On the Future of Healthcare [video]

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By NIHCM Foundation

This briefing brought together leading health care experts with diverse backgrounds to discuss the future of health care, including potential policy reforms and new ways of thinking about long-term care, the consumer experience and the concept of value in health care.

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One Response

  1. Military Plans to Use Biological Bugs in the Field

    Defense researchers want to deliver genetic changes to crops via insects and build new kind of electronics with bacteria. DARPA researchers believe that colonies of insects could be used to transmit viruses carrying beneficial genetic traits to the plants they feed on. The agency plans to investigate how to use gene therapies to protect crops from diseases, then deliver them via insects. Because the creatures can be bred within a single growing season, the technique could provide results faster than genetic modification of crops.

    https://www.technologyreview.com/s/603004/to-cure-crop-disease-faster-add-bugs/?utm_source=MIT+TR+Newsletters&utm_campaign=e5a048187e-newsletters-the-download&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_997ed6f472-e5a048187e-154253973&goal=0_997ed6f472-e5a048187e-154253973&mc_cid=e5a048187e&mc_eid=72aee829ad

    Meanwhile, scientists at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory are investigating how engineered bacteria can be used to act as sensors, controllers, and power sources for new types of electronics. Bryn Adams, an Army biotechnology research scientist, tells Ars Technica that she sees a future of “autonomous biohybrid devices where the biology controls the device, makes the decisions, gives feedback, [and] heals damage.”

    http://arstechnica.com/science/2016/12/the-armys-looking-into-putting-bacteria-into-its-electronics/?utm_source=MIT+TR+Newsletters&utm_campaign=e5a048187e-newsletters-the-download&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_997ed6f472-e5a048187e-154253973&goal=0_997ed6f472-e5a048187e-154253973&mc_cid=e5a048187e&mc_eid=72aee829ad

    Ann Miller RN MHA
    [via MIT Technology Review]

    Like

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