SURVEY: Primary Care Doctors Deliver Most Medical Care

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By MCOL

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25% of Primary Care Doctors Delivered 86% of Medical Care

 •  25% of primary care doctors delivered 86% of medical care.
 •  25% of specialists on average provided 75% of medical care.
 •  16.3% of physicians listed in Medicaid managed care plan provider network directors in a year qualified as ghost physicians (seeing zero Medicaid beneficiaries over the course of the year in an outpatient setting).
 •  The share of ghost physicians ranged from 13.4% to 24.9% across states.

Source: Health Affairs via Fierce Healthcare, May 5, 2022

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THE BUSINESS OF MEDICAL PRACTICE [Health 2.0]

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Medical Workplace Violence Prevention Guidelines

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Earliest Guidelines in California Program

By Eugene Schmuckler; PhD MBA MEd CTS

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA

UPDATE

At least 5 people are dead and multiple people are injured following a shooting at the Natalie Building at St. Francis Hospital in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Link: https://apnews.com/article/tulsa-oklahoma-c29a239d1c2ac7f7f0bfdc161b72f6f2

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The impact of medical workplace violence became widely exposed on November 6, 2009 when 39 year old Army psychiatrist Maj. Nidal M. Hasan MD, a 1997 graduate of Virginia Tech University who received a medical doctorate in psychiatry from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland, and served as an intern, resident and fellow at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in the District of Columbia, went on a savage 100 round shooting spree and rampage that killed 13 people and injured 32 others. In April 2010 he was transferred to Bell County Jail in Belton, Texas awaiting trial.

Federal Government Guidelines

The federal government and some states have developed guidelines to assist employers with workplace violence prevention. For instance, one of the earliest sets of guidelines for a comprehensive workplace violence prevention program was published in 1993 by California OSHA. This resulted from the murder of a state employee. In 1996, Guidelines for Preventing Workplace Violence for Healthcare and Social Service Workers was published by OSHA.

Book Link:  www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com

OSHA Guidelines

In its guidelines, OSHA sets forth the following essential elements for developing a violence prevention program:

  • Management commitment — as seen by high-level management involvement and support for a written workplace violence prevention policy and its implementation.
  • Meaningful employee involvement — in policy development, joint management-worker violence prevention committees, post-assault counseling and debriefing, and follow-up are all critical program components.
  • Worksite analysis — includes regular walk-through surveys of all patient care areas and the collection and review of all reports of worker assault. A successful job hazard analysis must include strategies and policies for encouraging the reporting of all incidents of workplace violence, including verbal threats that do not result in physical injury.
  • Hazard prevention and control — includes the installation and maintenance of alarm systems in high-risk areas. It may also include the training and posting of security personnel in emergency departments. Adequate staffing is an essential hazard prevention measure, as is adequate lighting and control of access to staff offices and secluded work areas.
  • Pre-placement and periodic training and education — must include educationally appropriate information regarding the risk factors for violence in the healthcare environment and control measures available to prevent violent incidents. Training should include skills in aggressive behavior identification and management, especially for staff working in the mental health and emergency departments.

On May 17, 1999, Governor Gary Locke signed the New Workplace Violence Prevention Act for the state of Washington. This act mandates that each healthcare setting in the state implement a plan to reasonably prevent and protect employees from violence.

New Washington Workplace Violence Prevention Act

According to this act, prevention plans need to address security considerations related to:

  • physical attributes of the healthcare setting;
  • staffing, including security staffing;
  • personnel policies;
  • first aid and emergency procedures;
  • reporting of violent acts; and
  • employee education and training.

Prior to the development of an actual plan, a security and safety assessment needs to be conducted to identify existing or potential hazards. The training component of the plan must include the following topics:

  • general safety procedures;
  • personal safety procedures;
  • the violence escalation cycle;
  • violence-predicting factors;
  • means of obtaining a patient history form from a patient with violent behavior;
  • strategies to avoid physical harm;
  • restraining techniques;
  • appropriate use of medications as chemical restraints;
  • documenting and reporting incidents;
  • the process whereby employees affected by a violent act may debrief;
  •  any resources available to employee for coping with violence; and
  • the healthcare setting’s workplace violence prevention plan.

Assessment

The act further mandates that any hospital operated and maintained by the State of Washington for the care of the mentally ill is required to provide violence prevention training to affected employees identified in the plan on a regular basis and prior.

Front Matter: Front Matter BoMP – 3 

Conclusion

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About Medical Workplace Violence

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UPDATE

At least three people are dead and multiple people are injured following a shooting at the Natalie Building at St. Francis Hospital in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Link: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/at-least-3-dead-multiple-people-injured-in-shooting-at-oklahoma-medical-office/ar-AAXYITO?li=BBnb7Kz

More than Physical Assault

[By Staff Reporters and Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA]

Business Med PracticeWorkplace violence is more than physical assault.

According to trauma specialist Eugene Schmuckler; PhD, MBA, CTS opining and writing in www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com; workplace violence is any act in which a person is abused, threatened, intimidated, harassed, or assaulted in his or her employment. Swearing, verbal abuse, playing “pranks,” spreading rumors, arguments, property damage, vandalism, sabotage, pushing, theft, physical assaults, psychological trauma, anger-related incidents, rape, arson, and murder are all examples of workplace violence.

The RNANS

The Registered Nurses Association of Nova Scotia [RNANS], a leading study group, defines violence as “any behavior that results in injury whether real or perceived by an individual, including, but not limited to, verbal abuse, threats of physical harm, and sexual harassment.” As such, medical workplace violence includes:

· threatening behavior — such as shaking fists, destroying property, or throwing objects;

· verbal or written threats — any expression of intent to inflict harm;

· harassment — any behavior that demeans, embarrasses, humiliates, annoys, alarms, or verbally abuses a person and that is known or would be expected to be unwelcome. This includes words, gestures, intimidation, bullying, or other inappropriate activities;

· verbal abuse — swearing, insults, or condescending language;

· muggings — aggravated assaults, usually conducted by surprise and with intent to rob; or

· physical attacks — hitting, shoving, pushing, or kicking.

Cause and Affect

Workplace violence can be brought about by a number of different actions in the workplace. It may also be the result of non-work related situations such as domestic violence or “road rage.” Workplace violence can be inflicted by an abusive employee, a manager, supervisor, co-worker, customer, family member, patient, physician, nurse, or even a stranger.

The UI-IPRC 

The University of Iowa – Injury Prevention Research Center [UI-IPRC] classifies most workplace violence into one of four categories.

· Type I Criminal Intent — Results while a criminal activity (e.g., robbery) is being committed and the perpetrator had no legitimate relationship to the workplace.

· Type II Customer/Client — The perpetrator is a customer or client at the workplace (e.g., healthcare patient) and becomes violent while being assisted by the worker.

· Type III Worker on Worker — Employees or past employees of the workplace are the perpetrators.

· Type IV Personal Relationship — The perpetrator usually has a personal relationship with an employee (e.g., domestic violence in the workplace).

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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