Understanding The Federal Reserve Act

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[By Staff Reporters]

Uncovering The FED

In the early 20th century, a financial crisis led panicked citizens to withdraw all their money at once, damaging banks. By 1913, Congress responded with the Federal Reserve Act, creating 12 regional banks acting as a federal bank to deal in local and global affairs with both private banks and the federal government.

Balancing v. Manipulation

Some say the Fed was meant to create a balanced economy, while others argue its purpose was to inorganically manipulate free enterprise, rescuing banks that we’d be better off without.

Assessment

Is the Fed still doing its job today? What secrets are being kept from us and how are the Fed’s actions impacting our economy?

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Conclusion

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3 Responses

  1. Why Do We Keep Swooning Over Failed Bankers?

    Sandy Weill and others are being celebrated for changing their minds about breaking up megabanks.

    http://www.propublica.org/thetrade/item/why-do-we-keep-swooning-over-failed-bankers

    But the many debacles that occurred on their watch seem to have cost them absolutely nothing in fashionable society.

    Ann Miller RN MHA

    Like

  2. Podcast: Inside Our New York Fed Investigation

    Here – Jake Bernstein and Steve Engelberg discuss the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s weak oversight and the aftermath of the Carmen Segarra tapes.

    http://www.propublica.org/podcast/item/podcast-inside-our-new-york-fed-investigation/?utm_source=et&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=dailynewsletter

    Leak at Federal Reserve Revealed Confidential Bond-Buying Details

    And Here – Then Chairman Ben Bernanke ordered an internal review of the previously undisclosed leak, which found its way into a newsletter for big investors.
    http://www.propublica.org/article/leak-at-federal-reserve-revealed-confidential-bond-buying-details?utm_source=et&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=dailynewsletter

    Joshua

    http://www.amazon.com/Comprehensive-Financial-Planning-Strategies-Advisors/dp/1482240289/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1417523070&sr=8-1&keywords=david+marcinko

    Like

  3. Federal Reserve

    After a level of hype that would have exhausted even the most dedicated Star Wars fans, the Federal Reserve finally began to tighten monetary policy last week, raising the funds rate from 0.25 percent to 0.50 percent.

    Although financial markets appeared sanguine when the rate hike was announced, the calm dissipated quickly. The Standard & Poor’s 500, Dow Jones Industrial, and NASDAQ indices finished the week lower. International markets fared better. Most finished the week higher.

    The last five times the Fed has begun to raise rates, the U.S. dollar has remained stable and stock prices have risen, on average, in the months immediately following the hike, according to The Economist.

    While tightening monetary policy (and talk of tightening monetary policy) often affects financial markets immediately, economic change happens at a more measured pace. The Economist explained:

    “The impact of changes in interest rates is not usually felt on announcement…The response of the real economy also comes with a delay. Most reckon it takes time for monetary policy to shift spending habits, and one rate rise is more an easing of the accelerator than a U-turn. Unemployment continued to fall in each of the past five tightening episodes. That will probably happen again…The most uncertain variable is inflation. This fell rapidly following rate rises in 1983 and 1988 as the Fed established its hawkish credentials. Yet in 2016, the most likely direction for inflation is up (the rate rise is aimed at restraining its ascent).”

    Another factor affecting the U.S. and global economies is the price of oil. Last week, The Wall Street Journal reported oil prices declined to a new six-year low. Falling oil prices have contributed to deflationary pressures in Europe, stunting the region’s economic recovery. They have had a mixed affect on the U.S. economy, helping consumers and hurting the energy industry.

    Arthur Chalekian GEPC
    [Financial Consultant]

    Like

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