OPEN LETTER on Dental Practice Management Ransomware

By Darrell Pruitt DDS

Dear Kiltesh Patel

CEO of tab32 dental practice management software

***
A recent report says “60% of organizations hit by ransomware-as-a-service attacks in the past 18 months.”

LINK:https://venturebeat.com/2021/11/15/report-60-of-orgs-hit-by-ransomware-as-a-service-attacks-in-the-past-18-months/

***

See the source image

QUERY: Doesn’t that mean that 60% of tab32 customers have been hit by ransomware as well?

QUERY: Have you yet come to the conclusion that ignoring dentists’ and patients’ concerns about security is a bad business decision?

Give it time! 

COMMENTS AND THOUGHTS ARE APPRECIATED.

***

***

Thank You

***

Real Estate Market Values Always Local

Location – Location – Location

By Rick Kahler CFP 

What investment asset class grabs the most attention of the average American?

My guess is that it isn’t the stock market, but a category many people don’t even think of as an investment—the local real estate market. While I don’t have data to back up this assumption, I find that people tend to be more interested in what’s happening in their local real estate markets than on national stock exchanges.

Why?

I think the reason is simple. Houses are tangible, understandable assets that we can see and touch. Most of us live in them, and some of us are in love with our homes. You likely know the ballpark value of your house from the annual assessed value you receive from the county. Chances are you know what repairs your home needs and have an idea of the rent you could charge for it. You probably have an idea of the price trends in your neighborhood or city. You know the best areas in which to live and the neighborhoods to avoid. You know these things because all real estate is local. There is no “national” real estate market.

Not so with common stocks. Because most of us own our stocks in mutual funds and exchange traded funds, we often don’t really know what companies we own, what town their headquarters are in, the price of the stock, the current yield, the trend of the company or sector, and any weaknesses or strengths of the company. Unlike real estate, publicly traded stocks are priced based on national rather than local influences. Further, we don’t work for or live in the companies in our portfolio. And few of us are in love with our portfolio of stocks.

It’s no wonder that most of us are far more interested in the economics of our homes than our stocks. This is even less of a surprise when we consider the average American has more invested in their home than they do the stock market.

Research

According to CoreLogic, the average annual price increase of real estate has slowed down in 2019. “During the first two months of the year, home price growth continued to decelerate,” said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic in an April 2, 2019 press release.

But that is just the average. Annual price changes range from an increase of 10.2% in Idaho to a decrease of -1.7% in North Dakota. South Dakota showed a 1.6% increase over the past 12 months.

Also according to CoreLogic, of the country’s top 100 housing markets, 35 percent are overvalued, 38 percent were at value, and 27 percent were undervalued. An under- or overvalued market is one in which home prices are at least 10 percent above or below the long-term sustainable level.

While my hometown of Rapid City, SD, is not among the top 100 markets, home prices are booming, according to Jeremy Kahler, a Realtor with Keller Williams of the Black Hills. He indicates that through April, the 12-month price increase in Rapid City is over 7%, which puts our local market into the top quartile for price increases on a national level. Zillow shows our average sales price as $204,100 compared with the national sales price of $226,800, so my hunch is that the Rapid City market might be at value to undervalued.

Assessment

However, I think it’s a reasonable generalization that most homes in flyover country are priced lower than their coastal cousins. Some of the reasons are what I call the snowflake discount, seasonal weather patterns, and the distance from major metropolitan areas. Those that can cope with those challenges are rewarded with lower housing costs.

***

homes

***

Opine: Your thoughts are appreciated.

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

[Dr. Cappiello PhD MBA] *** [Foreword Dr. Krieger MD MBA]

Front Matter with Foreword by Jason Dyken MD MBA

Book of Month

 

 

A Review of Investing Expenses

Join Our Mailing List

Peeling Back the Layers of Fees

By PALADIN [Research & Registry]

Advisor Pay

Channel Surfing the ME-P

Have you visited our other topic channels? Established to facilitate idea exchange and link our community together, the value of these topics is dependent upon your input. Please take a minute to visit. And, to prevent that annoying spam, we ask that you register. It is fast, free and secure.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners(TM)* 8

Socially Responsible and ESG Investing!

S.R.I.

[By Rick Kahler CFP®]

The concept of socially responsible investing is far from new; the first SRI fund appeared in 1952. Since then, these funds have used social and ethical screens to exclude companies selling products like tobacco, alcohol, or firearms.

You may not have heard of the next generation of SRI funds, called ESG funds, which means environmental, social and governance funds. Social responsibility is just one-third of the expanded focus of these funds, which also look to include companies that are sensitive to the environment and have more holistic corporate governance.

Updates

In recent years, ESG investing has exploded. According to a July 11, 2018, article in Forbes, The Remarkable Rise of ESG, by Georg Kell, over $20 trillion is invested in ESG funds. This accounts for 25% of all the professionally managed assets in the world. There are currently 275 ESG mutual funds and ETF’s from which to choose.

Yet one facet of investing in ESG funds is widely misunderstood. While ESG investing may help you feel better about yourself, it does not actually impact or hamper the companies you choose not to own.

This may come as a surprise to many ESG investors, who commonly believe that by not owning the shares of an offensive company they are restricting the flow of capital to that company, thereby imperiling its existence. For the most part, that isn’t the case.

The offenders

Listed among the worst offending companies by several ESG organizations are Philip Morris, WalMart, Tyson Foods, Pepsi Corporation, Coca-Cola, and Chevron. No dedicated ESG investors would have these companies in their portfolios. None of these companies would care or be hurt in the least if you didn’t own any of their shares.

Why?

The only time a company benefits from a sale of stock is when the company initially goes public (called an initial public offering, or IPO) or issues additional new shares to raise capital. These are actually fairly rare events.

Most stocks are bought and sold in the “secondary” market through exchanges like the New York Stock Exchange. These platforms facilitate transactions between individuals or institutions wanting to buy or sell shares in a company. The money moves between the buyer and the seller; none of the money goes to the company.

Another way companies receive funding to support their ventures is to borrow money from investors. This is called issuing a bond and is similar to an IPO, only the investor receives a promise from the company to pay them back at some future date and receives interest on the loan in the meantime.

Just like stocks, bonds are only issued by a company once. From then on, buying and selling bonds is done on the open market, and none of the money paid or received goes to the company.

So if you want to punish a company, don’t buy stocks or bonds it issues directly. Otherwise, excluding its shares from your portfolio has no effect on the company’s profits or cash flow.

***

big

***

Assessment

But if no one bought a company’s shares on the secondary market, wouldn’t that have an impact? Yes, it most certainly would. If the demand for the shares of a company dried up, the company’s stock price would plummet.

The problem is the demand for the shares of these companies isn’t going away as long as they remain profitable. If 25% of investors purchase ESG funds,  that leaves 75% of the market willing to buy these companies. This includes the 20% of stocks owned by passive index funds, which own the entire market.

CONCLUSION

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements.

Book Marcinko: https://medicalexecutivepost.com/dr-david-marcinkos-bookings/

Subscribe: MEDICAL EXECUTIVE POST for curated news, essays, opinions and analysis from the public health, economics, finance, marketing, IT, business and policy management ecosystem.

DOCTORS:

“Insurance & Risk Management Strategies for Doctors” https://tinyurl.com/ydx9kd93

“Fiduciary Financial Planning for Physicians” https://tinyurl.com/y7f5pnox

“Business of Medical Practice 2.0” https://tinyurl.com/yb3x6wr8

HOSPITALS:

“Financial Management Strategies for Hospitals” https://tinyurl.com/yagu567d

“Operational Strategies for Clinics and Hospitals” https://tinyurl.com/y9avbrq5

***

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™8Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

%d bloggers like this: