A 4/20 [Medical] Cannabis Culture Day Pictorial

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About Four-Twenty Day

[By Anonymous DEA Agent]

Today is … 420, 4:20, or 4/20 (pronounced four-twenty)

And, it refers to consumption of cannabis and, by extension, a way to identify oneself with cannabis subculture. Observances based on the number include the time (4:20 p.m.) as well as the date (April 20).

Again … that’s today as this ME-P was published @ 4:20 p.m., EST!

THE DEA DESTROYS A POT FARM

PHOTOS: 

  1. Photo taken after the “grow” was eradicated. There is still no “pot” of gold at the end of the rainbow.
  2. DEA taking one of many seized vehicles/equipment.
  3. The marijuana farm was operating under the name “Brian’s Green Thumb Farm.”
  4. Inside the barn, Agents found rows and rows of drying marijuana.
  5. Over 2,000 pounds of drying marijuana from the barn, bagged and ready for destruction.
  6. Air view of the massive “grow” from the guard tower.
  7. One of two sleeping shelters, each guarding the middle perimeter. In the back, one of four tents, each positioned in the corners for guards.
  8. The plant being ripped out of the ground by the backhoe.

© iMBA Inc. All rights reserved.

Assessment

Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/420_(cannabis_culture)

In 2019: Carl’s Jr. was become the first major fast-food chain to debut a cannabis-infused burger.

Conclusion

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13 Responses

  1. 4/20

    Hey Man – Why is this day different than any other day?

    Cheech

    Like

  2. Economists say U.S. would save billions if pot was legal

    So concluded more than 300 economists who said the government — if it got out of the business of enforcing marijuana laws — could save a whopping $7.7 billion annually.

    In fact, Harvard economist Jeffrey Miron also figured there’s another $6 billion to be mined each year by taxing the drug at rates similar to booze and tobacco.

    The economists, who signed a new petition don’t exactly go as far as suggesting pot be legalized, but maintain that it’s time for an “open and honest debate.”

    http://now.msn.com/money/0417-billions-saved-by-legalizing-weed.aspx

    BTW: Awesome images; well done ME-P!

    Carter

    Like

  3. Carter

    I can smell the GANJA, man!

    Chong

    Like

  4. ERs

    Chong – I bet the nation’s ERs will be especially busy today with pot-heads.

    Angela

    Like

  5. 4/20 is the day of doobies (and of Hitler, Columbine, Fenway)

    Why do pot smokers celebrate April 20th? Here is a useful link to help explain how this pot-culture phenomenon has hit the mainstream.

    http://specials.msn.com/a-list/news/420-popular-pages

    Harold and Kumar

    Like

  6. Willie Nelson unveils statue of himself on 4/20

    Country music legend Willie Nelson helped unveil a statue honoring him in downtown Austin by singing his new song “Roll Me Up and Smoke Me When I Die” on Friday 4/20, a date long reserved to celebrate marijuana use.

    http://movies.msn.com/movies/article.aspx?news=722714

    Greer

    Like

  7. White House Rejects Petition To Legalize Marijuana

    WASHINGTON — The White House has rejected several marijuana legalization petitions, one of which called on the federal government to stop interfering with state marijuana legalization efforts.

    “As a former police chief, I recognize we are not going to arrest our way out of the problem,” wrote Gil Kerlikowske, director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, in a statement released late on Friday. “We also recognize that legalizing marijuana would not provide the answer to any of the health, social, youth education, criminal justice, and community quality of life challenges associated with drug use.”

    The statement came in response to a petition submitted by retired Baltimore narcotics officer Neill Franklin as part of the White House’s “We The People” project, an effort to allow ordinary Americans to gain the attention of policymakers through an online portal at the White House website. Any petition garnering 5,000 signatures within 30 days of submission is guaranteed a response from the White House; Franklin’s petition received more than 17,000.

    “It’s maddening that the administration wants to continue failed prohibition polices that do nothing to reduce drug use and succeed only in funneling billions of dollars into the pockets of the cartels and gangs that control the illegal market,” said Franklin, who serves as executive director of advocacy group Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, in a statement released Saturday.

    Franklin’s petition comes as federal prosecutors have escalated enforcement actions against medical marijuana dispensary owners in California, vowing to shutter state-licensed businesses and threatening landlords with property seizures for violating federal drug laws. Franklin has also called on the president to remember his campaign promise not to waste government resources interfering with state-regulated marijuana dispensaries.

    The White House’s rejection statement was directed at seven other marijuana-related petitions, which together garnered more than 150,000 signatures. One such petition, which called for marijuana to be regulated in a manner similar to alcohol, received almost 75,000 signatures.

    “Like many, we are interested in the potential marijuana may have in providing relief to individuals diagnosed with certain serious illnesses,” the White House wrote in its official response. “That is why we ardently support ongoing research into determining what components of the marijuana plant can be used as medicine. To date, however, neither the FDA nor the Institute of Medicine have found smoked marijuana to meet the modern standard for safe or effective medicine for any condition.”

    Read the full response from the White House below:

    When the President took office, he directed all of his policymakers to develop policies based on science and research, not ideology or politics. So our concern about marijuana is based on what the science tells us about the drug’s effects.

    According to scientists at the National Institutes of Health — the world’s largest source of drug abuse research — marijuana use is associated with addiction, respiratory disease, and cognitive impairment. We know from an array of treatment admission information and Federal data that marijuana use is a significant source for voluntary drug treatment admissions and visits to emergency rooms. Studies also reveal that marijuana potency has almost tripled over the past 20 years, raising serious concerns about what this means for public health -– especially among young people who use the drug because research shows their brains continue to develop well into their 20’s. Simply put, it is not a benign drug.

    Like many, we are interested in the potential marijuana may have in providing relief to individuals diagnosed with certain serious illnesses. That is why we ardently support ongoing research into determining what components of the marijuana plant can be used as medicine. To date, however, neither the FDA nor the Institute of Medicine have found smoked marijuana to meet the modern standard for safe or effective medicine for any condition.

    As a former police chief, I recognize we are not going to arrest our way out of the problem. We also recognize that legalizing marijuana would not provide the answer to any of the health, social, youth education, criminal justice, and community quality of life challenges associated with drug use.

    That is why the President’s National Drug Control Strategy is balanced and comprehensive, emphasizing prevention and treatment while at the same time supporting innovative law enforcement efforts that protect public safety and disrupt the supply of drugs entering our communities. Preventing drug use is the most cost-effective way to reduce drug use and its consequences in America. And, as we’ve seen in our work through community coalitions across the country, this approach works in making communities healthier and safer. We’re also focused on expanding access to drug treatment for addicts. Treatment works. In fact, millions of Americans are in successful recovery for drug and alcoholism today. And through our work with innovative drug courts across the Nation, we are improving our criminal justice system to divert non-violent offenders into treatment.

    Our commitment to a balanced approach to drug control is real. This last fiscal year alone, the Federal Government spent over $10 billion on drug education and treatment programs compared to just over $9 billion on drug related law enforcement in the U.S.

    Thank you for making your voice heard. I encourage you to take a moment to read about the President’s approach to drug control to learn more.

    Source:
    Dawn Dearden
    Drug Enforcement Administration
    Section Chief, Public Affairs
    Phone 202 307-2402
    Fax 202 353-1628
    dawn.n.dearden@usdoj.gov

    Like

  8. ME-P

    Regardless of your position on this issue; the photos are fabulous.

    Mira

    Like

  9. LA votes to ban marijuana shops

    Unable to rein in hundreds of medical pot shops that blossomed around the nation’s second-biggest metropolis, the Los Angeles City Council banned them until the state’s highest court weighs in.

    Greer

    Like

  10. Revisiting Marijuana Addiction

    In a Psychology Today blog I discuss recent medical literature which highlights the likelihood of becoming addicted to marijuana as well as the various consequences for those who over consume it, especially those who do so in adolescence.

    https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/almost-addicted/201407/is-marijuana-addictive-part-2

    J. Wesley Boyd MD PhD

    EDITOR’S NOTE: Wes Boyd is on faculty at Harvard Medical School and is an Attending Psychiatrist at Cambridge Health Alliance and Children’s Hospital Boston.

    http://www.amazon.com/Dictionary-Health-Insurance-Managed-Care/dp/0826149944/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1275315485&sr=1-4

    Like

  11. IN Pandemic MICHIGAN

    You can smoke grass but can’t cut your grass.

    Dexter

    Like

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