On Smart Phones, Texting and Doctors Driving‏

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Doctors Beware – A Bad Idea

By Muhammad Saleem

Did you know that almost 60% of drivers use their phones on the road? What about doctors?

The numbers from our piece today could not be clearer on the consequences of using your smartphone while driving. For example:

  • You are 23 times more likely to get into an accident while texting.
  • 18% of distraction-related crashes are from cell phone usage.
  • Distracted driving is the number one killer of American teens.

Assessment

Doctors – Have you ever texted medical orders, or patient instructions etc., while driving? Be honest!

In addition to the above, our infographic discusses statistics on smarthpones and driving, illustrate the dangers, discuss the law, and provide tips to make you and your passengers safer.

Conclusion

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Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

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New IRS Guidance on Health FSAs for Doctors

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On Section 125 Cafeteria Plans

By Children’s Home Society of Florida Foundation

In Notice 2012-40; 2012-25 IRB 1 (29 May 2012), the IRS issued guidance on the changes required in 2013 for Sec. 125 Cafeteria Plans.

Section 125 Plans

Many companies have created healthcare flexible spending accounts under Section 125.  For 2013, the salary reduction contributions are limited to $2,500.  The notice indicates that this limit will be adjusted for inflation in 2014 and later years. If contributions greater than $2,500 are made to the account, the excess funds will not subject the employee to penalties if the funds are distributed as taxable income in the taxable year in which the cafeteria plan year ends.  The $2,500 limit does not apply to non-elective plans.  Many of these plans are described as “flex limit” or similar plans.

New Limits

Written cafeteria plans must be modified to reflect the new $2,500 limit and other provisions.  If the plan follows the proposed regulations issued in 2007, the participants may rely on the plan to be qualified.

Assessment

And so, as more and more medical professionals become employees, FSA rules should be monitored closely by doctors and their FAs.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Product Details  Product Details

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