What is a DIVIDEND ARISTOCRAT Stock?

By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA CMP®

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A Dividend Aristocrat is a stock that has exhibited a remarkable level of consistency, measured by the fact that only those S&P 500 companies that have increased their annual dividend for 25 straight years — or more — can be called one. The name was coined by cable TV personality and investor Jim Cramer

These companies have raised their dividends through good times and bad, including recessions, crashes, and pandemics. Being able to continue doing so is a tribute to their stability and strength. Now, the past 18 months have been a particularly difficult economic environment to operate in, and many companies were forced to slash or hold the line on their dividends as a result.

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100+ dividend aristocrats with dividend history

But some companies came through it just fine, like investment manager T. Rowe Price (NASDAQ: TROW), which increased its dividend for the 34th straight year in 2021. It is located in Baltimore Maryland not far from where I grew up. In fact, I used to play stick ball, as a kid, in the parking lot.

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One Response

  1. GE is NOT an Aristocrat

    General Electric Co. declared Friday a regular quarterly dividend of a split-adjusted 8 cents a share, which effectively keeps it at the same relatively low-yielding rate for the past three years. To the industrial conglomerate’s shareholders of record on Sept. 27, the dividend will be payable Oct. 25. The 8-cent dividend, following the 1-for-8 reverse stock split that went into effect in early August, is the same as the 1-cent dividend GE has paid out since December 2018, which was cut from 12 cents as GE tried to dig out of a cash-flow hole. GE’s stock slipped 0.3% in afternoon trading Friday.

    At current stock prices, the annual dividend rate implies a dividend yield of 0.31%, compared with the yield for the SPDR Industrial Select Sector ETF of 1.25% and the implied yield for the S&P 500 of 1.34%, according to FactSet. GE’s stock has lost 5.5% over the past three months, while the industrial ETF has slipped 0.5% and the S&P 500 has gained 5.9%.

    Hank

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