The Blockchain Book for Healthcare

Author Q & A

By staff reporters 

Peter B. Nichol, managing director of OROCA Innovations, is one of the world’s foremost experts in healthcare and blockchain technology.

He is also the author of the recently released book “The Power of Blockchain for Healthcare.”

In light of his expertise and the publication of this new book, here is a brief interview with Nichol on the current landscape for blockchain technology in healthcare as well as the trends he expects to see emerging in this budding space.

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Conclusion

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OUR OTHER PRINT BOOKS AND RELATED INFORMATION SOURCES:

Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™    Risk Management, Liability Insurance, and Asset Protection Strategies for Doctors and Advisors: Best Practices from Leading Consultants and Certified Medical Planners™

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6 Responses

  1. Blockchain

    For example, when a bitcoin transaction takes place, it is included in a shared public ledger called the blockchain, which is maintained by a network of computers around the world. Bitcoin “miners” validate transactions by solving a series of complex math problems using computers running bitcoin software.

    Miners get transaction fees and are in competition because transaction payments and rewards go to the miner who completes the equation first.

    Miners need more computing power than everyday PCs have, so they form groups that link multiple computers, or buy specialized bitcoin machines.

    Ohno

    Like

  2. Out Of Hospital Developments

    There will be many OOH blockchains developed to address the myriad of uses in healthcare; including tracking the development of drugs, doctor and nurse credentialing, real-time population health data analysis and alerts, insurance peer-to-peer risk pooling, telemedicine and home health visit data sharing, decentralized autonomous organizations, verification and audits, and remote device monitoring commonly addressed today under the Internet of Things category.

    These peer-to-peer healthcare blockchains will open the door to new business models in healthcare, including analytics-for-healthcare products and services, flash malpractice insurance and friction-less claims processing hence shorter revenue cycles; etc.

    Dr. David Marcinko MBA

    Like

  3. Blockchain Uber All

    China has just announced that it will use blockchain technology for social taxation and issuing electronic invoices. This is just the latest example of the broad array of applications possible for the technology.

    https://futurism.com/china-to-start-using-blockchain-to-collect-taxes-and-send-invoices/

    Seth

    Like

  4. Another Blockchain Healthcare Distruptor?

    Shifting Wealth From Intermediaries to Providers:
    https://www.pointnurse.com/blog/cyrus-maaghul-blockchain-healthcare-recruiters-credentialing/

    Percy

    Like

  5. Percy

    Will blockchain solve the EMR problem?

    http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2017/08/time-consider-blockchain-technology-ehrs.html

    Franklin

    Like

  6. Creative Disruption. At Scale.

    I’m pleased to begin serving as a reviewer for Ledger.

    Ledger is a peer-reviewed scholarly journal that publishes full-length original research articles on the subjects of cryptocurrency and blockchain technology, as well as any relevant intersections with mathematics, computer science, engineering, law, and economics. It is published online by the University Library System, University of Pittsburgh.

    The journal Ledger:

    * is open access to all readers,
    * does not charge fees to authors,
    * employs a transparent peer-review process,
    * encourages authors to digitally sign their manuscripts,
    * timestamps the published manuscripts in the Blockchain.

    Sean Manion, via the ME-P

    Like

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