“Reasonably-Preventable” Conditions

More Payment Reductions from Medicare

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Medicare has implemented its new policy of halting payment to hospitals for the added cost of treating patients who are injured in their care.

Reasonably Preventable

According to the New York Times on October 1, Medicare has put 10 “reasonably preventable” conditions on its initial list, including:

  • patients receiving incompatible blood transfusions.
  • developing infections after certain surgeries.
  • undergoing a second operation to retrieve a sponge left behind from the first.
  • developing serious bed sores.
  • developing urinary tract infections caused by catheters, and;
  • suffering injuries from falls.

Congressional Mandates

The Congressionally mandated Medicare measure is not projected to yield large savings – $21 million a year, compared with $110 billion spent on inpatient care in 2007. But, officials believe that the regulations could apply to several hundred thousand hospital stays of the 12.5 million covered annually by Medicare, while the policy will also prevent hospitals from billing patients directly for costs generated by medical errors.

Assessment

Over the last year, four states Medicaid programs have announced that they will not pay for as many as 28 “never events,” joining some of the country’s largest commercial insurers, including WellPoint, Aetna, Cigna and Blue Cross Blue Shield plans in seven states.

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Conclusion

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 Product Details 

Financial Planning for Physicians and Advisors Textbook

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Foreword and Book Review

[By Frank A. Cappiello; MBA]fp-book

Financial Planning for Physicians and Advisors is essentially a “how-to book” on finance, financial planning and related topics for healthcare providers.

Fortunately for patients, medicine requires a high degree of professional training, both in terms of science and technology. Unfortunately for providers, it affords little time for acquiring medical practice management skills, or learning about the financial aspects of business or investment planning. 

An Unusual Book

More to the point, this is an unusual textbook on financial planning for two reasons.

First, it is a detailed guide for physician’s seeking the complex road to success and profit in the confusing healthcare industrial complex.  Rarely does one see such clarity of presentation, without the usual jargon that often discourages those trying to learn such a foreign and forbidding subject, as finance. 

Second, the subject matter is focused for medical providers who work in one of the fastest growing industries in the United States. The contributors hope that by integrating both disciplines of finance and medical management, they will help foster affordable and profitable healthcare for our nation, which is so entrepreneurial, yet aging.

A Wall Street Career

In my thirty-five years on Wall Street, I have observed that physicians are particularly disadvantaged when it comes to anything regarding finance.  Most medical professionals have enough on their mind practicing their specialty and keeping up with healthcare technology and practice trends, that planning for their financial future is often forgotten.

Financial planning and good investment practices require a solid background of how companies work in the “real world”, and an awareness of how they function within the economy. These economic essentials are vital to understanding business, as principles like budgeting, risk management, cash flow analysis, fiscal benchmarking and rudimentary accounting are presented in this book.

Furthermore, the necessity of keeping up with state and federal insurance legislation, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act and other complex managed care contracting issues, places a continual burden on the individual practitioner, group or medical network seeking to stay abreast of current developments.

A Personal Knowledge Endeavor

But, the text focuses on financial planning and how the healthcare professional can increase personal knowledge and skills in this area. 

The coverage is both broad and yet detailed, ranging from basic macroeconomic factors that affect our national economy, such as the Gross Domestic Product (a single figure that summarize the business activity of the US), to the more mundane activities of maintaining cash flow, tax reduction strategies, home mortgages and even correcting credit card reporting errors.

Sophisticated Topics

More sophisticated topics include: debt and equity investment vehicles, derivatives, mutual fund and hedge fund investing, portfolio management and risk analysis, and the new laws on tax, retirement and estate planning. The book rightly concludes with practice succession planning for doctors, and begins with a chapter on the psychological meaning of money itself.

Assessment

It seems to me that all those in healthcare are well-served by reading this book with its format and step-by-step setup process for financial success, in terms of starting and ultimately surviving in a complicated business full of pitfalls and misinformation.  Most useful will be the extremely detailed table of contents that allows the user to quickly pinpoint an area of interest, and get started answering a problem.

Simply put, my recommendation is to read: Financial Planning for Physicians and Advisors, and “reap”.

Note:

Frank A. Cappiello; MBA
President, McCullough, Andrews & Cappiello, Inc
10751 Falls Road Suite 250
Lutherville, MD  21093
Distinguished Visiting Professor of
Finance
Loyola College, Maryland

Former Guest Panelist; Wall $treet Week with Louis Rukeyser TV

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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Product DetailsProduct Details

 

MD Seeking an Advisor

Desperate Doctor Seeking Advice and/or Financial Advisor

Hi Ann Miller,

I have contacted you thru the Executive-Post before regarding financial advisement for myself and you have been helpful.

Currently, like many people, I am having tremendous financial problems. I am experiencing a negative personal cash flow and have had to increase my credit card debt to keep ahead of my obligations. I have also maximized my home equity line of credit.

I was wondering if you know of any way that I can obtain capital to help me get over this rough financial time that I am having. I have not had much success with my local bank or credit union.

All comments are appreciated, and I am willing to work with a professional financial advisor, as needed.

Thanks again for your help; and voice.

Anonymous, MD
Los Angeles, CA

 

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