PODCAST: First Rules of Population Health

One of the 1st Rules of Population Health is That 5% of the Population Generates 50% of Total Healthcare Costs

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BY ERIC BRICKER MD

However, That 5% of High-Cost Claimants is a Heterogenous Population

2.5 Percentage Points of the 5% Are Claimants That Were Either High-Cost Claimants the Previous Year with On-Going Complex Medical Situations or Generated Claims Related to Chronic Diseases Such as Diabetes or Multiple Sclerosis.

HOWEVER, the Other 2.5 Percentage Points of the 5% Are Claimants That Generated Zero or Almost-Zero Claims in the Previous 12-Months.

They Essentially ‘Blow Up’ Out of Nowhere.

This Video Describes the 4 Categories of These High-Cost Claimants:

1) Previously Known and Prolonged High Costs

2) Previously Known and Episodic High Costs (that no longer continue)

3) Previously Unknown and Prolonged High Costs

4) Previously Unknown and Episodic High Costs (that no longer continue)

Learn the Clinical Diagnoses That Make Up Each Category and the Secret of Which Groups to Target and Why.

Your thoughts are appreciated.

THANK YOU

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Doubting the Accountable Care Organization B-Model

New Healthcare Business Model or Edsel Model?

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By David Edward Marcinko MBA http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

[Publisher-in-Chief]

Dr. Marcinko with ME-P FansDefined by Professor Michael Porter at Harvard Business School, value is defined as a function of outcomes and costs. Therefore to achieve high value we must deliver the best possible outcomes in the most efficient way, outcomes which matter from the perspective of the individual receiving healthcare and not provider process measures or targets.

Sir Muir Gray expanded on the idea of technical value (outcomes/costs) to specifically describe ‘personal value’ and ‘allocative value’, encouraging us to focus also on shared decision making, individual preferences for care and ensuring that resources are allocated for maximum value.

Healthcare Value and ACOs

According to our Medical Executive-Post Health Dictionary Series of administrative terms http://www.HealthDictionarySeries.org  and health economist and colleague Robert James Cimasi MHA, ASA, AVA CMP™ of www.HealthCapital.com; an ACO is a healthcare organization in which a set of providers, usually large physician groups and hospitals, are held accountable for the cost and quality of care delivered to a specific local population.

ACOs aim to affect provider’s patient expenditures and outcomes by integrating clinical and administrative departments to coordinate care and share financial risk.

ACO Launch

Since their four-page introduction in the PP-ACA of 2010, ACOs have been implemented in both the Federal and commercial healthcare markets, with 32 Pioneer ACOs selected (on December 19, 2011), 116 Federal applications accepted (on April 10, 2012 and July 9, 2012), and at least 160 or more Commercial ACOs in existence today.

Federal Contracts

Federal ACO contracts are established between an ACO and CMS, and are regulated under the CMS Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) Final Rule, published November 2, 2011.  ACOs participating in the MSSP are accountable for the health outcomes, represented by 33 quality metrics, and Medicare beneficiary expenditures of a prospectively assigned population of Medicare beneficiaries.

If a Federal ACO achieves Medicare beneficiary expenditures below a CMS established benchmark (and meets quality targets), they are eligible to receive a portion of the achieved Medicare beneficiary expenditure savings, in the form of a shared savings payment.

Commercial Contracts

Commercial ACO contracts are not limited by any specific legislation, only by the contract between the ACO and a commercial payor.

In addition to shared savings models, Commercial ACOs may incentivize lower costs and improved patient outcomes through reimbursement models that share risk between the payor and the providers, i.e., pay for performance compensation arrangements and/or partial to full capitation.

Although commercial ACOs experience a greater degree of flexibility in their structure and reimbursement, the principals for success for both Federal ACOs and Commercial ACOs are similar.

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Eidsel

Dr. David E. Marcinko with 1960 Ford Edsel

[© iMBA, Inc. All rights reserved, USA.]

[The Edsel was an automobile marque that was planned, developed, and manufactured by the Ford Motor Company during the 1958, 1959, and 1960 model years. With the Edsel, Ford had expected to make significant inroads into the market share of both General Motors and Chrysler and close the gap between itself and GM in the domestic American automotive market. But, contrary to Ford’s internal plans and projections, the Edsel never gained popularity with contemporary American car buyers and sold poorly. The Ford Motor Company lost millions of dollars on the Edsel’s development, manufacturing and marketing].

More:

 

Update

Junking the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) would undoubtedly let the proverbial air out of the MACRA balloon, dealing a significant blow to the value-based reimbursement shift; right?

Assessment

Although nearly any healthcare enterprise can integrate and become an ACO, larger enterprises, may be best suited for ACO status.

Larger organizations are more able to accommodate the significant capital requirements of ACO development, implementation, and operation (e.g., healthcare information technology), and sustain the sufficient number of beneficiaries to have a significant impact on quality and cost metrics.

Conclusion

But, will this new B-Model work? Isn’t leading doctors in a shared collaborative effort a bit like herding cats? And, what about patients, HIEs, outcomes management, data analytics and … Population Health via our colleague David B. Nash MD MBA of Thomas Jefferson University, often considered the “father” of Pop Health?

OR, what about the developing IRS scandal and full PP-ACA launch in 2014? Will it affect federal funding, full roll-out, or even repeal of the entire Act?

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

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America’s Safest Hospitals

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[Behind the Numbers]

[By Staff Reporters]56382989

Did you know that at Missouri Baptist Medical Center in St. Louis, it only takes 90 seconds to save a life? While all hospitals keep staff on-call for emergencies, Missouri Baptist has implemented a rapid response program through which anyone, even family members, can call a team of clinicians to the bedside of a distressed patient within 90 seconds.

An Idea from Down-Under

As seen in Forbes, January 27, 2009, Missouri Baptist imported the idea from Australia, with an overall emphasis on safety that is evident not only in its innovative programs, but also in its numbers.

The Internal Data

According to reported internal data, only 48% of patients die as would be expected given their diagnoses. With outcomes like these, it’s no surprise that Missouri Baptist was designated by HealthGrades, a private hospital rating company in Golden, Colo., as one of the safest in the country. In its seventh annual study of “quality and clinical excellence”, known as Behind the Numbers, HealthGrades identified 270 hospitals out of 5,000 that collectively had a 28% lower mortality rate and 8% lower complication rate than the national average. The list reflects the top 5% of hospitals nationwide.

About HealthGrades

The HealthGrades [NASDAQ: HGRD] site promotes the firm as a leading healthcare ratings organization, providing ranking and profiles of hospitals, nursing homes and physicians to consumers, corporations, health plans and other hospitals. Millions of consumers and hundreds of the nation’s largest employers, health plans and hospitals rely on HealthGrades’ independent ratings, consulting and products to make healthcare decisions based on the quality of care. Founded in 1999, the firm has over 160 employees www.HealthGrades.com

Assessment

Now, what ever happened to governmental reporting, the Joint Commission, etc? Of course, after the IOM Report on Crossing the Quality Chasm in 2001, this type of service may be more important than ever.

Link: quality-chasm3

Conclusion

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Medical Tourism and Values Based Health Insurance

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Two Emerging Medical Business Models

[By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™]dr-david-marcinko10

Last year, nurse-executive Hope Hetico; RN, MHA from www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com and I wrote a chapter on physician compensation for the book Practicing Medicine in the 21st Century. The book was edited by David B. Nash; MD, MBA of Jefferson Medical College, in Philadelphia. One of us [DEM] attended medical school at Temple University, so David clearly does not hold a grudge against us. Nevertheless, in the publication, we identified these two emerging trends that have grown even stronger with the passage of time:

Values Based Health Insurance Model

According to Mark Fendrick, MD and Michael E. Chernew, PhD, instead of the one size fits all approach of traditional health insurance, a “clinically-sensitive” cost-sharing system that supports co-payments related to evidence-based value for targeted patients seems plausible.

In this model, out-of-pocket costs are based on price and a cost/quality tradeoff in clinical circumstances: low co-payments for interventions of highest value, and higher co-payments for interventions with little proven health benefit. Smarter benefit packages are designed to combine disease management with cost sharing to address spending growth.

Medical Tourism and the Global Healthcare Model

American businesses are extending their cost-cutting initiatives to include offshore employee medical benefits, and facilities like the Bumrungrad Hospital in Bangkok Thailand (cosmetic surgery), and the Apollo Hospital in New Delhi India (cardiac and orthopedic surgery) which are premier examples for surgical care. Both are internationally recognized institutions that resemble five-star hotels equipped with the latest medical technology. Countries such as Finland, England and Canada are also catering to the English-speaking crowd, while dentistry is especially popular in Mexico and Costa Rica.

Although this is still considered “medical tourism,” Mercer Health and Benefits was recently retained by three Fortune 500 companies interested in contracting with offshore hospitals and JCAHO has accredited 88 foreign hospitals through a joint international commission. To be sure, when India can discount costs up to 80%, the effects on domestic hospital reimbursement and physician compensation may be assumed to increase downward compensation pressures.

Assessment

Another commentator on this topic is hospitalist Robert Wachter, MD; a blogger at Wachter’s World.

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Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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