Our Home as Hospital of the Future [video]

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Bert MeskoHealthcare Is Coming Home With Sensors And Algorithms

By Bertalan Meskó, MD PhD

Instead of futuristic hospital buildings and huge devices, disruptive technologies injected into small, almost invisible objects will set the trends in medicine. Such devices will create smart households bringing healthcare home.

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2 Responses

  1. New-Wave Anatomy for Medical School?

    These augmented reality tools could totally change med school:

    1. http://www.adam.com
    2. http://completeanatomy.3d4medical.com

    Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA

    Like

  2. CRISPR Inventors Battle for Rights in Court

    The University of California, Berkeley and the Broad Institute appeared in front of the Patent Trial and Appeal Board to determine who owns the rights to the gene-editing tool CRISPR–Cas9. Ever since its meteoric rise to biotech fame, there’s been dispute over the ownership of the intellectual property behind the technique.

    Both Jennifer Doudna, a molecular biologist at Berkeley, and Feng Zhang, a synthetic biologist at the Broad Institute, filed patents relating to the technique. Zhang was awarded one by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in 2014, but Berkeley contested it, sparking this hearing.

    https://www.technologyreview.com/s/532796/who-owns-the-biggest-biotech-discovery-of-the-century/?utm_source=MIT+TR+Newsletters&utm_campaign=ccffbcc378-newsletters-the-download&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_997ed6f472-ccffbcc378-154253973&goal=0_997ed6f472-ccffbcc378-154253973&mc_cid=ccffbcc378&mc_eid=72aee829ad

    During the single 45-minute session, each side’s attorney had just 20 minutes to present their case. Commentators seem to think that Berkeley struggled the most of the two to convince the judges of its claims to have invented the technique first—but both sides must now wait for the three judges to make a decision.

    MIT Technology Review

    Like

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