Don’t be a “Fireworks Fourth Fool” [Videos]

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA

[Publisher-in-Chief]

Graphic video image warning!

Back in the day, when I was a surgical resident and fellow, I treated my fair share of electrical, thermal and chemical burn injuries. Some were life, eyeball and limb threatening; but fortunately most were not! Treatment was with local wound care, followed by full, split thickness or postage stamp skin grafts, flaps, or various plastic surgery techniques, etc.

And, many were accidental of course, but a few were simply ill-conceived ideas from dumb or inebriated patients seen through the emergency room of the old Emory University – Northlake Regional Medical Center, in Tucker, GA.

So, for you medical types, here is a recap on the way we doctors classify burns, as referenced in several of my surgical textbooks and related medical publications.

Classification of Burn Depths

A. Superficial burn injury

1st degree burn

  • Limited to the epidermis
  • Presents with erythema and minimal swelling
  • Mild discomfort
  • Commonly treated on outpatient basis

B. Superficial partial-thickness burns

Second Degree Burn

  • Superficial 2nd degree burns
  • Involves the epidermis and superficial portion of the dermis
  • Often seen with scalding injuries
  • Presents with blister formation and typically blanches with pressure
  • Sensitive to light touch or pinprick
  • Commonly treated on outpatient basis; heal in 1-3 wks.

C. Deep partial-thickness burns

Deep 2nd degree burns

  • Involves the epidermis and most of the dermis
  • Patients often require excision of the wound and skin grafting
  • Appears white or poorly vascularized; may not blister
  • Less sensitivity to light touch and pinprick than superficial form
  • Extensive time to heal (3-4 wks)

D. Full-thickness burns

Third Degree Burn

  • Involves epidermis, and all layers of dermis, extending down to subcutaneous tissue
  • Appears dry, leathery, and insensate, often without blisters
  • Can be difficult to differentiate from deep partial-thickness burns
  • Commonly seen when patient’s clothes caught on fire/skin directly exposed to flame
  • Usually require referral to burn surgeon; need skin grafting to heal.

E. Fourth degree burns

Fourth Degree Burn

  • Full-thickness burn extending to muscle or bone
  • Common result of high-voltage electric injury or severe thermal burns
  • Requires hospital admission

Assessment

So, why do we review this clinical material on Independence Day? It is to remind our readers not to drink and shoot fireworks today; or to stop and re-think before proceeding with same. Don’t be like the fool in this YouTube video. I don’t want to see you in any ER; any where today! GOMER.

***

ME-P and Independence Day 2010

LINK:

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=fireworks+accidents&FORM=HDRSC3#view=detail&mid=D3AA2608DA10E002C8B4D3AA2608DA10E002C8B4

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Product Details
Product Details
Product Details
Product Details
Product Details

Product Details

THANK YOU

***

Next-Generation ACO Model to End in 2021

Next Generation ACO Model to End in 2021

Health Capital Consultants - Healthcare Valuation

Many accountable care organizations (ACOs) received disappointing news on May 21, 2021, when the Centers for Medicare & Medicare Services (CMS) announced that it would not be extending the Next Generation ACO (NGACO) model for 2022.

After five years and a dwindling number of participating ACOs, experts were split on whether or not CMS should keep the model in place for another year. On one hand, stakeholders have argued for the NGACO model’s extension until it can be replaced with or integrated into another program; howowever, others asserted that resources could not be properly invested with only one more year left in the program. (Read more…)

Citation: https://www.r2library.com/Resource/Title/0826102549

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts are appreciated.

THANK YOU

***

Malpractice Allegations Alter Practice Patterns of Emergency Department Doctors

Malpractice Allegations Alter Practice Patterns of Emergency Department Doctors

QUERY: When physicians are accused of malpractice, how does this experience affect their practice of medicine?

w28330.jpg

Researchers Caitlin Carroll, David M. Cutler and Anupam Jena use administrative data on all emergency medicine physicians in Florida to answer this question in How Do Physicians Respond to Malpractice Allegations? Evidence from Florida Emergency Departments (NBER Working Paper 28330).

WHITE PAPER: https://www.nber.org/system/files/working_papers/w28330/w28330.pdf

ASSESSMENT: Your thoughts and comments are appreciated.

MORE: https://www.routledge.com/Risk-Management-Liability-Insurance-and-Asset-Protection-Strategies-for/Marcinko-Hetico/p/book/9781498725989

THANK YOU

***

%d bloggers like this: