On PHYSICIAN RECRUITMENT: “Head-Hunters” and Executive Search Firms

ART AND SCIENCE OF PHYSICIAN RECRUITMENT

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

CMP logo

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Recruitment has become a refined art in recent years as practices and physicians themselves grow increasingly savvy about the finer points of marketing positions and securing employment.  It’s more competitive than ever, too.  Many organizations are going after the same physicians. Add to that a shortage of doctors in key specialties and certain geographical areas and the pressure becomes that much more intense.  Moreover, the aging of the physician workforce, their increased dissatisfaction with managed care, and changes in doctors’ work expectations (they want more free time) have affected the demand and supply.

Additionally, both practicing physicians and residents fresh out of training have become more discerning and skillful in managing the search process.  Candidates have learned to be selective based on how they’re treated on the phone, how they’re treated in person during site visits, or how smoothly the negotiations go.  One small bump in the road and they could choose to go elsewhere.  In truth, they look to rule organizations out, not in.  

Even the smallest of practices must have an effective recruitment plan because they compete directly with the big guys — larger practices and hospitals that have polished their efforts and perfected their processes. 

Facts about Physician Recruiters and Executive Search Firms

1) If you are job hunting, you should send your resume to recruiters

Different recruiters know about different positions. They do not usually know about the same ones. This is particularly true with retained firms. By sending your resume out widely, you will be placed in many different confidential databases and be alerted of many different positions. If you send your resume to only a few, it may be that none you send to will be working with positions which are suited for you. Throw your net widely.

If you change jobs, it is also wise to send follow-up letters to the recruiters and alert them of your new career move. Many search firms follow people throughout their careers and enjoy being kept up-to-date. It is a good idea to have your resume formatted in plain text so you can copy and paste it into email messages when requested to do so. Then, follow up with a nicely formatted copy on paper by postal mail.

Some estimate that only 1% to 3% of all resumes sent will result in actual job interviews. So, if you only send 50 resumes, you may only have less than 2 interviews, if that many. Send your resume to as many recruiters as you can. It is worth the postage or email time. Generally, recruiters will not share your resume with any employer or give your name to anyone else without obtaining your specific permission to do so. The recruiter will call first, talk to you about a particular position and then ask your permission to share your resume with that employer.

2) Your resume will be kept strictly confidential by the executive search firm.

It is safe to submit your resume to a search firm and not worry that the search firm will let it leak out that you are job hunting. Recruiters will call you each and every time they wish to present you to an employer in order to gain your permission. Only after they have gained your permission will they submit your name or resume to the identified employer. The wonderful aspect of working with search firms is that you can manage your career and your job search in confidence and privacy.

3) Fees are always paid by the employer, not the job candidate.

Recruiters and search firms work for the employer or hiring entity. The employer pays them a fee for locating the right physician for the job opening. This is important to remember, in that when you interact with executive recruiters, you are essentially interacting with an agent or representative of the employer. Recruiters are more loyal to employers than they are to job candidates because they work for the employer. This should not present a problem, but, should cause you to develop your relationship with the recruiter with the same integrity and professionalism that you would with the employer.

Recruiters are paid fees in one of two ways – retainer fees or contingency fees. This is an important distinction and will affect your process with both the employer and the recruiter. Some employers prefer working with contingency firms and some with retained firms. Both are respected by employers and useful in your job search, but, the two types of firms will not be handling the same positions with the same employers simultaneously.

A “retained” recruiter has entered an exclusive contract with an employer to fill a particular position. The retained recruiter, then, is likely to advertise a position, sharing the specifics of the position, location and employer openly. The retained firm feels a great obligation to fulfill the contract by finding the best person for the job.

A “contingency recruiter” on the other hand, usually does not have an exclusive relationship with the employer, and is only paid a fee if the job search is successful. Often, if the employer uses contingency firms, there will be more than one contingency firm competing to fill a certain position. As a job hunter, if you are sent to an interview by a contingency firm, you may find that you are competing with a larger number of applicants for a position. Generally, retained firms only send in from 3 to 5 candidates for a position.

Recruiters will be paid fees equal to about 25% to 35% of the resulting salary of the successful candidate plus expenses. This does not come out of the job candidate’s salary. This is paid to the recruiter through a separate relationship between the employer and the search firm. This may seem like a large fee, but, keep in mind that recruiters incur a great many expenses when searching for successful job candidates. They spend enormous amounts of money on computer systems, long distance calls, mail-outs, travel and interviews. Recruiters work very hard for these fees. Employers recognize the value of using recruiters and are more than willing to pay recruiters the fees. All you have to do is contact the recruiter to get the process moving. 

4) Not all medical recruiters work only with physicians.

Some search firms work exclusively with physicians or in healthcare, while others may work in several fields at once. Some of the larger generalist firms will have one or more search consultants that specialize in healthcare. It is important for you, as a job hunter, to assess the recruiters’ knowledge of your field. If you use industry or medical specialty buzz words in describing your skills, experience or career aspirations, you may or may not be talking a language the recruiter understands fully. It is wise to explore fully with the recruiter his understanding of your field and area of specialization.

5) Recruiters and search consultants move around.

Recruiters, like many professionals, move to new firms during their careers. Often you will find that recruiters will work at several firms during their careers. Since it is much more effective to address your letters to a person rather than “to whom it may concern”, it is smart for job hunters to have accurate and up-to-date information about who is who and where, since this can change frequently. Search firms also move their offices, sometimes to another suite, street or state. If you have a list of recruiters that is over one year old, you will certainly waste some postage in mailing your resumes and cover letters. Many of your mail-outs will be returned to you stamped “non-deliverable”, unless you obtain an up-to-date list. A resource, like the Directory of Healthcare Recruiters is updated very frequently, usually monthly [www.pohly.com/dir3.html].

6) Most search firms work with positions all over the country.

If you are from a particular state, and want to remain in that state, don’t make the mistake of only sending your resume to recruiters in your state. Often the recruiters in your state are working on positions in other states, and recruiters in other states are working on positions in your state. This is usually the case. Very few recruiters work only in their local area, most work all around the US and some internationally. Regardless of your geographic preference, you should still send your resume to all the healthcare recruiters. If you really only want to remain in your area, you can specify that preference in your cover letter.

7) Recruiters primarily work with hard to fill positions or executive positions.

Some recruiters specialize in clinical positions for physicians, managed care executive positions, healthcare financial positions or health administration positions. Others may specialize in finding doctors, nurses or physical therapists. Generally, an employer does not engage a recruiter’s assistance in filling a position unless it is hard to fill. Sometimes employers will engage search firms to save them the valuable time of advertising or combing through dozens of resumes.

Contingency recruiters tend to work with more mid-level management and professional positions, but, this is not always the case. Retained firms generally work with the higher level clinical or administrative positions.

One thing you will be assured of is that if a recruiter is working on a position that means that the employer is willing to pay a fee. That usually means that the position is a valued position and one worth closer inspection on your part. Even in healthcare, with certain exceptions, our economy is an “employer’s market”. This means that employers receive a deluge of resumes for their open positions. Increasingly, employers are using recruitment firms to handle their openings and schedule the interviews because employers simply do not have the manpower or time to handle the many resumes they receive. Therefore, if a job hunter is submitted by a recruiter, that job hunter has a great advantage over all other applicants.

ASSESSMENT: Your comments are appreciated.

SECOND OPINIONS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

SPONSOR: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

THANK YOU

***

Physician Recruitment and Executive Search Firms

Facts about Physician Recruiters and Executive Search Firms

May Launches the Busy Season

By Dr. David E. Marcinko MBA CMP®

CMP logo

Sponsored: http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

1) If you are job hunting, you should send your resume to recruiters

Different recruiters know about different positions. They do not usually know about the same ones. This is particularly true with retained firms. By sending your resume out widely, you will be placed in many different confidential databases and be alerted of many different positions. If you send your resume to only a few, it may be that none you send to will be working with positions which are suited for you. Throw your net widely.

If you change jobs, it is also wise to send follow-up letters to the recruiters and alert them of your new career move. Many search firms follow people throughout their careers and enjoy being kept up-to-date. It is a good idea to have your resume formatted in plain text so you can copy and paste it into email messages when requested to do so. Then, follow up with a nicely formatted copy on paper by postal mail.

Some estimate that only 1% to 3% of all resumes sent will result in actual job interviews. So, if you only send 50 resumes, you may only have less than 2 interviews, if that many. Send your resume to as many recruiters as you can. It is worth the postage or email time. Generally, recruiters will not share your resume with any employer or give your name to anyone else without obtaining your specific permission to do so. The recruiter will call first, talk to you about a particular position and then ask your permission to share your resume with that employer.

2) Your resume will be kept strictly confidential by the executive search firm.

It is safe to submit your resume to a search firm and not worry that the search firm will let it leak out that you are job hunting. Recruiters will call you each and every time they wish to present you to an employer in order to gain your permission. Only after they have gained your permission will they submit your name or resume to the identified employer. The wonderful aspect of working with search firms is that you can manage your career and your job search in confidence and privacy.

3) Fees are always paid by the employer, not the job candidate.

Recruiters and search firms work for the employer or hiring entity. The employer pays them a fee for locating the right physician for the job opening. This is important to remember, in that when you interact with executive recruiters, you are essentially interacting with an agent or representative of the employer. Recruiters are more loyal to employers than they are to job candidates because they work for the employer. This should not present a problem, but, should cause you to develop your relationship with the recruiter with the same integrity and professionalism that you would with the employer.

Recruiters are paid fees in one of two ways – retainer fees or contingency fees. This is an important distinction and will affect your process with both the employer and the recruiter. Some employers prefer working with contingency firms and some with retained firms. Both are respected by employers and useful in your job search, but, the two types of firms will not be handling the same positions with the same employers simultaneously.

A “retained recruiter” has entered an exclusive contract with an employer to fill a particular position. The retained recruiter, then, is likely to advertise a position, sharing the specifics of the position, location and employer openly. The retained firm feels a great obligation to fulfill the contract by finding the best person for the job.

A “contingency recruiter” on the other hand, usually does not have an exclusive relationship with the employer, and is only paid a fee if the job search is successful. Often, if the employer uses contingency firms, there will be more than one contingency firm competing to fill a certain position. As a job hunter, if you are sent to an interview by a contingency firm, you may find that you are competing with a larger number of applicants for a position. Generally, retained firms only send in from 3 to 5 candidates for a position.

Recruiters will be paid fees equal to about 25% to 35% of the resulting salary of the successful candidate plus expenses. This does not come out of the job candidate’s salary. This is paid to the recruiter through a separate relationship between the employer and the search firm. This may seem like a large fee, but, keep in mind that recruiters incur a great many expenses when searching for successful job candidates. They spend enormous amounts of money on computer systems, long distance calls, mail-outs, travel and interviews. Recruiters work very hard for these fees. Employers recognize the value of using recruiters and are more than willing to pay recruiters the fees. All you have to do is contact the recruiter to get the process moving. 

4) Not all medical recruiters work only with physicians.

Some search firms work exclusively with physicians or in healthcare, while others may work in several fields at once. Some of the larger generalist firms will have one or more search consultants that specialize in healthcare. It is important for you, as a job hunter, to assess the recruiters’ knowledge of your field. If you use industry or medical specialty buzz words in describing your skills, experience or career aspirations, you may or may not be talking a language the recruiter understands fully. It is wise to explore fully with the recruiter his understanding of your field and area of specialization.

5) Recruiters and search consultants move around.

Recruiters, like many professionals, move to new firms during their careers. Often you will find that recruiters will work at several firms during their careers. Since it is much more effective to address your letters to a person rather than “to whom it may concern”, it is smart for job hunters to have accurate and up-to-date information about who is who and where, since this can change frequently. Search firms also move their offices, sometimes to another suite, street or state. If you have a list of recruiters that is over one year old, you will certainly waste some postage in mailing your resumes and cover letters. Many of your mail-outs will be returned to you stamped “non-deliverable”, unless you obtain an up-to-date list. A resource, like the Directory of Healthcare Recruiters is updated very frequently, usually monthly [www.pohly.com/dir3.html].

6) Most search firms work with positions all over the country.

If you are from a particular state, and want to remain in that state, don’t make the mistake of only sending your resume to recruiters in your state. Often the recruiters in your state are working on positions in other states, and recruiters in other states are working on positions in your state. This is usually the case. Very few recruiters work only in their local area, most work all around the US and some internationally. Regardless of your geographic preference, you should still send your resume to all the healthcare recruiters. If you really only want to remain in your area, you can specify that preference in your cover letter.

7) Recruiters primarily work with hard to fill positions or executive positions.

Some recruiters specialize in clinical positions for physicians, managed care executive positions, healthcare financial positions or health administration positions. Others may specialize in finding doctors, nurses or physical therapists. Generally, an employer does not engage a recruiter’s assistance in filling a position unless it is hard to fill. Sometimes employers will engage search firms to save them the valuable time of advertising or combing through dozens of resumes.

A Career in Medical Recruiting - The Campus Career Coach

ASSESSMENT

Contingency recruiters tend to work with more mid-level management and professional positions, but, this is not always the case. Retained firms generally work with the higher level clinical or administrative positions.

One thing you will be assured of is that if a recruiter is working on a position that means that the employer is willing to pay a fee. That usually means that the position is a valued position and one worth closer inspection on your part. Even in healthcare, with certain exceptions, our economy is an “employer’s market”. This means that employers receive a deluge of resumes for their open positions. Increasingly, employers are using recruitment firms to handle their openings and schedule the interviews because employers simply do not have the manpower or time to handle the many resumes they receive.

Therefore, if a job hunter is submitted by a recruiter, that job hunter has a great advantage over all other applicants.

Your thoughts are appreciated.

Product Details

ORDER Textbook: https://www.amazon.com/Business-Medical-Practice-Transformational-Doctors/dp/0826105750/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1448163039&sr=8-9&keywords=david+marcinko

SECOND OPINIONS: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/schedule-a-consultation/

INVITE DR. MARCINKO: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

THANK YOU

***

Understanding the Debt Settlement Process for Doctors

Not just for Laymen

Join Our Mailing List

The Debt Consolidation Care Community [DCCC] has developed a financial infographic on the debt settlement process.

For the DIYers

This interactive infographic helps understand what happens in a DIY debt settlement when the debtor successfully negotiates a reduced payoff amount with a creditor.

Reviewing the graphical representation will also help know how a debt settlement company can help a debtor when he/she cannot settle debts on his/her own. The settlement company can negotiate with creditors to reduce the payoff amount and decide upon a single monthly payment that has to be paid to the settlement company every month. When enough accumulates, the settlement company pays the creditor the payoff amount as per agreement, and the debt thus gets settled.

Assessment

Debtors often ask questions in DCCC forums regarding what actually happens in debt settlement.

So, the primary reason behind this finance infographic is to clear misconceptions regarding the debt settlement process. This graphical representation can make it easily understandable for the many debtors who are looking for suitable solutions to solve their debt problems; not just medical professionals.

Source: www.debtconsolidationcare.com

Conclusion                

And so, your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Is this simplified essay applicable to medical professionals who may have complex business holdings? Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Health Dictionary Series: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/product/9780826105752

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest ME-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Sponsors Welcomed: And, credible sponsors and like-minded advertisers are always welcomed.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2007/11/11/advertise

Product Details  Product Details

Next Generation Physician Recruitment

Filling the Funnel with Candidates

By Susan L. Theuns; PA-C, CPC, CHC

The best-kept secret about physician recruiting is to keep the funnel filled with a pool of candidates. With the dearth of primary care physicians – and some specialists for example – modern healthcare organizations can’t afford to wait for doctors to beat a path to their door; they have to go after the physicians they want.  That means generating a sizeable list of prospects on the front end to narrow it down to the 100 or so doctors who will be called for an initial conversation.  From there, the team may do some 50 telephone screening interviews to generate five site visits in order to select the one perfectly matched prospect who will sign on the dotted line.

The Prospect List

Depending upon the opportunity, there are a number of ways to generate a list of prospects:

  • Direct mail using a purchased list of physicians culled from criteria such as medical specialty and current geographical location.  The American Board of Medical Specialties, the American Medical Association [AMA], and licensure boards can supply these lists.  The organization sends direct mail announcing the opportunity and then has a team member follow-up with outbound calling.  If the physician is not interested, the caller should ask if s/he knows someone who is.
  • Personal calls following recruitment fairs and specialty meetings.
  • Advertising in medical and specialty journals and on the web, Twitter, etc.
  • Resident campaign using posted flyers and announcements.
  • Physician networking based on group member recommendations.
  • Medical Staff Office contacts at the local hospital.
  • Networking through specialty or group management organizations. Some organizations offer free on-line job postings for members.
  • Affiliations with residency programs.

Screenings and Interviews

From the initial pool of candidates, the internal recruiter must call prospects and conduct preliminary screenings to verify licensure status and board certification, gather professional and personal details about the candidate, and answer his or her questions about the opportunity. Whenever possible, research should be done to secure the prospect’s home or cell telephone number. Calling prospects in the evening at home gives them more time and privacy to talk freely.

www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com

Assessment

Although this screening step generates a smaller list of credible prospects that meet the search criteria generated at the beginning of the recruitment process, it is a more viable one.

Front Matter: Front Matter BoMP – 3

About the Author: Susan Theuns has an extensive background in healthcare, business management, facilities/operations and compliance that spans three decades. She holds degrees in Allied Health and Business Management and has been a Certified Physician Assistant for 32 years. She is also a Certified Professional Coder and is certified in Healthcare Compliance. Susan has published a variety of articles for Coding Edge, Healthcare Compliance Today, and the Group Practice Journal and serves on the Advisory Board for Ingenix.  Her professional memberships and affiliations include the American Medical Group Association, National Honor Society in Business Administration (Delta Mu Delta), Health Care Compliance Association, American Academy of Professional Coders, and the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants. She was MedStar Health’s Compliance Director of the Year in 2003 and is currently Administrative Director of Physician Practices for Union Memorial Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Conclusion

And so, your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com and http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko

Our Other Print Books and Related Information Sources:

Health Dictionary Series: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/product/9780826105752

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Medical Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest ME-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Sponsors Welcomed: And, credible sponsors and like-minded advertisers are always welcomed.

Link: https://healthcarefinancials.wordpress.com/2007/11/11/advertise

Product Details 

Hospital Personnel and Physician Recruitment

Join Our Mailing List

Understanding Professional Employer Organizations [ PEOs]

By Eric Galtress

www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com

One way to improve human resources [HR] is to recruit physicians, nurses, technicians, allied healthcare providers and other hospital personnel who bring in a certain expertise and disseminate it to other employees.

Hospitals, larger practices and medical clinics are increasingly hiring materials managers from other industries, for example, to upgrade their materials management capabilities; so why not medical and other related professionals, as well?

 Hospitals Lag Conventional Industry

And, hospitals often lag far behind other industries with regard to professional human resource activities. For example, hospitals can hire personnel with experience in other professionals settings in order to gain new perspectives in physician management and leadership.  With these new perspectives, agreements with doctors and other providers can be renegotiated to make a hospital or clinic more competitive.

Internal Recruitment

www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Internally, improving the financial performance of any healthcare organization is a skilful balance between cinching the belt and investing in the right growth strategies.  Whether that strategy calls for expanding a clinic, moving into a key market, or adding a new clinical program, recruiting the right physicians and medical personnel becomes all important in achieving economic goals.  Without physicians and ancillary personnel there are no patients.  Indeed, doctors, nurses, and providers are key drivers in any healthcare organization’s growth strategy.

Simply put, finding and hiring the right medical professionals is a surefire prescription for success.  A winning centralized operational process includes: needs and criteria determinations; materials for sales, marketing and recruiting; interviews and onsite visits; and the correct reimbursements package with employment contract.

External Recruitment

www.HealthcareFinancials.com

External recruitment, on the other hand, may involve use of a professional employer organization (PEO) as hospitals and healthcare entities may find that employee leasing, also referred to as co-employment, can be an effective strategy to combat the spiraling costs of having a professional recruitment and clerical support staff.  PEOs can offer financial and administrative benefits to hospitals, which in turn, can increase staff loyalty and reduce turnover.  Office-based physicians will find that the personnel services of an employee leasing company will give them more time to address the efficiency of their practices and the quality of care they provide for patients.

Simply put, instead of the healthcare organizations, clinic, hospital, or practitioner being the employer of record of the workplace employees, this responsibility is outsourced to an off-site PEO that specializes in hiring, retention, labor management, and cost control. 

Assessment

In a PEO, the healthcare organization retains functional control of the employees, and the PEO handles the HR management issues.  The PEO can provide these HR services more cost effectively by combining employee groups and servicing their needs along with the employees of the many other healthcare organizations they already serve.  Outsourcing becomes a matter of simple economics.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Product DetailsProduct DetailsProduct Details

%d bloggers like this: