bottles or bags. The harm to patients, of course, may be fatal.

Well-written Rx for vicodin

Drug: Rx Vicodin

Disp: # 10 (ten) capsules

Sig: Take one or two capsules, po, prn pain.

Refills: 1 2 3 4 or 5

AM2685591

David Edward Marcinko, MBBS DPM MBA

Example:

  • Drug quantity can-not be changed.
  • Directions can-not be changed. Route of administration (by mouth) indicated.
  • Rx refills clearly indicated.
  • Handwritten, not pre-printed, DEA number.
  • Original physician signature, only.

Doctor Rx prescription abuse foibles are legendary in the DEA and include a Maryland podiatrist who wrote prescriptions for more than 1,235 Mepergan Fortis capsules ostensibly for his wife following minor foot surgery. Or, the Florida physician who prescribed more than 2,150 Vicodin capsules for a patient with whom he was having an extra-marital affair in order that his consort not disclose the fling to his wife. Or, the osteopath from New Jersey who wrote more than 100 narcotic prescriptions every 8 hour day, for more than a year, to any patient standing in a line in front of his office. And, finally the California dentist whose excuse for writing more than 1,845 narcotic tablet prescriptions in a six month period for the same patient was that they would be needed in his next reincarnation. Yes, all of these incidents are laughable if not for their serious consequences to the involved individuals, and society, alike. The bastards!

Fortunately, unlike drug local domestic drug kingpins or international narco-traffickers who ply their trade virtually undetected, these naive white-collared nerds, always get caught by the Drug Enforcement Agency. Their Rx abuse tactics are so amateurish!

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