Asset Allocation Methods for Physician-Investors

What’s Old … is New Again?

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™

Publisher-in-Chiefdem23

Asset allocation policies, incorporating the risk/return fundamental equation, have traditionally been classified under the following approaches: Principal Stability and Income, Income, Income-Oriented, Balanced, Growth, and Aggressive Growth.

Traditional Concepts

In all forms of traditional asset allocation and diversification policy approaches, the physician-investor is presumed to diversify within the chosen asset class in order to reduce the potential for specific or unsystematic risk.

Principal stability and income approach

Objective: Income, liquidity, and stability of principal.

Investment: Shorter-term fixed income securities with a large concentration in money market exposure to enhance liquidity and price stability. Accounts tend to maintain cash equivalent reserve balance of 30–50% of the portfolio.

Income approach

Objective: Maximum income.

Investment: 100% fixed income exposure.

Income portfolios arise from the traditional notion that an investor should spend only income and reinvest capital gains. Sometimes this is a legal requirement, as in a trust that has an income beneficiary distinct from the principal beneficiary.

Income-oriented approach

Objective: Income and some capital growth.

Investment: Accounts tend to maintain 15–35% in equity investments; balance of investment in fixed income.

Income and growth approach

Objective: Capital growth and income using a balanced approach to limit volatility.

Investment:  Accounts tend to maintain 45–65% equity exposure; balance of investment in fixed income.

Income and growth portfolio policies generally refer to both the fixed income and equity portions of the portfolios. Because of the income bias, the overall stock portion of the portfolio will usually have a dividend yield greater than the market yield. This method allows the portfolio manager to invest in some no- or low-dividend yielding issues.

Growth approach

Objective: Capital growth with income as a secondary objective.

Investment: Accounts tend to maintain between 65%–85% equity exposure; balance of investment in fixed income, usually cash reserves.

Aggressive growth approach

Objective: Long-term capital growth.

Investment: Accounts maintain 100% equity exposure. Exposure to variety of equity types normal (small capitalization, international, emerging markets, etc).

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Assessment Of course, the above is much more accurate during stable economic times, than it is today; don’t you think? Are newer concepts required today … or is past … prologue.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2008/10/25/new-wave-thoughts-on-investing/

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com  or Bio: www.stpub.com/pubs/authors/MARCINKO.htm

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Medicare and Medicaid Health IT Network Proposal

Governmental Initiative for the Elderly and Poor

By Staff Reporters200298593-001

According to Nancy Ferris of Government Health IT, on Mar 18, 2009, a rapid learning health information data network could close some gaps in medical knowledge and cut costs for Medicare and Medicaid recipients.

A Congressional Letter

In a letter to Congress, a group of health policy experts urged creation of a network to share information on Medicare and Medicaid patients in order to improve treatment received. In particular, Lynn Etheredge, one signatory of the letter, wants information to be shared on “dual eligible’s”. This term is defined as low income, elderly patients who receive money for medical care from both Medicare [Federal] and Medicaid [State] sources.dhimc-book6

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According to Etheredge, there are 7 million such dually-eligible patients in the US, which represents 40 percent of Medicaid spending, and 25 percent of Medicare spending. Etheredge and the others suggest that a network backed by government policy would hasten treatments for everyone.

Assessment

Others who signed the letter include Kenneth Kizer, who created the health-records system for the Department of Veteran Affairs; Commonwealth Fund President Karen Davis; National Quality Forum [NQF] President and CEO Janet Corrigan and National Committee for Quality Assurance [NCQA] President Margaret O’Kane. 

Link: http://govhealthit.com/articles/2009/03/18/network-for-data-on-medicaid-medicare-patients.aspx

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. One conclusion of this letter was that“[Researchers] spend way too much time simply acquiring data.” Do you agree, why or why not? Please opine. Will networked eHRs, eMRs and eDRs really save money and time; or cost money and time? Can they be inter-operable and connected on a nationally networked basis that is cost-effective, secure and available to all providers? What about CCHIT, and other vendors?

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Medical Real Estate Investments

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Physician’s Need to Understand Compensation Methods

[By Staff Reporters]

Property Managers

Medical property managers are compensated for their services on an hourly or fee basis. In addition, they may be reimbursed for expenses related to the maintenance of the property, such as materials, and they may also pay for expenses incurred by subcontractors.

Fees

Fees usually are based on a percentage of gross collected rents, but are negotiable. Property managers of larger medical complexes may receive higher fees than managers of small complexes because of the details involved in managing larger properties. Fees also are affected by the total pro-forma income stream. In general, the better a manager enhances the property’s performance, the more the manager is paid.

Barter

Some owners pay fees and provide rent-free units for resident medical managers to handle on-site leasing; or for offices for managers to take care of buildings warranting on-site property management. Bartered phantom income may be reportable to the IRS.

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Real Estate Brokers

Each state has specific requirements regarding the sales and leasing of medical, commercial and other real estate. Every state, however, has the clear and mandatory requirement that no commission or fee can be paid to anyone who is not licensed in that state as a real estate broker, an associate broker, or sales agent if the person represents or works on behalf of another. All fees and commissions must be paid to the company employing the broker, associate broker, or sales agent. Violation of these laws can have serious consequences to both the principal and the real estate broker.

Hybrid Compensation

A medical real estate broker is usually compensated by either a negotiated fee or a negotiated commission; or hybrid of both methods. Neither fees for work or commissions earned are set or standardized in any way. The amount earned or the amount paid is the result of an agreement. The agreement or contract must be in writing, under the Statute of Frauds, just as all real estate offers and contracts must be in writing sales or on leases of more than one year.

Commissions

If a broker is working on commission, h/she is paid only when she is successful and the sales transaction closes and title is passed to the buyer. Sales commission is established either in a Listing Agreement or a Buyers Brokerage Agreement. No fee is due if the sale does not occur. Rates of commission vary widely by city, region, and state. The amount of commission usually is a percentage of the sales price or a set amount. The percentage of commission is dependent on competition; effort required; to some degree, the size of the transaction; and market activity. For example, the sale of a large regional shopping center might be a 3% commission whereas the sale of a small retail building under $1 million might warrant a 7% commission.

Lease Execution Warrants Payment

Leasing commissions are based on gross rental income over the term of the lease, are due when the lease is executed by both landlord and tenant, and can be paid at one of the following times:

  1. On execution of the lease.
  2. Partly on lease execution and partly on occupancy; or
  3. On occupancy, depending on the landlord’s written agreement with the broker.

Leasing commissions usually are a negotiated percentage of gross rents, with the percentage varying dependent on type of lease. For example, the percentage rate of commission might be more on a net lease, in which the tenant pays all expenses, than if the same lease were structured on a gross or fully serviced basis; or in which the landlord provides services within the rents due. Commission on ground leases might range up to 10% and office space might range from 4% to 6%.

Example:

Term: 5 years (60 months)         

Monthly rental rate: $1,000 per month     

Gross rental income under the lease: $1,000 x 60 = $60,000        

Commission calculation (using a 6% rate): $60,000 x 6% = $3,600           

The fees paid under sales and leases are usually split between the colleague brokers working on the transaction and are shared between the listing agent and the selling or leasing agent under a co-brokerage agreement between the brokers. This too is a negotiated percentage. It is common for commissions to be split on a 50/50 basis, but it is not the rule. How the commission is divided between brokers depends on the transaction. The commission is often shared evenly between cooperating brokers, but the split ultimately is the seller and listing agent’s decision.

Hard-to-Move Properties

On extremely difficult medical real estate properties [as is seen in many parts of the country today], incentive splits may be offered. Incentive splits offer the selling or leasing agent a greater share of the commission if he or she is successful. Under commission agreements between a seller and a broker, or a buyer and a broker, in which the broker is representing a buyer, nothing is earned until the transaction is complete and the broker has added value, unless spelled out to the contrary in the agreement or the broker is working on a fee basis. On a typical sale, commissions are paid through escrow at closing. Leasing commissions are usually, but not always, paid upon lease execution.

Other forms of payment for property managers and real estate brokers

It has become increasingly common for medical property managers and real estate brokers, particularly when representing a buyer or a tenant, to work on a contractual basis. In these instances, the parties are paid on an hourly or set-fee basis, regardless of whether the transaction is completed. In some cases, a principal may decide he wants only some of the services offered, such as a lease review, and those are also paid on a negotiated basis for the service provided.

Assessment

Combinations of fixed fees and commission incentives also are common, but in most all cases there is not a set amount or standard fee charged by all brokers.

Conclusion

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