Wither STOCK SPLITS?

By Staff Reporters

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A stock split occurs when a company breaks up its existing shares to create a higher number of lower-value shares. Stock splits have the effect of reducing the trading price of a stock, which makes it more liquid and more affordable for investors.

Companies that engage in stock splits often have a nominally high share price, which is typically achieved by executing and innovating on the operating front. Companies within this list have high potential for a stock split, given their nominally high stock price.

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/082610254

Last year, well over 200 companies announced and implemented stock splits. However, the type of split that excites investors most is a forward stock split. This is where the share price of a company is reduced and its outstanding share count increases by the same magnitude, Thus, there’s no change in market cap. Companies that enact forward stock splits are usually firing on all cylinders and out-innovating their competition.

Reverse: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/2022/10/08/what-is-a-reverse-stock-split/

As we go boldly forward into a new year, two stock-split stocks stand out as amazing values that can confidently be bought hand over fist. Alphabet and Amazon? Meanwhile, another widely owned stock-split stock looks to be worth avoiding in 2023. Tesla?

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PODCAST: What is “SWARM” Learning?

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA

SWARM INTELLIGENCE IN MEDICINE

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Swarm learning, or swarm intelligence, is how swarms of bees or birds move in response to their environment.

When applied to data there is “more peer-to-peer communications, more peer-to-peer collaboration, more peer-to-peer learning and that’s the reason why swarm learning will become more and more important as … as the center of gravity shifts” from centralized to decentralized data.

DZNE : AI with Swarm Intelligence

Medicine Example:

Consider this example,  “A hospital trains their machine learning models on chest X-rays and sees a lot of tuberculosis cases, but very little of lung collapsed cases. So therefore, this neural network model, when trained, will be very sensitive to what’s detecting tuberculosis and less sensitive towards detecting lung collapse.”

“However, we get the converse of it in another hospital. So what you really want is to have these two hospitals combine their data so that the resulting neural network model can predict both situations better. But since you can’t share that data, swarm learning comes in to help reduce that bias of both the hospitals.”

And this means, “each hospital is able to predict outcomes, with accuracy and with reduced bias, as though you have collected all the patient data globally in one place and learned from it.”

Moreover, it’s not just hospital and patient data that must be kept secure. What swarm learning does is to try to avoid or reduce the sharing of data, or totally prevent the sharing of data, to [a model] where you only share the insights, or you share the learnings.

So, that’s why it is fundamentally more secure.

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DR. GOH PODCAST: https://www.technologyreview.com/2021/08/16/1031738/a-new-age-of-data-means-embracing-the-edge/?mc_cid=30af99395f&mc_eid=72aee829ad

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DICTIONARY: https://www.amazon.com/Dictionary-Health-Information-Technology-Security/dp/0826149952/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1254413315&sr=1-5

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Healthcare Leadership V.S. Management

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Understanding the Difference

[By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA]

DEM blueMany times, individuals will use the terms management and leadership synonymously. In actuality the terms have significantly different meanings.

For example, Warren Bennis describes the difference between managers and leaders as “Managers do things right, Leaders the right thing.”

Managers are those individuals who have as their primary function managing a team of people and their activities. In effect, managers are those who have been given their authority by the nature of their role and ensure that the work gets done by focusing on day to day tasks and their activities.

On other hand, a leader’s approach is generally innate in its approach. Good leadership skills are difficult to learn because they are far more behavioral in nature than those skills needed for management. Leaders are also very focused on change recognizing that continual improvement can be achieved in their people and their activities can be a great step towards continued success.

Training Camps

Perhaps some of the best training grounds for the development of leaders are the military. The Marine Corps slogan is “A Few Good Men” and the military academies at Annapolis (Navy), New London, Connecticut (Coast Guard), Colorado Springs (Air Force), and West Point (Army) all have as their main mission, the development of leaders.

This is done by a number of different techniques. At graduation, the new officers, regardless of the branch of service, have been taught, and more importantly, have internalized the following: communicate the missions, sensitivity matters, real respect is earned, trust and challenge your soldiers. It is due to these lessons that many graduates of the military academies go on to positions of leadership in the private sector as well as in government.  Communicating the mission refers to conveying to those who work with us what are practice is hoping to accomplish and the role of each employee in achieving that goal. Given an understanding and awareness of the mission, when confronted with a barrier, employees are able to face hard problems when there is no well-defined approach by which to deal with them.

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IRA advice and leadership

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Sensitivity Does Matter

This is my area to improve; as I can be glib on occasion.

A leader treats each employee with respect and dignity, regardless of race, gender, cultural background or particular role they actually perform in the practice. Consider how many legal suits are filed against any type of organization, whether it is a medical practice or a large manufacturing facility due to perceived disparate treatment towards the employee based on race, religion, gender sexual preference or other non-work related issues.

Real respect is earned – Having initials after one’s name and the wearing of a lab coat does not automatically entitle an individual to respect. Formal authority has been found to be one of the least effective forms of influence. Only by earning the respect of your staff as well as your patients can you be sure that your intent will be carried out when you are not present. Setting the example in performance and conduct, rather than ‘do as I say, not as I do,” level of activity enables one to exert influence far greater than titles.

Trust and challenge your employees – How many times have practices sought to hire the best and brightest only to second guess the employee. Eric Schmidt, the CEO of Google, describes his management philosophy as having “… an employee base in which everybody is doing exactly what they want every day.” Obviously there are certain policies and procedures, but at the same time, the leader enables decision making to the lowest possible level. This also enables employees to question why certain policies and procedures are still being followed when more effective and efficient methods are available.  (How the Army Prepared Me to Work at Google, Doug Raymond, Harvard Business)

The phrase “Physician, heal thyself” (Luke 4:23, King James Version) means that we have to attend to our own faults, in preference to pointing out the faults of others. The phrase alludes to the readiness of physicians to heal sickness in others while sometimes not being able or will to heal themselves.

By the same token, it now is necessary for us to learn how to manage ourselves. It suggests that physicians, while often being able to help the sick, cannot always do so, and when sick themselves are no better placed than anyone else (Gary Martin, phrases.org.uk/meanings/281850.html, 2010).

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Feet

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Self-Development

“We will have to learn how to develop ourselves. We will have to place ourselves outside the boundaries where we can make the greatest contribution. And we will have to stay mentally alert and engaged during a 50-year working life, which means knowing how and when to change the work we do” (Managing Oneself, Harvard Business Review – Jan. 2005 – pp 100-109, by Peter Drucker).

Although one’s IQ and certain personality characteristics are more or less innate and appear to remain stable over time there are individual capabilities that enable leadership and can be developed. Enhancement of these capabilities can lead to the individual being able to carry out the leadership tasks of setting direction, gaining commitment, and creating alignment. These capabilities include self-management capabilities, social capabilities and work facilitation capabilities.

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Assessment

Without question, while it is possible to cram for at test and graduate at the top of one’s class, that does not assure   leadership ability. We all know at least one person who scores at the highest levels on cognitive measures but would be incapable of pouring liquid out of a boot if the instructions were written on the heel.

So, here is my philosophy:

  • Leadership: By example and thru transparency with collaboration [Do the right thing]
  • Management: By walking-around thru tangible / intangible metrics [Doing things right].

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Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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More Orthopedic Physicians Sell Out to Private Equity Firms, Raising Alarms About Costs and Quality

STAFF REPORTERS

Private Equity Partnerships in Orthopedic Groups: Current State and Key Considerations

CITE: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

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READ HERE: https://journaloei.scholasticahq.com/article/17721-private-equity-partnerships-in-orthopedic-groups-current-state-and-key-considerations

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What is Your Academic Teaching Philosophy?

 Here is My Teaching Philosophy

[By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA]

Although any learner-centered teaching philosophy, or Boyer Model of scholarship, is constantly in flux, the mission of a public or private educator is: [1] to promote positive learning; [2] to motivate students, staff and graduates; [3] to provide a strong foundation for lifelong learning; and in modernity [4] to enhance career and life-work opportunities; to [5] improve bottom-line financial metrics, and [6] to collaborate on a national and global basis.

However, because we are specifically operating in the rapidly changing healthcare, business management, investing, finance, economics and education milieu, even deeper experiential insight is needed.

Developing NEW Teaching AND Education Skills FOR Business and Healthcare 2.0

Medicine and healthcare business today is different than a generation ago, and all educators and healthcare professionals need new skills to be successful.

Traditionally, the physician – like the classroom professor – was viewed as the “captain of the ship”. Today, their role may be more akin to a ship’s navigator, utilizing clinical, teaching skills and knowledge to chart the patient’s, or student’s, course through a confusing morass of requirements, choices, rules and regulations to achieve the best attainable clinical or didactic outcomes.

This new teaching paradigm includes many classic business school principles, now modified to fit the PP-ACA, the era of health reform, and modern technical connectivity. Thus, a Professor, Chair or Dean must be a subtle guide on the side; not bombastic sage on the stage.

These, newer teaching philosophies must include:

  • Negotiation – working to optimize appropriate curricula, services and materials;
  • Team play – working in concert with others to coordinate education delivery within a clinically appropriate and cost-effective framework;
  • Working within the limits of competence – avoiding the pitfalls of the generalist teacher versus the subject matter expert that may restrict access to professors, texts and facilities by clearly acknowledging when a higher degree of didactic service is needed on behalf of the student;
  • Respecting different cultures and values – inherent in the support of the academic Principle of Autonomy is the acceptance of values that may differ from one’s own. As the US becomes more culturally heterogeneous, educators and medical providers are called upon to work within, and respect, the socio-cultural and/or spiritual framework of patients, students and their families; 
  • Seeking clarity on what constitutes marginal education – within a system of finite resources; providers and professors are called upon to openly communicate with students and patients regarding access to marginal education and/or treatments.
  • Supporting evidence-based practice – educators, like healthcare providers, should utilize outcomes data to reduce variation in treatments and curriculum to achieve higher academic efficiencies and improved care delivery;
  • Fostering transparency and openness in communications – teachers and healthcare professionals should be willing, and prepared, to discuss all aspects of care and academic andragogy; especially when disclosing problems or issues that arise;
  • Exercising decision-making flexibility – treatment algorithms, templates and teaching pathways are useful tools when used within their scope; but providers and professors must have the authority to adjust the plan if circumstances warrant;
  • Becoming skilled in the art of listening and interpretingIn her ground-breaking book, Narrative Ethics: Honoring the Stories of Illness, Rita Charon, MD PhD, a professor at Columbia University, writes of the extraordinary value of using the patient’s personal story in the treatment plan. She notes that, “medicine practiced with narrative competence will more ably recognize patients and diseases; convey knowledge and regard, join humbly with colleagues, and accompany patients and their families through ordeals of illness.” In many ways, attention to narrative returns medicine full circle to the compassionate and caring foundations of the patient-physician relationship. The educational analog to this book is, The Ethics of Teaching [A Casebook], co-edited by my teacher and colleague Deborah Ware Balogh PhD of the University of Indianapolis.

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The Ohio State University
 Photo by Kevin Fitzsimons

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Assessment

Finally, these thoughts represent only a handful of examples to illustrate the myriad of new skills that tomorrow’s healthcare professionals, and modern educators, must master in order to meet their timeless professional obligations of compassionate patient care and contemporary teaching effectiveness.

Dr. Marcinko Teaching Philosophy

CHAIR: Chair 3.0 Philosophy Dr. Marcinko

Conclusion

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“Financial Management Strategies for Hospitals” https://tinyurl.com/yagu567d

“Operational Strategies for Clinics and Hospitals” https://tinyurl.com/y9avbrq5

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