Divorcing your EHR Sytem [A How to Approach]

Join Our Mailing List

Planning for an Escape Hatch

[By Shahid N. Shah MS]

Shahid N. ShahAs a doctor, or physician executive, you will spend weeks or months in the “sales and demo cycle” for selecting an EMR. If you’re lucky you will have time to consider all workflows; if you’re even luckier you will test drive the UI and make sure training goes smoothly.

You will also try to ensure that deployment will be easy.

However, another thing not to forget is to plan how to get out of an application or system after it’s been installed for a while.

It’s Harder to Get Out – Than Get in

Why is getting out important? Every application looks better in a demo than in a working environment and every solution becomes “legacy” sooner or later. Every system will be replaced or augmented at some point in time. The cost of acquisition (“barrier to entry”) is well understood now as something we need to calculate. But the “barrier to exit” or switching cost is something you must calculate at the time you decide what systems to purchase.

If you can’t answer the “how, in 6, 18, or 24 months, will I be able to move on to the next-better technology or system?” question then you’ve not completed your due diligence in the sales cycle. Vendor sales staff are quite reticent to answer the “how do I leave your system” question; you will need to press hard and ask for a plan before signing any contracts.

Some Vendor Queries

When preparing an RFI or RFP, ask vendors specific questions about how easy it is to get out of their technology (rather than just how easy to it is to deploy and interoperate). Put in specific test cases and have your folks consider this fact when they are looking at all new purchases.

Here are some specific factors to consider:

  • Do you own your data or does the vendor? If you don’t have crystal clear statements in writing that the data is yours and that you can do whatever you want with it, don’t sign the contract. Look for a new vendor.
  • Is the database structure and all data easily accessible to you without involving the vendor? If only your vendor can see the data, you’re locked in so be very wary. Find out what database the vendor is using and make sure you can get to the database directly without needing their permission.
  • Are the data formats that the system uses to communicate with other vendors open? If not, you don’t own your data. Be sure that at least CCR and CCD formats are available and that all document data is accessible in standard PDF or MS Office friendly formats. Discrete data should be extractable in XML or HL7.
  • How much of the technology stack is based on industry standards? The more proprietary the tech, the more you’re locked in.
  • Are all the programming APIs open, documented, and available without paying royalties or license costs? If not, when you try to get out you’ll pay dearly.

***

EHRs

***

More:

Book Chapter:

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Product Details

Chapter 13: IT, eMRs & GroupWare

Confusion About “Meaningful Use” Reigns

Join Our Mailing List

Are Doctors Embracing or Ignoring ARRA?

By D. Kellus Pruitt DDS

pruittAre physicians embracing ARRA Meaningful Use cash incentives or ignoring them? That depends on whom one asks.

Doctors versus the Feds

National progress towards Meaningful Use of expensive EHRs depends on whether one talks to federal employees whose jobs depend on the stimulus mandate, or doctors who purchase EHRs to improve care rather than to use them … Meaningfully.

The Feds

Today, Joseph Conn, writing for ModernHealthcare, posted a rosy outlook for MU adoption according to researchers working for HHS’ Office of the National Coordinator (ONC). They base their optimism for job security on a recent National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) survey:

“A growing number of office-based physicians are using more-robust EHRs that have higher-level functions needed to help the doctors qualify for federal EHR incentive payments [for Meaningful Use] and assist them in providing better, safer care for patients, the researchers reported.” (See “Researchers: More doctors using more-sophisticated EHRs”).

http://www.modernhealthcare.com/article/20121212/NEWS/312129956/researchers-more-doctors-using-more-sophisticated-ehrsJust

eMR and HIT Security

The Doctors

However, yesterday, in an InformationWeek article by Ken Terry titled, “Meaningful Use Doesn’t Drive Doctors’ EHR Selection,” doctors suggested a more depressing future for MU sophistication based on the same NCHS survey:

“Jason Mitchell, MD, assistant director of the Center for Health IT at the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), told InformationWeek Healthcare that he found [the lagging adoption of MU-capable EHRs] puzzling. While there’s no doubt that Meaningful Use has driven much of the increase in EHR use, he said, it seems strange that so many physicians would buy and implement EHRs that could not be used to show Meaningful Use.”

http://www.informationweek.com/healthcare/electronic-medical-records/meaningful-use-doesnt-drive-doctors-ehr/240144093

Assessment

Whom should doctors believe – HHS employees who give away billions of stimulus dollars for Meaningful Use, or family physicians who have determined that the subsidy isn’t worth the cost and effort?

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

DICTIONARIES: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko
PHYSICIANS: www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com
PRACTICES: www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com
HOSPITALS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781466558731
CLINICS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439879900
BLOG: www.MedicalExecutivePost.com
FINANCE: Financial Planning for Physicians and Advisors
INSURANCE: Risk Management and Insurance Strategies for Physicians and Advisors

 

 

Product Details

Proposed Regulations on HIPAA Accounting of Disclosures

New Rules and Regulations for Covered Healthcare Entities

ADVERTISEMENT

Join Our Mailing List 

By HCR@garfunkelwild.com

Proposed regulations regarding HIPAA accounting of disclosures have been recently published and are open for public comments.  If enacted in their current form, the new regulations will require Covered Entities to make significant revisions to their current HIPAA procedures and may require modifications to current computer systems.  

The HI-TECH Act

Under the HITECH Act, regulations must be enacted that allow individuals to receive a much expanded accounting of disclosures of electronic health information, including disclosures made for treatment, payment and health care operations. 

In order to accomplish this, the proposed regulations differentiate between “accountings of disclosures” and “access reports.”  Accountings will continue to be a list of certain limited types of disclosures.  Access reports will be similar to “audit trails” and must include information regarding each access to an individual’s electronic health information.  Covered Entities must be able to provide, upon request, both accountings and access reports.

Covered Entities

The proposed regulations also include specific requirements, including the following:

  • Accountings and access reports must be available in regard to disclosures or access, as applicable, for 3 years and must be provided within 30 days of the request. 
  • Accountings and access reports will be required only for health information maintained in designated record sets (e.g., medical records, billing records).
  • Accountings and access reports must include information about disclosures of, and access to, information maintained by business associates.
  • There are additional exceptions to the types of disclosures that must be included on an accounting (e.g., exceptions will include disclosures about abuse and to medical examiners).

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Health Dictionary Series: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/product/9780826105752

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest ME-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Sponsors Welcomed: And, credible sponsors and like-minded advertisers are always welcomed.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2007/11/11/advertise

Product Details 

%d bloggers like this: