Weighted Role of Commercial Health Insurance

Understanding Disproportional Influence

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA,

ho-journal4Most domestic health care is paid for by some type of insurance, whether private or governmental. Most private health insurance is purchased through employers who, to a great degree, make most of the buying decisions. Employer coalitions have emerged but, in general, most command leverage on price rather than quality or value. This often leaves healthcare providers as the only advocates for the quality, choice and access concerns of consumers.

Business Impact

According to Robert James Cimasi, writing and opining in the print journal: Healthcare Organizations [Financial Management Strateges] www.HealthCareFinancials.com, despite the fact that businesses bear less of the total U.S. healthcare premium dollar (approximately 25%) than government or individuals; corporate buyers and their coalitions and associations have asserted substantial, if disproportionate, influence over healthcare companies.

Best Community Interest Debate

Whether or not this is necessarily always in the best interests of consumers or the community at large is a matter of heated debate. What is generally acknowledged is that the relative bargaining position of buyers and providers in a given market has a dramatic impact on healthcare provider financial performance.

Healthcare is Different

Much like F. Scott Fitzgerald’s different-rich; keep in mind that healthcare differs in several respects from other industry sectors, in that:

  • There is more than one class of buyers: there are patients, families (proxies), insurance companies, and employers, each with different objectives.
  • The single largest payer, the government, both dictates a large portion of the healthcare pricing structure and strongly influences the rest.
  • There is a crucial divide or (“disconnect”) between consumer and payer.
  • A lack of information regarding consumer needs and quality of providers impedes the purchasers of health insurance from selecting the optimal plan.

Assessment

Of course, the impact of the Obama administration on this topic has yet to be seen. 

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Is this commercial influence on health insurance good or bad; please share your experiences with us.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com  or Bio: www.stpub.com/pubs/authors/MARCINKO.htm

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest E-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

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High-Tech Infection Tracking

The Hershey Experience or High-Tech Gamble?

Staff Reporters

gambling

At Hershey Medical Center, in Pennsylvania, a sophisticated computer program now serves as a watchdog for infection outbreaks.

 

 

Internet Enabled Health 2.0

According to the Associated Press, December 30 2008, with a few mouse clicks on a Web browser, the hospital’s infection-control staffers can quickly generate reports with charts and graphs illustrating how many patients within a particular unit are infected, and which lab specimen contained the germs; etc.

Assessment

Some Pennsylvania health officials view the nascent technology as a critical tool for helping hospitals reduce health care costs by identifying potential systemic infection-control problems sooner than is possible by reviewing paper records by hand. Other pundits may not agree!

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this Medical Executive-Post are appreciated. Will the data be reported for hospital quality improvement initiatives; or cloistered from stakeholders? And, will infection tracking and rate reporting finally become something more than a high-tech gamble?

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com  or Bio: www.stpub.com/pubs/authors/MARCINKO.htm

Our Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest E-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. It’s free. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

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