More on the Doctor Salary Conundrum

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Compensation Trend Data Sources

DEM 2013By Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

[Editor-in-Chief] www.BusinessofMedicalPractice.com

Related chapters: Chapter 27: Salary Compensation and Chapter 29: Concierge Medicine and Chapter 30: Practice Value-Worth

Physician compensation is a contentious issue and often much fodder for public scrutiny. Throw modern pay for performance [P4P], and related metrics, into the mix and few situations produce the same level of emotion as doctors fighting over wages, salary and other forms of reimbursement.

This situation often springs from a failure of both sides to understand mutual compensation terms-of-art when the remuneration deal was first negotiated. This physician salary and compensation information is thus offered as a reference point for further investigations.

Introduction 

A decade ago, Fortune magazine carried the headline “When Six Figured Incomes Aren’t Enough. Now Doctors Want a Union.” To the man in the street, it was just a matter of the rich getting richer. The sentiment was quantified in the March 31, 2005 issue of Physician’s Money Digest when Greg Kelly and I reported that a 47-y.o. doctor with 184,000 dollars in annual income would need about 5.5 million dollars for retirement at age.

Of course, physicians were not complaining back then under the traditional fee-for-service system; the imbroglio only began when managed care adversely impacted income and the stock market crashed in 2008.

Today, the situation is vastly different as medical professionals struggle to maintain adequate income levels. Rightly or wrongly, the public has little sympathy for affluent doctors following healthcare reform. While a few specialties flourish, others, such as primary care, barely move.

In the words of Atul Gawande, MD, a surgeon and author from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, “Doctors quickly learn that how much they make has little to do with how good they are. It largely depends on how they handle the business side of practice.”  And so, it is critical to understand contemporary thoughts on physician compensation and related trends.

Compensation Trend Data Sources

A growing number of surveys measure physician compensation, encompassing a varying depth of analysis. Physician compensation data, divided by specialty and subspecialty, is central to a range of consulting activities including practice assessments and valuations of medical entities. It may be used as a benchmarking tool, allowing the physician executive or consultant to compare a practitioner’s earnings with national and local averages.

The Medical Group Management Association’s (MGMA’s) annual Physician Compensation and Production Correlations Survey is a particularly well-known source of this data in the valuation community. Other information sources include Merritt Hawkins and Associates; and the annual the Health Care Group’s, [www.theHealthCareGroup.com] Goodwill Registry.

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Certified Medical Planner

www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

Assessment

However, all sources are fluid and should be taken with a grain of statistical skepticism, and users are urged to seek out as much data as possible and assess all available information in order to determine a compensation amount that may be reasonably expected for a comparable specialty situation. And, realize that net income is defined as salary after practice expenses but before payment of personal income taxes.

Conclusion

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4 Responses

  1. Salary

    I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again.

    Is there any other profession that is as tone deaf as we are when it comes to talking about our livelihood? Is there any other profession that feels so free to complain about making too little, when they objectively make so much compared to so many others?

    Dr. David Edward Marcinko MBA
    http://www.CertifiedMedicalPlanner.org

  2. Physician Pay Increasingly Tied to Patient Satisfaction
    [A New Survey]

    Physicians may have an extra incentive to keep their patients from sitting long in the doctor’s office waiting room, as an increasing amount of their compensation is becoming based on patient satisfaction.

    In what appears to be the very beginning of a growing trend, a new survey shows two percent of primary care physicians’ compensation is based on “patient satisfaction metrics” while one percent of specialist physician compensation is based on “patient satisfaction metrics.”

    It’s the first time patient satisfaction scores were part of an annual compensation report from the Medical Group Management Association but it likely won’t be the last. Across the country, business and health insurance companies are pushing for more patient satisfaction metrics, whether they are how quickly phone calls are returned to how long a patient sits in a physician office waiting area.

    Source: Forbes via Medicare Matters [7/3/13]

  3. Pharmacist Employment and Salary by Dispensing Format
    [Dispensing Format Total Employment Average Annual Salary]

    Mass Merchants with pharmacies 31,870 $117,990
    Chain and independent drug stores 122,840 $116,980
    Supermarkets and pharmacies 22,590 $111,040
    Mail pharmacies 3,110 $109,640
    Total 180,410 $116,288

    Publication Source: Managed Care, July 2013
    Data Source: 2012 National Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics: March 2013

  4. What if CMS divulges how much it pays doctors?

    Did you know that the CMS will make case-by-case determinations on releasing Medicare physician payments in response to Freedom of Information Act requests.

    http://www.medicalpracticeinsider.com/news/what-if-cms-divulges-how-much-it-pays-you?email=MARCINKOADVISORS@MSN.COM&GroupID=90115

    Meanwhile, the AMA cautions that unrestrained disclosure could be unfair to doctors.

    Hope R. Hetico RN MHA

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