Values-Based Health Insurance

Join Our Mailing List

Another New Idea?

[By Staff Writers]

According to Mark Fendrick MD and Michael E. Chernew PhD, instead of the one size fits all approach of traditional health insurance, a “clinically-sensitive” cost-sharing system that supports co-payments related to evidence-based value for targeted patients seems plausible.  

The Model

In this model, out-of-pocket costs are based on price and a cost/quality tradeoff in clinical circumstances: low co-payments for interventions of highest value, and higher co-payments for interventions with little proven health benefit.  

Benefit Product Packages

Smarter benefit products and packages are then designed to combine disease management with cost sharing to address spending growth. 

product sales

Assessment

What do you think of this new health insurance business model; is it revolutionary or evolutionary?

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Product DetailsProduct Details

Product Details

 

Tax and Estate Planning Attorneys

Join Our Mailing List

Legal Re-Tooling in the Era of Healthcare Reform

[By Staff Writers]

As a tax, estate planning or bankruptcy lawyer, you already know that almost every legal magazine around has articles or advertisements proposing that you become a financial planning professional or business consultant to your physician clients. 

Moreover, lawyers of all stripes are being pushed toward interdisciplinary alliances by encroachment on their turf by the Big Four accounting firms. With audits of publicly held companies now a commodity, the giant accounting firms are getting more of their revenues from consulting, and that puts them into direct competition with attorneys, MBAs, actuaries and other management and financial service professionals. 

Of all careers, you know how absolutely onerous it is to practice medicine today, and are finally thankful that you did not take that career route many years ago. So, like your neighbor the accountant, you begin to explore that potential of developing a service line extension to your legal practice, in order to assist your medical colleagues who have been hit on hard economic times.  

2010 Estate Tax Reform Letter

The Epiphany 

In fact, you soon realize that more than 90,000 trust, probate and estate planning attorneys like yourself are interested in pursuing financial planning in the next decade. And, you reckon, advising physicians has got to be easier than law, or less stressful than the corporate lifestyle of your MBA trained brother-in-law, right? 

So, you set out to stretch your legal horizons and explore the basic legal nuances of those topics not available in law school when you were a student. Things like medical fraud and abuse standards; managed care compliance audits and Medicare recoupments, CPT® codes, OSHA, EMTALA, HIPAA, capitation and EPA standards; anti-trust issues; and managed care contract dilemmas or de-selection appeals; etc. 

***

210_1

***

The New World 

What a brave new world the legal profession has become! Even the American Bar Association’s commission on multi-disciplinary practice has recommended that lawyers be permitted to share fees and become partners with financial planners, money managers and other similar professionals. 

As a real life example, the venerated Baltimore brokerage firm of Legg Mason teamed up with the Boston law firm of Bingham Danna, LLC, to create one of the first marriages between a law and securities firm. 

Assessment 

If you want in on the challenge and bucks, you’d better acquire at least a working knowledge of healthcare administration, or perhaps help craft some new case law, or assist your doctor-clients in some fashion; otherwise, you will remain a legal document producer.

Conclusion

Your thoughts and comments on this ME-P are appreciated. Feel free to review our top-left column, and top-right sidebar materials, links, URLs and related websites, too. Then, subscribe to the ME-P. It is fast, free and secure.

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Comprehensive Financial Planning Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners(TM)

***

EMRs and Patient Safety

Exploring the Shibboleths

Staff Writers

A new study by University of Alberta and the Canadian Health System suggests that while Electronic Medical Records [EMRs] might provide a patient safety boost, not much is known about the full benefits of this technology.  

Despite assumptions that EMRs improve clinical workflow and medical care quality, there’s little evidence-based research to document this outcome. 

It was also noted that there’s a definite cultural impact on health organizations when they adopt EMRs. And so, it seems there’s a need to go out and challenge some shibboleths and EMR assumptions a bit more. What are your experienced impressions?

Conclusion

What do you think? On face value, the study does more to document the unknown impact of EMRs, than it does known patient care outcomes. And so, your thoughts and comments on this Executive-Post are appreciated.

Related Information Sources:

Practice Management: http://www.springerpub.com/prod.aspx?prod_id=23759

Physician Financial Planning: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/0763745790

Medical Risk Management: http://www.jbpub.com/catalog/9780763733421

Healthcare Organizations: www.HealthcareFinancials.com

Health Administration Terms: www.HealthDictionarySeries.com

Physician Advisors: www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.com

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com  or Bio: www.stpub.com/pubs/authors/MARCINKO.htm

Subscribe Now: Did you like this Executive-Post, or find it helpful, interesting and informative? Want to get the latest E-Ps delivered to your email box each morning? Just subscribe using the link below. You can unsubscribe at any time. Security is assured.

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Supply and Demand in Medical Care

The Imperfect Competitive Medical Marketplace

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko; MBA, CMP™

By Hope Rachel Hetico; RN, MHA, CMP™biz-book1 

The issue is not how to fill or reuse empty beds. In this changing environment, hospitals and health systems must focus on streamlining and simplifying operational processes, facilitating case management, promoting the least costly setting for care delivery, and optimizing resource sharing among departments. When hospitals have addressed these issues, then solutions to the “bed problem” will be obvious.

-Cynthia Hayward, 1996

How and why the current healthcare imbroglio happened is very complex, but here is a brief synopsis of current supply-demand inequalities.

A Definition of Medical Care 

Medical care is defined as the finite examination and treatment of patients, for monetary compensation. Among other reasons, changes in patient demand may occur as a result of the absence or presence of health insurance plans or the encouragement of additional treatments by profit maximizing providers. 

Health Economics 101 

Changes in supply occur as a result of physician shortages or surpluses and a host of other factors. Until recently, a glut of physicians has caused them to become “price takers,” selling a homogenous service.

How else could aggregate HMO fee schedules drop to some percentage below prevailing Medicare or Medicaid rates in some instances? Or, how else could otherwise qualified physicians be de-selected from managed healthcare plans because of large (successful equates with expensive) practices? 

The Supply-Demand Curve 

A graphical representation of this economic relationship produces the classic downward sloping demand curve and the upward sloping supply curve. At some point in time however, the treatment plan is completed, the patient is satisfied, and additional services are not needed. This is known as market equilibrium.  

When an industry becomes more competitive – either by too much supply or too little demand – market equilibrium fees tend to become elastic while patient volume becomes very sensitive to even small changes in price. This may be where we have arrived, right now relative to medical price elasticity. 

Medical Price Elasticity 

In a managed care environment, every covered service has a low price ceiling and every “non-covered” service has its own price elasticity.   

Traditionally, medical services were inelastic to price changes and considered a growth industry since a fee increase would also increase revenues.  Now, the marketplace has become resistant to pricing pressure by physician oversupply and managed care.  

Generally, a pricing coefficient greater than one is considered elastic, while a coefficient less than one is inelastic.

Interestingly, exact unity prevails when elasticity of supply is exactly equal to one.  

In the golden days of medicine, the price elasticity of medical care was greater than 1, now it is about .35 and diminishing 

Meaning to Doctors 

Financially, all this means that many doctors are “taking what they’re given (by HMOs, CMS, etc), because they’re working for a living”.   

Younger doctors under 40 are especially inclined to work for less since they have had little exposure to fee-for-service compensation. Older doctors are retiring. Middle-Agers are frustrated. 

Additionally, physicians have an increasingly smaller share of the medical marketplace because of so-called medical care extenders, such as PAs and nurse practitioner’s.

Some health plans have even done away with many true allied healthcare professionals, such as RN’s or CRNAs, in favor of trained, not educated, and less costly technicians.  

Conclusion

Join Our Mailing List

Despite the financial impact of managed care on doctors, patients may also be hurt physically as the economic cost of medical re-intervention is often much more than the cost of the proposed initial professional care.  

For example, a study by Deloitte & Touche a few years ago, reported employee satisfaction was decreasing about 10 percent per year, as healthcare coverage represented a fiscal and economic time bomb on corporate books. 

How would you comment on the above in light of the IOM on medical errors and mistakes, findings a few years back?

Link: http://feeds.feedburner.com/HealthcareFinancialsthePostForcxos

Speaker: If you need a moderator or speaker for an upcoming event, Dr. David E. Marcinko; MBA – Publisher-in-Chief of the Medical Executive-Post – is available for seminar or speaking engagements. Contact: MarcinkoAdvisors@msn.com

OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

DICTIONARIES: http://www.springerpub.com/Search/marcinko
PHYSICIANS: www.MedicalBusinessAdvisors.com
PRACTICES: www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com
HOSPITALS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781466558731
CLINICS: http://www.crcpress.com/product/isbn/9781439879900
BLOG: www.MedicalExecutivePost.com
FINANCE: Financial Planning for Physicians and Advisors
INSURANCE: Risk Management and Insurance Strategies for Physicians and Advisors

Product Details

 Product DetailsProduct DetailsProduct Details

%d bloggers like this: